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Democrats' Backroom Dealing Decried in Lead-Up to Primary Election in June

KAREN SISTI
Spruce Street

Township Seen as Violating Its Own Ordinance Covering Residential Lots

SUSAN B. LOEW
Overbrook Drive

Front Page Editorial of 60 Years Ago Commended for Memories It Evoked

JANET STERN
Monroe Lane

Another Eyesore Spotted in Borough: Traffic Light Arm at Monument Park

THOMAS H. PYLE
Balsam Lane


Democrats' Backroom Dealing Decried in Lead-Up to Primary Election in June

To the Editor:

I am appalled, yet not surprised, by the backroom secret negotiations that have taken place in the last few weeks at the Township Committee. The fact that Bill Hearon would withdraw his resignation when someone other than Scott Carver was to replace him is shameful. After Chad Goerner had received the majority of votes over Scott Carver from the Township Democratic Committee, Mr. Carver withdrew his name in a fit of sour grapes. When Mr. Hearon was faced with having Mr. Goerner replace him he rescinded his resignation. The fact that the process can be thwarted by two people is a sad fact of the Democratic party in Princeton.

Look for more maneuvering and secret deals in the months leading up to the next election. All the while the same people (Mr. Carver and Mr. Hearon) will talk about wanting a more "open process." It is doubtful that there will be any new names on the Democratic ticket.Thanks, Bill and Scott; by following your own selfish agendas you make all Democrats look bad.

KAREN SISTI
Spruce Street

Township Seen as Violating Its Own Ordinance Covering Residential Lots

To The Editor:

From the do as I say, not as I do column, comes this, from the Spring 2006 Princeton Township Newsletter, page 3, "Zoning Department Updates:"

"The Township found (through numerous studies) that flooding, erosion, and water pollution occurs in the township due to excessive storm water run-off from construction of impervious surfaces such as roofs, driveways, parking areas, patios, and walkways. Because this has become an issue of great concern, the Township enacted an Impervious Coverage Limitation Ordinance, a zoning bulk requirement, which limits the amount of impervious coverage one can have on a residential building lot."

Now fast forward to Township Committee meetings as recent as March 27, wherein an impervious cover of some length (a sidewalk, where none presently exists) is being foisted on Overbrook Drive residential building lots in the guise of improved drainage and roadwork.

Are we speaking the same language?

SUSAN B. LOEW
Overbrook Drive

Front Page Editorial of 60 Years Ago Commended for Memories It Evoked

To the Editor:

Thank you for reproducing in the March 29 issue the front page of the first Town Topics, printed exactly 60 years ago. The editorial solemnly welcomed back the men and women of Princeton who served in World War II and observed their reentry into all facets of life in their town, "making places for themselves in the peacetime sun."

I was struck by the graceful tone of the writing — heartfelt yet direct, elegant yet restrained. In three succinct and poignant paragraphs, the editorial embraced those who stayed, those who left, and those who returned, and addressed them as members of one purposeful community.

This eloquent piece reminded me why journalists were once revered.

JANET STERN
Monroe Lane

Another Eyesore Spotted in Borough: Traffic Light Arm at Monument Park

To the Editor:

Has anyone else noticed the eyesore recently erected in Monument Park in front of Borough Hall — our quaint Town Square, our emerging outdoor statue museum, our midtown cherry blossom grove?

NJDOT trucks rolled up the other day, and the hardhat boys installed a utilitarian traffic light extension arm at the intersection of Nassau Street and Bayard Lane. Like a thumb in the eye, they stuck (ouch!) yet another traffic light into dramatic promenade vista showcasing the Battle of Princeton Monument by Frederick MacMonnies. Smack in the middle of the elegant sight line from Nassau Street now hangs "Delayed Green." Considering its ugly consequence for our village green, it might as well read, "Diminished Green."

Sure, Route 206 is a state road. Sure, traffic regulation is a problem. But enough already. Where were Princeton's Historical Preservation Commission or Zoning Board in this process?

THOMAS H. PYLE
Balsam Lane

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