Sharing Memories of Summers at Nassau Swim Club, a Special Place Post

To the Editor:

it is difficult to put in words the emotions I feel as Nassau Swim Club (NSC) is shut down by Princeton University. From age 7 to 17 (1975-85) the NSC community was my summer family. It sounds like the community support has not allowed this hallowed institution to continue. Shame on Princeton University for not supporting this place that was a summer home of so many of their staff and families over past 60+ years. There are some things that are more important than money and this is one of them.

I remember waiting anxiously for summer to start every year to see and catch up with everyone. One of my best summer friends was Marc Nystrom, who was the son of longtime coach Bruce Nystrom. They lived in Richmond, Va., and came up every summer and lived in Institute for Advanced Study housing. My older sister and I would literally ride our bikes 10 miles every day early in the morning to start the day with running laps, swim practice, then diving practice for me, maybe a hotdog and chips from Wawa, and back to the pool for games. more

Nassau Swim Club Faces April 23 End; Resistance Continues Post

By Donald Gilpin

With the April 23 lease termination date set and Princeton University having rejected a number of appeals, it is not clear what possibilities might remain for the future of the Nassau Swim Club (NSC) — but a sizable band of devoted, outspoken NSC supporters is not giving up hope.

“It’s not over until it’s over,” reads the headline on the NSC website. “Princeton University said no, but we still have one week left.”

The University responded on Monday, April 8 to a Town Topics inquiry as to whether there had been any reconsideration of the decision “in the light of further community support voiced for NSC, a popular online petition against the termination, and additional appeals for a delay and reconsideration of the termination.” more

University Should Make a Compromise, Give Nassau Swim Club Another Chance Post

To the Editor:

I am writing to you to express my concern that Princeton University terminated the lease on Nassau Swim Club (NSC) after 50+ years. At the Princeton University annual meeting with the town Council, President Eisgruber made it abundantly clear that mental health is a topic that needs to be addressed by stating the need to “combat loneliness” and to “make deeper connections.”  more

PU Should Do the Right Thing and Open Nassau Swim Club This Summer Post

To the Editor:

I was dismayed to read last week that Princeton University intends to shut down the Nassau Swim Club (NSC), despite not having any use for that land and despite it being against their own financial interest to do so.

I don’t have any connection with either institution, but the move makes no sense and strikes me as arbitrary and mean-spirited. more

Princeton University Should Reconsider Its Decision to Close Nassau Swim Club Post

To the Editor:

I am writing to express my deep concern regarding Princeton University’s recent decision to close Nassau Swim Club. As a member of the community who has cherished Nassau Swim Club for years, I cannot help but feel disheartened by what seems to be a disregard for the needs of the local families and children.

Nassau Swim Club holds a special place in the hearts of many as a beloved pool that has served as a valuable learning ground for numerous children in our community. It is a hidden gem, exuding the charm of old Princeton that is slowly fading in today’s ever-changing world. For many of us, Nassau has been a refuge where we could cling to the traditions of the past. more

Nassau Swim Club is a Valuable Town Asset That Should Be Saved Post

To the Editor:
I am saddened to write that Princeton will be losing a resource that contributed greatly to the character and vibrancy of the town with the closure of the Nassau Swim Club (NSC).

NSC is humble in comparison to Community Park Pool, but it checked all my boxes by offering a peaceful setting in the woods, a rare place to swim in the shade and sun, and a friendly community. It offered young and inexperienced swimmers the opportunity to join a welcoming and spirited swim/dive team. And its full day aquatics program gave kids the freedom to play with new friends and with minimal adult interference. A safe local gathering spot where kids can be kids and play freely outside all day is rare these days. NSC was a true hidden gem. I deeply regret that my family and I were only able to enjoy the pool as members for just one year. more

Nassau Swim Club Aquatics Program Has Benefited Community for Years Post

To the Editor:

I want to thank everyone who has written in support of the Nassau Swim Club. I have been a member of Nassau for almost four decades, and my children and grandchildren (and some of their cousins) have spent many magical summers there.

I am writing to mention another service to the community that Nassau has been offering for years at a very affordable cost. Designed for children of working parents, a full day aquatics program runs daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is open to children age 6 to 12. In the morning, children who are able to swim a full lane join the swim team practices, while the others receive swim lessons until ready to join.  more

Nassau Swim Club Serves as Haven Where Children Can Be Themselves Post

To the Editor:

As I sit with Princeton University’s decision to terminate Nassau Swim Club’s lease, I find myself overwhelmed with feelings of grief knowing that the magic of Nassau is being killed. A core part of Nassau Swim Club has always been its swim and dive teams. Since the 1960s, Nassau has given children the opportunity to explore themselves through its low pressure competitive teams through participation in the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) league.  more

Princeton University Should Rethink Decision to Close Nassau Swim Club Post

To the Editor:

Shame on Princeton University. For more than 50 years, Nassau Swim Club has provided Princeton-area residents, Institute for Advanced Study faculty and staff and the University community with a diverse, peaceful, sylvan escape from the heat and hustle and bustle of a New Jersey summer. Nassau, too, provides local kids, exercise, activity, and community engagement unparalleled in today’s screen-centric culture.

In October the University informed the Nassau Swim Club Board of Directors that Princeton would terminate the club’s lease in April 2024. The University, which owns the land on which the pool sits cited the pool’s failure to pay taxes owed as the reason for the closure. more

Nassau Swim Club is Essential Part of PU’s Value, Goodwill Toward Wider Community Post

To the Editor:

Last week, one month after you published the devastating news “Nassau Swim Club Lease Terminated,” I was again dismayed to hear from those fighting to save this community pool that Princeton University had again refused to grant them the three-year extension for which they have pleaded for months, to give them a more reasonable amount of time in which to organize “members who expressed willingness to support the club with a range of volunteer tasks as well as financial contributions; plans for a capital fundraising campaign among current members and NSC alumni; optimistic plans for a strengthened 2024 budget; extensive plans for increasing membership in the University and IAS communities and in the larger Princeton area; and innovative programs for children” [February 21, page 1]. more

Responding to University’s Decision To Terminate Nassau Swim Club Lease Post

To the Editor:

Last week Princeton University told the Nassau Swim Club (NSC) that its lease for the property where the pool is located would not be reconsidered, and would be terminated, in April. Nassau Swim Club is a valuable, much-loved, and important asset for the Princeton community.

Earlier this month Nassau Swim Club’s Board of Directors presented a well-considered five-year business plan to Princeton University administrators to address the NSC’s financial challenges. The board laid out its plan to re-establish its commercial viability, including facility repairs, revenue growth, and fundraising, while maintaining its very successful swim and dive teams, swim lessons, and daily aquatic programs. more

Nassau Swim Club Lease Terminated Post

SUMMER DAYS AT NASSAU SWIM CLUB: Princeton University has informed the Nassau Swim Club (NSC) that it will be terminating its lease agreement with the club in April. Unhappy to see the closure of their pool in the woods between the Graduate College and the Institute for Advanced Study, NSC members are continuing to challenge the decision. (Photo courtesy of Nassau Swim Club)

By Donald Gilpin

After more than 50 years of welcoming swimmers to its pool in the woods off Springdale Road, the Nassau Swim Club (NSC) has received notice that Princeton University is terminating its lease as of April 23.

Though faced by the challenges of declining membership and a variety of financial setbacks over the past decade, the NSC remains a much loved Princeton institution, and the current members and their families are not going to go away quietly.

“Tell Princeton University that Nassau Swim Club is Worth Saving!” reads a change.org petition, posted by the NSC board, that by the morning of February 20 had gained more than 460 signatures in less than a week. “NSC is a beloved summertime tradition for many people and its loss will be felt deeply, in Princeton and beyond,” the petition states, describing NSC as “an important community asset.” more

Nassau Swim Club Lemmings Staying Afloat, Enjoying Another Successful PASDA Campaign Post

IN FORM: Stephen Baytin of the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings displays his freestyle form in a race this summer. In late July, Baytin came up big at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet, taking first in the 12U boys’ 50-yard freestyle, first in 50 breaststroke, and first in 100 individual medley. Baytin’s heroics helped the Lemmings take seventh overall at the meet and second among Division 2 teams. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

While the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) has shrunk in recent years with such powerhouse teams as the Cranbury Catfish and West Windsor Whalers having folded, the plucky band of the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings has stayed afloat despite limited numbers.

With a squad of around 50 swimmers, the Lemmings went 4-2 in PASDA Division 2 dual meet action this summer and ended up taking seventh overall and second among Division 2 teams at the PASDA championship meet in late July. more

Enjoying a Big Summer Despite Having a Small Crew, Nassau Swim Club Took 2nd in PASDA Division 2 Post

YOUNG NASSAU: A group of some of the young stars for the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings are all smiles after competing at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) Mini-Meet earlier this summer at the Community Park Pool. Pictured, from left, are Uma Jain, Isabel Colón, Evelyn Colón, Elizabeth Colón, Liliana Brenner-Witten, Tatiana Yanovsky, Daniel Yanovsky, and Vladimir Yanovsky. That crew played a key role as the Lemmings went 5-1 in Division 2 dual meet action and placed second in Division 2 in the PASDA championship meet at CP in late July. (Photo provided by Rachel Adlai-Gail)

By Bill Alden

While the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings team only had a crew of 40 this summer, it accomplished a lot.

The squad went 5-1 in Division 2 dual meet action in the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) and then went on to place second in Division 2 in the PASDA championship meet in late July.

“It was a really great season for us, the kids really got a confidence boost,” said Nassau co-head coach Rachel Adlai-Gail. “Last year was a little bit hard on them. We still had fun but we did lose all of our meets. It was nice to see us winning something. One of the main things I noticed this summer is how much our kids have improved.”

The Lemmings battled hard at the PASDA championship meet held at the Community Park Pool, piling up 1,319 points to take second in Division 2 with Penn Brook scoring 1,352.50 to win the title.

“I think they definitely get energy from competing,” said Adlai-Gail, a longtime Lemming who is entering her senior season at Bryn Mawr and competes for its swim team. “We have a pretty competitive team, kids who like to win. I think this is an awesome setting for them to thrive. They definitely liked it, they were like, ‘We are competing against all of the teams.’ We said, ‘Yes, every team, but you have got this.’ They competed hard, they enjoyed it.”

Adlai-Gail pointed to a pair of 12-and-under boys, Gabriel Colon and Alex Ahlo, as rising to the occasion at the championship meet. Colon placed second in the 50 freestyle and third in both the 50 backstroke and 50 breaststroke while Ahlo took second in the 50 breast.

“Gabriel and Alex both came in not knowing all of the strokes, swimming was pretty new to them,” said Adlai-Gail. “When they left, both were competitive and placing well at champs.” more

Displaying Quality at PASDA Championships, Nassau Swim Club Features 4 MVPs at Meet Post

BACK IN THE FLOW: Stephen Baytin of the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings shows his backstroke form in a 2017 meet. Last month, Baytin starred at the Princeton-Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet, earning MVP honors for the Division 2 8-and-under boys. Baytin’s heroics helped the Lemmings place third in the Division 2 team standings at the meet. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Although the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings posted a pedestrian 2-2-1 record in Princeton-Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) dual meet competition this summer, Will Kinney was confident that the team would step up at the season-ending league championship meet.

“We saw the quality of our individual swims in our dual meets,” said Lemmings head coach Will Kinney. “We felt pretty good going into champs.”

Nassau displayed its quality at the PASDA championship meet held at the West Windsor Waterworks. Taking third in the Division 2 standings, four of the team’s boy swimmers earned MVP honors. The Lemmings scored 1,394 points in the two-day meet with the Ben Franklin Swim Team piling up 2,339 points to win the Division 2 title. more

Springdale Golf Club Looks to Future, Affiliates With Nassau Swim Club Post

By Anne Levin

There is significant history on the grounds of Springdale Golf Club. Right around the fairway of the fifth hole, George Washington’s troops are said to have camped prior to the historic Battle of Princeton in 1777.

But the current focus at Springdale is on the future — specifically, appealing to a broader base of the community.
Central to that mission is a new agreement with Nassau Swim Club, which is nestled in woods within walking distance of the golf club. more

Nassau Swim Club’s Activities and Programs Continue to Delight Swimmers of All Ages Post

NONNA AND HER “LEMMINGS”: “The Nassau Swim Club has a very attractive environment in the woods. It is very family-oriented, and there are activities all the time.” Chiara Nappi (“Nonna”), treasurer of the Nassau Swim Club, is shown with her granddaughters Nava Brenner-Witten (left) and Liliana Brenner-Witten. Both are swimmers (“lemmings”) at the club.

By Jean Stratton

Nassau Swim Club has been welcoming swimmers of all ages for 50 years. Nestled in the woods near the Institute for Advanced Study, at the tip end of Springdale Road, it is a hidden gem!

“We offer a safe and bucolic environment and constant contact with nature,” says Dr. Chiara Nappi, treasurer of the club. “In addition to the swimming, we have nature walks to the Institute and the Princeton Battlefield. We take advantage of our proximity to these places.” more

Despite Being Outnumbered at PASDA Meet, Nassau Swim Club Finished Third in Division 2 Post

SO GOOD: Nassau Swim Club’s Sophia Burton shows her breaststroke form in a meet this summer. Burton helped the Lemmings place third in Division 2 at the recently-held Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet. Burton took first in the 12-and-under 100 individual medley and second in both the 50 freestyle and 50 butterfly. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

It would be understandable if the Nassau Swimming Club Lemmings felt like they were in over their heads as they competed in the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet last month.

The Lemmings were vastly outnumbered by many of the clubs on hand for the meet at the Community Park pool at Princeton on July 24 and 25. more

Displaying Quality, Upbeat Competitive Approach, Nassau Swim Club Surges to 2nd in PASDA Meet Post

Becca Adlai-Gail girls 17/U 50 breast

GAIL FORCE: Becca Adlai-Gail displays her breaststroke form in a race this summer for the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings. Last week, Adlai-Gail won the Division 2 girls’ 18-and-under 100-yard individual medley, took second in the 50 freestyle, and third in the 50 butterfly at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet. Her performance helped the Lemmings place second in the Division 2 team standings at the meet. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Liz Noles has fond memories of wiling away summer days with the Lenape Swim Club program. more

Featuring a Blend of Quality and Quantity, Nassau Swim Club Thrived at PASDA Meet Post

WILLPOWER: Nassau Swim Club Lemmings standout Will Kinney displays his breaststroke form. Kinney, who also stars for the Princeton High boys’ swim team, came up big for the Lemmings at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet. He won the boys’ 18-and-under division 50 freestyle and finished second in both the 50 backstroke and 50 breaststroke as Nassau placed second of five teams in the Division 2 standings at the meet.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

WILLPOWER: Nassau Swim Club Lemmings standout Will Kinney displays his breaststroke form. Kinney, who also stars for the Princeton High boys’ swim team, came up big for the Lemmings at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet. He won the boys’ 18-and-under division 50 freestyle and finished second in both the 50 backstroke and 50 breaststroke as Nassau placed second of five teams in the Division 2 standings at the meet. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

For the Nassau Swim Club, a blend of quantity and quality helped it enjoy a big performance at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet.

“We did really well,” said Nassau head coach Morgan Sawin, whose team took second out of five teams in the Division 2 standings at the PASDA meet. more

Buoyed by Strong Efforts From Its Young Swimmers, Nassau Swim Club 2nd in Division 2 at PASDA Meet Post

NO BACKING DOWN: Nassau Swim Club’s Sophia Burton is poised to start a backstroke race in a meet this summer in Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) action. Last week, Burton won the girls’ 10-and-under 25-meter backstroke and took second in the 100 individual medley at the PASDA championship meet to help the Lemmings place second among Division 2 teams at the competition, which was held at West Windsor Community Park.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

NO BACKING DOWN: Nassau Swim Club’s Sophia Burton is poised to start a backstroke race in a meet this summer in Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) action. Last week, Burton won the girls’ 10-and-under 25-meter backstroke and took second in the 100 individual medley at the PASDA championship meet to help the Lemmings place second among Division 2 teams at the competition, which was held at West Windsor Community Park. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Buoyed by a number of superb efforts from its younger swimmers, the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings proved to be a force in Division 2 at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet last week.

The Lemmings scored 1,690 points to take second of five teams in the division, trailing only the Ben Franklin Swim Team, which piled up 2,987.50 to place first.

In the girls’ 6-and-under division, Juliet Wei and Lexi Hoffman came up big for the Lemmings. Wei placed first in the 25-meter freestyle and 25 backstroke while Hoffman placed second in the 25 free and third in the 25 back.

Maggie Hoffman placed third in the 25 free and Charlotte Scaturo took fourth in the 25 breaststroke in the girls’ 8-and-under division. Nassau picked up big points in the age group in the relays, taking first in the 100 free relay and third in the 100 medley relay.

The Lemmings boasted a slew of standouts in the girls’ 10-and-under group. Sophia Burton won the 25 back and took second in the 100 individual medley while Kimi Wei won the 100 IM and placed third in the 25 fly. Emma Hopkins was second in the 25 free, Helen Amon was fourth in the 25 breast, and Nina Urcioli finished fourth in both the 25 free and 25 fly. Not surprisingly, Nassau won both the 100 free and medley relays in the age division. more

After Enjoying Final Season With Nassau Swim Club, Monaghan Primed to Start Stanford Water Polo Career Post

AIMING HIGH: Sophia Monaghan prepares to unload the ball in action for the Tiger Aquatics water polo club team. The Princeton resident and former Lawrenceville School standout has had a busy summer. She coached and starred for the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings, winning two titles at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet in late July. After completing that season, she headed to California where she helped her Tiger Aquatics team take 9th in the gold division at the Junior Olympics. Now she is preparing to start her freshman season with the Stanford University women’s water polo team.

AIMING HIGH: Sophia Monaghan prepares to unload the ball in action for the Tiger Aquatics water polo club team. The Princeton resident and former Lawrenceville School standout has had a busy summer. She coached and starred for the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings, winning two titles at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet in late July. After completing that season, she headed to California where she helped her Tiger Aquatics team take 9th in the gold division at the Junior Olympics. Now she is preparing to start her freshman season with the Stanford University women’s water polo team.

For Sophia Monaghan, coaching was a primary focus of her experience this summer in her 10th and final campaign with the Nassau Swim Club Lemmings.

“I came into this season more as a coach than as a swimmer,” said Monaghan, who guided the 10-and-under swimmers for the Lemmings.

“I had a very good group. I don’t think I had a swimmer who came to practice who didn’t improve or have fun. It is so rewarding to have had the 10-and-under swimmers; it is an age group where they really look up to the older kids. My being able to swim helped. They would come up and say they were going to watch my race. I would support them and then they would cheer me on. It is not professional coaching; it is a community thing.”

Monaghan still had time to earn cheers for swimming, taking first in both the 18-and-under 50 freestyle and 50 backstroke and placing third in the 50 fly at the Princeton Area Swimming and Diving Association (PASDA) championship meet in late July.

“I just wanted to be able to swim fast and do it for fun,” said Monaghan. who graduated from the Lawrenceville School this spring and is headed to Stanford University where she will be a member of the Cardinal women’s water polo team.

“When I was younger, the PASDA meet was a big deal. It definitely made me want to swim. Swimming in a year-round club can be tough; some kids burn out. The sense of community and encouragement that you get at Nassau makes kids want to compete. It helped shape me as an athlete and as a person.”

For Monaghan, that competitiveness manifested itself in water polo as she was a four-year starter for the Lawrenceville team and rose through the Olympic Development Program, playing for the 2012 USA Women’s Water Polo Junior team in the Under-19 Pan American Championship last summer in Montreal, Canada.

After finishing the PASDA meet, Monaghan headed to California to compete with her Tiger Aquatics water polo club team in the Junior Olympics.

“The team has a range of players; water polo is growing on the east coast,” said Monaghan.

“We were 9th in the gold division. We were pretty happy with that. We weren’t happy with some of our close losses. The junior national team is a lot more of an individual focus. The Junior Olympics is a team and club focus. It is more fun. You are playing to win with your team rather than trying to make a team.”

Playing with the national program, though, helped put Monaghan on the path to college water polo.

“It started in my freshman and sophomore year when I started doing Olympic development and got to go out to California,” said Monaghan. “I saw how much I loved the sport and I realized that I could play with the girls out there.”

Monaghan fell in love with Stanford years ago and was thrilled to get recruited by the Pacific 12 power.

“I had wanted to go there as a school since 7th or 8th grade, it was always a dream of mine,” said Monaghan, who was a team captain for Lawrenceville and helped the Big Red go 18-1 last winter on their way to winning the prestigious Beast of the East Tournament.

“They have been ranked No. 1 for water polo. It didn’t always seem realistic. When it got to be a possibility, I realized that I wanted to play at the highest level of water polo. I wanted to give myself the chance to be the best water polo player I can be.”

As Monaghan looks forward to starting her college career next month, she knows she has to raise to the level of her game.

“A big challenge is seeing how I play going from east to west coast; it is a really different game out there,” said Monaghan, a 5’9 center-defender.

“We only have three or four girls that are not from California. I am going into this year looking to learn as much as I can. I don’t know how much playing time I am going to get; we have Olympians and it is a star-studded team. My goal is to get in and play and show some improvement.”

Summer Fun for All Ages, From Tots to Retirees, Is Offered at the Very Special Nassau Swim Club Post

SWIM TIME: These three young swimmers show their form as they get ready to take a dip in the Nassau Swim Club’s six-lane, 25-foot pool. “This is a safe, peaceful environment, where kids can really have a summer just being kids without all the pressure that is so prevalent today,” points out Ansie Monaghan, President of Nassau Swim Club Board of Trustees.

SWIM TIME: These three young swimmers show their form as they get ready to take a dip in the Nassau Swim Club’s six-lane, 25-foot pool. “This is a safe, peaceful environment, where kids can really have a summer just being kids without all the pressure that is so prevalent today,” points out Ansie Monaghan, President of Nassau Swim Club Board of Trustees.

Nestled in the woods near The Institute for Advanced Study is a hidden gem. Located at the tip end of Springdale Road, Nassau Swim Club has been welcoming members for nearly 50 years.

“We are a small safe family community,” reports Anne Merrick Mavis, board member and director of marketing. “Families return year after year for the friendly atmosphere, great swimming, and good company. My kids, now 15 and 13, love it. This is a place that they look forward to. They spend all day here. It’s their summer home.”

A private, cooperative, board-run organization, Nassau Swim Club offers 200 memberships to families and individuals. Its community atmosphere is enhanced by members taking part in the club’s operation. As Ms. Mavis notes, “Members take on two responsibilities when they join. For example, mowing the lawn, getting the pool ready, or helping with barbecues, picnics, etc.”

The club has several social events throughout the season, including its Memorial Day opening, the Fourth of July, Labor Day, and various other occasions, including a silent auction fund-raiser for the pool.

Princeton and Beyond

“We have a ‘Night Under the Stars’ with a special dinner, also a Texas Barbecue and a Movie Night, when we set up a big projector outside,” reports Ansie Monaghan, president of the board.

Members include people from Princeton and beyond, she adds. “They are people from all over the area, with different backgrounds, and we might not meet each other if it weren’t for the pool. It’s nice, too, because the kids are often from different schools, so they make new friends, as well as seeing people they already know.”

Adults are pleased that there is always a designated two-lane lap area in the six-lane, 25-foot pool, except for three hours — 8 to 11 a.m — when the swim team practices.

Children of all ages enjoy the opportunities geared to their level. A baby or wading pool is available to kids five and under. Its location beside the main pool is a plus, points out Ms. Mavis. “When my children were small, I could be with the 2-year-old in the little pool, and also keep an eye on my older child in the regular pool.”

In addition, chairs and tables are set up in shady spots surrounding the pool area.

A 13.5-foot diving well is another feature, which is also available for water polo.

Two life guards and one supervisor/life guard are always on duty. They are 15 yeas old or older, and have received life guard-, first aid-, CPR-, and AED- certified.

Small group swimming lessons are free to all ages, including adults.

Focus on Fun

The club’s swim and dive teams are part of the Princeton Area Swim & Dive Association (PASDA) and teams consist of boys and girls six to 18. They compete against teams in the area, and are at all ability levels. Various meets are held, including a championship meet at the end of the season.

The focus is on the enjoyment of swimming and the pleasure of being on the team. As the club statement notes: “At the conclusion of a meet, individual swimmers are ranked and awarded ribbons. The individual swimmers’ combined scores result in a winning team. We have a number of very good swimmers, but the emphasis is on fun and being part of the team. We believe that creating an atmosphere where kids are enjoying the activity keeps them interested. We encourage team members to come to practice daily, but we understand when other summer commitments take priority.”

Team members are required to have completed the deep end test and have a desire to have fun, continues the statement. “No previous experience is needed to join the team. Parents of participants are asked to volunteer to work at three of the meets, either home or away, and to bring a baked good for the home meet. You will also be asked to work one event at the championship.”

Regulations for the dive team are similar to those for the swim team.

General pool regulations require that children under 12 be accompanied by an adult (except for team members). Those over 12 may be unaccompanied, if they have passed the deep end test, and have signed parental permission.

Children often go on to become life guards as they grow up, says Ms. Mavis. “My son Andrew, who has come to the pool since he was four, will be a life guard this summer.”

Unique Atmosphere

Supervisor David Adlai-Gail, 19, has been with Nassau Swim Club since his very earliest days, and has a singular history. He came as a baby, began swimming at two, but as he reports, he actually came before he was born. “My mom came to the pool when she was expecting me!”

Nassau Swim Club provides a unique atmosphere that results in long-standing memberships, points out Ms. Monaghnan.

“It’s such a special place. You can always count on it here. It will always be the same relaxed, tranquil environment, as well as a place to make new friends. We want to keep it this way and have it continue to be this special place where we are able to offer the joy of swimming and an atmosphere of simplicity. And, it is a joy to be part of an organization that teaches children the love of water.”

Ms. Mavis agrees, adding: “We really are set apart by the simplicity, the wonderful setting with the natural shade, and the cooperation among the members. What a privilege to be part of such a special place.”

Family and individual memberships are available at reasonable costs, including discounts for those over 55, students, and those from nearby Princeton University, The Institute for Advanced Study, and Princeton Theological Seminary. There is also a generous guest pass policy.

Members may bring their own snacks or lunch; a refreshment concession is operated by students on an intermittent basis.

The pool is open from Memorial Day through the second week in September from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. (609) 436-0797. Website: www.nassauswimclub.org.

 

Former Resident Notes That There Is No Other Swim Cub Like Nassau Post

To the Editor:

How does one sum up a childhood of summer memories? Where does one form lifelong friendships well into old age? Where are life lessons experienced along with swim lessons, getting along and developing into one large family?

Why does one need DEI training when you’ve grown up at Nassau Swim Club?

Residing in Richmond, Va., as a parent of three children, I went in search of a “Nassau Swim Club” in the area for my children. Surely there was a small, family oriented pool offering swim lessons, a swim team, and the family atmosphere and camaraderie I experienced growing up at Nassau. Two years later, having joined our local club, I came to the realization that Nassau was itself its own entity.  more

Nassau is Valuable Club That All Families Should Have Opportunity to Experience Post

To the Editor:

I am shocked and surprised that Princeton University doesn›t see the value of Nassau Swim Club. The club was my home away from home every summer growing up. My siblings and I lived there and swam all day. We learned valuable lifelong skills and I still use them today. Nassau taught me how to swim (a lifesaving skill); how to socialize with peers, coaches, and parents (a skill that is slowly being lost today); responsibility; organization; and it brought joy.  more