Obituaries 9/26/12 Post

Howard “Pat” Curtiss

Howard “Pat” Curtiss, an Emeritus Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University, died September 20, 2012 after a stoic struggle with bladder cancer. He is remembered as a pioneering researcher in the field of helicopter dynamics and aerodynamics and as an exceptional teacher and advisor to his students. His lifelong fascination with flight was both infectious and exciting.

Professor Curtiss was highly regarded for his contributions to understanding the complexities of helicopter forces and motions. He was director of the Princeton University Dynamic Model Track for nearly 30 years and a leading theorist. He published pioneering studies on helicopter rotor blade motion, authored influential work on control system design, and was the co-author of a highly regarded textbook, A Modern Course in Aeroelasticity.

Professor Curtiss served as a consultant for many aerospace companies, including Sikorsky, Agusta Helicopters, Kaman Aerospace, and Piasecki Aircraft. In 1985, he was appointed as an honorary professor at the Nanjing Aeronautical Institute. In the following years, he served as visiting research fellow at Glasgow University and the Technical University of Braunschweig. In 2000, Professor Curtiss delivered the American Helicopter Society’s Nikolsky Honorary Lecture, named for his thesis adviser, Alexander Nikolsky.

Most recently, he designed a new helicopter rotor blade that significantly improves the load-carrying ability, cruising speed, and range of Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The rotor blades are manufactured by Carson Helicopters, and are used on the “Marine One” helicopter fleet used by the President as well as by the British navy.

Professor Curtiss’s technical contributions are only surpassed by the influence he had on his undergraduate and graduate students. He combined an enthusiasm for his field with sparkling wit and patience with those new to a complex and sometimes bewildering topic. Many of his students became professors, researchers, administrators, and leaders in industry and government.

Born March 17, 1930 in Chicago, Illinois (named “Pat” for his birth on St. Patrick’s Day), Professor Curtiss completed a B.A.E. at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1952 and his Ph.D. at Princeton University in 1965. After participating in Naval R.O.T.C. Training, he was commissioned and served as a Line Officer on the U.S.S. Mississippi, from 1952 to 1954.

No description of Pat would be complete without mentioning his lifelong love of sailing – from his first experiences at the Erie Yacht Club, to competing in the 1947 Lightning Junior Championships, to weekend racing at the Jersey Shore, and to adventures with Betty on the Metedeconk River. He advised the Princeton Sailing Team for many years and enjoyed sailing with Sam, his grandson.

Professor Curtiss was also noted for the quality of the apple pies he often baked at Christmas.

Pat is survived by his wife Betty Curtiss of Princeton, N.J., daughter Lisa Curtiss of Brooklyn, N.Y., son Jon Curtiss of Ann Arbor, Mich., stepchildren John Fenton of Atlanta, Ga., Anne Fenton of Falls Church, Va., Agnes Mironov of Stockton, N.J., and grandchildren Cami, Sam, Elizabeth, Marek, Crosby, Kalena, and Kit. Professor Curtiss’s first wife, Betty Ruth Cloke Curtiss, passed away in 1985.

His gentle, friendly spirit will be greatly missed.

His family is thankful for the love and support shown by their friends and communities, and is grateful to the doctors, nurses and staff of the University Medical Center at Princeton, whose care was compassionate and generous.

In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to the R.P.I. School of Engineering (Checks to Gifts Processing Center, P.O. Box 3164, Boston, Mass., 02241-3164—In memory of Howard C. Curtiss, Jr) or to Habitat for Humanity (Checks to Habitat for Humanity of Trenton, In memory of Howard “Pat” Curtiss, Jr., 601 North Clinton Avenue, Trenton, N.J., 08638).

A memorial service will be held in Princeton, N.J. on a date in November to be announced.

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Rudolf F. Lehnert

Rudolf Frederick Lehnert, 83, passed away on September 18 after a short battle with lymphoma. Born in Munich, Germany, the family lived on Long Island and moved to Princeton in 1937. He graduated from the Lawrenceville School in 1948 and Princeton University in 1952 as an aeronautical engineer. His connection to the University continued with a long-term engagement with the Forrestal Research Center; a highlight of this time was an outreach project in 1965 to help establish the aeronautical engineering department at the Kanpur campus of the Indian Institute of Technology.

Later, Rudy managed the Nassau Delicatessen on Princeton’s Palmer Square, the family business established by his parents Fred and Therese Lehnert. His love of sport fishing then led him to the position of VP of engineering, and later president, of Egg Harbor Yacht Company, and a subsequent role as a consultant to boat owners.

Rudy served on the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, was a NAUI-certified SCUBA instructor, ham radio operator, a member of the Princeton Lions Club, the Citizen’s Range and Recreation Club of Central N.J., and the National Rifle Association. Rudy was well known for his long-standing connection with Princeton University, which included service as the webmaster and treasurer for the Class of 1952, his enthusiastic support of the University’s sports teams, and his membership in the Princeton Varsity Club.

He is survived by his wife Mildred McCool Lehnert, with whom he recently celebrated 60 years of life together, his son John Lehnert, daughters Cheryl Costello and Laurie Horan, grandson Sean Horan, and granddaughter Katie Horan.

Calling hours were held at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home on Sunday, September 23 from 2 to 5 p.m. and Monday, September 24 from 9 to 11 a.m., with a memorial service to follow. Burial was at the Princeton Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Temple University Hospital Cancer Center 3401 North Broad Street, Philadelphia Pa. 19140 or Rudy F. Lehnert ’52 Memorial Fund P.O. Box 5357 Princeton, N.J. 08540.

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Marion F. Clohossey

Marion Frances (Daly) Clohossey, of San Jose, California, passed away peacefully with family present on Friday, August 17, 2012, at the age of 86. She was a long-time Princetonian, from her birth in 1926 until early-2010 when she moved to California to be closer to her 4 children. She was born to Joseph and May Daly in Princeton, who lived on Pine Street for almost 50 years. Marion spent her first 20 years living on Pine Street, resided more than 30 years on Jefferson Road, and thereafter for 20 years at Elm Court on Elm Road.

She attended St. Paul’s Grammar School and was a valedictorian of Princeton High School Class of 1943. From 1942-1952, she worked as a secretary at Princeton University’s Astronomy Department for Dr. Lyman Spitzer, Jr. In 1946, she married Edward A. Clohossey, of Rumford, Maine. She also worked for 1 year in Niagara Falls, NY, while her husband attended Niagara University on the GI bill. After her children were grown, she also worked at Educational Testing Service and at Princeton University’s Firestone Library.

Marion enjoyed watching various Princeton University events including crew practices, ice skating on Carnegie Lake both as a child and parent, concerts at the University Chapel (especially the PHS Christmas concerts), the American Legion’s fireworks at Palmer Stadium, walking at Marquand Park, swimming at the YMCA and Community Park pools and in the ocean at Manasquan, many PHS sporting events including basketball, lacrosse, soccer, tennis and cross-country. She loved trees and gardening, especially her dogwoods and azaleas. Marion also enjoyed taking her children to various local museums in Princeton and Trenton. Her proudest accomplishment was having raised her four children.

Marion was predeceased by her husband, Edward A. Clohossey, a WWII U.S. Navy radioman, in 1999, and her brother, John K. Daly, PHS Class of 1942 and D-Day Purple Heart recipient with the U.S. Navy, of Blue Ridge, Georgia, in 2008. She is survived by her 4 children, Susan Brennan and her husband James of San Jose, California; Michael Clohossey and his wife Natalie of Sacramento, California; Daniel Clohossey and his wife Laurel of Menlo Park, California; and Constance Perry of Colorado Springs, Colorado. She was the proud grandmother of 8 grandchildren: Hannah Brennan Infante, Patrick Brennan, Conor Brennan, Marc Mason and Monica Mason Borel, Paloma Clohossey, Kelly Perry and Edward Perry. She was also the great-grandmother of 6. She is also survived by a cousin, Joe Hall, of Princeton Junction, numerous nieces and nephews, brother-in-law Walt Clohosey and his wife Grace, of Middletown, Connecticut, and her sister-in-law, Edwina Clohosey, also of Middletown, CT.

She will be buried at St. Paul’s Cemetery in Princeton beside her parents.

The family would ask that, should remembrances wish to be made, they be made in her name to the Princeton Education Foundation (www.pefnj.org) or to the Princeton Public Library.

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John C. Yeoman

John Cornelius Yeoman (Jack), 86, passed away on Saturday, September 15, 2012 after an extended illness. He had pulmonary fibrosis for several years and gave up the hard fight in Peachtree Christian Hospice.

Jack was born in Utica, New York on August 25, 1926. He was the son of Ethel Keefer and Earl Walker Yeoman. He was raised in Princeton, New Jersey and graduated from the Pennington Preparatory School. Between Army services in Germany during World War II and Japan during the Korean conflict, Jack graduated from Wake Forest University.

Jack married Elinor Weber Yeoman in 1953 and they spent their honeymoon at Boy Scout Camp Pahaquarra where Jack was the camp director. He was an executive with the Boy Scouts of America, an Eagle Scout and a member of the Order of the Arrow.

In 1954 Jack joined Palmer Square, Inc. in Princeton as a comptroller and soon became secretary/treasurer and general manager, positions he held until Palmer Square, Inc. was sold by Princeton University in 1983.

He was one of the founders in 1959 of the Princeton Chamber of Commerce and was president in 1971. He was awarded the “Man of the Year” award by the Chamber of Commerce in 1982. For fourteen years he was treasurer of the United Way and helped organize the Princeton Merchants Association. In 1975 he was awarded the Gerald B. Lambert award for civic service. Jack was a member of the Princeton Rotary Club and was made president in 1964. He was also treasurer of the Princeton Arts Council. Additionally, Jack served as an elder and deacon at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Princeton. Politics was always a part of his life and in the early 1970’s, Jack was elected to the position of Republican Committeeman and Municipal Chairman for Princeton Township.

Jack moved to Dunwoody, Georgia in May 1983 to retire, but it didn’t last long. In September 1983 he became controller of Meteor Photo in Atlanta, where he was employed until May 1994. Because his residence in Dunwoody did not have a sunny yard, he and his wife bought a home in Alpharetta, where Jack spent many happy hours in his flower garden. He was a member of Windward Association of Retired Men (WARM) for many years. While retired, Jack and Elinor traveled to many countries and had many happy memories of their trips together.

After Hurricane Andrew, Jack traveled with his Church group to Homestead, Fla. and Mexico to re-build homes. During this time, Jack also tutored third graders in reading and arithmetic at APC and Creek Side Elementary School.

Jack was preceded in death by his brother, William Russell Yeoman. Jack is survived by his wife of 59 years, Elinor Weber Yeoman, his son John C. Yeoman, Jr., and his wife Tiffany. Sisters Barbara Y. Antonelli of Jupiter, Fla. and Nancy Y. Field of Indianapolis, Ind. Several nieces and nephews also survive.

A celebration of Jack’s life was held on Saturday, September 22, 2012 at the Alpharetta Church at 11 a.m. Mr. Yeoman’s ashes are to be interred in Princeton Cemetery in the Yeoman Plot at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Shriners Children’s Hospital. SouthCare Cremation and Funeral Society in Alpharetta, Georgia is in charge of arrangements. Please express condolences online at www.southcare.us.

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Jacob Goldsmith

Jacob Goldsmith, infant son of Tasha and Scott Goldsmith, passed away on Monday, September 17 2012. Jacob is survived by his parents and grandparents: Charlotte Hussey and Dan Bauer; Stephen and Heather Goldsmith; and Sheila Ellman; aunt, Aislinn Bauer; uncle and aunt, Richard and Jessica Goldsmith; and cousins, Anthony and Alyssa Goldsmith. The family thanks the staff at Capital Health Medical Center, and friends Jessika Thomas, Rebecca Crider, Ray Tucholski, Helen and Tim Sharpley, the Rusling Hose Fire Company and HTFD District 3. Donations for the Goldsmith family for funeral expenses in lieu of flowers may be sent to 1314 Genesee Street, Apt.1, Trenton, NJ, 08610. Donations in Jacob’s name to First Candle, 1314 Bedford Avenue, Suite 210, Baltimore MD 21208, first
candle.org are appreciated. Friends and family are invited to gather on Sunday, September 30, 2012 from 12pm to 4pm at Colonial Firehouse, 801 Kuser Road in Hamilton.

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John F. Hayes

John F. Hayes, 81, died Wednesday, September 19, 2012 at his home in Lawrence Township, NJ.

John was born September 26, 1930 in Boston, Massachusetts to John F. and Marie F. Hayes.

After serving in the U.S. Air Force, in Iceland and Morocco, and working for defense contractors, in post World War II Europe, he moved his family to California and worked for RCA as a project manager on the TIROS project, the world’s first weather satellite.

Mr. Hayes also served as vice president for the Singer Corporation in the newly-opened 1 World Trade Center in New York, after which he formed his own international electronics export business.

He is survived by his wife of over 50 years, Sonja Hayes; a daughter, Michaela Van Orden of Flemington, NJ; three grandchildren; a brother, Paul, and a sister, Judy, both of Boston, MA and many nieces and nephews and their families. He is also survived by his beloved Dalmatian and constant companion, Norton.

A memorial gathering will be held on Sunday, September 30, 2012, at the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue in Princeton, NJ from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. with remembrances beginning at 12:30 p.m.

To extend condolences and sign the guest book, please visit www.TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Obituaries 8/1/12 Post

George A. Miller

George A. Miller, Princeton’s James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Psychology Emeritus and a pioneer in cognitive science, died of natural causes Sunday, July 22, at his home in Plainsboro, He was 92 years old.

Miller, who joined the faculty in 1979, was an innovator in the study of language and cognition, helping to establish psycholinguistics as an independent field of research in psychology. In 1991, he was awarded the National Medal of Science, the highest scientific honor awarded by the United States, in recognition of his contributions to understanding processes of the human mind. He did receive an honorary doctor of science degree from Princeton in 1996.

Miller, together with Jerome Bruner and Noam Chomsky, led the “cognitive revolution” that replaced behaviorism as the leading psychological approach to understanding the mind in the 1950s, said Christiane Fellbaum, senior research scholar in computer science who worked closely with Miller at Princeton. “George believed that the human mind in all its aspects was interesting and worth studying — believe it or not, that was revolutionary at the time,” she said.

Philip Johnson-Laird, the Stuart Professor of Psychology Emeritus and senior scholar at Princeton, said Miller’s work has made a permanent impression on cognitive science.

“As long scientists study the mind, they will honor ideas that he was first to formulate,” said Johnson-Laird, who collaborated with Miller on the 1976 book Language and Perception.

Miller’s work spanned more than five decades. An early work, his 1951 book, Language and Communication, helped establish the field of psycholinguistics, a collaboration between linguistics and psychology.

In 1956, he was the author of The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two, a paper that, in part, proposed new ideas about the way immediate memory works, suggesting that people can retain about seven “chunks” of information in what is commonly known as short-term memory. The paper became one of the most frequently quoted papers in the field. (And, as Miller often noted, also one of the most misquoted papers.)

Johnson-Laird said the paper reflected several of Miller’s important skills. “He could think more deeply than others, and he could put his thoughts into beautiful transparent prose,” he said.

The paper’s attention-grabbing opening lines are well known in psychology: “My problem is that I have been persecuted by an integer. For seven years this number has followed me around, has intruded in my most private data, and has assaulted me from the pages of our most public journals.”

He was also the main author of Plans and the Structure of Behavior, a 1960 book that was a catalyst for the cognitive revolution in psychology.

Beginning in 1986 and continuing for many years, Miller helped oversee development of WordNet, a large-scale electronic reference that helps computers understand human language and continues to influence applications such as search engines.

Miller was born in Charleston, W.Va., and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Alabama in 1940 and 1941, respectively. While an undergraduate at the University of Alabama, he met and married Katherine James, who was his wife for more than half a century.

During World War II, he worked on military voice communications at the Harvard University Psycho-Acoustic Laboratory. He earned his doctorate at Harvard in 1946.

He was an assistant professor of psychology at Harvard from 1948 to 1951, when he went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an associate professor for four years. He returned to Harvard for the next 12 years. Named professor in 1958, he served as chair of the psychology department from 1964 to 1967.

Miller taught and studied at Rockefeller University from 1968 to 1982 and was twice appointed as a visitor of the Institute for Advanced Study.

He joined the Princeton faculty in 1979 and was named the McDonnell Distinguished Professor of Psychology in 1982. He and Gilbert Harman, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy, established the Cognitive Science Laboratory at Princeton. Miller was director of the McDonnell-Pew Program in Cognitive Neuroscience from 1989 to 1994. He transferred to emeritus status in 1990.

Fellbaum said Miller was a gentleman noted for his kindness to graduate students. Miller’s son, Donnally, said that he remembers his family always opening its home to foreign graduate students at Thanksgiving, when they otherwise wouldn’t have had anywhere to go.

“He was the sort of man who was generous with his time and took a lot of care with his students,” Donnally Miller said.

Among his awards, Miller received the American Psychological Foundation’s Life Achievement Award in 1990 and the Louis E. Levy Medal in 1991. He was a Fulbright research fellow at the University of Oxford and served as president of the American Psychological Association in 1969. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1957, the National Academy of Sciences in 1962, and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1985.

A celebration of Miller’s life will be held at 7 p.m., Thursday, August 9, at the Windrows retirement community, 2000 Windrow Drive, Princeton.

Miller is survived by his second wife, Margaret Page; two children, Nancy and Donnally; and three grandsons, Gavin Murray-Miller, Morgan Murray-Miller, and Nathaniel James Miller.

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Elizabeth Robertson

Elizabeth Robertson died peacefully at home in Princeton on July 21.

Born August 12, 1919, Betty grew up in Elizabeth, New Jersey. During the war she worked in Washington as a cryptanalyst, breaking German and Japanese codes.

She was an avid golfer who played at Springdale Country Club into her eighties, and was active in the alumnae association of Mount Holyoke College, the Present Day Club, and Women’s College Club.

She was married for 61 years to the late Nat Robertson; and is survived by her children, Henry, Mandy, and Paul Robertson; granddaughters, Julia Cavalier and Elinor Keith; and great granddaughter, Amanda Cavalier.

A memorial service will be held at the Presbyterian Church of Lawrenceville on Saturday, August 4 at 11:30 a.m., followed by a reception at Princeton Windrows. No flowers, please.

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Donald C. Cox

Donald Charles Cox, of Princeton, died Friday, July 27, 2012 after a long and valiant battle with esophageal cancer.

Born in 1943 in Pontiac, Mich., to Charles and the late Anne Cox, he received a BS in mathematics from Western Michigan in 1965 and an MBA from the University of Michigan in 1970. He was a lifelong, die-hard Wolverine fan.

Don served as an officer in the U.S. Navy aboard the U.S.S. Conway during the Vietnam War. He was a proud resident of Princeton, an active swimmer and an avid lover of trains. Professionally, Don was passionate about his work as an IT executive for such companies as Bristol-Myers Squibb, Oracle, and Hotwire.

Don had an incredible mind and his combined intelligence and photographic memory resulted in banishment from family games of Trivial Pursuit. He was very proud of his large family and talked often about how lucky he was to have lived long enough to know his 9 grandchildren.

In addition to his father and grandchildren, he is survived by his wife, Sharon, of 27 years; his sister, Shirley Cox; his beloved sons, Kevin and Patrick Cox; his stepdaughters, Sarah, Rachel & Gabby Kachur; his stepson, Matthew Kachur; and their spouses.

A committal of ashes will take place in Arlington Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Donations in Don’s memory may be made to the YWCA of Princeton, 59 Paul Robeson Place, Princeton, N.J. 08540. www.ywcaprinceton.org.

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Francesca Delneso

Francesca Delneso, 98, of Princeton, died Friday, July 20, 2012 at Merwick Care and Rehab Center of Plainsboro. Francesca was born in Manhattan, N.Y. and resided in New York until age 6 before moving to Ischia, Italy, and then returned back to Princeton at the age of 20.

She was a member of St. Paul’s Church of Princeton. Francesca enjoyed writing, and would send birthday and anniversary cards to all her family and friends.

Francesca was the daughter of the late Salvatore and Teresa Trani, wife of the late Francesco Delneso; and mother of the late Francesco Delneso. She was also predeceased by three sisters and three brothers. She is survived by two sons and a daughter-in-law, John L. Delneso and Salvatore and Antonietta Delneso, all of Princeton; a daughter, Maria and Robert Merrick of Pennington; four grandchildren, Frank Delneso, Theresa Helper, Julianna Delneso, and Andrea Merrick; two great grandchildren, Steven and Michael Helper; and many nieces and nephews here and in Italy.

Memorial contributions may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, Tenn., 38105; or St. Paul’s Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 08542.

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Sung Hyok Yi

Sung Hyok Yi was born on August 21, 1921 in Kanggye, North Pyongyang province, modern-day North Korea, as the first of four children of Jungwon and Myungsun Yi. His father was a successful businessman in Kanggye, running several businesses as diversified as lumber manufacturing and rice distribution. His mother was a devout Christian, eventually holding the highest positions in Saemoonan Presbyterian Church in Seoul, which was founded in 1887 by the American missionary Horace Underwood.

After graduating from Chuncheon High School in 1939, Mr. Yi went on to Tokyo, Japan, to study at Waseda University, where he completed his BS in economics and political Science in 1943. While at Waseda, Mr. Yi was a member of the varsity basketball team.

After Korea’s independence from Japan in 1945, Mr. Yi returned to Kanggye to work in his father’s lumber business. But as rising political tensions made northern Korea unsafe, he was sent south in 1948 with his mother and two of his three younger sisters to Seoul. Shortly thereafter, the border between North and South Korea was closed, leaving his father and youngest sister, Sangseon, unable to escape. Their whereabouts are still unknown.

In 1954, he married Yongcha Bae in Seoul, and had two boys, Peter and Robert Yi. Today, Peter is a medical oncologist in Princeton, and Robert is head of investor relations for Samsung Electronics in Seoul.

Once settled in Seoul, Mr. Yi entered the film industry, founding a film production company. He produced several famous films, most notably introducing Koreans to actress Um Aing-Ran, Korea’s first movie star.

Mr. Yi led another business venture as president of a Korean crafts export business, which became so successful that he was awarded a presidential medal in 1970 by the president of South Korea, Park Chung-hee.

In 1972, Mr. Yi immigrated with his family to the United States, settling in Queens, N.Y., and opening Subok Exports on 32nd St. and Broadway in Manhattan. He would become one of the first merchants to establish the region in today’s Koreatown, finally retiring in 1983. Since 1990, Mr. and Mrs. Yi have lived with their son and daughter-in-law in Princeton.

Mr. Yi was an avid golf player, stating that some of his happiest moments were on the golf course; In Seoul, he was a member of Korea’s first private golf club, Hanyang Country Club. In the United States, he was a member of the Princeton Korean Presbyterian Church in Plainsboro and Waseda University’s New York alumni association.

Mr. Yi is survived by his wife, Yongcha; two sisters, Sanggil and Sangcheon of Seoul; two sons, Peter and Robert; two daughters-in-law, Alice and Grace; and four grandchildren, Justin, Lauren, Jonathan, and Erin.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Princeton Korean Presbyterian Church, 500 Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro, N.J. 08536 (www.princetonkorean.org); the Korean Community Center of Greater Princeton, P.O. Box 1128, Princeton, N.J. 08542 (www.kccprinceton.org); and Princeton Healthcare System Foundation, 629 US Route One, Princeton, N.J. 08540 (www.princetonhcs.org).

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John D. Humble

John Duncan Humble, 87, of the Deerwood Community, formerly of Princeton, passed away on Tuesday, July 24, 2012.

A native of Waco, Texas, he was the son of the late Paul M. and Pauline Duncan Humble. He graduated in 1946 from Texas A&M University with a degree in mechanical engineering. He took an engineering position with Mobil Oil Company in Beaumont, Texas, thus beginning a career with Mobil working on projects all over the world and spanning more than 4 decades. He was a U.S. Navy veteran serving during World War II and Korea.

Mr. Humble is survived by two sons, Dr. Tim Humble and his wife, Terri, of Beaumont, Texas; and Dr. Ted Humble and his wife, Dr. Nancy Humble, of Asheville, N.C. He had seven grandchildren, Daniel, Sarah, Ryan, Morgan, Kristen, Paul, and Mark; and was preceded in death by two grandchildren, Nicholas and Mary Ann.

Mr. Humble ’46 was thankful for the opportunities provided by attending Texas A&M and wanted that to be available for his sons. Tim, ’74, and Ted, ’78, both graduated there — launching careers in medicine, both as general surgeons. Ever thankful still he later established several endowed scholarships at A&M so that other young people could have access to a college education, “especially engineering”.

No local services are planned at this time.

Memorials may be made to The Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University, 505 George Bush Drive, College Station, Texas 77840.

Groce Funeral Home at Lake Julian is assisting the family and the memorial register is available at groce
funeralhome.com.

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Area Exhibits 7/25/12 Post

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, is showing “Water Light,” watercolors by Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone, through August 5. The artists will host a “Coffee and Conversation” August 5 from 2-5 p.m. Visit www.lambertvillearts.com.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center has “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, through July 28. “Monday Gestures and Poses,” in which members of the ACP’s Monday night Life Drawing Workshop, is also on view. For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries. In the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, work from the Ennis Beley Photography Project, a summer student program, is on display. Both shows are through July 27.

Dalet Gallery, 141 North Second Street, Philadelphia, hosts “Made in Princeton,” with works from members of the Princeton Artist Alliance and the Princeton Photography Club, through August 13. A reception is August 3, 5-9 p.m. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Visit www.dalealert.com.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, shows “Trenton Makes,” the local segment of the Trenton Artists Workshop Association’s Trenton/New York Visual Art Exhibition, through August 5. A partner show is at the Prince Street Gallery, 530 West 25th Street, 4th floor, New York, July 31-August 18. Works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar, Aubrey Kauffman, Leon Rainbow, Linda Osborne, and others are included in these shows. Call (609) 989-3632 for Ellarslie information; (646) 230-0246 for Spring Street Gallery.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the Milberg Gallery through December 28 is “Woodrow Wilson’s Journey to the White House.”

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows the third annual Juried Photographic Exhibition through August 11. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, exhibits “Flora, Fauna and Mystical” through July 27. Paintings by Linda Gilbert are in the show. Next is “All About the Birds,” the art of Necati Itez, from August 5-26. A reception is August 5 from 1-3 p.m. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 1 to 3 p.m. Sundays July 15 and 22.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery through February 15. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries through September include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. “Aerial Roots” by Steve Tobin is in the Meadow Gallery through July 31. See www.groundsforsculp
ture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display through September 15. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen and ceramics by Bill Macholdt through September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10. “To Stir, Inform, and Inflame: The Art of Tony Auth” is on view through October 21. “I Look, I Listen: Works on Paper by Marlene Miller” is exhibited through October 14.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms,” through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day. “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” is on view through June 23, 2013.

Joan Perkes Fine Art Gallery, 202 North Union Street, Lambertville, has the First Annual Works on Paper Show through August 17. Call (609) 460-4708 for more information.

Mercer County Senior Art Show is being held through August 3 at Meadow Lakes, 300 Meadow Lakes just off Etra Road, East Windsor. Categories are acrylic, craft, computer imagery, drawing, mixed media, oil, pastel, photography, print, sculpture, and watercolor. Call (800) 564-5705.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, presents “The Garden at Night: Photographs by Linda Rutenberg” through September 16. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, is showing works by artists influenced by the late professor I-Hsiung Ju. A closing reception July 31 is from 6:30-8 p.m. Howard Ye will demonstrate Chinese brush painting. The gallery’s hours are 1-6 p.m.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

Princeton Township Municipal Complex, 400 Witherspoon Street, is exhibiting a photo collection of the traditional costumes of the Molise region, on loan from the Cultural Ministry of the Region of Molise. The photos will be on display through the month of July. The exhibit was arranged by the Princeton/Pettoranello Sister City Foundation.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” through September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. “Root and Branch,” which explores the form of a tree in art and includes several art forms, runs through November 25. The Museum will install 12 sculptures by Ai Weiwei at Scudder Plaza, in front of Robertson Hall, for one year starting August 1. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

West Windsor Arts Center Gallery, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, will show “Pantyhose, Wire, Brushstrokes & Lens” through August 31. This is work by teaching artists and faculty of the arts center. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Friday, 12-6 p.m. Visit www.westwindsorarts.org.

Area Exhibits 7/18/12 Post

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, is showing “Water Light,” watercolors by Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone, through August 5. The artists will host a “Coffee and Conversation” August 5 from 2-5 p.m. Visit www.lambertvillearts.com.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center has “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, through July 28. “Monday Gestures and Poses,” in which members of the ACP’s Monday night Life Drawing Workshop, is also on view. “Words with Friends,” through July 20, blends language and art. For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries. In the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, work from the Ennis Beley Photography Project, a summer student program, is on display. Both shows are through July 27.

Dalet Gallery, 141 N. Second Street, Philadelphia, hosts “Made in Princeton,” with works from members of the Princeton Artist Alliance and the Princeton Photography Club, through August 13. A reception is August 3, 5-9 p.m. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Visit www.dalealert.com.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, shows “Trenton Makes,” the local segment of the Trenton Artists Workshop Association’s Trenton/New York Visual Art Exhibition, which will also feature a show at the Prince Street Gallery, 530 West 25th Street, 4th floor, New York, July 31-August 18. Works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar, Aubrey Kauffman, Leon Rainbow, Linda Osborne, and others are included in these shows. Call (609) 989-3632 for Ellarslie information; (646) 230-0246 for Spring Street Gallery.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. Opening in the Milberg Gallery July 23 and running through December 28 is “Woodrow Wilson’s Journey to the White House.”

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows the third annual Juried Photographic Exhibition through August 11. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, will exhibit “Flora, Fauna and Mystical” through July 27. Paintings by Linda Gilbert are in the show. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 1 to 3 p.m. Sundays July 15 and 22.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery through February 15. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries through September include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. “Aerial Roots” by Steve Tobin is in the Meadow Gallery through July 31. See www.groundsfor sculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen and ceramics by Bill Macholdt through September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10. “To Stir, Inform, and Inflame: The Art of Tony Auth” is on view through October 21. “I Look, I Listen: Works on Paper by Marlene Miller” is exhibited through October 14.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms,” through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day. “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” is on view through June 23, 2013.

Joan Perkes Fine Art Gallery, 202 North Union Street, Lambertville, has the First Annual Works on Paper Show July 21-August 17. An opening reception is July 21, 3-7 p.m. and July 22, 1-6 p.m. Call (609) 460-4708 for more information.

Mercer County Senior Art Show will be held July 18-August 3 at Meadow Lakes, 300 Meadow Lakes just off Etra Road, East Windsor. Categories are acrylic, craft, computer imagery, drawing, mixed media, oil, pastel, photography, print, sculpture, and watercolor. Call (800) 564-5705.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, presents “The Garden at Night: Photographs by Linda Rutenberg” through September 16. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, is showing works by artists influenced by the late professor I-Hsiung Ju. A closing reception July 31 is from 6:30-8 p.m. Howard Ye will demonstrate Chinese brush painting. The gallery’s hours are 1-6 p.m.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

Princeton Township Municipal Complex, 400 Witherspoon Street, is exhibiting a photo collection of the traditional costumes of the Molise region, on loan from the Cultural Ministry of the Region of Molise. The photos will be on display through the month of July. The exhibit was arranged by the Princeton/Pettoranello Sister City Foundation.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” through September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. “Root and Branch,” which explores the form of a tree in art and includes several art forms, runs through November 25. The Museum will install 12 sculptures by Ai Weiwei at Scudder Plaza, in front of Robertson Hall, for one year starting August 1. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

West Windsor Arts Center Gallery, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, will show “Pantyhose, Wire, Brushstrokes & Lens” July 22-August 31. An artists’ reception is July 22 from 4-6 p.m. This is work by teaching artists and faculty of the arts center. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Friday, 12-6 p.m. Visit www.westwindsorarts.org.

Area Exhibits 7/11/12 Post

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, is showing “Water Light,” watercolors by Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone, through August 5. The artists will host a “Coffee and Conversation” August 5 from 2-5 p.m. Visit www.lambertvillearts.com.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center has “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, through July 28. “Monday Gestures and Poses,” in which members of the ACP’s Monday night Life Drawing Workshop, is also on view. “Words with Friends,” through July 20, blends language and art. For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries. In the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, work from the Ennis Beley Photography Project, a summer student program, is on display. Both shows are through July 27.

Dalet Gallery, 141 N. Second Street, Philadelphia, hosts “Made in Princeton,” with works from members of the Princeton Artist Alliance and the Princeton Photography Club, through August 13. A reception is August 3, 5-9 p.m. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Visit www.dalealert.com.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, shows “Trenton Makes,” the local segment of the Trenton Artists Workshop Association’s Trenton/New York Visual Art Exhibition, which will also feature a show at the Prince Street Gallery in Soho. Works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar, Aubrey Kauffman, Leon Rainbow, Linda Osborne, and others are included. The show runs through September 1. Call (609) 989-3632.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. Opening in the Milberg Gallery July 23 and running through December 28 is “Woodrow Wilson’s Journey to the White House.”

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows the third annual Juried Photographic Exhibition July 13-August 11. The opening is July 13 from 6-8 p.m. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, 12-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, will exhibit “Flora, Fauna and Mystical” through July 27. Paintings by Linda Gilbert are in the show. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 1 to 3 p.m. Sundays July 15 and 22.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery through February 15. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries through September include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. “Aerial Roots” by Steve Tobin is in the Meadow Gallery through July 31. See www.groundsforsculp
ture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen and ceramics by Bill Macholdt through September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10. “To Stir, Inform, and Inflame: The Art of Tony Auth” is on view through October 21. “I Look, I Listen: Works on Paper by Marlene Miller” is exhibited July 14-October 14.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms,” through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day. On July 11, Art After Hours includes an exhibition tour of “Aspects of Architecture” and a performance by the band Cotton at 7 and 8 p.m.

Mercer County Senior Art Show will be held July 18-August 3 at Meadow Lakes, 300 Meadow Lakes just off Etra Road, East Windsor. Categories are acrylic, craft, computer imagery, drawing, mixed media, oil, pastel, photography, print, sculpture, and watercolor. Call (800) 564-5705.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, presents “The Garden at Night: Photographs by Linda Rutenberg” through September 16. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 12-4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, is showing paintings by I-Hsiung Ju through July 15. A reception hosted by the MIT Club of Princeton and the gallery is July 12, 6-8 p.m., for area alumni. From July 17-31, a joint show of artists influenced by the late Mr. Ju will be on view, in a show called “A Tribute to a Teacher.” The opening reception is July 17, 6:30-8 p.m. Call (917) 520-8653.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

Princeton Township Municipal Complex, 400 Witherspoon Street, is exhibiting a photo collection of the traditional costumes of the Molise region, on loan from the Cultural Ministry of the Region of Molise. The photos will be on display through the month of July. The exhibit was arranged by the Princeton/Pettoranello Sister City Foundation.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” from July 14-September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. “Root and Branch,” which explores the form of a tree in art and includes several art forms, opens July 14 and runs through November 25. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Tinicum Arts Festival, Tinicum Park, Erwinna, Pa. is July 14 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and July 15 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., rain or shine. Ty Hodanish, Impressionist painter and founder of the Artists Colony at Prallsville Mills, will be the featured artist, creating an original painting starting at 11 a.m. Saturday. He will donate the painting, which will be up for bid at the Silent Auction tent. Visit www.tinicumarts
festival.org.

West Windsor Arts Center Gallery, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, will show “Pantyhose, Wire, Brushstrokes & Lens” on view through August 31. An artists’ reception is July 22 from 4-6 p.m. This is work by teaching artists and faculty of the arts center. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Friday, 12-6 p.m. Visit www.westwindsorarts.org.

Area Exhibits 6/27/12 Post

Art Way Gallery, Schalks Crossing Road at Wyndhurst Drive in Plainsboro, shows “Inverted Minds,” featuring Thibaud Thiercelin’s paintings and Leo Vayn’s photographs through July 22. An opening reception is July 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Visit www.ArtWayGallery.org for more information.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, is showing “Water Light,” watercolors by Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone, opening July 6. An opening reception is July 7, 4-7 p.m. Visit www.lambertvillearts.com.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center has “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, through July 28. “Monday Gestures and Poses,” in which members of the ACP’s Monday night Life Drawing Workshop, is also on view. For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher through July 1.

Bucks County Gallery of Fine Art, 77 West Bridge Street, New Hope, Pa., presents new bar and tavern interior scenes by Steve Messenger through June 30. Visit www.buckscountygal
leryart.com.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries. In the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, work from the Ennis Beley Photography Project, a summer student program, is on display. Both shows are through July 27.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, shows “Trenton Makes,” the local segment of the Trenton Artists Workshop Association’s Trenton/New York Visual Art Exhibition, which will also feature a show at the Prince Street Gallery in Soho. Works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar, Aubrey Kauffman, Leon Rainbow, Linda Osborne, and others are included. The show runs through September 1. Call (609) 989-3632.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows “The Elephant and the Rainbow” by Charlie Gross through July 1. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street, Cranbury, will exhibit “Flora, Fauna and Mystical” July 8-27. Paintings by Linda Gilbert are in the show. A reception is July 8, 1-3 p.m. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 1 to 3 p.m. Sundays July 8, 15 and 22.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen and ceramics by Bill Macholdt through September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10. “To Stir, Inform, and Inflame: The Art of Tony Auth” is on view through October 21. “I Look, I Listen: Works on Paper by Marlene Miller” is exhibited July 14-October 14.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” through July 8. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day. On July 11, Art After Hours includes an exhibition tour of “Aspects of Architecture” and a performance by the band Cotton at 7 and 8 p.m.

Joan Perkes Fine Art Gallery, 202 North Union Street, Lambertville, is showing “Reveries,” contemplative portraits in the tradition of the Renaissance masters by Ken Hamilton, through July 9.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, presents “The Garden at Night: Photographs by Linda Rutenberg” through September 16. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1. Marie Sturken’s prints, “Kimono Mania: Handmade Paperworks,” will be on display from July 1-September 4.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing work by New Jersey artist Mayumi Sarai through July 1, and “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, presents works in mixed media by Liz Adams through June 28.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, shows the works of Ma Xinle through June 29. The artist specializes in paintings of animals and hopes to raise awareness of environmental protection through his work. Hours are 12-6 p.m. or by appointment.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” from July 14-September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. “Root and Branch,” which explores the form of a tree in art and includes several art forms, opens July 14 and runs through November 25. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” through June 30.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by artists Kyle Walsh through the end of June, followed by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Thomas Sweet Cafe, Montgomery Shopping Center, Skillman, is showing “Old Masters 2,” the second annual exhibit by artists from Hannah Fink’s class at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, through June 30. Works range from still life to landscape, in a variety of media.

Area Art Exhibits Post

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, is showing “Water Light,” watercolors by Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone, opening July 6. An opening reception is July 7, 4-7 p.m. Visit www.lambertvillearts.com.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center has “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, through July 28. On June 21, “Monday Gestures and Poses,” in which members of the ACP’s Monday night Life Drawing Workshop exhibit their work, opens with a reception from 5:30-7 p.m. For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncil
ofprinceton.org.

Artsbridge at New Hope Arts, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, presents the 18th Annual Juried Show through June 24. The show is open Thursdays-Sundays, noon-5 p.m. Visit www.arts
bridgeonline.com.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher through July 1.

Bucks County Gallery of Fine Art, 77 West Bridge Street, New Hope, Pa., presents new bar and tavern interior scenes by Steve Messenger through June 30. Visit www.buckscountygal
leryart.com.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries. In the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, work from the Ennis Beley Photography Project, a summer student program, is on display. Both shows are through July 27.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, opens “Trenton Makes” on June 23 with a reception from 6-9 p.m. This is the Trenton Artists Workshop Association’s Trenton/New York Visual Art Exhibition, which will also feature a show at the Prince Street Gallery in Soho. Works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar, Aubrey Kauffman, Leon Rainbow, Linda Osborne, and others are included. The show runs through September 1. Call (609) 989-3632.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. “ The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows “The Elephant and the Rainbow” by Charlie Gross through July 1. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen and ceramics by Bill Macholdt through September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting a series of original children’s book illustrations until June 24. Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” runs through July 8. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day. On July 11, Art After Hours includes an exhibition tour of “Aspects of Architecture” and a performance by the band Cotton at 7 and 8 p.m.

Joan Perkes Fine Art Gallery, 202 North Union Street, Lambertville, is showing “Reveries,” contemplative portraits in the tradition of the Renaissance masters by Ken Hamilton, through July 9.

Lawrence Art & Frame Gallery, Lawrence Shopping Center, Texas Avenue and Brunswick Pike, Lawrence, presents an exhibit of paintings by Bill Plank through June 22. The gallery is open Mondays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, presents “The Garden at Night: Photographs by Linda Rutenberg” through September 16. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing work by New Jersey artist Mayumi Sarai through July 1, and “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, presents works in mixed media by Liz Adams through June 28.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, shows the works of Ma Xinle through June 29. The artist specializes in paintings of animals and hopes to raise awareness of environmental protection through his work. Hours are 12-6 p.m. or by appointment. A meet-the-artist reception is June 23, 2-5 p.m.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Princeton and the Gothic Revival: 1870-1930,” 40 works of art never before exhibited, through June 24. “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” will be up from July 14-September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. “Root and Branch,” which explores the form of a tree in art and includes several art forms, opens July 14 and runs through November 25. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” through June 30.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by artists Kyle Walsh through the end of June, followed by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Thomas Sweet Cafe, Montgomery Shopping Center, Skillman, is showing “Old Masters 2,” the second annual exhibit by artists from Hannah Fink’s class at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, through June 30. Works range from still life to landscape, in a variety of media.

Area Exhibits 6/13/12 Post

Art All Night, at Roebling Wire Works, 675 South Broad Street, Trenton, June 16, 3 p.m. to June 17, 3 p.m. Free, 24-hour art show with entertainment, food, and a list of special events ranging from a Hula Hoop Lounge to a walking tour of the Roebling Works with historian Clifford Zink. Artists of all ages and levels are invited to submit one piece of art in any medium or format, on June 15 from 5-9 p.m. or June 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Millyard Park entrance. Visit artworkstren
ton.org.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, is showing “Water Light,” watercolors by Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone, opening July 6. An opening reception is July 7, 4-7 p.m. Visit www.lambertvillearts.com.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center has “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, through July 28. For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncil
ofprinceton.org.

Artsbridge at New Hope Arts, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, presents the 18th Annual Juried Show through June 24. The show is open Thursdays-Sundays, noon-5 p.m. Visit www.arts
bridgeonline.com.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher through July 1.

Bucks County Gallery of Fine Art, 77 West Bridge Street, New Hope, Pa., presents new bar and tavern interior scenes by Steve Messenger through June 30. Visit www.buckscountygalleryart.com.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries. In the Olivia Rainbow Gallery, work from the Ennis Beley Photography Project, a summer student program, is on display. Both shows are through July 27.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, opens “Trenton Makes” on June 23 with a reception from 6-9 p.m. This is the Trenton Artists Workshop Association’s Trenton/New York Visual Art Exhibition, which will also feature a show at the Prince Street Gallery in Soho. Works by Mel Leipzig, Jon Naar, Aubrey Kauffman, Leon Rainbow, Linda Osborne, and others are included. The show runs through September 1. Call (609) 989-3632.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows “The Elephant and the Rainbow” by Charlie Gross through July 1. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen and ceramics by Bill Macholdt through September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting a series of original children’s book illustrations until June 24. Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” runs through July 8. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day. On July 11, Art After Hours includes an exhibition tour of “Aspects of Architecture” and a performance by the band Cotton at 7 and 8 p.m.

Joan Perkes Fine Art Gallery, 202 North Union Street, Lambertville, is showing “Reveries,” contemplative portraits in the tradition of the Renaissance masters by Ken Hamilton, through July 9.

Lawrence Art & Frame Gallery, Lawrence Shopping Center, Texas Avenue and Brunswick Pike, Lawrence, presents an exhibit of paintings by Bill Plank through June 22. The gallery is open Mondays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, opens “The Garden at Night: Photographs by Linda Rutenberg” June 15. The opening reception is June 14, 5:30-7:30 p.m. The artist will lecture on June 15 at 10 a.m. about her work. To reserve tickets for the lecture ($12 friends of Morven; $15 general public), visit www.morven.org or call (609) 924-8144, ext. 106. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing work by New Jersey artist Mayumi Sarai through July 1, and “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, presents works in mixed media by Liz Adams through June 28.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, shows the works of Ma Xinle through June 29. The artist specializes in paintings of animals and hopes to raise awareness of environmental protection through his work. Hours are 12-6 p.m. or by appointment. A meet-the-artist reception is June 23, 2-5 p.m.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Princeton and the Gothic Revival: 1870-1930,” 40 works of art never before exhibited, through June 24. “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” will be up from July 14-September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixed media, historical period, and place of origin. “Root and Branch,” which explores the form of a tree in art and includes several art forms, opens July 14 and runs through November 25. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” through June 30.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by artists Kyle Walsh through the end of June, followed by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Thomas Sweet Cafe, Montgomery Shopping Center, Skillman, is showing “Old Masters 2,” the second annual exhibit by artists from Hannah Fink’s class at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, through June 30. Works range from still life to landscape, in a variety of media. An opening reception is June 14 from 7-9 p.m.

Area Exhibits 6/6/12 Post

Art All Night, at Roebling Wire Works, 675 South Broad Street, Trenton, June 16, 3 p.m. to June 17, 3 p.m. Free, 24-hour art show with entertainment, food, etc. Artists of all ages and levels are invited to submit one piece of art in any medium or format, on June 15 from 5-9 p.m. or June 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Millyard Park entrance. Visit artworkstrenton.org.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street, presents “Transient Spaces” in remembrance of Herban Garden, Writers Block, and Quark Park through June 9. On view through July 28 is “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, and “Terrace Project: Sculpture by Jonathan Shor.” For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscoun
cilofprinceton.org.

Artsbridge at New Hope Arts, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, presents the 18th Annual Juried Show June 8-24. The show is open Thursdays-Sundays, noon-5 p.m. The opening reception is June 8, 5-8 p.m. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher from June 8-July 1. The opening reception is June 9 from 5-8 p.m.

Bucks County Gallery of Fine Art, 77 West Bridge Street, New Hope, Pa., presents new bar and tavern interior scenes by Steve Messenger through June 30. Visit www.buckscountygal
leryart.com.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, through July 27.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. “The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows “The Elephant and the Rainbow” by Charlie Gross through July 1. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows sculpture by Nancy Cohen from June 10-September 9. Visit www.hunterdonartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting a series of original children’s book illustrations until June 24. Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” runs through July 8. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day.

Joan Perkes Fine Art Gallery, 202 North Union Street, Lambertville, is showing “Reveries,” contemplative portraits in the tradition of the Renaissance masters by Ken Hamilton. The opening reception is June 9 from 6:30-9:30 p.m. The show runs June 9-July 9.

Lawrence Art & Frame Gallery, Lawrence Shopping Center, Texas Avenue and Brunswick Pike, Lawrence, presents an exhibit of paintings by Bill Plank through June 22. The gallery is open Mondays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Morven Museum & Garden, in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, presents “Paint Out at Morven” on June 9 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event allows the general public to experience painting en plein air. Visit www.morven.org or call (609) 924-8144, ext. 106. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, is showing work by New Jersey artist Mayumi Sarai through July 1, and “Botanica Magnifica: Photographs by Jonathan Singer” through August 26.

Princeton Art Gallery, 20 Nassau Street, opens its first show with the works of Ma Xinle through June 29. The artist specializes in paintings of animals and hopes to raise awareness of environmental protection through his work. Hours are 12-6 p.m. or by appointment. A meet-the-artist reception is June 23, 2-5 p.m.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Princeton and the Gothic Revival: 1870-1930,” 40 works of art never before exhibited, through June 24. “John Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum” will run through June 10. “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” will be up from July 14-September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” through June 30.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by artists Kyle Walsh through the end of June, followed by Johanna Furst through the end of July. “The Future is Female 2.0” runs the month of September.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” through August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Thomas Sweet Cafe, Montgomery Shopping Center, Skillman, is showing “Old Masters 2,” the second annual exhibit by artists from Hannah Fink’s class at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, through June 30. Works range from still life to landscape, in a variety of media. An opening reception is June 14 from 7-9 p.m.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, is showing “Deep Within the Soul,” photographs by Colleen Maniere, through June 10. A percentage of all sales of the work benefit pancreatic cancer research.

Area Exhibits 5/30/12 Post

Art All Night, at Roebling Wire Works, 675 South Broad Street, Trenton, starts Saturday-Sunday, June 16-17, 3 p.m. to 3 p.m. Artists of all ages and levels are invited to submit one piece of art in any medium or format, on Friday, June 15 from 5-9 p.m. or Saturday, June 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Millyard Park entrance. Visit artworkstrenton.org.

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street, presents “Transient Spaces” in remembrance of Herban Garden, Writers Block, and Quark Park through June 9. On view through July 28 is “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, and “Terrace Project: Sculpture by Jonathan Shor.” For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscoun
cilofprinceton.org.

Artsbridge at Prallsville Mills, Route 29 in Stockton, presents the 18th Annual Juried Show from June 8-24. Artists from a 50-mile radius are invited to submit work until June 3 at 5 p.m.; acceptances will be announced June 5. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher from June 8-July 1. The opening reception is June 9 from 5-8 p.m.

Bucks County Gallery of Fine Art, 77 West Bridge Street, New Hope, Pa., presents new bar and tavern interior scenes by Steve Messenger June 1-30. The opening reception is June 2. Visit www.buckscountygal
leryart.com.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, through July 27.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. “Alan Turing at Princeton,” is on display in the lobby through June 5. The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. An opening celebration is May 31 at 4 p.m.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, shows “The Elephant and the Rainbow” by Charlie Gross June 1-July 1. The opening reception is June 1 from 6-8 p.m.; Meet the Photographer is June 3 from 1-3 p.m. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. In the Education Gallery through June 6, “The Impact of Art” will show works by artists with disabilities. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows “Kirsten Hassenfeld: Cabin Fever,” through June 3. The artist does sculpture and collage. From June 10-September 9, sculpture by Nancy Cohen is on view. Visit www.hunter
donartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” is featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting a series of original children’s book illustrations until June 24. Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” runs through July 8. “In the Search of an Absolute: Art of Valery Yurlov” is on view through June 3. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31. The museum is offering free admission this summer to all active military duty personnel and their families, through Labor Day.

Lawrence Art & Frame Gallery, Lawrence Shopping Center, Texas Avenue and Brunswick Pike, Lawrence, presents an exhibit of paintings by Bill Plank through June 22. The gallery is open Mondays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Lewis Center for the Arts of Princeton University presents in its Lucas Gallery at 185 Nassau Street the “Senior All-Star Art Show,” an exhibition of the best of the best of graduating student work, through June 5. Paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, film, video, and mixed media are included.

Morven Museum & Garden presents “Puzzles of the Brain: An Artist’s Journey through Amnesia,” through June 3. The show tells the story of Princeton native Lonni Sue Johnson. In collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton, “Paint Out at Morven” on June 9 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. allows the general public to experience painting en plein air. Visit www.morven.org or call (609) 924-8144, ext. 106. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street, hosts work by senior artists through May 31. Acrylics, watercolors, pencil drawings and pastels by senior artists who attend classes at PSRC will be on view.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Princeton and the Gothic Revival: 1870-1930,” 40 works of art never before exhibited, through June 24. “John Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum” will run through June 10. “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery” will be up from July 14-September 30. The show includes more than 60 works from the museum and private collections and mixes media, historical period and place of origin. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” through June 30. A “Feminist Fete” honoring Ms. Flack is June 3 from 3-6 p.m.

Straube Center, Route 31 and Franklin Avenue, Pennington, presents “The Inception of an Era” June 1-August 31. Works in all media are by artists who have graduated from colleges and universities within the past five years. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Thomas Sweet Cafe, Montgomery Shopping Center, Skillman, is showing “Old Masters 2,” the second annual exhibit by artists from Hannah Fink’s class at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, from June 1-30. Works range from still life to landscape, in a variety of media. An opening reception is June 14 from 7-9 p.m.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, is showing “Deep Within the Soul,” photographs by Colleen Maniere, through June 10. A percentage of all sales of the work benefit pancreatic cancer research.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, has a juried exhibit for visual artists ages 13-33, called “Can You Hear It?” running through June 8. Visit ww.westwindsorartscenter.org/Call-to-VisualArtist.html for details.

Area Exhibits 5/23/12 Post

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street, presents “Transient Spaces” in remembrance of Herban Garden, Writers Block, and Quark Park through June 9. On view through July 28 is “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, and “Terrace Project: Sculpture by Jonathan Shor.” For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscoun
cilofprinceton.org.

Artsbridge at Prallsville Mills, Route 29 in Stockton, presents the 18th Annual Juried Show from June 8-24. Artists from a 50-mile radius are invited to submit work until June 3 at 5 p.m.; acceptances will be announced June 5. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher from June 8-July 1. The opening reception is June 9 from 5-8 p.m.

Bucks County Gallery of Fine Art, 77 West Bridge Street, New Hope, Pa., presents new bar and tavern interior scenes by Steve Messenger June 1-30. The opening reception is June 2. Visit www.buckscountygal
leryart.com.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, through July 27. An opening reception is May 23 from 6-8 p.m.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. “Alan Turing at Princeton,” is on display in the lobby through June 5. The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. An opening celebration is May 31 at 4 p.m.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, through May 27 shows Frank Magalhaes’ “I Am a Tree, Part 2.” From June 1-July 1, “The Elephant and the Rainbow” by Charlie Gross is on view. The opening reception is June 1 from 6-8 p.m.; Meet the Photographer is June 3 from 1-3 p.m. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Garden State Watercolor Society at Prallsville Mill, Route 29, Stockton, presents the Annual Members’ Exhibition through May 27. Hours are 12-6 p.m. Thursdays to Saturdays. The reception and awards presentation is May 27 from 3:30-6 p.m.

Gourgaud Gallery at Cranbury Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street in Cranbury, is showing “Local Paintings & Preview of the Journey through Britain in Watercolor Exhibit,” by Daniel Turner Thomas, through the end of May. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 1-3 p.m. Sunday.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. In the Education Gallery through June 6, “The Impact of Art” will show works by artists with disabilities. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princ
etonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows “Kirsten Hassenfeld: Cabin Fever,” through June 3. The artist does sculpture and collage. From June 10-September 9, sculpture by Nancy Cohen is on view. Visit www.hunter
donartmuseum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has a permanent exhibit, “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements,” is featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting a series of original children’s book illustrations until June 24. Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” runs through July 8. “In the Search of an Absolute: Art of Valery Yurlov” is on view through June 3. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31.

Lawrence Art & Frame Gallery, Lawrence Shopping Center, Texas Avenue and Brunswick Pike, Lawrence, presents an exhibit of paintings by Bill Plank through June 22. The gallery is open Mondays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Lawrenceville School, Hutchins Gallery, Gruss Center for Visual Arts, presents “Cassie Jones ‘97 over and under” through May 26. Visit www.lawrenceville.org for information.

Lewis Center for the Arts of Princeton University presents in its Lucas Gallery at 185 Nassau Street the “Senior All-Star Art Show,” an exhibition of the best of the best of graduating student work, through June 5. Paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, film, video, and mixed media are included.

Morven Museum & Garden presents “Puzzles of the Brain: An Artist’s Journey through Amnesia,” through June 3. The show tells the story of Princeton native Lonni Sue Johnson. Visit www.morven.org or call (609) 924-8144, ext. 106. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street, hosts work by senior artists through May 31. Acrylics, watercolors, pencil drawings and pastels by senior artists who attend classes at PSRC will be on view.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Princeton and the Gothic Revival: 1870-1930,” 40 works of art never before exhibited, through June 24. “John Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum” will run through June 10. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” through June 30. A “Feminist Fete” honoring Ms. Flack is June 3 from 3-6 p.m.

Straube Center is presenting a “Fine Art Show: Grace, Strength and Freedom,” through May 25. Local artists will be featured. The center is on Route 31 at West Franklin Avenue in Pennington, in buildings 100 and I-108.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, is showing “Deep Within the Soul,” photographs by Colleen Maniere, through June 10. A percentage of all sales of the work benefit pancreatic cancer research.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, has a juried exhibit for visual artists ages 13-33, called “Can You Hear It?” running through June 8. Visit www.westwindsorartscenter.org/Call-to-Visual-Artists.html for details.

Area Exhibits 5/16/12 Post

The Arts Council of Princeton at Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, 102 Witherspoon Street, presents “Transient Spaces” in remembrance of Herban Garden, Writers Block, and Quark Park through June 9. On view through July 28 is “Poolscapes and Swimmers,” with drawings of the old Princeton Community Pool by Stephanie Magdziak and Ronald Berlin, and “Terrace Project: Sculpture by Jonathan Shor.” For more information call (609) 924-8777 or visit www.artscouncil
ofprinceton.org.

Artsbridge at Prallsville Mills, Route 29 in Stockton, presents “Rocco Scary, Book Arts and Sculpture” on May 17 at 7 p.m. as part of its Distinguished Artist Series. Visit www.roccoscary.com for more information. From June 8-24 the 18th Annual Juried Show is on view. Artists from a 50-mile radius are invited to submit work until June 3 at 5 p.m.; acceptances will be announced June 5. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, presents “Absorptions and Immersions,” an exhibit of watercolors and photographs by Gail Bracegirdle and John Treicher from June 8-July 1. The opening reception is June 9 from 5-8 p.m.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place off Rosedale Road, presents “Crossing Cultures,” art celebrating the biodiversity of habitats, through July 27. An opening reception is May 23 from 6-8 p.m.

DiGiovanni Photography Studio, 4577 Route 27, Kingston, presents “Connect,” a series of work by Michael Ciccotello May 19 and 20. A reception is May 19 from 6-9 p.m., and an open house is May 20 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Firestone Library at Princeton University is showing “A Fine Addition: New & Notable Acquisitions in Princeton’s Special Collections” through August 5 in its Main Gallery. In the library’s Milberg Gallery, “Capping Liberty: The Invention of a Numismatic Iconography for the New American Republic” is on view through July 8. “Alan Turing at Princeton,” is on display in the lobby through June 5. The Princeton University Numismatic Collection is showing historically important pieces in the Boyd Room of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. An opening celebration is May 31 at 4 p.m.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, through May 27 shows Frank Magalhães’ “I Am a Tree, Part 2.” Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. or by appointment.

Garden State Watercolor Society at Prallsville Mill, Route 29, Stockton, presents the Annual Members’ Exhibition through May 27. Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays; noon to 5 p.m. Mondays to Fridays. The reception and awards presentation is May 27 from 3:30-6 p.m.

Gourgaud Gallery at Cranbury Town Hall, 23-A North Main Street in Cranbury, is showing “Local Paintings & Preview of the Journey through Britain in Watercolor Exhibit,” by Daniel Turner Thomas, through the end of May. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 1-3 p.m. Sunday.

Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, presents Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” installed in the new East Gallery. Artists displayed in other GFS galleries include Sharon Engelsein, Willie Cole, and Marilyn Keating. In the Education Gallery through June 6, “The Impact of Art” will show works by artists with disabilities. See www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton at Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, is presenting “Einstein At Home,” an exhibit featuring home furnishings, personal memorabilia, and photographs of Albert Einstein with family, friends, colleagues, and national dignitaries, through August 19. Admission is $4 per person; free to HSP members. At the HSP’s Updike Farmstead on Quaker Road, “The Art of First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson: American Impressionist” is on display. Opening hours are Saturday and Wednesday from 12-4 p.m. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton shows “Kirsten Hassenfeld: Cabin Fever,” through June 3. The artist does sculpture and collage. Visit www.hunterdonartmu
seum.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., is hosting “Mavis Smith: Hidden Realities” through May 20. “Intelligent Design: Highlights of Arts and Crafts Studio Craft Movements” is a permanent exhibit featuring works by Wharton Esherick, George and Mira Nakashima, David Ellsworth, and others. “Have Gags Will Travel: The Life and Times of a New York Cartoonist” will look at the work of Sylvia Getsler through July 1. “Offering of the Angels,” a selection of 45 Renaissance and Baroque masterworks from the Uffizi Gallery, is on view through August 10.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, is hosting a series of original children’s book illustrations until June 24. Rachel Perry Welty’s first solo show, “24/7,” runs through July 8. “In the Search of an Absolute: Art of Valery Yurlov” is on view through June 3. “Aspects of Architecture: The Prints of John Taylor Arms” is on display through July 31. Admission is free on May 18, which is Celebrate Art Museum Day.

Lawrence Art & Frame Gallery, Lawrence Shopping Center, Texas Avenue and Brunswick Pike, Lawrence, presents an exhibit of paintings by Bill Plank through June 22. The gallery is open Mondays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Lawrenceville School, Hutchins Gallery, Gruss Center for Visual Arts, presents “Cassie Jones ‘97 over and under” through May 26. Visit www.lawrenceville.org for information.

Lewis Center for the Arts of Princeton University presents in its Lucas Gallery at 185 Nassau Street the “Senior All-Star Art Show,” an exhibition of the best of the best of graduating student work, May 17-June 5. An opening reception is May 17 from 7-9 p.m. Paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, film, video, and mixed media are included.

Mercer County Community College, Old Trenton Road in West Windsor, holds the Visual Arts Student Exhibition through May 17, in the school’s gallery.

Morven Museum & Garden presents “Puzzles of the Brain: An Artist’s Journey through Amnesia,” through June 3. The show tells the story of Princeton native Lonni Sue Johnson. Visit www.morven.org or call (609) 924-8144, ext. 106. Museum hours are Wednesdays-Fridays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. on. Group tours of 10 or more can be arranged any day by advance reservation. There is free on site parking.

Mudd Manuscript Library at 65 Olden Street, Princeton University, is presenting “She Flourishes,” showcasing the history of women at Princeton, through August 31. The show documents the struggles and accomplishments of women associated with the University.

Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, is showing “Thoughts on Paper” by Princeton artist Anita Benarde, through July 1. A reception will be held May 20 from 3-5 p.m.

Princeton Brain and Spine Care Institute at 731 Alexander Road, suite 200, presents “The Activity of Form,” a photography exhibit by Laura McClanahan, Greg McGarvey, Barbara Osterman, and Larry Parsons, through September.

Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street, hosts work by senior artists through May 31. Acrylics, watercolors, pencil drawings and pastels by senior artists who attend classes at PSRC will be on view.

The Princeton University Art Museum presents “Princeton and the Gothic Revival: 1870-1930,” 40 works of art never before exhibited, through June 24. “John Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum” will run through June 10. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Princeton University Office of Gender and Sexuality in 113 Dickinson Hall is presenting “Roles with a Punch,” collages and paintings by Stacie Speer Scott, through June 30.

Mason Gross Galleries, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, presents “Audrey Flack: Recent Pages from an Ancient Past,” May 19-June 30. A “Feminist Fete” honoring Ms. Flack is Sunday, June 3 from 3-6 p.m.

SOHO20 Chelsea, 547 West 27th Street, Suite 301, New York, is showing “Painting Poetry” by Princeton artist Anne Elliott through May 19. Hours are Tuesday-Saturday 12-6 p.m.

Straube Center is presenting a “Fine Art Show: Grace, Strength and Freedom,” through May 25. Local artists will be featured. The center is on Route 31 at West Franklin Avenue in Pennington, in buildings 100 and I-108.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, is showing “Deep Within the Soul,” photographs by Colleen Maniere, through June 10. A percentage of all sales of the work benefit pancreatic cancer research.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction, has a juried exhibit for visual artists ages 13-33, called “Can You Hear It?” running through June 8. Visit ww.westwindsorartscenter.org/Call-to-Visual-Artists.html for details.

Obituaries 3/21/12 Post

Ira S. Warren Jr.

Ira S. Warren Jr., a lifelong resident of Princeton passed away Monday, March 12, 2012 at the University Medical Center at Princeton.

He was a graduate of Princeton High School, attended the Hun School and received his Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Virginia. He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Air Force, after serving at Cape Canaveral, Fla., working on the missile program under Dr. Wernher von Braun, during the time of the Korean War.

Mr. Warren retired from the Hercules Company in Kingston as a chemist. In his leisure time, he enjoyed gardening and caring for his dogs. Ira was a member of American Legion Post 76, the Nassau Club and Trinity Church in Princeton.

Predeceased by his parents, Ira S. Sr. and Emily Warren; Ira is survived by his beloved wife of 41 years, Rosemary S. Warren; three brothers, Lee Roy and Benjamin Rossell Warren, both of Princeton, and Edward Warren of Marietta, Ga.; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held on Friday, March 16, 2012 at 10 a.m. at the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton. Burial followed in the family plot at Princeton Cemetery.

Visitation was on Thursday, March 15, 2012 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

Memorial contributions in his name can be made to SAVE, 900 Herrontown Road, Princeton, N.J. 08540; or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Extend condolences at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

———

Michael P. Barnett

Michael P. Barnett was surrounded by three generations of family until shortly before his peaceful death at Princeton Medical Center on March 13, 2012.

Professor Barnett was born in London, England in 1929. He attended Kings College, London, where he received a BSc in chemistry in 1948 and a PhD in theoretical chemistry in 1952 that resulted in the discovery of recurrence formulas known as the Barnett-Coulson expansion. This research involved the use, for the first time in the U.K., of the IBM 650 computer for solving complex mathematical calculations.

His military service was as a senior fellow at the Royal Radar Establishment where he worked on theoretical solid state physics. On completion of his service, he joined IBM UK where he directed the computer center and participated in numerous projects such as calculating DNA structures and simulations of hydrology projects of the river Nile for planning where to place dams.

In 1957 he was invited to pursue post-doctoral work at the University of Wisconsin and in 1958 became an associate professor of physics at MIT. While at MIT, he was the director of the cooperative computer laboratory and he developed a way to typeset computed mathematical formulae directly. He also did some initial work on word processing. In 1963 he went back to England as Reader of Information Processing at the University of London.

Believing that academic research should lead to industrial applications, in 1964 he joined the newly formed graphic systems division of RCA in Princeton to create software for commercial typesetting. Barnett designed the algorithmic markup language PAGE-1 to express complicated formats in full page composition. This was used for a wide range of typeset products that included, over the years, the Social Sciences Index of the H.W. Wilson Company and several other publications. In 1975 he joined the faculty of the Columbia School of Library service where he introduced library automation courses.

In 1977, Barnett moved to the Department of Computer Information Science at Brooklyn College of the City University (CUNY) of New York, retiring as professor emeritus in 1996. While at CUNY, he directed a major NSF funded project to develop computer-generated printed matter for undergraduate teaching. He was a dedicated, creative, supportive teacher at institutions that ranged from Ivy League to public inner city college, and his students came from all walks of life.

He lived in Princeton for 38 years before retiring to Hightstown in 2003. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Barbara; his daughter, Gabrielle; his son, Simon; his daughter-in-law, Melissa Roper-Barnett; predeceased by his son, Graham. He leaves six grandchildren.

Michael was a member of the Princeton traffic safety committee. He was active until shortly before his death, enjoying long walks, swimming, listening to classical music, and telling stories. Both friends and strangers were struck by his enormous intellect, well-spoken manner, upbeat wit, and quintessential British charm. Interment will be private; a memorial service at Trinity Episcopal Church will be planned.

———

Philip J. Cobb

Philip Jackson Cobb died at age 84 at the Veteran’s Home in Augusta, Maine on March 15, 2012.

Phil was born September 5, 1927, a son of Roland and Catherine Thomson Cobb, in Denmark, Maine. He was educated at The George School, the University of Florida at Gainesville (Bachelors of Education) and Rutgers University (Masters of Education). He served in the U.S. Navy.

He loved organized children’s camps and spent more than 75 years in camping, co-directing Camp Runoia in Belgrade Lakes for over 50 years. He was an administrator of the John Witherspoon School in Princeton for over 30 years after teaching history at the Nassau Street School in Princeton. He volunteered for the Maine Youth Camping Association, the Town of Belgrade, the Maine Attorney General’s Office, the Senior Peace Corps in the Philippines and the Natural Resource Council of Maine.

He spent nearly 50 loving years married to his wife, Elizabeth (Betty) Nawrath Cobb. He was predeceased by his wife, Betty, and two sons, Eric Cobb and Robert Cobb.

Phil is survived by his daughters, Cassandra Cobb and Pamela Cobb Heuberger; his sister, Virginia Cobb Thibodeaux; and his daughter-in-law, Marsha Cobb; son-in-law, Mark Heuberger; his grandchildren, Crystal Cobb, Jai Kells, and Mike Gray; and three great granddaughters.

A private family memorial will be held at the Friends Cemetery in Windham, Maine. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in Phil’s name can be made to: Betty Cobb Campership Fund: Camp Runoia Alumnae Organization, P.O. Box 450, Belgrade Lakes, Maine 04918; or the Natural Resource Council of Maine, 3 Wade Street, Augusta, Maine 04330.

———

Alexander P. Robinson

Alexander Proudfit Robinson, son of the late Rev. Stewart Robinson, DD (Princeton, ’15) and Anne Payne, died March 9 at The Pennswood Village, a retirement community where he had resided for the past seven years during which he had a warm, delightful relationship with staff and residents.

Born in Lockport, N.Y. on June 16, 1928, Alex grew up in Elizabeth, N.J. He attended the Darrow School, and upon graduation from Columbia University in 1951, joined the United States Marine Corps. He was discharged in 1954 with the rank of First Lieutenant and later attained the rank of Captain as a reservist.

From the early sixties until 2005, Alex was closely involved in the educational world and the community affairs of Montgomery Township. After serving as assistant headmaster at the Chapin School in Princeton and later teaching at The Hun School, he began a career at Somerset Community College in 1972 as associate dean of students and two years later took on the added responsibilities of registrar, positions he held until 1993. Subsequently, Alex continued part time as an adjunct instructor in the English department until 2003 and for the next two years tutored students. In 1987 Somerset CC was renamed Raritan Valley CC in recognition of Somerset and Hunterdon Counties joining forces to support the college.

During the period from 1978 to 1991, Alex devoted a great deal of time to the affairs of Montgomery Township, serving on a number of boards and committees, including a six year stint on the Township Committee during which period he also served one year terms as mayor and deputy mayor. In addition, he was very actively involved in the affairs of the Mary Jacobs Memorial Library as a member of the committee charged with raising funds to finance two library expansions. He also served on the Library Advisory Board and helped plan the second addition. Mei Mei Morris, former library director stated: “Without his help, our two additions and renovations, in 1992 and 2005, would not have been possible.”

A close, long term friend of Alex’s, Keith Wheelock, adjunct Professor of history at Raritan CC since 1992, served on the Township Committee at the same time as Alex, comments that in his role as mayor, “he looked and acted distinguished and thoughtful.” He further notes: “I remember Alex as a person proud of his country, dedicated to education and student mentoring, and as a steadfast friend. Alex thoroughly enjoyed teaching and mentoring and was good at both.”

Alex did find time for avocations. For a number of years during the 60’s and 70’s, he sang with the men’s singing group known as the Palmer Squares, and in the latter part of his life sang for several years with the Hopewell Valley Chorus. He also maintained a woodworking shop in his Princeton Hill Apartment, where he turned out wood working with meticulous pride principally for friends and family. As a young man, Alex was a devotee of fly-fishing, especially in the vicinity of his parents summer home located in Delhi, N.Y. Later in life he remained an active member of the local Delaware Fishing Club.

Alex is survived by his son Bruce; his brother J. Courtland (Princeton ’47); his wife Sally (Shoemaker); his sister Nancy and her husband William Becker; 13 nieces and nephews; and a number of grand nieces and nephews. His brother, Stewart (Princeton ’41) and his wife Ruth (McClelland), his sister Anne and her husband William Eddy (Princeton ’42), and his son Alexander predeceased him.

A memorial service is planned for a future date.

———

Memorial Service

Fadlou F. Shehadi

A memorial service for Fadlou Albert Shehadi, 86, will be held at the Princeton University Chapel on March 28th at 3 p.m.