June 12, 2019

Lucienne Pucciarelli Tullo

Lucienne Pucciarelli Tullo, 93, of Princeton, NJ, passed away on Sunday June 2nd.

Lucienne, “Lulu,” was born on February 18th, 1926 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada to Emile Gariepy and Margaret Cassidy. She is survived by her loving son William Tullo, daughter-in-law Shari, and grandsons Matthew and Michael. Twice widowed, Lucienne was preceded in death by William Tullo and Joseph Pucciarelli. Lucienne was also preceded in death by her four siblings Emile, Emilenne, Therese, and Marcel.

Lulu worked as a nurse’s aide until her retirement in 1993. She loved cooking and playing with her grandchildren. She will be greatly missed by her family and friends. Her family will hold private services and requests that, in lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to The Eden Institute, Serving Children and Adults with Autism, 2 Merwick Road, Princeton NJ 08540.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Keith R. Koleno

Keith R. Koleno, 59, of Princeton, passed away on June 7, 2019 at University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro.

He was born in Perth Amboy, raised in Hopelawn, and has resided in Princeton for the last 30 years.
Keith attended Rutgers University and The Chubb Institute for computer programming. He was employed as an administrative supervisor in the computer division with the New Jersey State Judiciary Department for the last 10 years.

Keith was an avid reader and board game collector. He enjoyed challenging board games with family and friends.
He was predeceased by his parents, Joseph and Anita Koleno.

Surviving are his sisters, Paula Blaze and her husband Stephen of Branchburg, Karen of Hopelawn, and his nieces, Christine and Lauren.

Memorial visitation will be held on June 15, 2019, from 1-3 p.m. at Flynn and Son Funeral Home, 23 Ford Avenue, Fords with a service at 2:30 p.m.

A private cremation was held.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society.
For directions or to send condolence messages, visit www.flynnfuneral.com.

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Dorothy Ruth McCusker

Ruth died June 6, 2019 in Princeton, NJ, aged 94. She was born in Bellaire, OH, to Rev. Boyd McCleary of Amsterdam, NY, and Mabel Kyle of Dunedin, New Zealand.

She spent her summers at Green Lake, NY, and dearly loved the hills and lakes of the area. She attended schools in Bellaire, OH, and Oneonta, NY, and took college classes at Beaver College before graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in Education with a specialty in Occupational Therapy. There she met her husband, Joseph Henry McCusker, who predeceased her in 1994.

Her children have fond memories of her picking berries, watching birds, and pouring over books and maps of the history of the Boston area, where she lived for eight years.

Ruth moved to Princeton in 1960 and later entered the workforce at Peterson’s Guides. Her interests in homes soon led her to work for the Princeton Township Engineering Department. She volunteered at the League of Women Voters and at the Princeton Hospital “Fete” where she developed lasting friendships. Her friends treasured Ruth for her wonderful sense of the absurd.

She is survived by her son William McCusker of Sioux Falls, SD; her daughters Kathleen Conard of Gresham, OR, and Nancy McCusker of San Mateo, CA; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Princeton Senior Resource Center, 179 Spruce Circle, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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Dr. Thomas Allen Buzard
1932-2019

Thomas Allen Buzard, MD, FACS of Princeton, NJ, passed away peacefully at the age of 86, on Saturday, June 8, 2019.

Tom was born in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 1, 1932 and was a native of Brookline, City of Pittsburgh. He graduated from Dormont High School in 1950. He enrolled at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, PA, telling his father that he wanted to attend college there upon first sight, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1954. He was a member of the Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity. In 2004, he received his alma mater’s highest honor — The Service to Humanity Award.

Tom wanted to be a doctor at any early age, so he could care for others. He graduated from the Temple University School of Medicine in 1958, completed his internship at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center in Johnstown, PA, in 1959, and completed his residency in General Surgery at Temple University Medical Center in 1963.

While a Resident at Temple, he met Betty Powers, a Temple nursing student. They were married in March of 1963, and resided in Green Tree, PA, briefly prior to Tom accepting an opportunity to be on the staff at Helene Fuld Hospital in Trenton, NJ, now the Capital Health Regional Medical Center.

Dr. Buzard shared his professional talents with dignity and humility throughout his career. In addition to running his private surgical practice, he served as both Vice President and President of the Medical Staff over a four-year period, was Vice Chairman and Chairman of the Surgery Department for three terms each, was Chief of Surgery for three terms, was the founding Director of Trauma Surgery which he served for five years, and was Chairman and member of multiple Board Committees. As the inaugural Director of Trauma Surgery, Dr. Buzard took great pride in helping to build the hospital system’s first Trauma Program, which is flourishing today.

Tom was a nurturing, always-providing husband, father, and grandfather. A resident of Princeton since 1968, he was a lifelong fan of the Pittsburgh Steelers and Pirates. He was a member of the Springdale Golf Club, and was a faithful member of Nassau Presbyterian Church for 48 years where he served on the Session and was Chair of the Finance Committee. Tom savored travel and enjoyed annual summer visits to his beloved Stone Harbor, NJ, with his family.
His greatest joy was his family with whom he shared many happy memories together. Dr. Buzard is survived by his loving wife of 56 years, Betty Powers Buzard; his three children, Thomas Buzard Jr. and wife Arlene of Franklin Park, PA; Lisa Vande Yacht and husband Troy of Milwaukee, WI; and Robert Buzard and wife Karen of Newport, RI; and seven grandchildren, Audrey, Elaine, and Mark Buzard; Mason and Connor Vande Yacht; and Thomas John (T.J.) and William Buzard.

A Memorial Visitation will be held at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ, on Thursday, June 20th from 6–8 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ, on Friday, June 21st at 11 a.m. with a reception at 12 p.m. All are welcome.

Many heartfelt thanks to the physicians, administrative leaders, and staff at Capital Health Regional Medical Center for their wonderful loving care and support.

In lieu of flowers, donations are appreciated to Capital Health System (www.capitalhealth.org/donate) and/or Arm in Arm, who help feed, shelter, and employ people of Trenton, NJ (www.arminarm.org).

June 5, 2019

Kam Williams

Prolific Film and Literary Critic Dies

Over the past two decades, film and literary critic Kam Williams published nearly ten thousand articles and reviews.
Throughout his nearly 22-year career as a writer, he was most known for his film reviews and celebrity interviews for websites such as RottenTomatoes.com and over 100 publications around the world, ranging from local papers like Princeton, NJ’s Town Topics to international news chain Metro.

A prolific journalist, he also wrote countless book reviews, editorials, and a novel that will be published posthumously later this year.

Mr. Williams, who was a resident of Princeton, NJ, died Thursday, May 30 from prostate cancer. He was 66 years old.
Born Lloyd Joseph Williams in New York City and raised in St. Albans, Queens, Mr. Williams was commonly referred to as “Kam,” a nickname short for “Kamau,” a name given to him while he was a student at Brown University, by famed Jazz musician Sun Ra.

Mr. Williams’ path to a career in writing was circuitous. He was a graduate of Brooklyn Tech High School in New York City and earned his Bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in Black Literature in 1974. While receiving his Master’s in English from Brown University in 1975, he first attempted a career in screenwriting at Chicago’s WTTW, a PBS affiliate TV station.

However, Mr. Williams had a diverse set of interests and diverted his attention from writing for business and entertainment law, receiving his J.D. from Boston University in 1978 (along with Bar membership in MA, PA, CT, NY, and NJ) followed by an M.B.A. from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1980.

Mr. Williams’ first wife, the late Kristina Barbara Johnson (who had previously been married to sculptor J. Seward Johnson II, the grandson of Johnson & Johnson Co-Founder Robert Wood Johnson I), introduced him to art dealing and the antique business in which he subsequently deployed his corporate and legal knowledge for over a decade.

Mr. Williams had a colorful personality and a commanding presence, according to friends and family. He was a tall African American man with freckles and wore his bright-red hair in a large Afro hairstyle that was immediately noticeable in a crowd.

His diverse life experiences and base of knowledge (he was a polymath who read a book a week) made him a compelling conversationalist and led to a brief but recurring guest appearance on the radio show, The Howard Stern Show.

It was that experience that later sparked his career in journalism when a family friend and writer at the Princeton Packet, a local newspaper in his hometown Princeton, NJ, recommended that Mr. Williams write a film review of Howard Stern’s 1997 biographical film Private Parts.

Mr. Williams’ intense work ethic and glowing journalistic reputation led to extensive work interviewing celebrities associated with upcoming film and book releases, including Quentin Tarantino, Denzel Washington, Mel Brooks, Russell Simmons, LeBron James, and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, among many others.

Mr. Williams was also a staunch supporter of civil rights-related causes, publishing countless Op-Eds on the topic and later joined the NAACP Image Awards Nominating Committee.

Outside of his writing career, he had a deep passion for music and boasted a large collection of albums. He enjoyed long daily walks in nature, was an avid sports fan, and a passionate Little League baseball coach. He was also an enthusiastic participant in weekly trivia nights with a large group of friends at a local bar in Princeton, NJ.

He is survived by many friends, four siblings (Lawrence, Daryl, Teresa, and Rod), and his second wife of 25 years, Susan, and stepson, Nicholas.

A memorial service will be held at the Princeton Garden Theatre on June 29.

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Thomas B. Hagadorn Sr.

Thomas B. Hagadorn Sr., 60, of Princeton passed away on Saturday, June 1, 2019 at his home in Seaside Park.

Thomas was born and raised in Princeton. He graduated from Princeton High School in 1977. He served with Princeton Engine Company No. 1 for many years, serving as their Chief In 1985. After joining on with Clean Harbors Environmental Services in 1988, he moved his family to Maine where they lived for 12 years. Clean Harbors brought him back to New Jersey where he became Director of Health and Safety and eventually Vice President of Health and Safety. He and his team took part in the clean-up of some major disasters including 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and Deepwater Horizon, just to mention a few.

Preceded in death by his parents James Randall and Florence (Swinnerton) Hagadorn, and his brothers Richard and Christopher Hagadorn; he is survived by his son Thomas B. Hagadorn Jr; his daughter Melissa Hagadorn and her husband Devin Feder; his grandchildren Trenton and Hudson Feder; his former wife of 28 years Nancy Hagadorn; his partner of the past seven years Holly Byrne; his brothers Randall and Jeffrey Hagadorn; his sister Suzan Sanders; and many nieces and nephews.

Visitation will be on Friday, June 7, 2019 from 1-3 and 6-8:30 p.m. followed by a funeral service at 8:30 p.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Ave., Princeton, NJ 08542.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org.

May 29, 2019

Mac Glenn Morris

Mac Glenn Morris, 97, passed away peacefully on Memorial Day, Monday, May 27, 2019 in Princeton, NJ. He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of nearly 73 years, Janelle Connevey Morris; his son Robert Steven Morris of Cleveland, OH; his daughter Janelle Morris Thibau and son-in-law Eric Thibau of Potomac, MD; his son-in-law Edward Michael Harris of Perkasie, PA; and his son John Logan Morris and daughter-in-law Susan Teare Morris of Princeton, NJ.  He is also survived by 13 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren, along with many loving nieces and nephews.  He was preceded in death by his beloved daughter Patricia Morris Harris of Perkasie, PA, who passed away May 17, 2019. 

Mac was born January 24, 1922 in Bessemer City, NC, to Erin C. Morris and Manley T. Morris, a station agent for the Southern Railway. He grew up in Gastonia, NC. At age 16 he went to Davidson College in Davidson, NC, where his two older brothers had also attended. Upon graduation in 1942, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served throughout World War II as a bomber pilot in the Pacific, providing close air support to allied troops in the Philippines. He earned the rank of First Lieutenant and was decorated for his service with seven Air Medals and two Distinguished Flying Crosses.

Mac met his wife Janelle while assigned to Chase Field Naval Air Station in Beeville, TX, after the war ended. Their wedding on July 27, 1946 marked the beginning of a love story that grew to encompass not only family but a community of friends and colleagues that spanned the country and the globe. Mac enjoyed the partnership of Janelle throughout his career, often crediting her with all of his success, starting in advertising sales in Birmingham, AL, with Progressive Farmer, moving to This Week Magazine in New York, NY, then as head of Newspaper One, and finally as Vice President and national sales leader at Newspaper Advertising Bureau for the top brands in the U.S. During his long career, Mac developed close friendships with editors and publishers of the major U.S. city newspapers and newspaper chains, and had an unique foresight in recognizing industry changes for the future.

Mac and Janelle moved to Princeton, NJ, in 1947, to the Stanworth Apartments on Bayard Lane, which were welcoming veterans.  Mac commuted to New York by train and made many friends on the daily commute. Mac and Janelle purchased Clearbrook Farm on Herrontown Road, Princeton in April 1962. It became the hub of activity for the Morris family and their friends, hosting the Annuals, Thanksgiving and Christmas gatherings, church picnics, weddings, and many musical evenings. Countless family members and friends remember gatherings at the “farm,” with Texas barbecues, spotlight tag, sing-alongs around the piano, and ball games.

Throughout his life, Mac was the family station wagon “pilot” for annual drives out West with Janelle, developing a community of treasured friends within the Navajo, Zuni, Santo Domingo, Hopi, and other Native American communities whose beautiful jewelry they so admired and loved to share. The family has wonderful memories of many road trips around the country seeing friends and singing and laughing all the way.

Mac will be remembered by all those who loved him as a kind, generous, and loving soul, a loyal friend, an inspiration and mentor, a patriot and a faithful servant. He served many years as an active elder of the First Presbyterian Church, then of its successor the Nassau Presbyterian Church, in Princeton, NJ.  He was on the board of the Princeton Bank, and a longtime member of the Nassau Club, Springdale Golf Club, and the Princeton Investor Group.

Services will be held Monday, June 10th, 2019 at 2 p.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton, NJ.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made in his name to Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina, or Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton, NJ.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Stephen L. McDonald

Stephen L. McDonald, 56, of Lawrenceville, NJ, passed away suddenly on May 13, 2019. He was born July 21, 1962 in Princeton, NJ.

He grew up in Princeton, attended St. Paul’s School, and graduated from Princeton High School where he developed many lifelong friendships. He excelled on the lacrosse field for the Little Tigers and loved the camaraderie that the sport provided on and off the field. Stephen attended Franklin Pierce College in Rindge, NH, and settled in the Boston area. He lived in Marblehead, MA, for many years, fishing and lobstering the waters and working in construction. He returned home to the Princeton area in 1996 to be closer to his family and to spend more time with his nieces and nephews.

Affectionately known as Mackey, Stephen brightened every room he entered. He always had a smile on his face and “never had a bad day.” His generous spirit, loving nature, fierce loyalty, and wicked sense of humor truly defined his character. Above all, he cherished his family. Anyone who knew Stephen was well aware that his days living in the Boston area cultivated one of the most loyal Boston sports fans. He loved the Red Sox, Celtics, Bruins, and especially his New England Patriots.

Stephen worked for Airgroup-Philadelphia in Allentown, NJ, in logistics for the last 25 years. Every weekend and many mornings before work he could be found on the golf course at The Lawrenceville School trying to perfect his game. He took great pride in his Irish heritage and was a long-standing member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in Hamilton, NJ. He spent his summer holidays in Carlow, Ireland, where most of his extended family lives. He thoroughly enjoyed those summers playing golf on most days and reveled in the craic and banter that was sure to follow at the nearby pub. The locals anticipated his annual visit and affectionately nicknamed him “The Yank.” Stephen’s love of his nieces and nephews was clear and undeniable. He devoted his time to teaching, nurturing, and loving them like his own children. He was always on the sidelines cheering them on and was so proud of all of their accomplishments. His presence in their lives will be sorely missed but will endure for years to come.

Son of the late Christopher McDonald, he is survived by his mother Julia McDonald of Lawrenceville, brother Christopher McDonald and his wife Kari of North Brunswick, sister Sheila Brush and her husband Jonathan of Lawrenceville, nephew Michael McDonald (Rachel) of Washington DC, niece Hayley McDonald of North Brunswick, nephews Patrick and Keelan Brush and niece Teagan Brush all of Lawrenceville. Stephen leaves behind countless special friends, aunts, uncles, cousins, and his entire extended family in Ireland. He loved each and every one of them dearly.

The service will be held on June 1, 2019 at St. Ann’s Church, 1253 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, NJ. Friends will be received from 9 to 10 a.m. at the church with the Memorial Mass immediately following at 10 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Stephen’s name to ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

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Robert Burchill Stewart

Robert Burchill Stewart, age 86, of Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, passed away peacefully on Friday, May 17th, after nine months fighting brain cancer. He was an artist, outdoorsman, and a proud father of four girls but above all a gentleman with a sense of humor and dogged work ethic.

Born in Sewickley, PA, in 1932, Bob grew up with mother, Eileen Burchill and father, John Alexander Stewart and his two siblings: his older brother, John and his younger sister Eileen. When he was 12 years old his family moved to Terhune Road in Princeton, NJ, where Bob managed Robeson’s livery stable renting out horses and wagons for recreation. He went to Princeton High School and met his wife, Carol Theresa Scasserra of Kingston, NJ, and afterward attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Art where he learned graphic design and taught painting and drawing.

Bob served in the U.S. Navy for eight years and piloted a landing craft for troops in the Korean War.

Once Bob and Carol got married they moved to New York City where he worked in various advertising agencies, J. Walter Thompson, BBD&O, and Warren Pfaff Inc. where he was creative art director and senior vice president for prestigious clients such as Pan American Airlines, Rolls Royce, the Metropolitan Opera, and Macanudo Cigars.

When Bob and Carol started a family, they settled back in New Jersey in Kendall Park, then Princeton, then the small town of Hopewell. The historic John Hart Farm on Hart Avenue was home for the growing Stewart family for 35 years. It was a labor of love for Bob and he took great pride in restoring the homestead.

Bob and Carol retired to Kennett Square, PA.

He was an avid sportsman and belonged to both Black Rock Gun Club and Nassau Gun Club. He traveled all over the world to hunt and fish from the boundary waters of Minnesota to the grasslands of Africa. The best fishing of course was at dusk off the dock on the north end of Kezar Lake in Lovell, ME.

He is survived by his wife Carol; his daughters Karen, Celia, Alison, and Emily; his grandchildren Ben, Bobby, Sam, Jackson, Henry, Maggie, Sophie, Emily, Miles, and Margot; and great-grandchildren Birchal and Bethani.

Burial was on Saturday, May 25, 2019 at the Highland Cemetery, 95 Hopewell-Wertsville Road, Hopewell, NJ.

In lieu of flowers, a donation in Robert Burchill Stewart’s name may be made to the American Cancer Society, 1626 Locust Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103.

To view his online tribute and to share a memory with his family, please visit www.kuzoandfoulkfh.com.

May 22, 2019

Richard Erskine Downs
Julie Marie Amelie Henriette Downs

Richard and Julie Downs of Durham, NH, and more recently of Skillman, NJ, each passed away peacefully within 48 hours of one another after extraordinary lives and 70 years of marriage together. Richard, born on December 2, 1920, died at age 98 on May 14, 2019, at the Princeton Medical Center and Julie, born on December 1, 1926, died at age 92 on May 16, 2019, at the Stonebridge at Montgomery retirement community in Skillman.

Richard was born in Cambridge, MA, and grew up in North Andover, MA, attending Phillips Academy (grad. 1938) and Harvard (grad. 1942). He witnessed the Great Depression as a child and following graduation from Harvard served in the U.S. Navy during World War II (learning Japanese to assist in the interception of military intelligence), rising to the rank of Lieutenant. He went on to study in Geneva and Paris and ultimately earn a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Leiden (Netherlands) following the war.

Julie van Oldenborgh was born in Semarang, on the Indonesian island of Java, growing up there until moving back to her family’s native Netherlands as a young teenager in 1939 just in time to suffer through the German occupation of that country during WWII.  She was attending the University of Amsterdam with the plan of following her father into the practice of law when she met Richard, fell in love, and eventually married in April 1949.

Following the birth of their first child in the Netherlands and post-doctoral field work in Malaya, the couple moved across the globe to make their lives in the United States in 1960 and eventually settled in Durham, NH, in 1962. It was there that Richard went on to be a Professor of Anthropology at the University of New Hampshire and Chair of that institution’s Sociology and Anthropology department and, later, the newly formed Department of Anthropology, for many years.  Julie and Richard raised their family (their second child was born in 1964) in Durham before his retirement at age 70 from UNH in 1991. During this time, Richard completed numerous consulting missions, under contract to the U.S. Agency for International Development, in Senegal, Mauritania, Rwanda, Swaziland, and the Republic of the Congo. The couple also took advantage of Richard’s sabbaticals to live in England, The Hague, and the south of France. In 2004, they moved from Durham to Stonebridge, entering in the original group of residents.

Richard was known for his intellectual curiosity, his mastery of several languages, and his dry wit. He had an abiding love of classical music. Julie was warm, vivacious, and full of good humor. She took great pride in being the matriarch of a close-knit Dutch-English-American family that spans four generations and five countries.

Julie is survived by a sister, Marian Plantenga of Rotterdam, Netherlands.  They both are survived by their sons David E. Downs of Hastings-on-Hudson, NY, and Stephen J. Downs of Princeton, NJ; their daughters-in-law Alexis Chapin-Downs and Janet Estes; their grandchildren Ashley and Taylor and Olivia and Theo; and their great-grandchildren Anna and Emory.

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Donald Henry Luecke

Donald Henry Luecke, 85, passed away peacefully Saturday morning, May 11, 2019 at home in Burleson, TX. He had been a resident of Princeton Junction, NJ, for 45 years until his move to Texas in August 2018. He coped courageously with Alzheimer’s disease for the last five years of his life.

Don was born on August 5, 1933 in St. Louis, MO, to Erwin and Helen (Doswald) Luecke. He spent his early years in Forest Hills Gardens, New York. He graduated from Xavier High School in New York City. He received a BA degree cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, IN, and an MBA from Harvard Business School. He felt honored to serve in the U.S. Navy as a Hospital Corpsman and remained in the reserves until 1961.

After spending the early years of his business career in Product Management and Advertising at major corporations, he decided to take a different path and started his own business, Princeton Security Systems, Inc. In his own business he exemplified his vision and belief: “People before Profits” and managed it until he was in his late 70s.

He was a very active member of St. Paul’s Parish in Princeton, NJ, serving as Lector, Eucharistic Minister, and Sunday Collection Counter. He coordinated and taught the Bible Study program at St. Paul’s for 20 years. He lived his life as a devout Catholic in thought and deed and was a beautiful example for all.

Don was a kind and gentle person. He had a quick wit and was quite the punster. He enjoyed collecting stamps, coins, military memorabilia, and building ship models. He had an appreciation of ancient Green and Roman classics and learned to read and translate koine Greek, enabling him to read the Books of the New Testament in their original Greek.

While his education provided a foundation, his pursuit of knowledge was evident throughout his life as he was never more than arm’s length from a book or two or three. His love of animals and compassion for all helpless creatures was evident to those who witnessed his careful removal of spiders or once a bat from the house to the outdoors.

Don is survived by his loving wife of 58 years, Joan (Meister) Luecke; daughters, Charlotte Luecke, of Lumberton, NJ, and Susan Luecke-Schnuck (Perry) of Burleson, TX; and six grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; brother, Erwin Robert (Bob) Luecke; and niece, Jean Ann Kaminsky.

There will be a funeral mass at St. Ann’s Chapel in Burleson, TX, on May 24, 2019 at 10 a.m. Interment will be at DFW National Cemetery in Dallas, TX at 2 p.m.

There will be a memorial mass at St. Paul’s Church in Princeton, NJ, on June 14 at 10 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, you may make a donation in memory of Don to: Community Hospice of Texas, 6100 Western Place, Suite 105, Fort Worth, TX, 76107; Senior Care Services, P.O. Box 1517, Princeton, NJ 08542-1517; Xavier High School, 30 W. 16th St., New York, NY 10011-6302; or St. Paul’s Catholic Church, 216 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 08542.

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Patricia Lane Snyder

Patricia Lane Snyder passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her family on May 6, 2019 at the age of 78.

Patricia is survived by her brother, John Lane and his wife, Elizabeth Lane, of Staunton, VA; her sons, Steven J. Toto and his wife, Nina Rariden Toto, of Newtown, PA and Daniel T. Toto and his wife, Christine Toto, of Pennington, NJ; and her daughter, Cheryl Toto Beal and her husband, David Beal, of Hamilton Square, NJ.

She is predeceased by her parents, Howard R. and Doris A. Lane; her husband, Miles E. Snyder; her sister, Cynthia Avery; and her nephew, Andrew Lane.

Patricia was born in Upper Darby, PA and resided in Princeton, NJ for many years before moving to Hamilton Square. She attended Princeton High School and worked for the State of New Jersey.

She was a loving and devoted grandmother to her seven grandchildren, Christian and Emily Toto, Erica, Amanda and Claudia Toto, and Matthew and Danielle Beal. She was an adoring aunt to Edward Lane, Mary Lane Jackmin, and Brandon and Garrett Avery and shared a special relationship with her niece, Jocelyn Avery Dorgan, her husband, Guy Dorgan, and their children, Avery and Tara Dorgan.

A memorial mass was held on Saturday, May 11, 2019, at 2 p.m. at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ, with interment immediately following at Princeton Cemetery, 29 Greenview Avenue.

Memorial contributions may be made in Patricia’s name to the American Diabetes Association. www.saulfuneralhomes.com.

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Tze-Ning Chen

Tze-Ning Chen departed us on May 14, 2019 at home with his family, in Stamford, Connecticut. Tze-Ning was born November 18, 1929, in Zhejiang, China, the second son of Li-Fu Chen and Lu-Ching Sun. He graduated from National Taiwan University, and was the first of a long pipeline from NTU to conduct his doctoral studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he specialized in combustion engineering. He later joined Ingersoll Rand’s research division in Princeton, NJ, where he enjoyed many years working with a large team of researchers to develop many of the cutting-edge technologies behind small and large industrial machinery, and then later completed his career at Thermo-Electron.

He was a quintessential engineer, constantly pushing the limits of human invention, while also bringing the best out from his colleagues. His accomplishment and ingenuity as an engineer were matched by his commitment to family and home, where he continually fixed, modified, and improved every corner of their house with his handiness and know-how, and demonstrated to his children the importance of creativity, integrity, and patience.

Tze-Ning is survived by his wonderful, loving wife, Joan of 59 years; his children, Bernie and his wife Lisa Ruderman, Chris and his wife Melinda Shockley, and Jeff and his wife Karen Ho; his grandchildren, Jason, Michael, Adam, Mira, Jacob, Ella, and August; his brother John and sister Jenny and her husband Arthur Yu; and countless nieces and nephews who all admired and adored him. Tze-Ning was preceded in death by his brother Jimmy.

Widely appreciated for his wisdom and for his ability to bring people together, he enjoyed a tight-knit, warm, and loving extended family. Tze-Ning was an unbeatable chess strategist, ping pong player, and puzzlebreaker; a passionate gardener; and loved playing tennis with his longtime friends. He traveled the world extensively with his family and friends, and experienced the evolution of nations, cultures, and the American dream many times over. Tze-Ning will be deeply missed by all who knew him and cherished his love and his friendship.

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Patricia Ann Morris Harris

Patricia Ann Morris Harris, 64, passed away peacefully on Friday, May 17, 2019 in Philadelphia, PA, surrounded by her family. She is survived by her loving and devoted husband Edward M. Harris of Perkasie, PA; her daughter Patty Harris Dawson and son-in-law David Dawson of Quakertown, PA; and her son Mac William Harris of New York City, NY. She is also survived by her parents Mac Glenn and Janelle Connevey Morris of Princeton, NJ; her brother Robert Steven Morris of Cleveland, OH; her sister Janelle Morris Thibau and brother-in-law Eric Thibau of Potomac, MD; and her brother John Logan Morris and sister-in-law Susan Teare Morris of Princeton, NJ; along with many loving nieces and nephews.

Patricia, known to her family and friends as Pat, grew up on Clearbrook Farm in Princeton, NJ, and attended the Princeton public schools. She graduated in 1973 from Princeton High School and attended Davidson College in Davidson, NC, matriculating in the first co-ed class. She founded the Davidson Women’s Chorale Group and was lead singer in several campus musicals. She graduated in 1977 with a B.A. in Music.

Patricia was an advertising sales associate at the Norfolk Ledger Star newspaper and worked in a nursing home in Norfolk, VA, before joining the team responsible for the opening of the Princeton Campus of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner, and Smith, Inc. on Scudders Mill Road. She enjoyed a long career at Merrill Lynch, and later Bank of America, in Human Resources where she focused on Manager Training. She later joined the staff of Thompson Toyota in Doylestown, PA, where she made many wonderful friends and colleagues on that exceptional team.

Countless family members, friends, and the community have heard Pat playing piano and guitar and singing over the years with her family. Aside from her career, she was a dedicated wife to Ed and a wonderful mother to Patty and Mackey. A highlight of her life was the recent wedding of her daughter Patty to David Dawson outdoors at a beautiful farm. At that wedding, her son Mackey, a songwriter in his spare time, assembled his friends and launched the “Silo Boys” as a band unmatched in its talent. Pat was proud to be anointed their Number One fan. In addition to her love of family and music, Pat was famous for her baking and canning, and her homemade chocolate chip cookies and coffee cake were relished by all. She loved her collies, musicals, horseback rides, and singing duets with her sister Janie. She loved to drive out West with a car full of cousins on annual family trips. Pat is known to be the fountain of kindness that has fed a very large extended family, and will continue to serve as an inspiration of giving to family, her church, and the community at large. Pat will always be remembered for the music that brought joy to everyone around her, and which will forever be celebrated by those who knew and loved her.

Pat grew up in the Nassau Presbyterian Church of Princeton, NJ, and was a member of the congregation of Deep Run Presbyterian Church of Perkasie, PA. The family wishes to thank the kind and loving staff at The Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia and her doctors and nurses who cared for Pat as if she was one of their own.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made in her name to Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home,
Princeton.

May 15, 2019

Antoinette “Toni” Caruso McGuire

Antoinette “Toni” Caruso McGuire, 97, passed away peacefully at home in Ft. Collins, CO, on Tuesday, April 23, 2019.

Toni was born in Princeton, NJ, in 1921 to Jennie K. and Daniel M. Caruso. Her father emigrated from Italy and became a fine custom tailor in Princeton and was one of the first tenants on Palmer Square. Her mother continued the business after he died in 1951 until her retirement in 1982, at age 91. Not surprisingly, Toni was always smartly dressed.

Together, her parents were leaders in the Italian-American community in Princeton and at St. Paul’s Church. She learned from them the values of faith, family, hard work, civic responsibility, and the importance of a good education.

Toni attended St. Paul’s School, graduated from Princeton High School in 1939, and was the first in her family to earn a college degree, graduating from the New Jersey College for Women (Douglass College), Class of 1943. She was selected for a National Science Foundation graduate summer program at Kent State University in 1966. She later earned a Master’s Degree in Education/Counseling from Trenton State College. She was a member of Phi Delta Kappa, a professional association for educators.

Toni worked for the Gallup Poll conducting interviews. She was the director of one of the first community based correctional programs for young girls in the late 1960s. As a counselor at Mercer County Community College she was instrumental in shaping and guiding young college students’ lives, many of whom were the first in their family to attend college. She later worked as a school social worker in Dunellen, Dutch Neck, and Bordentown, NJ, and in Neshaminy, PA.

Toni lived in Pennington, NJ, for 45 years where she and her husband Gene raised their family. She was an active member of Saint James Church where she was a member of the Guild, helped establish a parish library, served on the scholarship committee, and chaired and/or worked on countless church dinners and events. Living across the street from the Little Church, their home was often a social gathering place after Sunday Mass.

Toni volunteered at the local schools, served on the PTA, and was active in the efforts to regionalize the Hopewell Valley School System. When her son went to join Cub Scouts and there was no more room, she became a Den Mother, providing an opportunity for a half dozen more boys to join Cub Scouts. She was an active supporter and volunteer throughout her sons’ scout experiences and saw them both achieve the rank of Eagle Scout.

Toni and Gene were among the founding members of Penn Brook Swim Club in 1957. She helped her sons become good swimmers and cheered them on as members of the Penn Brook Swim team. She later watched her granddaughters learn to swim there as well. Her family maintained its membership continuously for more than 50 years.

In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her first husband, Eugene “Gene” F. McGuire, in 1982. 

Toni met her second husband, Gordon T. Godly, at a church prayer group in Pennington. She delighted in saying… “What do you think I was praying for?” Toni and Gordon were married in 2004 and since then have lived in Fort Collins, CO, where her son Dan and his family live. She and Gordon spent nearly 20 wonderful years together. He was the tall, distinguished British gentleman and she the zesty Italian. Together they made a wonderful pair.

Her husband Gordon, her two sons, James and his wife Elizabeth, Pennington, NJ, Daniel, Ft. Collins, CO, four granddaughters: Meredith (Forrest), San Francisco; Laurel (David), Littleton, CO; Abbey, Lambertville, NJ; Michelle, Medford, OR; and a great-grandson Charlie, San Francisco survive her. Her husband’s children: Gerda, Titusville, NJ; Martin, Sarasota, FL; Christopher, Rochester, NY; and their respective spouses, children, and grandchildren also survive her.

Toni McGuire lived a long, full, and loving life and set an example for the generations that followed and was the “wind beneath their wings.”

Friends may call at the Blackwell Memorial Home, 21 N. Main St., Pennington on Tuesday, May 21 from 5 to 7 p.m.

A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on May 22, 2019 at 11 a.m. at the St. James Little Church, Eglantine Ave., Pennington, NJ 08534. Burial will be private at the convenience of the family.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests consideration of a contribution to: Dorothea’s House, 120 John Street, Princeton, NJ 08540, dorotheashouse.org which was formed in the early 1900s to serve Princeton’s growing Italian Community; or Womanspace, Inc., 1530 Brunswick Ave., Lawrenceville, NJ 08648, womanspace.org, where her granddaughter works as a counselor.

Arrangements are under the direction of Blackwell’s Funeral Home, Pennington. For condolences, visit our website at blackwellmh.com.

———

Patricia Lane Snyder

Patricia Lane Snyder passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her family on May 6, 2019 at the age of 78.

Patricia is survived by her brother, John Lane, and his wife, Elizabeth Lane, of Staunton, VA; her sons, Steven J. Toto and his wife, Nina Rariden Toto, of Newtown, PA, and Daniel T. Toto and his wife, Christine Toto, of Pennington, NJ; and her daughter, Cheryl Toto Beal and her husband, David Beal, of Hamilton Square, NJ.

She is predeceased by her parents, Howard R. and Doris A. Lane; her husband, Miles E. Snyder; her sister, Cynthia Avery; and her nephew, Andrew Lane.

Patricia was born in Upper Darby, PA, and resided in Princeton, NJ, for many years before moving to Hamilton Square. She attended Princeton High School and worked for the State of New Jersey.

She was a loving and devoted grandmother to her seven grandchildren, Christian and Emily Toto, Erica, Amanda and Claudia Toto, and Matthew and Danielle Beal. She was an adoring aunt to Edward Lane, Mary Lane Jackmin, and Brandon and Garrett Avery and shared a special relationship with her niece, Jocelyn Avery Dorgan, her husband, Guy Dorgan, and their children, Avery and Tara Dorgan.

A memorial mass was held on Saturday, May 11, 2019, at 2 p.m. at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ, with interment immediately following at Princeton Cemetery, 29 Greenview Avenue.

Memorial contributions may be made in Patricia’s name to the American Diabetes Association. www.saulfuneralhomes.com.

———

J. Edward (Ed) Penick, Jr.

J. Edward (Ed) Penick, Jr. of West Chester, Pennsylvania (formerly of Princeton, New Jersey) passed away May 11 at Penn Presbyterian Hospital. Ed was born April 11, 1949, in Woodbury, New Jersey. During his childhood his family lived in New Jersey (twice), Rhode Island, Kansas (twice), and California. Ed graduated from UCLA in l971 majoring in Economics and Music. He earned his MBA from the Cornell Graduate School of Business and his Juris Doctorate from the Cornell Law School in l975.

Following law school, Ed was an Associate and Partner at the Los Angeles Law Firm of Lawler, Felix and Hall before joining Bristol-Myers Squibb. At Bristol-Myers Squibb, Ed held various positions including Counsel to Unitek Corporation (Monrovia, California), Senior Counsel to Genetic Systems and Oncogene (Seattle, Washington) Senior Counsel, Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute (Princeton, New Jersey), and Senior Counsel to ConvaTec (Skillman, New Jersey).

Ed served as an elder at Harlingen Reformed Church (Belle Mead, New Jersey) and at Calvary Lutheran Church (West Chester, Pennsylvania). He and Marsha attended Christ Church (formerly The Journey Church, West Chester, Pennsylvania) and Ed attended Community Bible Study for several years.

Ed is survived by his wife, Marsha; two daughters, Katherine Taylor (Pete) of Glen Allen, Virginia and Emily Penick of New York; and three grandchildren, Ellianna Taylor, Verity Taylor, and Joshua Taylor.  Ed is also survived by his brother, David Penick (Mary) of New York and Princeton, New Jersey and sisters-in-law, Trisha Merchant of North Canton, Ohio and Lisa Snider (Bill) of Denver, Colorado. He was predeceased by his parents, Joe E. Penick and Norma Gene Penick.

Ed is remembered as a loving husband of 36 years, a devoted father, and an adoring grandfather and is dearly missed. He took great delight in his family and especially enjoyed traveling across the country to wherever his daughter Emily had shows in production. In recent years, he found great joy in his young grandchildren.

Services for Ed will be held at the DellaVecchia, Reilly, Smith & Boyd Funeral Home, Inc., 410 N. Church St., West Chester, PA 19380, (610) 696-1181, www.DellaFH.com, on Saturday, May 18, 2019. Visitation will be at 10:30 a.m. with services at 11 a.m.

Interment will follow at Birmingham Lafayette Cemetery.

———

Norman Glickman

Norman Glickman, a retired University Professor at Rutgers University’s Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, passed away on Wednesday, May 8. He was 76. Professor Glickman was known for connecting theory and practice as a way to improve the lives of urban residents.  According to his colleagues, his contributions to the field of urban planning benefited everyone he knew and millions he never knew. His legacy is that of an institution builder, an intellectual leader, mentor, friend, and mensch.

During his tenure at Rutgers University (1989-2015), he conducted research and teaching in urban planning and public policy and studied the work of nonprofit organizations. Stuart Shapiro, Associate Dean of Faculty at the Bloustein School said, “Norm was a treasured part of the Bloustein community. He was a great teacher, a dedicated mentor to junior faculty, and a good friend to many of us.”

From 1989 to 2000, Dr. Glickman directed the Rutgers University Center for Urban Policy Research, which later became part of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy in 1992. During that time, he and CUPR won awards for research and service from the United Nations, the Fannie Mae Foundation, the APA, and other organizations. In 2003, Dr. Glickman was part of a team at Rutgers that received a five-year, $10-million grant from the National Science Foundation to establish a Center for Learning and Teaching. The thrust of the CLT was “Mathematics and America’s Cities” and Professor Glickman’s role was to research and teach about the connection between teaching math in inner-city schools to institutions and families in poor neighborhoods.

An economist by training, Glickman served as the co-director for the Rutgers Economic Advisory Service (R/ECON) at the Bloustein School from 1991-2003, which continues to provide forecasting and other economic analyses for businesses and governments.

Prior to coming to Rutgers, Dr. Glickman was the Mike Hogg Professor of Urban Policy and Professor of Economics at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin (1983-1989), where he taught courses in political economy, urban and regional economics, and urban poverty.

He was named a professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania in 1970, where he founded and directed the Urban Studies Program (1970-74). At Penn he was awarded the Lindback Prize for Distinguished Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania and holds HUD’s Certificate of Special Achievement. Norm put in place the guiding principles that shaped Urban Studies at Penn in the late 1960s/early 1970s when, as an assistant professor in City Planning, he took on a group of idealistic and committed undergraduates interested in studying cities. The stars were aligned because the new Penn President, Martin Meyerson, was a city planner, which allowed Norm to navigate the institutional waters and make the major official. The essence of the program — its commitment to connecting theory and practice — was there at the beginning.

Dr. Glickman became a legend early in his career thanks to his renowned PhD work. He created the first regional econometric model out of the work of his advisor, Nobel Prize winner Lawrence Klein. While Klein is known for having produced the first national macroeconomic forecasting models, Norman Glickman’s dissertation presents the first of all regional (subnational) macroeconomic systems forecasting and simulation models.

“Norm’s academic record speaks for itself. At the University of Pennsylvania, Texas, and at Rutgers, he was a major player in developing and analyzing social and economic policies for cities and metropolitan regions. CUPR and Norman individually won many awards and grants for path-breaking policy-related research,” said Michael R. Greenberg, a longtime colleague, University Professor, and former dean of the Bloustein School.

Throughout his career Dr. Glickman also served as an advisor to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on national urban policy, was a member of Governor James J. Florio’s Council on Job Opportunities  (1992-1993), was a member of the City of Austin, Texas Economic Development Task Force for the Austin Comprehensive Plan and served as chair of the Economic Development Commission for the City of Austin (1985-1989), and served on the Vice President’s Task Force on Youth Employment as a principal analyst for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

He was the recipient of the President’s Award, the highest honor of the New Jersey Chapter of the American Planning Association, given to CUPR for its contribution to urban planning in the state of New Jersey and was awarded a Certificate of Special Achievement by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Dr. Glickman also worked with community development organizations throughout the country on issues of economic development and poverty and was a certified mediator of public policy disputes.

Dr. Glickman was the author of numerous books, monographs, and reports, including The New Competitors: How Foreign Investors Are Changing the U.S. Economy (New York: Basic Books, 1989) with Douglas P. Woodward, which was translated into Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish; Choices for American Industry (Washington, D.C.: Labor Policy Institute, 1987) with Ray Marshall; Econometric Analysis of Regional Systems: Explorations in Model Building and Policy Analysis (New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1977); and Economy in Crisis: The State of Working New Jersey, 2009 (New Jersey Policy Perspective, 2009). After his retirement in 2015, he edited and contributed to LBJ’s Neglected Legacy: How Lyndon Johnson Reshaped Domestic Policy and Government (University of Texas Press, 2018).  He served on the editorial boards of several journals including Journal of Planning and Markets, Regional Studies, Planning and Markets, Journal of Planning Literature, International Regional Science Review, Urban Affairs Quarterly, Journal of Regional Science, and Regional Science and Urban Economics, among others.

Dr. Glickman earned his Ph.D. and Master of Arts in Economics as well as a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Son of Beatrice and step-father Harry Glickman and father Abraham Pesso, he is survived by his wife of 37 years, Elyse M. Pivnick and two daughters, Katy Rose Glickman and her husband Joshua Ellis and daughter Madeline Claire Glickman and partner Shomik Sarkar.

Memorial contributions may be made to Norman Glickman Fund for Urban Studies, www.sas.upenn.edu/urban/news-events/news/memoriam-norm-glickman, or The Pennsylvania Innocence Project, https://innocenceprojectpa.org/donate-2.

A memorial service will be held on Sunday, May 19 at 2 p.m. at Lawrenceville Presbyterian Church, 2688 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, NJ.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Star of David Memorial Chapel, Princeton.

May 8, 2019

Katharine Welsh Huston

Dec. 13, 1922 — April 2, 2019

Katharine W. Huston died on April 2, 2019 at her residence at Stonebridge at Montgomery in Skillman, N.J. She was 96.

Born in Philadelphia, Pa., she was the daughter of the late Emily Welsh Myers and W. Heyward Myers Jr. The family moved to St. David’s, Pa., where Katharine and her brothers and sisters were raised.

She attended The Shipley School and graduated from The Knox School, then located in Cooperstown, N.Y., where she excelled in athletic and artistic interests.

After doing secretarial and volunteer work during World War II she married Aubrey Huston Jr. in February 1949. They began their family while living in Reading, Pa., and moved to Princeton, N.J., in 1957.

Katharine devoted herself to raising her three children, supporting their passions for figure skating, ballet, and hockey, and to volunteer work in the community. She spent many years working for the Altar Guild of Trinity Church, Princeton, especially on the Flowers and Linen committees. Also, she was a longtime volunteer at Princeton Hospital, as well as a volunteer for Princeton Day School’s The Outgrown Shop, now known as the Nearly New Shop. In addition she served on the board of the Princeton Ballet Society.

She was a member of the Contemporary Garden Club and Pretty Brook Tennis Club. She loved playing tennis and bridge with friends and family, as well as knitting and sewing creations for her children and grandchildren.

Also, she loved to spend time at her family’s summer home on the shores of Lake Champlain near Essex, N.Y., a legacy the rest of her family deeply appreciates.

Katharine was “reserved but warm; a sort of quietly extraordinary woman,” in the words of her granddaughter Isabel. “I’m sure she’s somewhere right now clutching her pearls, demurring at all the fuss, and wishing someone would do one more polite pass around the room with the mixed nuts before dinner.”

She was predeceased by her parents; her husband; and her brothers, W. Heyward Myers 3rd and John T. Myers II. She is survived by her sisters, Anne Churchman of Newtown Square, Pa., and Polly White (Peter) of Toledo, Ohio; her children, Aubrey Huston III (Alice) of Hopewell, N.J., Natalie W. Wiles (Ellis) of Springfield, Va., and Marion H. Lisko (John) of West Seattle, Wa.; her grandchildren, Geoffrey Wiles (Kathryn) of Vienna, Va., Nathaniel Wiles (Maureen) of Pittsburgh, Pa., Peter Hunter of Santa Monica, Ca., Isabel Huston of Washington, D.C., Jocelyn Huston of Virginia Beach, Va., Barbara French (Alex) of West Seattle, Wa., and Fred Lisko (Abi) of Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; and four great-grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 1, from Trinity Church, 33 Mercer St., Princeton, N.J. A reception will follow at the Nassau Club. An additional service will be held this summer in Essex, N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to the Altar Guild, Trinity Church, 33 Mercer St., Princeton, N.J. 08540. Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Ave., Princeton.

———

David Comstock Hazen

David Comstock Hazen, 91, passed away on Saturday, April 27, 2019 at Talbot Hospice House in Easton, MD. Born on July 3, 1927 in Hastings-on-Hudson, NY, he was the son of William Gardner Hazen and Anna Ewing Hoover Hazen.

David moved with his family from Rye, NY, to Easton, MD, in 1937. He was a member of the first graduating class from the Country School (then known as The Calvert School). After graduating from the Choate School in 1944, he attended Princeton University where he earned his Bachelor’s Degree in 1948 and his Master’s Degree in 1949. Joining the faculty of the Princeton Aeronautical Engineering Department as an instructor, he was appointed to Professor in 1963. David retired as Professor Emeritus in 1982 after 33 years of teaching. Pursuing a second career, he served as the Executive Director of the Commission on Engineering and Technology at the National Research Council from 1980-1985. In 1992, he came out of retirement to teach at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL, serving as Chairman of the Aerospace Department and Dean of Graduate Studies. In 1995, he retired for the third, and final time.

During his tenure at Princeton, he served as the University’s representative to the Kanpur Indo-American Program (1963-1972) and helped establish the Aeronautical Engineering Department at the Indian Institute of Technology/Kanpur (1964). As a result of his successful efforts in India, he chaired Princeton’s interests in Asia and was actively engaged in similar programs in the Middle East. He assisted in the development of the Engineering School at the University of Jordan. He served on the Boards of Trustees of Robert College of Istanbul, Turkey; the College of Petroleum and Minerals of Dhahran, Saudi Arabia; and the Sterling School in Vermont.

In 1977, David was awarded the Distinguished Civilian Service Award by the Navy for contributions made as Chairman of the Naval Research Advisory Committee and a Certificate of Commendation by the Marine Corps. He served the U.S. Navy in research and consultant capacities for over 40 years.

He married his neighbor and fellow Country School classmate, Mary Ann Shipherd in 1948, and moved to Princeton, NJ, where they raised their three children (George, Thomas, and Anne). They lived there until 1982, when they moved to the Washington, DC, area for his position with the National Research Council. While still in DC, they built their retirement home, Doshaih (Dickerson’s Old Sailor’s Home and Ice House), on Trippe Creek across from their respective childhood homes. David and Mary Ann moved to Doshaih in Oxford when he retired from the National Research Council. In 2014, David and Mary Ann moved to Londonderry.

David was an avid reader and history buff, preferring biographies and histories over novels. As an amateur historian, he delighted in researching and writing three local histories: The Holy Trinity Church, The First 150 Years (1851-2001), A Talbot Treasure, The Chesapeake Bay Yacht Club (1885-2010) and The Londonderry Air (1989- 2015). A member of the Chesapeake Bay Yacht Club, he served as their Historian and Archivist for seven years.  He served on the vestries of both Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Oxford and St. Paul’s in Trappe. For many years, he enjoyed serving as a volunteer in both the Oxford Museum and the Oxford Library. He served on the Board of the Maritime Museum for 15 years.

David and Mary Ann were enthusiastic sailors, having spent their youths on the local creeks and Chesapeake Bay. With the purchase of a Dickerson 35’ in 1969 they resumed their passion for sailing and spent many long weekends on the bay with family and friends. They were members of the Dickerson Association, and he had the honor of serving as Commodore five times.

David traveled extensively around the world for work and pleasure, including whirlwind tours of Europe and Asia while going to and coming from their year of residence in India (1963-1964). Other destinations included Bermuda, Alaska, Panama Canal, French Canal Barge trips, Northern Europe, the Caribbean, the intercoastal waterway, and Nova Scotia. When not traveling or sailing, he was an avid gardener, raising a large variety of fruits and vegetables.

David is survived by his wife of 70 years Mary Ann Hazen, his son, George Hazen (Susan) of Annapolis, MD, and daughter Anne Brendel (Gary) of Murrysville, PA; grandchildren, Jennifer Driggs (Peter), Christian Hazen (Meghan), Joshua Hazen (Stephanie), Rebecca Brendel, and Peter Brendel; great-grandchildren, Emma Driggs, Grace Driggs, Luke Hazen, and Allison Hazen. He was preceded in death by son Thomas Hazen, who died in 2014.

A memorial service will be held at The Church of the Holy Trinity in Oxford, MD, on Saturday, May 18, 2019 at 11 a.m., followed by a reception in the Parish Hall.

In lieu of flowers, please send memorial contributions in Mr. Hazen’s honor to the Naval Airship Association www.naval-airships.org or Delmarva Public Radio, P.O. Box 2596, Salisbury, MD 21802.

For online tributes, please visit www.fhnfuneralhome.com.

———

Joseph A. Vales

Joseph A. Vales, of Princeton, NJ, died peacefully on May 3, 2019 surrounded by his family and many friends, from complications related to a stroke.

Joseph (“Joe”) was 60 years old and is survived by his loving wife of 16 years Dori A. Vales and their children, daughter, Keaton L. Vales, and son, Joseph C. Vales. He is also survived by his sister, Maria (Tina) V. Dugan, and her husband Mark P. Dugan, of Cranford, New Jersey, and brother, Anthony C. Vales, and his wife, Lauren J. Vales of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was a loving uncle to six nieces and four nephews.

Joe was born in Brooklyn, NY, the son of the late Gloria Vales (nee Galves) and Joseph Vales, of Sewickley, Pennsylvania, both of whom predeceased him. The family moved to Green Lawn, New York, and then to Holmdel, New Jersey. Based on employment commitments, his parents relocated to Florida and then settled in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, where they resided until their passing. Joe remained in Homdel to complete his senior year in high school living with the Sourlis family, which he loved second only to his own. Elaine and Ted Sourlis along with their children, George, Virginia, Jim, and Dorothy became and continued to be a loving and important part of Joe’s life.

Joe was actively recruited by numerous basketball programs at some of the best colleges in the country and selected Johns Hopkins University from which he graduated with a B.A. degree in 1981. He remained a loyal and devoted alumnus until his death. In 1984, he graduated from the University of Maryland Law School with a Juris Doctorate degree.

Joe moved to Princeton, New Jersey, in 1984 where he lived for 35 years and became an active part of the community for the remainder of his life. He joined the Princeton based law firm of Hill Wallack, LLP in 1985 and became an equity partner in 1990 serving on the firm’s management committee for 25 years. He was the Chairman of the Firm’s Banking and Financial Services Practice group as well as the Chairman of the Commercial Real Estate practice group. He was admitted to practice in New Jersey and before the United States District Court. He was a member of the Mercer County, New Jersey State, and American Bar Associations. He was devoted and trusted advisor to his clients with whom he typically developed long lasting personal relationships.

He served on numerous boards and civic organizations, the State Chamber of Commerce Board, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Trenton State College Corporation, Princeton Chamber of Commerce, Boys and Girls Club and many other entities. He was a member of the Bay Head Yacht Club, The Bedens Brook Club, Jasna Polana, The Nassau Club, Princeton Investors Club, and other organizations.

He married Dori Ann Klug in August of 2003 at the Princeton University Chapel. They had two children, Keaton (11) and Joseph (8), and as a family became an active part of the daily fabric of Princeton life with a wide circle of friends and deep relationships. The children attend the Princeton Charter School and the family attends St. Paul’s Church in Princeton. In 2015, the family acquired a summer home in Bay Head, New Jersey, where they spent wonderful summers hosting and entertaining family and friends, enjoying the beach and socializing at the Bay Head Yacht Club.

Joe was an avid sports fan dedicated to the Boston Red Sox, Pittsburgh Steelers, Johns Hopkins basketball and lacrosse, and the University of Maryland basketball. He was a connoisseur and collector of fine wines, art, and antiques. He loved opera, music, and all forms of entertainment.

Joe lived an inspirational life full of friendships and joy. Always happy and positive he endeared himself to every individual he came in contact with, building an extensive collection of cherished lifelong friendships which he cultivated as an important accomplishment in his life. Each one of these friends reciprocated the sentiments and as a result, Joe was blessed with a circle of friends he called brothers. His love for others and his contribution to all of their lives stands as a testimonial to the greatness of his character. He will always be remembered for his larger-than-life personality and how much he brightened the lives of everyone who was fortunate to have known him.

Viewing will take place at Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ, on Wednesday May 8, 2019 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. A funeral mass will be celebrated at the Princeton University Chapel on Thursday May 9, 2019 at 9 a.m. Interment will be at the Princeton Cemetery, 29 Greenview Avenue, Princeton, immediately following the mass. A repast will be held at The Nassau Club, 6 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ at 12 noon.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in Joe’s name may be made to the Johns Hopkins Men’s Basketball program, Johns Hopkins University, Blue Jays Unlimited, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (www.hopkinssports.com/bju).

———

Naomi B. McClendon

Mrs. Naomi B. McClendon, 99.

On April 20, 2019, in the quiet of the morning, Naomi’s prayers were answered and she joined the Lord Savior Jesus Christ and Dave, her beloved husband of 62 years.

Naomi was born on November 14th, to Lucille and Charles Brooks in Brooklyn, N.Y. She was the youngest of 10 children. Naomi is pre-deceased by her nine siblings and parents. She is survived by her three sons, David Jr. McClendon (Patricia), of Brick, NJ, Dennis McClendon (Bettie), Evans, GA, and Dale McClendon (Terri) of Plainsboro, NJ. In addition, Naomi is survived by nine grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, two great-great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces, nephews, and friends.

Naomi lived in Princeton since 1972, where she was an active and devoted member of Nassau Presbyterian Church. In the last years of her life Naomi lived in the Augusta, GA, area near her son Dennis. The family is grateful to the staff at Morningside of Evans and Stevens Park Health and Rehabilitation for the care they gave our mother during her stay.

A celebration of Naomi’s life will be held at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ, at 11 a.m. on Friday, May 17, 2019, followed by internment at the Brigadier General William C. Doyle Memorial Cemetery, Wrightstown, NJ. Arrangements are by the Hughes Funeral Home.

———

Ernst de Haas

Ernst de Haas, 96, of Kingston died Friday, May 3, 2019 at Salana Doylestown, PA.

Born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, he resided in Princeton and Franklin before moving to Kingston. He worked for many years as a Professional Engineer with Princeton University. He was a member of the Bunker Hill Lutheran Brethren Church, Fellow Academy of Medicine of New Jersey. He served as Fire Commissioner of Franklin Township, Chairman of the Board of County Mental Health, and Past Trustee of Hagadorn Hospital.

Son of the late Emanuel and Jeannette (Heijmans) de Haas, he is survived by his wife Claudia (Lisco) de Haas; two sons, Sven Erik de Haas and Kenneth Frank de Haas; four daughters, Inger Piranian, Pamela Farrell, Patricia Barry, and Penelope Shershen; 19 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

The Funeral Service will be held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, May 12, 2019 at the Bunker Hill Lutheran Brethren Church 235 Bunker Hill Road, Griggstown. Friends may call on Sunday from 2 p.m. until the time of the service at the church. Burial will be on Monday at 10:30 a.m. in the Griggstown Cemetery.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Bunker Hill Lutheran Brethren Church 235 Bunker Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540.

———

Günter Michael Krauthamer

Günter Michael Krauthamer, more commonly known as George, died peacefully in his home on Tuesday, April 16th, 2019. George was born in Berlin on September 14th, 1926. At 11 years old, he escaped Nazi occupied Germany with his family and returned years later as a U.S. soldier. He had a long successful career as a neuroscientist and professor at Rutgers Medical School and was a longtime Princeton resident.

George was blessed with six children and 10 grandchildren. He was a great thinker with a sharp wit and warm soul. He cared greatly for his family, and we will miss him dearly. He is survived by his wife, Barbara K. Brandt; his children, Michele, Peter, Barbara, Stephanie, Christina, and Michael; his sister Charlotte and nephew Alan; and his grandchildren. A memorial service will be planned at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to either The Southern Poverty Law Center or the NAACP.

May 1, 2019

Priscilla Snow Algava

Priscilla Snow Algava lived a fuller-than-full life glowing with love, art, color, people, light, boundless possibility, and generous spirit from July 21, 1940 to April 23, 2019. She recently described her explorations in art and living as “communicating the grief and difficulties of living a passionate life and always gleaning the kernel of joy, of sunshine, of magic in the moment that is Now.” Priscilla died peacefully in her Princeton, NJ, home surrounded by a circle of loving family and friends, mirroring her vibrant paintings and drawings of dancing women. Throughout the past three very difficult years since a stage 4 cancer diagnosis, Priscilla exuded grace, determination, courage, and passion, supported by her devoted daughters, husband, and caregivers, along with her Sloan Kettering family. She continued seeing — and creating — beauty everywhere. In the midst of this uphill journey, she taught us how living and dying are truly about the same thing. Love.

The first in her family to attend college, Priscilla graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor’s degree in English and education and earned a master’s degree in studio art and art education from DePauw University. A brilliant artist and lifelong learner and teacher, Priscilla’s limitless faith in each and every human being gifted her students, friends, family, and every soul she met the ability to see beauty, create beauty, and love the beauty in our lives.

From Marist College to South Brunswick Schools to the Princeton YWCA and the West Windsor Arts Council, Priscilla created artistic spaces of imagination, safety, possibility, and love. She was active in local and regional art groups such as Art+10, the Art Station, Trenton Artists Workshop Association, the 3rd Street Gallery in Philadelphia, and so many more. “Wondrous on Witherspoon,” the pop-up gallery Priscilla launched celebrated, in her words, “the kaleidoscope of our joint commitment to art-making, creativity, community, teaching, and learning.” Priscilla had been generously offered the space to use for displaying her own artwork, but that was inconceivable to her. She immediately invited over 40 professional and emerging artists from the Princeton and Trenton areas to create and share a community gallery.

Priscilla embodied unconditional love and filled everyone who knew her with purple light. Born in the Bronx, NY, she was the devoted eldest daughter of Irving and Rachel Snow. Priscilla leaves a cosmic hole in the lives and hearts of countless friends and relatives, including her three sisters, Bobbi Snow, Sheila Snow, and Madeline Hayden; two daughters and a son-in-law, Alisa and Carin Algava and Michael Gow; grandchildren, Drew and Sabria Algava, whom she deeply adored; husband, Martin Silverman; and wuzband, Andy Algava.

For Shiva times and locations, and more information, please visit: caringbridge.org/visit/priscillasnowalgava.

Instead of a graveside burial, Priscilla’s ashes will ultimately be let go in places she loved like Santorini, Cape Cod, and the Adirondacks. Instead of flowers, please consider a donation to the Priscilla Snow Algava Scholarship Fund at the West Windsor Arts Council.

We must now surround each other and our world with Priscilla’s see-beauty-everywhere light and love.

Arrangements are under the direction of Star of David Memorial Chapel of Princeton.

———

Bruce Adin LaBar

Bruce Adin LaBar, age 86, died peacefully on April 18th at Morris Hall in Lawrenceville, NJ. Bruce is survived by son Phil LaBar of Plainsboro and daughter, Jeanette MacCallum of Brentwood, TN, and three grandchildren, Christina Jezioro of Brentwood, TN, Jacob Jezioro of Boston, MA, and Bruce Adrian LaBar of Manville. He is predeceased by his wife of 59 years, Marion Moll LaBar.

Bruce was raised in Minerva, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains where his parents operated Morningside Camps and Cottages, a seasonal retreat for its guests, offering 80 private acres on Minerva Lake. Along with his brother, Frank, Bruce aided his father in constructing and maintaining the cabins and grounds. During the off-season, the LaBar family cultivated a Christmas tree grove and operated a maple syrup farm. Morningside remains in the LaBar family and is now owned and managed by Bruce’s nephew, David LaBar. The extended family and many friends have enjoyed countless visits and reunions in this idyllic setting to this day.

Bruce attended Bucknell University in Lewisburg, PA, where he met his eventual wife, Marion while singing in the chapel choir. Upon graduation with a degree in Commerce and Finance in 1954, Bruce served as a radio operator in the US Army in Fairbanks, AK. His army tenure ended in June 1956, the same month of his marriage to Marion. After completing an MBA at The Wharton School, Bruce enjoyed a successful career in accounting, finance, and investment analysis working for Arthur Andersen, Waddell & Reed, Lionel Edie & Co., and the Division of Investment for the State of New Jersey from which he retired in 1992.

Bruce enjoyed a wide variety of hobbies including woodworking, forestry, canoeing, hiking, skiing, photography, genealogical research, square dancing, bridge, tennis, and antique glass collecting. He was a voracious reader with a particular interest in world history. Bruce and Marion especially enjoyed traveling together, often with friends. They attended many classical music concerts and regularly enjoyed opera productions. Their greatest passion was choral singing and they sang in a choir together every year of their married lives. They sang in the Nassau Presbyterian Church Choir in Princeton for over 45 years.

In more recent years, Bruce and Marion resided at Princeton Windrows where they maintained an active social life and served on numerous committees. They also established the Moll-LaBar Family Scholarship at Bucknell University for students with demonstrated financial need and took pleasure in getting to know student recipients. Bruce and Marion nurtured relationships with many, but nothing gave them more pleasure than spending time with their children and grandchildren.

Bruce’s health declined after his diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2015. After Marion’s death, the light went out of his eyes as he simultaneously struggled with memory loss, but his sweet, steady spirit never departed. A memorial service will take place at Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton on Friday, May 3rd at 11 a.m. with a reception to follow in the fellowship hall.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Music Fund at Nassau Presbyterian Church or the Moll-LaBar Family Scholarship at Bucknell University. Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home.

———

Helen Dane Schwartz

June 14, 1935 — April 26, 2019

Helen Dane Schwartz died Friday, April 26, after a short battle with lung cancer. She was 83. Helen was known for her work in the community as an artist, a basket weaver, and board member at the Princeton Adult School. She is survived by her son Eric Schwartz (Patty), of Wilmington, daughter Lisa of New York City, and three grandchildren, Will, Maddie, and Drue. Services are pending.

———

Memorial Service

Katharine Salter Pinneo

April 16, 1930 — March 16, 2019

A memorial service to celebrate Kay’s life will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 11 at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton. All are welcome at a reception in Pierce-Bishop Hall following the service.

April 24, 2019

Charles Barnwell “Barney” Straut, Jr.

Charles Barnwell “Barney” Straut, Jr. passed away on Saturday afternoon, April 13th, 2019, at his home in Princeton, NJ, surrounded by his wife, children, and grandchildren. He was 93.  With boundless love of family and endless kindness to all, he made this world a better place. He was a joy to all who knew him.

Born August 29th, 1925 in Suffern, NY, Barney was the first child of Maida Roe Straut and Charles Barnwell Straut, Sr. Along with his younger sister, Maida “Tinker” Straut Moore of Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ, Barney grew up first in Hillburn, NY, and then Mahwah, NJ, where he attended Ramapo Valley Day School and Ridgewood Junior High School. During his school days, he spent several formative summers at Camp Dudley on Lake Champlain in Westport, NY.  He then attended St. Andrews School in Middletown, DE, graduating in 1943. That summer, he entered Princeton University, age 17, and was drafted shortly thereafter on his 18th birthday into the Army Specialized Training Corps.  He landed in Normandy in the fall of 1944 as part of the Army’s 100th Infantry Division and over time his 155 MM Howitzer Artillery unit moved across France, through the Siegfried Line and along the Moselle River. He participated in liberating forced labor camps along the Rhine River. After the war in the European Theater ended, he and his unit trained near Frankfurt in the summer of 1945 for the planned invasion of Japan. After the Pacific war ended, Barney returned to Princeton on the GI Bill in the fall of 1946 and in 1949 graduated Summa Cum Laude with a degree in Psychology.

Barney started his banking career in 1951 with the NY Trust Company, first in Patterson, NJ, and then in New York City.  By 1976, he was Chairman, President and co-founder of Horizon Bancorp after serving as President of Princeton Bank and Trust, where he had worked from 1965 to 1976. Along the way, he earned a Masters in Economics and taught Economics at Princeton University.  He also worked for two years in economic development for the World Bank in Washington, DC, focusing on Venezuela.  From 1976 to 1980, Barney was a Managing Director of the investment bank William Sword & Co. in Princeton, and then became Chairman of Hillside Capital, a New York City private equity firm he co-founded, from 1980 until his retirement in 1997.  He was Chairman of Buffalo Color Corporation as well as Teepak Corporation.

Barney loved his schools and those of his wife, children, and grandchildren, and was generous to each of them. He was grateful to be able to endow the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Chair in English at Princeton University in honor of his father, and the Roe/Straut Chair in the Humanities at Smith College in honor of his mother, aunt, wife, and sister, alumnae all. Barney served as a trustee of Smith College, Planned Parenthood Association of the Mercer Area, Princeton Day School, and Princeton Medical Center. He served on the board of Nassau Nursery School in Princeton as well as on the Board of National Schools Committee for Economic Education.  Later in life, Barney loved reading to elementary school children through the Grandpal program at the Princeton Senior Resource Center and enjoyed serving meals with Meals on Wheels with his son, Derek.  He was a devoted member of the Trinity Church congregation in Princeton and a Rotary member.

Barney met Barbara Sheldon Barry of Washington, DC at Smith College, when she was an undergraduate. They married January 31st, 1953 at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. This past January, they celebrated their 66th wedding anniversary. In 1955, they moved to Princeton, where they raised their four children and have lived ever since. Barney loved sports—particularly baseball, football, tennis, skiing, hiking, and fishing.  He ran track and played football at Princeton.  He was proud to have represented Princeton as a sprinter at the Penn Relays in Philadelphia. Barney also loved the mountains.  With Barbara, in 1969 he led his family to Sun Valley, ID, where they continue to gather. Barney loved animals, music, theater, Shakespeare, and spy stories. He and Barbara have been patrons of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra and other community organizations for many years.

Barney is survived by his wife Barbara, their four children and their spouses (David Barnwell Straut and Maureen McMunigal Straut of Washington, DC, Derek Woodhull Straut of Princeton, Leslie Roe Straut Ward and Grant Murray Ward of Princeton, and Barbara Sheldon “Shelley” Straut Goldsmith and Graham Campbell Goldsmith of Darien CT), nine grandchildren (Charles Barnwell Straut II, Catherine Roe Straut, Rosemary Casey Straut, Walker Barnwell Ward, Mason Murray Ward, Sophie Roe Ward, Campbell Youngs Goldsmith, Lily Oliver Goldsmith, and Marguerite “Margot” Graham Goldsmith), and Barney’s sister Maida Moore.

The entire Straut family wishes to express its heartfelt gratitude to Nancy and Tony Cifelli and the many caregivers who supported Barney in his later years, especially Majorie Chisholm and Monica Parsons.  A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church in Princeton on Thursday, May 2nd at 11 a.m., followed by a reception at the Nassau Club. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you consider a gift to Trinity Church, Planned Parenthood, or Nassau Nursery School. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ.

———

Dorothy Turnage Diehl

Dorothy Turnage Diehl, 74, of Princeton died Sunday, April 14, 2019 at home. Born in Los Angeles, CA, she graduated with a degree in English from San Jose State University. She lived in Washington, DC, Tucson, AZ and Hana, HI before settling in Princeton in 1995. She taught high school chemistry and physics and worked as a bookkeeper and as comptroller on several political campaigns. In later years she worked as a nanny and helped to raise several beloved Princeton-area children. She was fiercely proud of her tiny, historic 18th century house in the heart of Princeton’s John-Witherspoon neighborhood, which she worked to restore with her own hands. She appreciated fine dining, and was a regular at several local restaurants where she counted the staff among her friends. She loved dogs and horses, and visited Cheyenne, “her” horse, at Hasty Acres weekly even after she was no longer able to ride. She loved the music of Keith Jarrett and was a student of the piano up through the last weeks of her life.

Daughter of the late Henry Charles and Helen Frances (Turnage) Diehl, Jr., she is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Alison Lake and Brian Cameron of Colorado Springs, CO, and by her two sisters, Karen Merris of Hayward, CA and Diana Imig of Tucson, AZ. She will be deeply missed.

Memorial donations may be made to WQXR.

———

Laura Anne Steinmetz

Laura Anne Steinmetz passed away peacefully on April 5th, 2019 at the age of 80, leaving behind her son James and his wife Kirsten.

Laura was born May 21st, 1938 in Princeton, New Jersey to Giovanni and Anna Lazzari. She attended Princeton Public Schools and was a lifelong Princeton resident. Her passions included but were not limited to horses, bike riding, sewing, church and her sobriety.

There will be a graveside funeral service and burial at St. Paul Church Cemetery Princeton, New Jersey on Friday, May 3rd at 11 AM.

In lieu of flowers, donations, in her memory, to the 24 Club of Princeton, PO Box 208, Rocky Hill NJ 08553 located at 208 124 Montgomery Road, Skillman NJ are appreciated.

Extend condolences and share remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Maureen Stevens

Maureen Stevens (Cahill) passed away at her home in Princeton, New Jersey on Sunday, February 24, 2019. 

She was a lifelong Princeton resident and an active St. Paul’s Catholic Church parishioner. Maureen had a varied career as she was a real estate agent, an interior designer, and most of her working career was spent at Telequest as an office manager — a job she loved.  She considered her co-workers at Telequest as family. Maureen was proud to have a large family and numerous loyal friends.

She was predeceased by her loving husband, Michael Stevens, beloved friend David Dilts, and older brother, Daniel Cahill. She is survived by her sister, Ann Caton, and seven brothers: Thomas Cahill, Jr., Peter Lappan (wife Glenda), Richard Lappan, Charles Lappan (wife Corrie), William Lappan (wife Kelly), Robert Lappan, and Gerald Lappan (wife Lorraine); as well as several nephews and nieces that she loved dearly. Maureen was known for her contagious sense of humor and love of having a wonderful time.

A Memorial Mass will be celebrated this Saturday, April 27, 2019 at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08542. Interment to follow in Princeton Cemetery. Immediately following Maureen’s burial a reception will at St. Paul’s Spiritual Center in the lower level of the Church.

Donations may be made to St. Paul’s Church in her memory.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

April 17, 2019

Stuart Carothers
1923-2019

Former Executive Director of Recording for the Blind and Founder of the Princeton Area Community Foundation.

Stuart Carothers passed away peacefully February 2, 2019 in Lawrenceville, NJ, at Morris Hall Meadows, where he and his wife, Dodie, were together after 60 years in Princeton Borough and Princeton Windrows in Plainsboro.

Born in Bethlehem, PA, in 1923, he attended Blair Academy in New Jersey and graduated with a degree in economics from Princeton University, Class of 1945, after U.S. Army service in the Aleutian Islands in the final years of WWII. He earned his law degree from St. Louis University Law School while working in labor relations at McDonnell Aircraft.

Subsequent local administrative roles included Associate Director of the Princeton University Office of Research Administration, Secretary and Counsel of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and 15 years as Executive Director of Recording for the Blind, where he presided over the relocation of the national headquarters to Princeton and modernization of the master library production operation.

Post-retirement from RFB, Mr. Carothers founded the Princeton Area Community Foundation in 1991. To date, total PACF grant funding to not-for-profit service and educational organizations is now approaching $150,000,000.

An avid sports enthusiast, Stuart spent much of his life on the tennis court and was an energetic supporter and advocate for the Princeton University varsity wrestling program, serving for over a decade as editor of the Princeton Wrestling News.

He is survived by his wife, Helen (Dodie) Conant Carothers; three children, Stuart Jr., Eileen, and Elizabeth; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

Memorial gathering will be Friday afternoon, May 31st 2 p.m. at Princeton Cemetery, reception to follow until 4 p.m. at Mather-Hodge Funeral Home with words of remembrance at 3 p.m. Contact: (609) 924-0242, www.matherhodge.com.

Please direct memorial tribute donations to Princeton Area Community Foundation, Stuart Carothers Memorial Fund. Contact: Donor Services (609) 219-1800, www.pacf.org/donate.

———

Kaye Laura Carnevale

Kaye Laura Carnevale, 82, of Princeton passed away on Friday, April 12, 2019 at Sunrise at Reston Town Center, Reston, VA.

Kaye was born to Jean and Homer Pritchard in Ohio and was a resident of Kingston and Princeton. She was active in her church, was an avid quilter, and loved taking her dog Dusty on a daily walk.

Kaye is preceded in death by her parents and her loving husband, Olindo. She is survived by her daughter, Tina Louise Carnevale; her son, Michael Homer Carnevale and wife Corrine; four grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and two sisters.

Visitation will be on Monday, April 22, 2019 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542.

Funeral service will be held on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 at 9 a.m. at the funeral home. Burial will follow in Kingston Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at www.alz.org.

April 10, 2019

Vicktoria Heath Tallmadge

Vicktoria Heath Tallmadge (nee Jones) was born on October 16, 1950, to Mary Jane and Vicktor Jones, in Princeton, New Jersey. When she was not on adventures with her friends on and around the Millstone River, she was in New York City or Philadelphia modeling for various child and teen fashion magazines and catalogues; the seeds of art, her lifelong love, were planted.

Vicktoria graduated from Princeton High School in 1968, and enrolled in Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA, in order to sound her artistic depths. Upon receiving her BA in Textiles and Design, she returned to Princeton, working in an art gallery and frame shop. Clotho, the spinner, would soon weave a unique and fitting tapestry for Vicktoria, melding art, education, and love.

Vicktoria fell in love with Henry “Tad” Hobart Tallmadge V and they married in 1981. Skye Weatherly Tallmadge, Henry’s beautiful 9-year-old daughter from a previous marriage, was soon joined by her brother Brigham Heath Tallmadge in 1982.

In 1985, Vicktoria began what would be a 30+ year career as a teacher in a wonderfully unique school at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton — Crossroads Nursery School. Here, with her teaching partners, whom she loved and cherished as family, she found distinct pleasure in stimulating the creative process in children. She was truly able to combine her loves; developing programs and activities integrating art, science, nature, and play.

The loving and kind presence she offered to countless Princeton-area families, as their journey of structured education was developing its foundation, was for her, a rewarding and most distinguished vocation.

Art covered the canvas of Vicktoria’s life, regardless of the medium with which she chose to practice. Whether a cook, a weaver, a painter, a mother, a partner, a friend, or a grandmother, all were more beautiful in her hands.

Vicktoria was preceded in death by her adoring husband of 31 years, Henry, and is survived by her daughter Skye, her son-in-law Jacob Rashkind, her son Brigham, her daughter-in-law, Alison (nee Goeke), her grandchildren Nathan and Lily Rashkind, and Mary Eleanor Tallmadge.

Most people believed Vicktoria to be shy because of her indefatigable emotional reserve and convivial temperament. Those of us who knew her well, understood her comportment to be an aspect of her depth and strength. She did not hide her flaws, nor did she hide behind her many singularly exceptional traits; her stoic reserve nobly continued as she battled an unexpected illness. The time and memories that were afforded by Vicktoria’s strength are a gift, and will not be forgotten by all who love her.

A celebration of Vicktoria’s life will be held later this spring. Details will be made available to family and friends. Donations in Vicktoria’s name may be made to Crossroads Nursery School and/or your local arts program.

———

Dorothy M. Johnson

Dorothy M. Johnson, 100, passed away on Saturday, April 6, 2019 at Rose Hill Assisted Living of Robbinsville, NJ, her home since 2003.

Dorothy was born on January 16, 1919 in Kingston, NJ. She married Henry B. Johnson on June 15, 1940 in Kingston, NJ. She was a homemaker and was dedicated to her family. She was the oldest member of the Princeton United Methodist Church.

Predeceased by her husband Henry B. Johnson; she is survived by her daughter Sandra R. Johnson (Hightstown, NJ); her son Henry B. Johnson, Jr. and wife Anna (Roosevelt, NJ); her grandchildren Michael S. Johnson and wife Susan and their children Ethan and Karissa (Bowie, MD); and David B. Johnson and wife Heather and their children Rachel and Ashley (Baldwin, MD); her one niece; and two cousins.

Visitation will be on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 from 10-11 a.m. followed by a funeral service at 11 a.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial will follow in Colonial Memorial Park, Hamilton, NJ.

Memorial donations may be made to Princeton United Methodist Church, 7 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542.

April 3, 2019

Katharine Salter Pinneo

Katharine Salter Pinneo, longtime Princeton resident, died on March 16, 2019 at Pennswood Village in Newtown, PA, surrounded by family. She was born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, on April 16, 1930 to Marion Williams and Thomas Manning Salter, attended Glen Ridge High School, and earned a BA in history from Skidmore College in 1952. Following a MA in education from NYU, Kay worked for the College Board in New York City during which time she met Everard Pinneo, who was then director of admissions at the University of Pittsburgh. She and Ev were married in Bennington, Vermont, on July 7, 1962.

Kay’s professional life centered on healthcare policy. In Princeton, she worked for Planned Parenthood, the Carnegie Foundation, the New Jersey League of Women Voters, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Forums Institute.

In addition to her work advancing matters of equality and social justice, Kay was widely recognized as a talented flower arranger. She served for years on the Trinity Church Altar Guild and received formal training at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Where some saw flower arranging as a hobby that counterbalanced her work, Kay regarded justice and beauty as two sides of the same coin and each an expression of the divine.

To her children she imparted a sense of curiosity and adventure and a willingness to take a wrong turn and get lost. The journey was always more important than the destination.

She is survived by Ev, her husband of 57 years, daughter Nell and grandson Martin of Pau, France and son Tom, grandson Steven, and devoted daughter-in-law Dr. Julie Pantelick of Princeton.

Celebrations of her life will be held at Pennswod Village in Newtown, PA, on Friday, May 10 at 10 a.m. (primarily for residents), Trinity Church in Princeton on Saturday May 11 at 11 a.m., and in Pau, France later in the summer.

Donations may be made to the Princeton Friends School, www.princetonfriendsschool.org, donations email: friends@princetonfriendsschool.org; the Princeton-Blairstown Center, www.princetonblairstown.org; or to a charity of choice.

———

Memorial Service

George Cordell Easter
September 8, 1934 — December 18, 2018

A memorial service to celebrate George’s life will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road. All are welcome at a reception following the service.

———

John Little

John Edwin Little, the son and only child of the late Charles E. and Geraldine B. Little, was born on April 2, 1934, in Circleville, Ohio. He died peacefully at home in Lawrenceville, NJ, on March 17, 2019, after a long illness. A graduate of Fairview High School in Dayton, Ohio, John contemplated majoring in chemistry in college but pursued history instead. He received his A.B. cum laude from Harvard University in 1957, and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan and Princeton University. In 1966 he was awarded a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University where he completed a dissertation under the direction of Wesley Frank Craven on “John Adams and American Foreign Affairs, 1775–1780.”

John married Rosemary von Storch Allen in the Princeton University Chapel on October 8, 1966. Carolyn Allen, the bride’s sister, attended the bride, and John’s colleague at the Papers of Woodrow Wilson, David Hirst, served as best man. During their 35 years of marriage the couple traveled the world, visited friends, and enjoyed the companionship of their adopted rescue cats Rudy and Carrie. John was buried in the Princeton Cemetery next to his beloved wife Rosemary, who predeceased him in 2001.

John was an American historian and accomplished editor of historical documents. Working under the direction of project editor Arthur Link, Little participated in collecting and editing The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, a comprehensive edition of Wilson’s correspondence and writings (Princeton University Press, 1966–1992). While continuing to write his dissertation, he joined the Wilson Papers project in 1961 as a “searcher,” charged with going through “seemingly endless boxes” — as John described them — of Wilson materials at the Library of Congress and the National Archives. Offered a full-time job at the project in 1964, he began as an editorial assistant and ended his career with Wilson as an associate editor. What began as a one-year appointment stretched to 34 years. Then, from 1996 until 2015, he was a research associate with The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, contributing to volumes 28–43 of this edition, also published by Princeton University Press.

He was a longtime member of the American Historical Association and belonged to the Association for Documentary Editing. Based on his years at the Wilson Papers, he presented a paper at the 1992 annual meeting of the ADE, “The Work of the Project: An Inside View,” which was published in the June 1993 issue of the association’s journal, Documentary Editing. John had a deep, lifelong interest in classical music, with a particular interest in the works of Gustav Mahler. As a performer, John mastered the French horn, his instrument of choice. He regularly attended performances of the New York Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Boston Symphony (including its summer appearances at Tanglewood), and music festivals in Norfolk, Connecticut, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. He was an enthusiastic follower of concerts at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium. Combining his interest in music and history, he also researched and wrote several entries for the Dictionary of American Biography (Oxford University Press) on nineteenth- and twentieth-century composers, performers, and conductors. Among these are pieces on Antonin Dvorák, Joseph Casimir Hofmann, Vladimir Horowitz, Arnold Schoenberg, and Frederick August Stock. John was a knowledgeable historian and scrupulous textual scholar. As a number of his friends and colleagues observed, John was always “a gentleman and a scholar.”

———

Maria Geczy, MD

Born January 8, 1934; passed away peacefully, surrounded by love on March 13, 2019.

Maria Geczy, MD, was a cardiologist, pharmaceutical executive, women’s rights advocate, lifelong intellectual, and beloved mother/grandmother/sister/aunt. She died peacefully March 13, 2019, at Stonebridge retirement community, surrounded by family.

Maria was born in Budapest, Hungary on January 8, 1934, to Lea Szitar and George Geczy. She lived in Budapest until she was 11, when she, her parents, and brother fled Hungary. The family spent six years as refugees in Austria, primarily in Salzburg. Under the circumstances, Maria received no formal secondary education. The family emigrated to the United States in 1951 and settled in New Brunswick, NJ. Maria was accepted to Douglass College the following year, and then went on to Pennsylvania Women’s Medical College. While in residency at the Cleveland Clinic, she married Tamas Raday in April 1962. The couple settled in the Philadelphia suburbs, where they eventually had two children, Thomas and Sophia Raday. After practicing cardiology at Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, Maria entered a career in the pharmaceutical industry.

She worked at both Smith Kline and Wyeth Laboratories before taking a position at Syntex Laboratories in Palo Alto, CA, in 1979. She was at one point the highest-ranking woman in the pharmaceutical industry, culminating her career as Vice President, Medical Affairs at Syntex. She was a tireless champion for women in the workplace, regularly recruiting other women as leaders as well as advocating for women in the administrative area to be promoted to higher positions and put on career tracks. At the same time, she sought to elevate the skills associated with women’s traditional roles as caregivers and household managers, insisting that — when homemakers sought to move into the workplace — these skills should be respected as important qualifications.

In 1987, Maria and Tamas separated amicably, remaining close friends until Tamas’s death in 1991. Maria became a devoted San Franciscan, active in the San Francisco Symphony, the Metropolitan League, the City Club, and the Asian Art Museum.

She was a deep and independent thinker and progressive in her politics. When she retired from Syntex in 1994, she worked on the first health-care reform-efforts under President Clinton, advising a key Member of Congress. She also pursued interests in art, architecture, classical music, fractals, photography, genealogy, and archaeology, traveling to study hieroglyphics at Oxford and to Israel and Egypt to view and translate relics firsthand.

Maria is survived by her children Thomas (Jill) and Sophia Raday (Blair Alexander); her brother George Geczy, Jr.; her sister Elizabeth Zuckerman; her beloved grandchildren Tom, Matthew, and Natalie Raday and George and Catalina Alexander; and many nieces, nephews, grand-nieces, and grand-nephews.

A private memorial is planned for late spring.

Donations in memory of Maria may be made to the Nature Conservancy.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

March 27, 2019

Henry Horn

Henry Horn, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, emeritus, a scholar and fervent naturalist for whom Princeton’s campus and the surrounding areas provided a rich biosphere for study, died suddenly March 14 at Princeton. He was 77.

Horn joined the Princeton faculty in 1966 amid a wave of interest in evolution and ecology in the then-Department of Biology.

In 1991, he led the University into a new era of interdisciplinary environmental research as founding director of the Program in Environmental Studies. He transferred to emeritus status in 2011.

“Henry Horn was one of the stalwart pillars of the department,” said Daniel Rubenstein, the Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and director of the Program in Environmental Studies. “He had an original mind and was so caring. He saw patterns in the natural world that others often overlooked, and he had a unique ability to identify why they came to be and how they worked. He was so generous and genuine in his  encouragement of students and colleagues and provided personal and intellectual glues that helped hold the department together. He will be sorely missed.”

Simon Levin, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, said Horn was “a brilliant scientist who continued to add to the intellectual life of the department. He also was a wonderful human being. His principal impact was on the students, the culture, and the cultivation of the climate of good collegiality and good mentorship.”

Horn was a mentor to generations of students.

A common theme in Horn’s work was a combination of geometry in conception, mechanical inventiveness in measurement, and “muddy boots” fieldwork in execution, noted an entry in the  Princeton emeritus booklet upon Horn’s retirement.

Horn had a lasting interest in the growth of trees, in particular, how they got their shape and their branching patterns. Part of his tree work was published in The Adaptive Geometry of Trees in 1971.

Horn also studied the wind dispersal of seeds and forest succession, and he had a longtime fascination with butterfly behavior.

Horn was born in Philadelphia on November 12, 1941, the son of Catherine Stainken and Henry E. Horn, a Lutheran pastor. His family moved to Virginia and Georgia, eventually settling in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he attended Cambridge High and Latin School.

​He completed his A.B. at Harvard University in 1962 and his Ph.D. at the University of Washington in 1966. His Ph.D. thesis was a pioneering study on the adaptive nature of the social behavior of blackbirds.

Over the years, Horn’s research took him across the continental United States and Canada, and to locations across the globe including Central and South America, Austria, Britain, France, and Japan.

But it was the areas in and around Princeton that most-often served as a muse and a setting for his fieldwork and teaching.

He was an expert on the ecology of the Princeton campus and the Institute Woods surrounding the Institute for Advanced Study.

An editorial consultant to Princeton University Press beginning in 1967, Horn was co-editor of Monographs in Population Biology, a continuing series of books intended to examine important aspects of the ecology of plants and animals. He served on the Press’ editorial board from 1993 to 1998 and was editorial board chair in 1998.

Horn was a Bullard Fellow for Harvard Forest at Harvard University and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as a permanent principal investigator at the University of Arizona-Tucson.

He led frequent workshops for K-12 school teachers and students, and in 2002 he was awarded a Certificate of Recognition for Commitment to Exemplary Science Education (K-12) from the Princeton Chapter of Sigma Xi.

In 2011, he received the Jack Gleeson Environmental Award from the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space, and in 2013 he was honored with the Environmental Leadership Award by  the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association.

He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; a daughter, Jennifer, of St. Paul, Minnesota; a son, Eric, of Champaign, Illinois; six brothers, David, Charles, William, Richard, Michael, and Andrew; and three sisters, Jean Swanson, Eleanor Grotsky, and Marguerite Horn.

A memorial service will be held at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 5, 2019 in the University Chapel.

Donations may be sent to The Nature Conservancy.

View or share comments on a blog intended to honor Horn’s life and legacy.

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Karl Zaininger

Karl Zaininger passed away Friday, March 22, 2019 in Princeton, with his loving family at his side.

Born August 3, 1929 in Bavaria, Germany, he emigrated to the U.S. on Christmas Eve 1951. He was following his heart to marry Sophia Hugel, a Ukrainian refugee whom he met in postwar Germany. It was to be the start of a long, fulfilling life of family and career.

Soon after his arrival, he was drafted to the U.S. Army during the Korean War, served for two years, and was honorably discharged as a sergeant.

He promptly enrolled in the City College of New York and earned his BS in Electrical Engineering, graduating Magna Cum Laude, and was inducted to the Tau Beta Pi Society. He continued his education earning an MA, a MS, and a PhD in Electrical Engineering at Princeton University in 1964. His studies in the nascent field of solid-state physics would anchor him and his family in Princeton for the next six decades.

Karl became a research scientist at RCA’s David Sarnoff Laboratories and over the next 20 years worked on many groundbreaking inventions and discoveries that paved the way for the electronics revolution, the foundation of today’s information age. He and his colleagues were known for their many papers and patents; among them work on MOS and gallium arsenide semiconductors and the development of some of the first CCDs.

In the mid-seventies, Karl was appointed by the Dept. of Energy to help establish the U.S. Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado. Thereafter, he managed a number of programs at the U.S. Army Electronics Technology & Devices Lab, in Fort Monmouth and at the Pentagon, with military focus including early work on the GPS system.

Karl returned to the private sector in 1980, when he joined Siemens to strengthen their North American R&D activities. He established Siemens Corporate Research and Support, Inc. in Princeton where he rose to Vice-Chairman and CEO.

From his earliest days, Karl was inspired by great teachers and was drawn to education. Over many decades, he inspired engineering students the world over through his lectures at his beloved Princeton University, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Rutgers University, UCLA, and La Salle College. Later in his life, he shifted focus and taught executive MBA sessions at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, L’viv Business School, and Ukraina University. He also taught executive MBA sessions at the University of Neu-Ulm and helped to bring German students to Columbia Business School. Finally, he was instrumental in establishing the programs of entrepreneurial education at Princeton’s Keller Center, where he taught Innovation Leadership.

Many honors were bestowed on Karl. He was a Lifetime Fellow of IEEE and was inducted into the Ukrainian National Academy of Engineering. At Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, he was awarded an honorary professorship, served on the advisory board of the business school, and received the Medal of Saint Petro Mohyla. He received an honorary doctorate from Ukraina University and was on the advisory board of the L’viv Business School. He was a member of the advisory board of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University as well as a member of the Industrial Research Institute.

Predeceased by his beloved son Mark, Karl is survived by his wife Sophia, his son Alexander, his daughter Lydia, and his five grandchildren, Paula, Augustin, Louisa, Charlotte, and Luke.

A memorial service will be held at the Princeton University Chapel on Sunday March 31 at 1:30 p.m. followed by a reception at the Nassau Club.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Ukrainian Institute of America or the Ukrainian Museum, both in New York City.

March 20, 2019

Richard Stoll Armstrong

The Reverend Dr. Richard Stoll Armstrong, 18 days shy of his 95th birthday, died peacefully at his home at the Princeton Windrows in Plainsboro Township, NJ, on March 11, 2019, surrounded by his children and beloved caregiver. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 29, 1924, he was the second child of Elsie Stoll Armstrong and Herbert Eustace Armstrong, Sr.

Dick, as he was known to his family and friends, grew up in Baltimore and attended McDonogh School, a semi-military academy in Owings Mills, Maryland, where his father was head of the upper school mathematics department, athletic director, and head coach of the varsity football, baseball, and ice hockey teams. Dick excelled at sports while at McDonogh, playing for the varsity football, basketball, and baseball teams. He was captain of the baseball team, co-captain of the basketball team, and starting left end on the football team. He was the leading pitcher and center fielder for McDonogh’s 1942 baseball team, which he led in hits, extra base hits, and runs that year.

After graduating from McDonogh in 1942, Dick was awarded a Maryland Regional baseball scholarship to Princeton University, where he majored in economics. He played varsity basketball one season and varsity baseball on five different teams, including two war-time summer seasons, and was the only freshman on the 1943 baseball team. He was awarded the Underclassman Cup in 1943.

Having enlisted in the U.S. Navy in December, 1942, Dick was assigned to a V-12 unit at Princeton as an Apprentice Seaman, and was ordered to the Navy Supply Corps School in the Midshipmen/Officers Course (MOC) at Harvard School of Business Administration in June, 1944. He was commissioned as an Ensign that October, and after graduating from the MOC in May, 1945, was assigned to the USS Chandeleur as Disbursing Officer, and later promoted to Supply Officer. Dick was Honorably Discharged as Lt. (jg) from the U.S. Navy in July, 1946 and in September of that year, re-entered Princeton University as a senior under the G.I. Bill, graduating in June, 1947 (class of 1946). Dick’s senior thesis on “The Unionization of Baseball” was cited in the Senate Antitrust Hearings on Major League Baseball in 1958.

After graduation, Dick signed with the American League’s Philadelphia Athletics as a pitcher and utility infielder and was assigned to their Martinsville, Virginia, farm club in the Carolina League, later moving up to the Lancaster, PA Red Roses in the Interstate League. In September, 1947, Dick was offered and accepted a front office position with the Athletics’ Farm Department.

In January, 1948, Dick married the love of his life, Margaret Frances Childs (Wellesley, 1947) in a ceremony held in the Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ, and together they embarked on his exciting career as a baseball front office executive during which he served as the Business Manager for the minor league Portsmouth Athletics in the Ohio-Indiana League (1948-1949), and then as the first Public Relations Director for two major league clubs, the Philadelphia Athletics (1949-1952) and Baltimore Orioles (1953-1955).

In between his stints with the two clubs, Dick accepted an offer to become Copy and Plans Director of the W. Wallace Orr Advertising Agency in Philadelphia. While with the agency, Dick’s versatile writing talents were used to create presentations for potential clients, plan and produce major advertising programs, write copy for radio and television commercials, newspaper and magazine ads, and write, produce, and participate in singing commercials. He also co-produced and directed a television sports show featuring the National Football League’s Philadelphia Eagles called The Eagles’ Nest.

In October, 1953, Dick was lured back into professional baseball when he had the opportunity to establish the first public relations department for the new American League Baltimore Orioles, where his father had also been appointed Business Manager. Among Dick’s then innovative ideas as the Orioles’ first PR Director were creating the first “live” Major League mascot, “Mr. Oriole,” who made his debut in 1954 (ten years before the creation of the New York Mets’ mascot, “Mr. Met”), and developing the first Major League club fan survey. A permanent “Dick Armstrong Collection” has been established at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, comprising photographs, correspondence, and other memorabilia from both his and his father’s years in professional baseball, as well as an oral history Dick dictated for the Hall.

A dramatic “Damascus Road” experience during spring training in 1955 led Dick to leave his promising career in baseball for the pastoral ministry, a moving first person account of which is told in his book A Sense of Being Called. After graduating from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1958, Dick began his pastorate career, serving as Pastor of both the Oak Lane Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, PA (1958-1968) and Second Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis, IN (1974-1980), and Minister of Worship at the Interdenominational Congregation of Pennswood Village in Newtown, PA (2002-2018), where he was still preaching at the age of 94 up until his retirement due to his cancer diagnosis. In addition, Dick was Interim Preacher for several congregations in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and often was a guest preacher at many different churches around the country. Dick’s book The Oak Lane Story and film that followed recount the renewal of the urban Philadelphia church he served that became a racially inclusive congregation through a service-oriented outreach to the community. The story inspired congregations throughout the United States and abroad to view their parish as a mission field.

Having first matriculated as a student, Dick returned to Princeton Theological Seminary twice, first in an administrative capacity as Director of Development and later Vice President (1968-1974) and then in a faculty position as the first occupant of the Ashenfelter Chair of Ministry and Evangelism (1980-1990). He retired with emeritus status in 1990, but continued to be active in various ministries throughout the world. He served in South Africa as a member of the advisory committee for the Centre for Contextual Ministry at Pretoria University, where he assisted with the peaceful transition for black ministers who had limited educational opportunities due to apartheid. Dick also served as vice president and then president of the Academy for Evangelism and Theological Education (1987-1991), as well as editor of the Academy’s journal (1991-1997).

Dick was an exceptionally creative person who wrote poetry and music throughout his life. His song “The Connie Mack Swing,” published in 1950 as part of the year-long Golden Jubilee celebration Dick created to commemorate legendary Philadelphia Athletics’ owner/manager Connie Mack’s 50 years with the club, became the A’s unofficial theme song while the club was still in Philadelphia. Two of Dick’s songs are in Princeton University’s songbook, Carmina Princetonia, and his first hymn, written for a music course he took at Princeton seminary, was published in the United States’ Armed Forces Hymnal. In 1996 he was commissioned to write a song commemorating the 50th reunion of Princeton University’s Bicentennial Class of 1946, which was introduced by the Princeton University Band and sung by the Princeton Nassoons. His song “Tigertown Blues,” written while he was a member of the Nassoons in 1946 and for many years the group’s unofficial theme song, was featured in the 2013 film Admission starring Paul Rudd and Tina Fey.

A prolific writer, Dick authored numerous books and articles drawing upon his varied background as a Navy veteran, major league baseball front office executive, advertising copy and plans director, radio broadcaster, development officer, journal editor, teacher, coach, and pastor. At the time of his death Dick had more than four dozen unfinished book projects, including nearly 3,000 pages of unpublished poetry.

In addition to his awards for athletic and academic achievement during his school and college years, Dick received many other honors as an adult. He was the first recipient of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ (FCA) “Distinguished Service Award” in 1965, and later received the FCA’s “Branch Rickey Memorial Award” (1973) and “Life Trustee Award” (1981). The FCA, founded in 1954, was an organization Dick was instrumental in getting established and was involved with for the rest of his life: he was an officer and member of its National Board of Trustees; established the Philadelphia, Princeton, and Livingston (NJ) chapters of the FCA and assisted in the establishment of chapters in Baltimore and other cities; and served in a variety of capacities for the organization’s annual national conferences from 1958-1974. On four separate occasions Dick was invited by the Board of Trustees to become the President of the FCA; however, work and family obligations prevented Dick from accepting the position each time.

Among Dick’s other major awards and honors were the “Outstanding Service Award” from the Indiana Chapter of the National Conference of Christians and Jews (1980); the Friends of Princeton Baseball’s “Robert L. Peters Award” (1990); the first recipient of the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education’s “Charles Grandison Finney Award” (1997); the National Council of Presbyterian Men’s “Horizon 21 Award for Leadership Service” (1999); and the Albert Nelson Marquis Who’s Who “Lifetime Achievement Award” (2017).

Dick served on the Board of many not-for-profit, religious, and sports organizations, including the FCA; Princeton Theological Seminary; McDonogh School; American Boychoir School; and the Indianapolis Indians baseball club, the AAA affiliate of the American League Cleveland Indians. He was elected to the Maryland Oldtimers Baseball Association Hall of Fame in 1994, and the McDonogh School Athletics Hall of Fame in 1997.

As busy as he was with his work and volunteer activities, Dick was devoted to his wife and family. He and Margie were married for almost 66 years, prior to her death in 2013. Dick always said that he was in love with Margie “even before I met her,” because she was the “girl of my dreams” who embodied all the qualities he admired and was seeking in a life partner. Together they had five children, three of whom survive, and at the time of his death Dick was the proud and loving grandfather of seven and great-grandfather of six, with a seventh on the way.

Dick and Margie loved to travel, taking their young family all over the United States, and in later years leading groups of family members and friends on many international tours, including to Eastern and Central Europe, Australia and New Zealand, and the Holy Land. Margie also accompanied Dick on his speaking and teaching engagements throughout North America and abroad; they were an inseparable pair, joined at the heart and through their deep faith. A poet, pioneer, pastor, preacher, professor, author, singer/songwriter, and a man of many firsts who always tried to do his best in all things, Dick will be missed by family, friends, colleagues, and former students all over the world.

Dick is survived by his son-in-law, Michael Kanarek; his son and daughter-in-law Andrew and Caroline Armstrong; his son and daughter-in-law William (Woody) and Christine Armstrong; his daughter and son-in-law the Reverend Elsie and Thomas Rhodes; his grandson Derek Kanarek and his wife Rebecca; his grandson Graham Kanarek and his wife Marnie; his grandson Orion Kanarek; his granddaughter Alyssa McGlinn and her husband Francis; his granddaughter Olivia Armstrong; his grandson Seth Olsen and his wife Mary; his grandson Samuel Rhodes; his great-grandsons Charlie, Will, Elliott, Gabriel, and Julian; step-great-grandson Chili; and a large extended family of nieces, nephews, and cousins. He was predeceased by his devoted wife of nearly 66 years, Margaret Childs Armstrong, brother Herbert Eustace Armstrong, Jr., daughter Ellen Armstrong Kanarek, and son Richard Stoll Armstrong, Jr.

Arrangements by the Mather Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ (matherhodge.com). Burial will be private. A memorial service is planned for 1:30 p.m. on May 9, 2019 at Miller Chapel, Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08542.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Childs and Armstrong Family Scholarship Fund at Princeton Theological Seminary (ptsem.edu), to the Armstrong Family Scholarship Fund at McDonogh School (mcdonogh.org), or to Seasons Hospice Foundation (seasons.org).

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Catherine C. Blackwell

Catherine C. Blackwell, 106 ½, of Hopewell, NJ, passed away peacefully on February 25, 2019, at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center, Plainsboro, NJ.

Mrs. Blackwell was married to Norman P.  Blackwell for 42 years. She met Norman when the taxi she was riding in broke down in front of the Broad Street Garage. Norman was employed at the garage and later purchased it. Mrs. Blackwell worked closely with her husband as a partner in addition to doing the bookkeeping, running errands for her husband like picking up parts in Newark and Staten Island, and she even sold cars. She loved American History, singing in the church choir and the Hopewell Valley Chorus, dogs, driving cars, and wearing hats and gloves. Mrs. Blackwell was a member of the Hopewell Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary for 77 years, and a member of the Order of the Eastern Star.

Predeceased by her parents James and Catherine (Deasy) Cunningham, her husband Norman, and grandchildren, Jon A. Zuccarello and Amy B. Dula, she is survived by her daughters and sons-in-law, Catherine B. and Joseph D. Zuccarello and Dr. Nora L. and Dr. David J. Dula; her grandchildren Michael J. Zuccarello and wife Jeannette M., Kate A. Zuccarello, Dr. Molly E. Guzic and spouse Dr. Nicholas Guzic, Dr. Brian D. Dula and Kelly M. Dula; and great-grandchildren Justin M. and Anthony J. Zuccarello, Ava E. and Emily N. Guzic, and Serena R., Ashton J., Alaina W., and Tristan B. Dula and Special Family Friend Roberta Schott.

Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 5, at Mather Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ. Visitation at 10 a.m. and service at 11 a.m. Burial will follow at Highland Cemetery, Hopewell, NJ.

Memorial Contributions may be made in her name to Hopewell Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary, P.O. Box 253, Hopewell, NJ 08525 or SAVE Animal Shelter, 1010 Route 601, Skillman, NJ 08558.

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Merlynn Hale Dixon

Merlynn Hale Dixon passed away peacefully on March 13, 2019 at the age of 95, leaving behind her three children, Cynthia, Phyllis, and Kenneth and seven grandchildren, Sarah, Sean, Jessica, Samantha, Rebecca, Madeline, and Lily, and two great-grandchildren, Fiona and Milo.

Born on August 10, 1923, Merlynn Hale Cook grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her beloved mother, Fiona. She attended Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts, and after graduation moved to Rochester, N.Y., to work for Kodak as a medical illustrator. There she married and soon thereafter returned to New England living in both Woodstock, Connecticut, and Wayland, Massachusetts, where she raised her three children. In 1970, Merlynn moved to Princeton, New Jersey, where she lived for the next 49 years and where she finished raising her family.

Merlynn spent her summers from her early childhood years to her senior years at her family’s summer home in Wales, Massachusetts, located on a beautiful country lake surrounded by generations of memories of her great-grandparents, grandparents, and her mother. Her children and grandchildren have wonderful memories of time spent with her at Wales, enjoying the summers swimming, boating, playing games, and picnicking. Merlynn was a fabulous cook!

Merlynn was a talented artist, painting countless paintings of her familiar and beautiful surroundings and her beloved pets. During her years living in Princeton Merlynn was involved in many community activities, including as a teacher of yoga at the YMCA, participating in painting classes at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, volunteering at Witherspoon Public Library, and very active in the Trinity Church of Princeton.

We will always remember the sweet companionship Merlynn had throughout her life with her cats. Each one living solo with her for up to 19 years at a time. Sunny, Christie, Lucy, then Tomas.

Merlynn’s last few years were spent living at Stonebridge at Montgomery, where she was lovingly cared for.

A memorial service celebrating her life will be held on Saturday, June 22, 2019 at 11:30 a.m. at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton.

Extend condolences and share memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Gert Paul Volpp

Gert Paul Volpp of Princeton, 88, died February 8 in Philadelphia.

Born in Lörrach, Germany, in July 1930, he was the second son of the late Anna Zeller and Otto Volpp. He received his Ph.D. degree summa cum laude from the University of Basel with a doctoral thesis on the structure of the African arrow poison ouabagenin (“Zur Konstitution des Ouabeginins”) under the direction of Nobel Laureate Thaddeus Reichstein. He arrived in the U.S. in 1958 to begin a five-year postdoctoral fellowship in chemistry at Harvard University, where he engaged in a total synthesis of colchicine with Nobel Laureate Robert Burns Woodward. At Harvard he met Ching Yuan, a postdoctoral fellow working with Nobel Laureate Konrad Bloch. The two were married in Oxford, England, where Ching, originally from Beijing, had a second postdoctoral fellowship with Sir Ewart Jones. They settled in Princeton in 1963, where they raised four children. Gert lived in Princeton for 55 years.

In 1963 Gert began a 38-year career at FMC Corporation, serving as Director of Commercial Development, Research and Development, Agricultural Products Group from 1978-2001. He traveled worldwide negotiating contracts with research laboratories for insecticide research and development. Initially focused on Japan and Western Europe, he extended the purview of FMC’s negotiations to Australia, China, Korea, India, and Eastern Europe. He held patents in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, France, Spain. Switzerland, Uruguay, the United Kingdom, Belgium, South Africa, the Philippines, Romania, and the Soviet Union.

He was predeceased by his wife Ching, and is survived by a brother, Kurt Volpp of Mosbach, Germany; a sister, Helga Reichel Kessler of Rheinfelden, Germany; three daughters, Sophie and Leti of Berkeley, Calif., and Serena of New York City; a son, Kevin, of Wynnewood, Pa.; and seven grandchildren, Daniel, Anna, Thea, Julia, Daphne, Nico, and Liliana.

Gert was an avid hiker, and loved hiking in the Alps. He spent his 80th birthday hiking in Yosemite. Until the birth of his children, he enjoyed piloting both small planes (the Cessna 182) and gliders. For his 86th birthday, he went paragliding, jumping from the Elfer mountain near Innsbruck, Austria. He was also an excellent storyteller, and a member of the memoir writing group at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, where he began his memoir, Opa Stories.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Friends of Herrontown Woods (fohw.org) in his memory.

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Laura Kruskal

Laura Kruskal, renowned and beloved creator and teacher of origami, died on February 6, 2019 at the age of 95. Laura was a sparkling personality, who drew people to her and impressed them with her unique charm. She wrote and sang origami songs, like the “International Origami Anthem,” and performed origami raps as she taught her original paper fold models, whether to students in schools and libraries or to origami enthusiasts at conventions.

Laura received her undergraduate degree with a biology major and chemistry minor from Hunter College, and her master’s degree from New York University. She was introduced to origami by her mother-in-law, the late Lillian Oppenheimer, who popularized origami in the United States. It was also through Lillian that Laura was introduced to her husband of 56 years, the late Martin David Kruskal.

Laura literally thought outside of the box, as she created origami models which could be folded from a rectangle rather than from the traditional square. She started this technique as she traveled the world, often to exotic places, with Martin David, a world-famous mathematician and physicist. It wasn’t always easy to find origami paper, but letter-sized computer paper was plentiful, and her creations worked equally well with pages from magazines, which made them very accessible. Laura taught her original origami models for years in the Princeton area and around the world, not only at origami conventions, libraries, and schools, but also in prisons, in restaurants, in buses, and anywhere where people were intrigued by her and her art.

Laura is survived by her three children, Karen Kruskal (and daughter-in-law, Sheera Strick), Kerry Kruskal, and Clyde Kruskal; five grandchildren, David Strick (and his wife, Jennifer Levy), Emma Kruskal, Alexander Kruskal, Justin Kruskal, and Rebecca Kruskal; and two great grandchildren, Ryan Strick and Lyla Strick.

(Photograph by Andrew Cribb)

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Deacon Michael David Ross, Ph.D.

Deacon Michael David Ross, Ph.D., 78, a former Professor and Academic Dean at the Pontifical College Josephinum, died Sunday evening, March 3, 2019, while hospitalized in Honolulu, Hawaii, of kidney failure and complications from severe pancreatitis. A sign in his room asked that he be addressed as “Deacon Mike,” reflecting his commitment to and love for the Church.

Deacon Mike was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1940, to Sidney Ross and Lee (Genud) Ross, both first-generation Americans of Jewish descent. As members of the Communist Party, his parents worked actively with poor and marginalized people for democracy and justice, providing role models for their children’s lifetimes of social justice service.

The Ross family moved to Baldwin, Long Island, in 1948, where Michael graduated high school. He then attended Antioch College, class of 1963, where he majored in and taught history at an Antioch summer program. Following graduation, he attended Columbia University, where he earned a Ph.D. in political science, and went on to teach and serve as Assistant Dean at Columbia College.

In college and during a year abroad at Leeds University in England, Michael was a leader in civil rights activities, helping to integrate a barbershop in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and to desegregate public accommodations in both countries. While studying and teaching, he also participated in community programs at a drug rehabilitation program for young adults in New York City.

Michael transitioned to working as an administrator for several psychiatric hospitals in New York and New Jersey. He was the Acting Chief Executive Officer of Ancora Psychiatric Hospital and the CEO of both Greystone and Marlboro Hospitals in New Jersey, from 1981–1994. 

In 1990, Michael converted to Catholicism and returned to school to enrich his education and capacity for religious service. He was ordained as a Deacon in the Church on May 14, 1994, and served diaconal ministry at St. Paul’s Church, Princeton, N.J. (1994–2003).

In 2003, he earned a second Ph.D., in theology from the Catholic University of America.In 2003, Deacon Mike moved to Columbus, Ohio, to become a systematic theology professor at the Pontifical College Josephinum. He was later appointed Josephinum’s Academic Dean and then its Provost. While in Columbus, he served at St. Mary Parish, Columbus (2003–2007) and St. Joan of Arc Parish, Powell (2007–2014). After retirement from the college, he remained active with the Josephinum Distance Learning Program, which he had founded in 2008.

Deacon Mike and his wife, Betty, moved to Kona, Hawaii, in 2014, where he served as the Coordinator of Spiritual Formation for the Deacon Program of the Diocese of Honolulu, and an instructor and advisor for the Office of Permanent Deacon Formation. During this time, he also served as the President of the Board of Directors of West Hawaii Habitat for Humanity. He was actively serving in ministry at St. Michael the Archangel Parish in Kona at the time of his death.

Deacon Mike is survived by his wife of over 45 years, Betty David Ross; his beloved son, Damon Ross; his first wife and Damon’s birth mother, Jean Ross; and Jean’s husband, John Womack; his daughter-in-law, Cylin; his grandson, August; his sister, Randy Ross; his nieces, Tara and Shivani Ganguly; his grand-nephew, Sidney Roth-Ganguly; and his godchildren, Yvette Minear, her husband, Josh, and Michael “Mowgli” Bunce. His energy, kindness and wit, and his example of scholarship, service, and love of family and community, continue to live on in those who survive him, and inspire those who have been privileged to know him. We will never forget him.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, March 30, 2019, at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Kailua Kona, Hawaii. Visitation at 9 a.m., Mass at 10 a.m., and reception at 11 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the following organizations that Michael was deeply involved in: The local chapter of Habitat for Humanity in Kailua Kona, PO Box 4619, Kailua Kona, HI 96745; or St. Michael’s Catholic Church, 75-5769 Ali’I Drive, Kailua Kona, HI 96740, in memo: debt reduction.

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Dr. Thomas John “Jack” McNeill

Dr. Thomas John “Jack” McNeill, D.D.S., at 84 years passed peacefully March 12, 2019 in Princeton Hospital hospice. He will be forever adored by his wife Peggy “My Bride” married 60 years; son Keith, wife Toffee Albina, their children Claire and Ross; daughter Karin, husband Benjamin Bashore, Ben’s son Thomas; siblings William McNeill, Samuel McNeill (passed 2016), Kathleen Coffman, and their families; Peggy’s brother Robert Davis and family; Peggy’s sister Lynn Davis; extended family across the U.S., Ireland, England, and Australia; plus friends from his dental practice and sports activities.

Jack was born in July 1934 to John and May McNeill who immigrated from Ireland in the late 1920s. Raised in Gloucester, New Jersey, he graduated from Gloucester High School, Ursinus College, and University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry. Jack served 11 years in the U.S. Army. As Lieutenant Colonel in Vietnam 1969-1970 he ran a dental MASH unit outside Saigon and joined helicopter missions retrieving soldiers injured in jungle combat.

The family moved to Princeton in 1970, where Jack was a Princeton Dental Group partner and New Jersey Dental Association officer. Jack drew respect as an excellent dentist graced with a gentle touch. In the tradition of a family doctor, he ensured his patients’ comfort 24/7.

Jack’s easy warmth, humility, generosity, and dry humor charmed all he met. Socializing, outdoor play, and a deep appreciation of nature kept Jack vibrant. A trickster, Jack wound jolly tales. He eagerly shared life’s joys with his children and especially his three grandchildren. Quite an athlete throughout life, Jack enjoyed all variety of sports with a jaunty, competitive spirit. He treasured biking with a buddy to the D&R Canal towpath and lazing along its banks, #1 hoagie and magazine in-hand. He was doe-eyed over Karin’s lakeside forest home in Vermont. Greathearted with time and strength, Jack led countless moving days when his parents and next generation changed residences. At home, Jack tended his yard in any weather, ready to chat with neighbors passing the yard edge along a historic shortcut between streets. Through Jack’s stewardship and neighbors’ efforts the path is now an official Town right-of-way. In commemoration, family and neighbors have named the path “Jack’s Peaceful Passage.”

Celebrate Jack’s life on Tuesday March 26, 5-8 p.m. at Mountain Lakes House located at 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, NJ. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the D&R Greenway Land Trust.

———

Patricia Rasche McPherson

Patricia Rasche McPherson, a resident of Princeton for 56 years, died peacefully in her sleep on March 16, 2019, at Brandywine Assisted Living in Pennington, New Jersey.  Born in St. Peter, Minnesota on September 2, 1936, Pat graduated from Northwestern School of Nursing in Minneapolis in 1957 and began a career as a registered nurse at the St. Peter State Hospital the same year.  In 1958 she moved with her husband James McPherson to Baltimore, where she worked as a research assistant in the Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital while her husband pursued graduate study at Johns Hopkins University. In 1962 she came to Princeton, where Jim taught history at the university and she served as director of Princeton Homemakers Services and subsequently worked as a nurse at New Jersey Neuropsychiatric Hospital and Carrier Clinic. 

Sensitive to human needs and dedicated to a life of service, she was also a deacon and elder at Nassau Presbyterian Church and originated there the monthly hunger offering which has helped feed hungry people in many lands for more than 40 years.

Pat is survived by her husband, a brother William Rasche, a daughter Jenny Long, and three grandchildren: Gwynne, James, and Anne.

A memorial service to celebrate Pat’s life will take place at 11 a.m. April 13 at Pennington Presbyterian Church, 13 South Main Street.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Princeton Hospice, 88 Princeton-Hightstown Road, Princeton Junction, NJ 08550. Arrangements are by the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington. Condolences are welcome at www.wilsonapple.com.

March 12, 2019

William Paul Jacobs

After a long decline, William Paul Jacobs of Princeton, NJ, died peacefully at home in his sleep on Sunday, March 3 at the age of 99. He is survived by his beloved wife of nearly 70 years, Jane Shaw Jacobs; two children, Mark Jacobs of Phoenix, AZ, and Anne Jacobs of West Windsor, NJ; as well as his sister, Mary Jacobs Brown of Worcester, MA; five treasured grandchildren, Jeffrey Jacobs, Robinson Jacobs, Patrick S. Jacobs, Phoebe Brown, and Madeleine J. Jacobs; and six great-grandchildren.

Bill was born in Boston, MA, on May 25, 1919 to Elizabeth G. Kennedy Jacobs and Vincent Henry Jacobs. He grew up in West Roxbury, MA, attended Boys English High School in Boston, and was graduated magna cum laude in 1942 from Harvard University, where he later received a Ph.D. in biology. He served stateside in the U.S. Army during World War II.

While doing graduate work at The California Institute of Technology, Bill traveled for a weekend ski trip to Yosemite National Park in February 1946. He found the slopes icy, so he took what he thought was a safe trail through a woods. This strategy led to his losing his way in the mountains, surviving a blizzard and 5 degree temperatures on his first night out, spending eleven days lost in the snow, eating lichen and snowmelt, and finally being rescued only after his parents and the Yosemite ski patrol had conceded his death. 

Within two years of this misadventure, Bill met and married Jane Shaw and joined the faculty of biology at Princeton University, where he remained until his retirement in 1989. He studied the hormonal control of plant development and was an early proponent of quantitative techniques in that field. “What Makes Leaves Fall,” one of his early papers published in 1955 in Scientific American, describes how a decrease in the plant hormone auxin coming from the leaf blade creates a specialized layer of self-destructing cells, the abscission layer, which weaken a leaf’s attachment to a plant, allowing a breeze to blow the leaf away.

Bill also studied a unique alga, Caulerpa, which consists of only a single cell, yet grows to lengths of three feet and differentiates into roots, stems, and leaves. In a paper published again in Scientific American in 1994, he referred to this anomaly as “a gauntlet flung in the face of biological convention” and described the work done in his lab discovering the conditions that allow Caulerpa to develop without interior cell walls.

The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1967, Bill also received the Charles Reid Barnes Life Membership Award from the American Society of Plant Biologists in 1998. He published 165 papers, including seven after his retirement. His book, Plant Hormones and Plant Development, was published in 1979.

One of Bill’s regrets when he was lost in Yosemite was that he had not danced enough.  This was in spite of having often snuck out of his second story boyhood bedroom in West Roxbury to dance at the Roseland-State Ballroom in Boston. Bill compensated during his remaining 73 years, throwing and attending dance parties, joining Jane on the dance floor at the first trigger of a good song, and playing many Fred Astaire, John Travolta, and Gene Kelly movies for captive grandchildren.

In his last years, Bill was cared for with truly amazing grace and loving kindness by his aides and nurses from HomeWatch Care Givers and from Princeton Hospice.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests a donation to HomeFront in Lawrence Township.

A memorial service will be held at The Mountain Lakes House, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton at noon on April 6.

———

Mary Cullens Murdoch

January 3, 1933 – February 27, 2019

Mary Cullens Murdoch, a 50-year resident of Princeton, died peacefully of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on February 27, 2019 in her home at Princeton Windrows. Born in Newtown, CT, Mary was the only child of Reverend Paul Archibald Cullens and Agnes Robinson Cullens, and the wife for over 60 years of William F. Murdoch, Jr. who predeceased her in 2018.

She is a graduate of the Dana Hall School and Wheaton College in Massachusetts, where she was recognized in 2006 with an Alumni Board award.  A standout student-athlete on Wheaton’s varsity basketball team, Mary also sang in the a cappella group Wheaton Whims. She met Bill Murdoch in Boston while teaching third grade at the Tower School in Marblehead, MA. They married in 1958. They lived together in Pittsburgh, PA, Fairfield, CT, and Baltimore, MD, before relocating to Princeton in 1968.

A former President of the Princeton Day School Parents Association and head of the local Wheaton College alumni group, Mary also served on the board of the Princeton University McCosh Health Center and more recently chaired the Windrows Welcome Committee. She volunteered for decades to host parties for Princeton alumni and co-chaired several major Princeton reunions.  She was recognized as an honorary member of Princeton’s Class of 1952. Mary spent 70 summers at her family’s wilderness retreat on the French River in Northern Ontario. She and Bill welcomed family members and guests to the beauty and tranquility of island life where they were surrounded by fresh water and Canadian wildlife.

Mary is survived by four children and their spouses, Mary (Molly) Murdoch Finnell and Samuel C. Finnell, III (Skillman); Elizabeth Murdoch Maguire and Henry C. Maguire, III (Lewisburg, PA); Timothy R. Murdoch and Pascale Lemaire (Montreal); and Kate Murdoch Kern and John W. Kern IV (Bethesda, MD).  She had nine grandchildren: Julia and Eliza Kern (San Francisco); Liliane and Maxime Murdoch (Montreal); Henry Maguire (Calgary) and Alexandra Maguire (New York City); Maggie Finnell (Princeton), Sam Finnell and Morgan Bunting Finnell (Boston), Louise Finnell Trapasso and Jon Trapasso, plus two great-grandsons, Frederick and William Trapasso (Metuchen).

The family is planning a private burial service in Wakefield, RI. In lieu of flowers, people are encouraged to donate to the Poodle Club of America Rescue Foundation, Inc: www.poodleclubofamericarescuefoundationinc.org or to a charity of choice.

———

Leonard J. La Placa

Leonard J. La Placa, 95, of Princeton died Sunday, March 10, 2019 surrounded by his loving family. Born in Jamesburg, NJ, he resided most of his life in Princeton. Leonard was the co-owner, along with his late wife Laurel, of Nassau Interiors, Princeton for over 60 years. Leonard was a devoted Husband, Father, Grandfather, and an energetic member of the Princeton Community. Mr. La Placa’s charming and warm personality touched all that knew him.

Son of the late Giuseppe and Mary (LaMar) La Placa, wife of the late Laurel (Smith) La Placa, he is survived three daughters and three sons-in-law, Laurie and James Holladay, Claudia and Michael George, and Trinna and Rachid BenMoussa; a sister, Josephine La Placa; and four grandchildren, Clayton George, Jawed BenMoussa, Noor BenMoussa, and James Holladay.

The Funeral Service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery. Friends may call on Friday, March 15, 2019 from 4–7 p.m. at the Funeral Home.

Memorial Contributions may be made in Leonard’s memory to his favorite charity: Princeton Nursery School, 78 Leigh Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542.

———

Maureen Stevens

Maureen Stevens (Cahill) passed away at her home in Princeton, New Jersey, on Sunday, February 24, 2019. 

She was a lifelong Princeton resident and an active St. Paul’s Catholic Church parishioner. Maureen had a varied career as she was a nurse, a real estate agent, and an interior designer. However, most of her working career was spent at Telequest as an office manager — a job she loved. She considered her co-workers at Telequest as family. Maureen was proud to have a large family and numerous loyal friends.

She was predeceased by her loving husband, Michael Stevens; beloved friend David Dilts; and older brother, Daniel Cahill. She is survived by her sister, Ann Caton, and seven brothers: Thomas Cahill, Jr., Peter Lappan (wife Glenda), Richard Lappan, Charles Lappan (wife Corrie), William Lappan (wife Kelly), Robert Lappan, Gerald Lappan (wife Lorraine); as well as several nephews and nieces that she loved dearly.  Maureen was known for her contagious sense of humor and love of having a wonderful time.

A Memorial Mass will be celebrated on Saturday, April 27, 2019 at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08542.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Frank L. Tamasi

Frank L. Tamasi, 87, of Princeton died Sunday, March 10, 2019 at Princeton Care Center. 

Born in Pettoranello, Italy, he resided in Princeton for 60 years. He was a member of St. Paul’s Church. He served in the Italian Army. He was a supervisor at Princeton University and also was employed by ETS.

Son of the late Sebastiano and Elpidia (Paolino) Tamasi, husband of the late Liliana (Palumbo) Tamasi, he is survived by his daughter and son-in-law Debbra and Mark Sullivan; his sisters and brother-in-law Ersilia Nini, Esterina Toto, and Clarice and Antonino Cifelli; a sister-in-law Maria Palumbo; two grandchildren Christine Trump and her husband Ian and Kathleen Sullivan; one great-granddaughter Ellanore Mae; and several nieces and nephews.

Calling hours will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 14, 2019 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

The Funeral will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, March 15, 2019 at the funeral home.

Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. on Friday at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Burial will follow in Princeton Cemetery.

March 6, 2019

Linda M. Mondone

Linda M. Mondone, longtime resident of Princeton, died on January 2, 2019 at the    Masonic Village at Burlington in Burlington, New Jersey.

Linda, born March 18, 1938, grew up and lived in Princeton on Hamilton Avenue. She was a dedicated and enthusiastic worker at the Princeton University Library from 1965 until she retired in 2003.

Linda was the daughter of  Margaret (nee Carnevale) and Raymond Mondone originally from Parma, Italy. Raymond was a former Chief of Police of Princeton Borough. Her older sister Virginia Mondone Pegram died in 1981.

Linda was an avid reader and was passionate about scholarship and education. She loved nature, art, and writing and was a trusted friend and confidant.

She was a beloved member of Nassau Presbyterian Church for 67 years. At Nassau she made many friends and was loved and cherished by her church family. She gave of herself in every way and especially treasured conversation, prayer, and sacred music.

A Memorial Service in thanksgiving to God for Linda’s life will take place at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton on March 17, 2019 at 2 p.m. in Niles Chapel. A reception will follow.

———

Jeremy Chen Peterson

Jeremy Chen Peterson, 22, passed away on February 19, 2019 of unknown causes in Claremont, CA.

Born in Palo Alto, CA, Jeremy spent his early years in Menlo Park, California and Toronto, Canada. He went on to attend Princeton schools, Littlebrook and John Witherspoon, graduating from Princeton High. At the time of his passing, he was attending Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, CA, where he was working towards a dual degree in economics and psychology.

Jeremy had an adventurer’s passport, one with the extra pages. He traveled with family and friends to places as far-flung as Columbia, Cuba, France, Honduras, Hong Kong, Italy, Iceland, Mexico, Panama, Portugal, and Spain to name just a few. He also spent a good deal of time, especially summers, at his grandparents’ ranch in western Nebraska. 

While Jeremy had great passion for art, books, music, and films, he reserved some of his greatest enthusiasm for food. His tastes ran the full gamut from gourmand to gourmet, from hog wings at the Amish market to multi-course Michelin-starred tasting menus. His family and friends can all easily recall many meals and food runs shared and often organized by Jeremy. 

Jeremy is survived by his parents, Jason Peterson and Audrey Chen; his sister, Avery; his paternal grandparents, Pete and Jonnie Peterson; and his maternal grandmother, Effie Chen. 

A service of remembrance will be held at Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 on Friday, March 8, 2019 at 5 p.m. with a gathering of family and friends beginning at 4 p.m. 

In lieu of flowers, we are asking for friends and family to make a gift towards a scholarship fund being established in Jeremy’s name at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Mercer County. Checks can be mailed to: Boys & Girls Club, 212 Centre Street, Trenton, NJ  08611.

Please contact Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ at (609) 924-0018 with questions about the service.

———

Thomas Robert Robinson

Thomas Robert Robinson passed away peacefully in his home in the evening on Sunday, February 17, 2019.

Tom met his wife of 50 years, Dina Nicol Robinson, while they were both students at The George Washington University. Tom is survived by his loving wife, as well as his two spectacular daughters, Jennifer R. Closser, a lawyer currently living in Princeton, New Jersey, and Elizabeth R. Benjamin, a trauma surgeon in Los Angeles, California, and his much-adored grandchildren, Sarah and Thomas Closser, and Isabella Benjamin.

Born in Houston, Texas, on August 23, 1943, Tom was raised in Midland, Texas. He received his undergraduate degree and PhD in Economics from The George Washington University in Washington, DC. He attended the University of Aberdeen in Scotland on a post-graduate fellowship between his undergraduate and doctoral studies. He worked for many years at Merrill Lynch and Oppenheimer & Co in New York City.

Tom was known for his devotion to his wife, children, and grandchildren, his deep love of learning, and his support of the Boys and Girls Club of New York City, Trinity Church in Princeton, New Jersey, and as a mentor to young professionals in the business community.

The family will hold a memorial service at 11 a.m. on April 4th, 2019 at Trinity Church, with reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, New Jersey.

February 26, 2019

Stanford H. Spencer

Stanford H. Spencer of Belle Mead, formerly of Princeton, died February 15 after a brief illness. He was 69 years old. A devoted son and brother, he was pre-deceased by his parents, Helen S. and James L. Spencer, both of Princeton. He leaves behind two sisters, Nancy S. Rushton (Alan), of Flemington and Linda S. McClellan (Robert), of Princeton Junction; three nephews, Andrew (Patricia), Daniel, and Garrett; niece Cassandra; and grand-niece Adelina.

“Stan” attended Miss Mason’s, Princeton Country Day School, the Chapin School, and Princeton High School Class of 1967. He earned his BS degree from The College of NJ.

Stanford served in the United States Army Reserves.

Stan was a passionate patriot, outdoorsman, and lover of animals. He would go out of his way to help anyone in need and was a very talented Mr. Fix It.

Stan was self-employed in the greater Princeton area, and was formerly employed as an engineer by Johnson and Johnson and RJ Nabisco.

Family service will be private this summer in Ohio.

Arrangements made by Mather Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Donations in his memory may be made to Trinity Episcopal Church of Princeton, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 or SAVE Animal Shelter, 1010 Route 601, Skillman, NJ 08558, Savehomelessanimals.org/donate. Stan volunteered time here.

———

Jeanette Wong

Jeanette Wong, devoted mother, teacher, and humanitarian, passed away peacefully on February 10th at the age of 96. Friends and relatives are invited to attend her Remembrance Gathering on March 9th, 2 p.m. at Bear Creek, 291 Village Road East, West Windsor, NJ.

Born in Tianjin, China, Jeanette grew up at the Jade Pagoda near the Emperor’s Summer Palace. One of few women to attend Fudan Univ. in China, she escaped from war in 1945 and came to the U.S., got her BS at Bucknell University, a Master’s at Columbia University, and an advanced degree in teaching from the City College of New York.

Jeanette married Kit Y. Wong in 1952 and raised three children in Dover, NJ, and later moved to Princeton Junction, NJ. She was a public school teacher in NYC and commuted for 24 years and was drawn to the newly-arrived Chinese immigrants to help them transition to the U.S., based on her own life experience. Her favorite song was “God Bless America.” Jeanette opened her own home to over 14 relatives and two Vietnamese boat people to get them started for life in America.

Open, generous, warm, and kind, she was devoted to her family. Jeanette was married to Kit for 65 years until his recent passing, and she leaves behind three children, Dr. Richard Wong, Dr. Michael Wong, and Lisa Wong, along with seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Jeanette had an enchanting singing voice and loved the dance performances of her daughter Lisa. She came from humble beginnings, escaped war in China, and emigrated to America, where she embraced all of the things America represents. She led a joyous life and leaves a legacy of abundant generosity.

Arrangements are under the care of Ruby Memorial of Milltown, NJ. For full obituary and donations visit: rubymemorialhome.com.

———

Kay A. Langeland

Kay A. Langeland, of Griggstown, NJ, passed away on February 20th, after a long illness.

Kay was born in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, NY, in 1929. She spent her early childhood living in Norway. Upon returning to the United States in 1935, she settled with her family in Bay Ridge. After high school, she worked for The Mutual Insurance Co. of N.Y. in Manhattan. She retired from Princeton University after 26 years.

She married Kenneth Langeland in 1950. After the birth of her two daughters, she moved to Griggstown in 1962. During the 1960s, she was a girl scout leader for Troop 253 of the Raritan Girl Scout Council. She was active in the Griggstown Historical Society and loved the history of Griggstown. She attended Bunker Hill Lutheran Church for 57 years. She was deeply appreciative of the vast efforts of her doctors, especially Dr. Peter Yi, nurses, family, and friends that helped her fight her illness. She enjoyed gardening, traveling, photography, and loved life. She often said she felt blessed to have lived a life filled with love, kindness, faith, many dear friends, and a close loving, devoted family.

Daughter of the late Anders and Henriette Morch, she is survived by her husband of 68 years, Kenneth; two devoted daughters and sons-in-law, Lori and Lawrence Dudek of Skillman, NJ, and Dale and David Antonevich of Mechanicsville, VA; her beloved granddaughters, Susanne Dudek of Griggstown, NJ, Kristi Nelson and husband Peter and her great-grandson Avery Thomas Nelson of Pennington, NJ; her sisters Esther Spindanger of Phoenix, AZ, and Alita Fjeldsgaard of Kristiansand, Norway; and a brother-in-law, Charles Langeland of Cranbury. She had many cherished nieces and a nephew.

Her family wishes to thank “Kay’s Angels,” Elin, Kim, Alexa, Sasha, Masha, Mary, and Ginna.

The Funeral Service was held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, February 26 at the Bunker Hill Lutheran Church, 235 Bunker Hill Road, Griggstown. Burial followed in the Griggstown Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Bunker Hill Lutheran Church, 235 Bunker Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 or The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Donor Services, PO Box 98018, Washington, DC 20090.

Arrangements are under the direction of M.J. Murphy Funeral Home, Monmouth Junction.

February 20, 2019

Lalitha Harish-Chandra

Lalitha Harish-Chandra, known as Lily, passed away at home on Thursday, January 24, 2019.

Born in Warsaw, Poland, Lily spent most of her childhood in Bangalore, India, with her Polish mother and Indian father. Lily’s father was an agricultural scientist; her mother, after earning a doctoral degree in child psychology, became a teacher of French, German, and Russian at the Indian Institute of Science. When her family spent time in Italy, Lily added Italian to her language repertoire that already included English, French, and Hindi. In 1939 Lily and her mother were returning to India from Italy by ship on the day England declared war on Germany. Her father came home six months later after a long eastward journey by land, and Lily loved hearing stories of his adventures on this desert trip during her childhood.

One of Lily’s mother’s students, 22-year-old Harish Chandra, lodged in her family’s house and first met Lily when she was 11 years old. Seven years later the couple were married in Mysore; they then moved to the U.S. where Harish had a faculty position in the mathematics department at Columbia University. Subsequently Lily earned a B.S. in zoology from Barnard College and later she studied Linguistics at Columbia. Their two daughters were born in New York City. In 1963 Harish was offered a position at the Institute for Advanced Study and the family moved to Princeton. They spent many happy years here. After a long illness, Harish passed away in 1983.

During the more than 50 years that she lived in Princeton, Lily was an active participant in the town’s community life. As a faculty wife, a parent, a coworker, and later as a senior resident, she always welcomed newcomers and maintained ties to those she had known for many years. After her children left home, Lily joined the staff of the International Finance Section of Princeton University’s Department of Economics, where she worked for 11 years. Prior to this, she was a volunteer at Princeton’s Professional Roster; here Lily took a special interest in women who were returning to work outside the home after raising children. For many years Lily also served on the boards of Crossroads Nursery School and of Princeton Community Housing.

1n 2012 Lily moved to Windrows. She always wanted to maintain her independence, an aspect of life in the U.S. that she particularly liked. Amiable, inclusive, gracious, and articulate, Lily was a dear friend worth having.  Lily will be dearly missed by many.  She is survived by daughters Premala of Highland Park, NJ, Devaki of Berkeley, CA, and four grandchildren. 

A celebration of Lily’s life will be held on February 23, 2019 at 3:30 p.m. at the Institute of Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, and all who knew and loved Lily are most welcome. Her family suggests that donations in Lily’s memory may be given to the following organizations:  Doctors Without Borders, Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project, Tunnel to Towers Foundation, and Women for Women International.

———

William Dudley Jones

Lieutenant Colonel William Dudley Jones passed away, surrounded by love, on February 13, 2019 in Skillman, NJ. He was 86.  

Known for his extraordinary kindness and telling wonderful stories, Bill loved his beloved wife, children, and grandchildren above all things. He was a proud West Point graduate who served and gave unselfishly to his country, his family, his God, his friends, and community. Our hearts are broken but we are richer for being loved by him. 

Bill is preceded in death by his parents, Newton Wesley Jones and Elizabeth Dudley Jones. He is survived by his loving wife of 59 years, Nancy Dawn Zarker Jones; daughter Jennie Dawn Jones Hanson (husband Jeff Hanson) of Nashville, TN; son Wesley Zarker Jones (wife Kim Durham) of Chesapeake, VA; and four “grand” grandchildren Connor Wesley Jones, Christian William Hanson, Taylor Carolyn Jones, and Sara Dawn Hanson. 

Born May 7, 1932 in Okmulgee, Oklahoma, Bill graduated from high school in Cheyenne, Wyoming, the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1953, and Princeton University with a Master’s in Civil Engineering in 1958. He served 20 years active duty in the U.S. Army with service in Korea, Europe, Southeast Asia, and various locations in the continental U.S. He served in the Corp of Engineers and later in the Medical Service Corp. Bill received numerous military awards including Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster, Korea Service Medal, UN Service Medal, National Defense Medal with One Oak Leaf Cluster, and Ranger TAB.  

Retiring from active military service in 1973, Bill continued his service to others with a 20-year civilian healthcare administration career at Hunterdon Medical Center in Flemington, NJ, as Director of Facilities and then as Vice President of Support Services. He was a Fellow of both the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Society of Healthcare Engineers. He also served as President of the Healthcare Engineers of New Jersey, spoke nationally on leadership, and was an Instructor for The Goldfarb Institute.

Bill was a 45-year resident of Belle Mead. Known as a tremendously caring person, Bill volunteered often in his community, serving on the Montgomery Township Board of Health, School Board Management Review Committee, and Citizen’s Advisory Board. Bill was an Eagle Scott and continued his lifelong support of this program as an Eagle Scout Advisor for Boy Scout Troop 46. He and his wife were avid travelers, enjoying trips to Russia, Kenya, and Churchill Canada, and taking their family on many wonderful family reunions. 

A deeply religious man with a generous heart, Bill was a professed life member of the Third Order of Society of Saint Francis. He was Episcopalian, a past associate member of the Montgomery United Methodist Church, and most recently attended the Princeton United Methodist Church. He loved his church, gave generously to charity, and was grateful for and blessed by family and friends. 

Funeral arrangements were under the direction of the Hillsborough Funeral Home, Hillsborough, NJ.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Princeton United Methodist Church or the United States Military Academy at West Point. 

February 13, 2019

Irving Lavin

Irving Lavin, Professor Emeritus in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, passed away in Princeton on February 3 at the age of 91.

Lavin was an art historian distinguished by his charismatic and challenging teaching, rigorous search for the relationship between form and meaning in the visual arts, and the conviction that the study of the history of art was the study of the history of ideas. He was renowned for his tenacious explorations of difficult subjects, and his willingness to see all the facets and possibilities of their solutions. 

“Irving exemplified the characteristics of a world leading scholar and humanist in his generosity, enthusiasm, and curiosity, which spanned diverse disciplines,” said Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director and Leon Levy Professor. “The Institute community, where Irving made his intellectual home for 45 years, was enriched by his presence, his insights, and his dear friendship. He will be greatly missed here and around the world.” 

Lavin’s deep knowledge of Italian art and culture was the result of over 50 years of study, particularly in Rome, where he embraced the city and encouraged Italian art history to move into the world of intellectual creativity. For this gift, the city offered him many honors, including the Tercentennial Medal, commemorating the death of Gianlorenzo Bernini (1980), and the Premio Daria Borghese (1981), and appointed him Honorary Member of the Corporation of Sculptors and Marble Workers of Rome as well as Membro Straniero della Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. He also received the Premio Internazionale “Galileo Galilei,” from the University of Pisa (2005), the Sescentennial Medal, commemorating the birth of Donatello, from L’Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, Florence (1986) and was made Accademico d’Onore by Accademia Clementina, Bologna (1986). He died as he was about to fulfill his last invitation: to be plenary speaker at the Fondazione Caetani colloquium on sixteenth-century Roman sculpture (March 2019). His last article on “The Silence of David by Gianlorenzo Bernini” will be published posthumously in the periodical Artibus et Historiae, in the Spring 2019 issue.

“Irving Lavin continued to be part of the life of the School of Historical Studies until a few weeks before his passing. The breadth of his knowledge on the history of art and culture was phenomenal, as was his ability to recognize connections between seemingly disparate phenomena,” said Angelos Chaniotis, Professor of Ancient History and Executive Officer of the School of Historical Studies. “With an alert mind and youthful curiosity, he took a genuine interest in the projects of the Members, created bridges between the disciplines, and stimulated discussions.”

Lavin began his career studying philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and at the invitation of Bertrand Russell went to Cambridge University to become his tutee. He soon became aware that such a theoretical field was not for him and took up more practical studies, namely the history of art. Within ten years he had degrees from New York University and Harvard University, and had won the prestigious Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize for Scholars under 40 three times (’59, ’62, and ’68) — so often, in fact, the paradigm for the prize was changed. In 1966, Lavin began a series of discoveries, the first of which brought to light the earliest marble portrait bust made by the young prodigy Gianlorenzo Bernini at the age of 14 years. That discovery was only the first of many previously unknown Bernini busts made throughout his career. Lavin’s last contribution was a black-and-white marble sculpture of the famous Roman lawyer Prospero Farinacci (d. 1619), published in the spring of 2018.

Lavin was born on December 14, 1927, in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his B.A. from Washington University (1948), his M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1951), and an M.A. (1952) and Ph.D. (1955) from Harvard University for his dissertation, “The Bozzetti of Gianlorenzo Bernini.” He taught on the faculties of Washington Square College, New York University (1957–59; 1963–66); Vassar College (1959–61); the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1967–73); and Princeton University (1974–90). Lavin joined the Institute’s School of Historical Studies as a Professor in 1973 and became a Professor Emeritus in 2001. 

Reflecting on Lavin’s appointment and early years as a Professor in the School, the late Carl Kaysen, IAS Director 1966–76, observed in an Oral History interview, “I found it interesting that Irving could talk about nineteenth-century English art as well as about Bernini and as well about Tunisian mosaics. […] Irving fulfilled the notion of real intellectual interaction across the faculty boundary.” With John Elliott, Professor in the School from 1973–90, Lavin worked to make the School more cohesive in the 1970s, with a focus on actively encouraging the appointments of younger Members. As Elliott recalled in an Oral History interview, Lavin viewed the Institute as an international center with an international message and as “a place of refuge for younger people to get on with their own work as visiting Members.” 

Lavin’s publications show his wide-ranging intellectual interests: from late antique architecture (Triclinia) to North African, particularly Tunisian, floor mosaics, the Renaissance (Donatello, Michelangelo, Pontormo, and Giovanni Bologna), the Baroque (Caravaggio and Bernini), to the twentieth century, with essays on Picasso and Jackson Pollock. He also communicated easily with practicing artists and was close friends with George Segal, Mel Bochner, Frank Stella, and traveled with and wrote about Frank O. Gehry.

His books include Bernini and the Crossing of St. Peter’s (1968); Bernini and the Unity of the Visual Arts (1980); Past–Present: Essays on Historicism in Art from Donatello to Picasso (1993); Santa Maria del Fiore: Il Duomo di Firenze e la Vergine Incinta (1999); and Caravaggio e La Tour: La Luce Occulta di Dio (2000). The first two volumes of a projected six-volume edition of his collected works have been published as Visible Spirit: The Art of Gianlorenzo Bernini (2007–09), while the third volume has appeared as Bernini at St. Peter’s: The Pilgrimage (2012). A gathering of his essays on modern and contemporary art, The Art of Art History, has also appeared in Italian as L’Arte della storia dell’arte (2008).

Lavin was a celebrated lecturer: he gave the Franklin Jasper Walls Lecture at the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York (1975); the Slade Lectures at Oxford University in 1985; the Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures at the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, 1985–86; the Una’s Lectures in the Humanities, University of California, Berkeley, 1987; and the Andrew W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., in 2004. In 1993, Lavin hosted a centennial symposium on the work of Erwin Panofsky at the Institute for Advanced Study, where Panofsky had been a Professor.

In addition to his scholarly production, he gave considerable efforts to shaping the directions of art historical research in North America. He was a founding member of the committees charged with the creation of three new institutes dedicated to research in the history of art and architecture in America and abroad: The J. Paul Getty Research Center (Los Angeles); The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA), the National Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), in Montreal, Canada.

In 2011, he and his wife, Professor Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, co-authored a small book titled Truth and Beauty at the Institute for Advanced Study, in which they explore the origin and historical framework of the Institute and its seal, designed in 1931 by French artist Pierre Turin. Lavin writes in the introduction, “It is our joint hope that, to some extent, this perhaps excessively academic study expresses the gratitude we both feel for the precious gifts we have received over the years from this wondrous place.” 

Lavin is survived by his wife of 66 years, Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, a distinguished art historian; their daughters, Amelia Lavin and Sylvia Lavin, her husband Greg Lynn; and grandchildren, Sophia Lavin Lynn and Jasper Lavin Lynn.

February 6, 2019

Linda Goldstein

Linda Goldstein passed away peacefully on January 27, 2019, surrounded by her family and friends, at the age of 67. Linda faced her long-term illness with courage, determination, and grace.

Despite coming from humble origins, Linda worked very hard and had a long and robust career in the insurance industry. While working full-time, she attended college at night, and eventually graduated with a bachelor’s degree with honors from Douglass College at Rutgers University.

In her retirement, she volunteered at Princeton Hospital and the Princeton Learning Cooperative. Her life forever changed when she met her true love, soulmate, and husband, Bruce Goldstein. The light of Linda’s life were her children, Sara Goldstein (Jordan) and Daniel Goldstein (Alyssa). Linda was an incredible mother and told her children how much she loved them each and every day. In addition to her husband and children, Linda is survived by her sister, Diane Hajdamowicz; mother-in-law, Evelyn Goldstein (Ascher, of blessed memory); and many beloved in-laws, nephews, nieces, and cousins.

Even with her health issues, Linda lived life to its fullest. She was very loved and will be missed by all who knew her. Memorial contributions may be made to Princeton Medical Center Foundation at www.princetonhcs.org/giving.

Services were entrusted to Mount Sinai Memorial Chapels, East Brunswick. To leave a message of condolence, please visit www.msmc.us.

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Marilyn A. Lynch

Marilyn A. Lynch, 82, of Princeton died peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, on Saturday, February 2, 2019 at Brandywine Senior Living at Princeton. Born in Buffalo, NY, she was a resident of Princeton for over 46 years. Marilyn was a member of St. Paul’s Church and the Princeton-Pettoranello Sister City Foundation.

Daughter of the late Anthony and Matilda (Cramer) Monaco, she is survived by her devoted husband of 58 years, Charles A. Lynch; her daughters Nancy van der Horst and Cara Lynch; sons-in-law Jan van der Horst and Rafael Alvarez; grandchildren Rose van der Horst and Rafael E. Alvarez; two brothers and a sister-in-law Anthony and Rose Monaco, Jr., David Monaco; niece Victoria Pohlman; and nephews Paul and John Monaco. The family would also like to acknowledge the many caregivers who tended to Marilyn over the last four years.

As a child, Marilyn and her brothers spent five years at the German Roman Catholic Orphanage in Buffalo. Though sadly separated from her parents, she had many fond memories of the care she received from the Sisters of St. Francis. Her mentor, Sister Francesca, inspired her to become a teacher and a lifelong advocate for children. A graduate of D’Youville College in Buffalo, NY, Marilyn started her career as an elementary school teacher, and taught for seven years in the Buffalo area, then South Bend, IN, and Westfield, NJ. 

Marilyn went on to earn her master’s degree in Nutrition from Rutgers University in 1979 and returned to the workforce offering pre/post natal nutritional counseling for the WIC (Women, Infants and Children) program in Newark, NJ. She later joined WIC at the NJ State Department of Health in Trenton, as a Program Coordinator and then as Assistant Director for all WIC agencies in NJ for more than 25 years. She was a staunch advocate for children and breastfeeding mothers, and she pioneered policies to address and serve the homeless, those stricken with HIV/AIDS, and more. She addressed many conferences nationwide on the advances that the NJ WIC Program had instituted and she developed a mentoring and internship program to groom recent Nutrition graduates, in an effort to better prepare those joining the field for certification exams. 

Marilyn passionately and determinedly championed causes that she believed in and gave her all to realize her vision. She retired from the Health Department in 2006 and received many accolades for her contributions to the health and welfare of NJ women and children. 

Marilyn was an avid tennis player until her early 70s, and competed in local tournaments and Volvo Tennis. She often advanced to the final rounds, and faced opponents more than 20 years younger. She was a fierce competitor. 

In her leisure, Marilyn enjoyed gardening, local symphony events, going to the Metropolitan Opera in New York, fine dining, and many travels and cruises with her husband, Charles. In 1965, they famously embarked on their first trip to Europe with toddler Nancy in tow. They traveled around Europe for three months with no jobs or home to return to. That was the first of many adventures together.

A memorial mass will be celebrated at St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton at 11 a.m. on Friday, February 8th.  Burial services will be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul’s Church or to D’Youville College.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Dede Lawson-Johnston

Dede Lawson-Johnston passed away peacefully on January 28 after a 70-year love affair with her surviving husband, Peter, and decades of devotion to their family. She was born Dorothy Hammond in Owings Mills, MD, to Donald and Molly Hammond and developed a signature mischievous wit at the nearby Garrison Forest School. In 1950, she married Peter, now honorary chairman of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and chairman of the Harry F. Guggenheim Foundation, and together they extended the Guggenheim family legacy in art and philanthropy.

She was a prolific hostess and fundraiser for many causes including the Guggenheim Museum, serving as gala Co-Chair on several occasions, as well as the Princeton Medical Center, New Jersey Neuropsychiatric Institute, and Planned Parenthood. She was known for overwhelming generosity and hospitality to legions of family and friends, and especially enjoyed playing tennis, bridge, and dancing. She was a member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, The Colony Club, Edgartown Yacht Club, The Present Day Club, The Contemporary Garden Club, Bedens Brook Club, and The Jupiter Island Club.

More than anything, she will always be loved and remembered as the supportive and deeply loyal matriarch of a clan that includes four surviving children and their spouses, Wendy and Tom McNeil, Tania and Sam McCleery, Peter and Karen Lawson-Johnston, Mimi and Nat Howe; her sister Mary “Dumpsy” Hackney; more than 20 grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and a lifetime of beloved dogs of every shape, size, and demeanor. Her extraordinary life was celebrated at Christ Memorial Chapel in Hobe Sound, FL, on Monday, February 4. In lieu of flowers, donations will be gratefully accepted by the Garrison Forest School (gfs.org; 300 Garrison Forest Road, Owings Mills, MD 21117). 

January 30, 2019

Sylvia B. Mann

Sylvia B. Mann passed away peacefully on January 15, 2019 at her home at 775 Mt. Lucas Road, Princeton, with her family present. Widow of esteemed American historian, Arthur Mann, and the mother of McCarter Theatre Center’s Artistic Director, Emily Mann, and New York literary agent, Carol Mann, Sylvia leaves two grandsons, Nicholas Bamman and David Helene; two sons-in-law, Gary Mailman and Howard Helene; a granddaughter-in-law, June Lee; and a great-grandson, Oliver Arthur Bamman.

Born in New York City on April 16, 1921 (a year after women got the right to vote, as she would often say), Sylvia was a lifelong feminist. She grew up in Paterson, N.J., attended New Jersey State Teachers’ College, and moved to Massachusetts after marrying Arthur Mann. While he attended Harvard graduate school, Sylvia taught elementary school in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and was active in The League of Women Voters. After the family moved to Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1955 for Arthur Mann to teach at Smith College, Sylvia soon returned to school, receiving a Master’s degree in Education from Smith College, and became a remedial reading specialist, founding and directing a remedial reading center in the Northampton public schools. When Arthur Mann became Preston and Sterling Morton Professor of American History at the University of Chicago in 1966, Sylvia continued teaching remedial reading in Chicago, privately, to all ages — from young people to illiterate adults — and also taught at Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a consummate teacher. But her particular genius was for love. She adored her family and they her. When she turned 92, she moved to Princeton from Chicago to be nearer to her family, and her family had the great privilege of sharing her last years with her on a daily basis. A brilliant being, she was remarkably loving, wise, and profoundly intuitive. She knew the world, but her world in her later years was her family. Until the end, she maintained a fierce pride in the accomplishments and humanity of her children, grandchildren, and their spouses. We will love her and carry her with us, always.

All ceremonies will be private. In lieu of flowers, please send donations in Sylvia Mann’s name either to McCarter Theatre Center or the Southern Poverty Law Center.

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Virginia (Ginny) Petrone Goeke

Virginia (Ginny) Goeke, 84, of Kingston, passed away on January 26, 2019 at Compassionate Care Hospice at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital at Hamilton, NJ, after a brief illness, surrounded by her loving family.

Mrs. Goeke was born in Trenton and raised in Princeton before moving to Kingston 56 years ago. She was a graduate of Princeton High School, Class of ’52. Ginny retired from Century 21 Carnegie Realty to provide daycare for her grandchildren. She loved family gatherings and photography. She was a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Kingston Volunteer Fire Company.

She is the daughter of the late Victor W. and Alice Scheck Petrone, sister of the late Victor W. Petrone, Jr., and great-grandmother of the late Emilia Sophia McDonald. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Robert L. Goeke, Sr.; her son Robert Goeke, Jr. of Kingston; son and daughter-in-law, Richard and Petra (Felkl) Goeke of Bridgeport, VT; daughter Debra Goeke of Hopewell; six grandchildren, Melissa, Jennifer, Pamela, Christa, Patrick and Jeffrey; four great-grandsons; and many nieces and nephews.

A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. on Monday, February 4, 2019 at St. Paul Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Burial services will be private.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Kingston Ladies Auxiliary, PO Box 131, Kingston, NJ 08528.

Extend condolences and share memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Gavin Lewis

Gavin Edward Harry Lewis died peacefully at home, in the company of his loving wife, on January 20, 2019, in Princeton, New Jersey. He was a few days short of 76.

Born in Sutton, Surrey, England in 1943, Gavin Lewis was the son of the late Michal Hambourg, a celebrated concert pianist, and the late Edward Lewis, an architect. Gavin attended Westminster School in London and then Oxford University, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts in History. He then earned his Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. His doctoral studies took him to Vienna, Austria, and to Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, where he met his future wife Nadia Katyk. After their wedding in Bratislava in 1978, Nadia joined Gavin in New York City. Soon after, they settled in Princeton, NJ.

For over 30 years, Gavin taught Western Civilization to undergraduate students at John Jay College of Criminal Justice-CUNY. His research and publications include studies of central European history, Sumerian civilization, Athenian politics and religion, print and culture in the Renaissance, and the decipherment of Egyptian writing. With historian Thomas H. Greer, Gavin co-authored A Brief History of the Western World, a widely-used undergraduate textbook. Gavin is also the author of Church and Party in Political Catholicism: The Clergy and the Christian Social Party in Lower Austria, 1887-1907; Tomás Masaryk; Close-Ups of the Past: Western Civilization Case Studies; and WCIV. He also worked as a book editor, editing countless works of scholarship for major university presses.

Throughout his life, both professionally and personally, Gavin was a tremendous reader and writer. His commitment to the study of history and the humanities persisted well into his retirement, and he was at work on a book about the Roman Fifth Macedonic Legion at the time of his death.

Above all, Gavin Lewis cherished his family life. He was a devoted husband to his wife of 40 years. Together, they raised four children and, in recent years, took great joy in their five grandchildren. Gavin Lewis is survived by his wife, Nadia; his son Michael and his wife Irena; his daughter Anna and her husband Nicholas; his son Alexander and his wife Mandy; his daughter Dorothea and her husband Béla; as well as by five grandchildren, Nicholas, Sofia, Clara, Isadora, and Henry.

Gavin Lewis was buried at Princeton Cemetery on Tuesday, January 22, 2019. He will be greatly missed and his memory cherished.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home Princeton.

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Thomas Osborne Stanley

Thomas Osborne Stanley, 91, died on January 14, 2019 at his home in Oxford, Maryland. Born in Orange, New Jersey, he was the younger son of Edmund Allport Stanley and Emily Hasslacher Stanley.

After attending public schools in South Orange, he went to The Lawrenceville School, graduating in 1945. He served in the US Navy from 1945 to 1946, then attended Yale University, earning a BE and ME in electrical engineering. In 1951 he and Nanette Lee Grodnick of Pelham, New York, were married.

Mr. Stanley worked at RCA Corporation’s David Sarnoff Research Center in Princeton, New Jersey, for his entire career, beginning in 1950. RCA sponsored a 1958/9 sabbatical at Cambridge University, England, with Lee and family, where he studied with computer pioneer Maurice Wilkes. He had a walk-on part at the debut of color television, happily contrived the world’s first transistorized pocket radio, and was midwife at the birth in the early 1960s of the MOS transistor — the core component of microprocessors. He predicted that “the geometry and simple fabrication of these devices will someday permit integration of thousands on a single wafer.” In research management, he held titles of Staff Vice-President, Systems Research and Staff Vice-President, Research Programs, including responsibilities for laboratories in Zurich and Tokyo. He was issued 14 patents in the fields of color television, transistor circuits, video disc systems, and flat-panel television displays.

Tom and Lee made their homes in Princeton and in Mantoloking, NJ, and in Manhattan, before moving to Oxford in 1992. He was engaged with civic organizations both in Oxford and further afield, including Washington College’s Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the Maryland ACLU, and the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was a founding contributor to the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

In his wallet he carried a hand-written card stating: Listen to diverse voices / Seek new ideas / Embrace variety / Resist stereotypes / Respect diversity / Explore outward / Educate yourself.

Mr. Stanley was predeceased by a daughter, Bridget Alexandra; a son, Mark Raoul; his wife Lee; and brother Ted. He is survived by two sons, Tom and Alex; a daughter, Susan; two grandchildren, Daisy and Vishveshvara; and six nephews and nieces. A memorial celebration will be held in Oxford in May.

For online condolences, please visit www.fhnfuneralhome.com.

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Doris Ayres Brinster

Doris Ayres Brinster died peacefully at Stonebridge on Wednesday, January 23, 2019. She was 97 years old.

Doris was born in Springfield, NJ, and raised in Roselle, NJ. She excelled in school, allowing her to enter college at age 16. She attended the Women’s College Greensboro North Carolina, one of the few schools that would take young students. She earned a B.S. in Secretarial Administration.

Doris met her husband, the late John F. Brinster, in 1941 and they were married in Princeton on December 8, 1945. John graduated in 1943 from Princeton University and was working in the Palmer Laboratory. They built a home and raised their three children in Princeton. Doris was very active in town: she was a member of The Present Day Club for many years, a member of The DAR, and president of the Women’s College Club from 2002-2003. She worked for Audrey Short Realty and for the Law Board department at ETS.

She is survived by her daughters, Jaye White and Meg Michael; and her son, John E. Brinster. She is also survived by her nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. The family will be holding a private burial service. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at www.alz.org.

January 23, 2019

Norman Itzkowitz

Professor Norman Itzkowitz, 87, passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, on January 20 in Princeton, New Jersey, where he had resided for over 65 years. Norman was a beloved professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University and served as the Master of Wilson College, one of the University’s residential colleges, from 1975 to 1989. He was the author of a number of highly regarded books in his field of Ottoman and Turkish Studies, including The Ottoman Empire and Islamic Tradition; Mubadele: An Ottoman-Russian Exchange of Ambassadors, co-written with his friend Prof. Max Mote; his translation of Halil Inalcik’s The Ottoman Empire: The Classical Age, 1300-1600; Immortal Ataturk, co-written with his dear friend and collaborator Dr. Vamik Volkan; and, reflecting the wide range of his academic interests, Turks and Greeks: Neighbors in Conflict, co-written with Dr. Volkan; and Richard Nixon: A Psychobiography, co-written with Dr. Volkan and Andrew Dod. Later in life he wrote a series of children’s history books for Scholastic with co-author Enid Goldberg.

Norman Itzkowitz was born on the Lower East Side of New York City in 1931. His father, Jack Itzkowitz, was born in Lowicz, which today is in Poland. His mother, the former Gussie Schmier, was born in Bobrka, a suburb of Lviv, which today is in Ukraine.

Norman attended Stuyvesant High School in New York City and then the City College of New York, which was, at the time, known for producing great scholars and not-bad athletes. Norman was both, winning the College’s Cromwell Medal in History and playing on the varsity lacrosse and fencing teams. On graduating from City College, he was admitted to Princeton University Graduate School. At Princeton, he studied under his mentor, the great historian Lewis Thomas. Upon his teacher’s death, he completed Prof. Thomas’s fundamental Elementary Turkish, still in use today. During graduate school he married his college sweetheart, Leonore Krauss. When he was awarded a prestigious Ford Foundation grant to study in Turkey in the mid-1950s, she accompanied him and they lived there for several years. They returned to Turkey often in the 1950s and 60s, and their son Jay was born in Ankara. Their daughter Karen was born in Princeton.

Well into his traditional academic career Norman developed an interest in psychoanalysis and went back to school in New York City at the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis. He trained to become a lay analyst, eventually seeing a small number of patients in New York. He felt that becoming a practicing analyst would be the most genuine way to engage in psychohistory, a discipline which merged his two interests. It was during this period that he co-wrote his psychobiography of Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey, working with Dr. Vamik Volkan of the Psychiatry Department at the University of Virginia Medical School. The book was regarded as a groundbreaking application of psychoanalytic theory to modern Near Eastern history. He extended his academic work in the area of psychoanalysis into hands-on work in the area of inter-ethnic conflict resolution. He traveled to Estonia where he worked with Dr. Volkan on reducing Estonian-Russian tensions following Estonian independence. Prof. Itzkowitz was also one of the earliest Princeton scholars to develop online teaching materials, in particular his online lecture series The Demonization of the Other: The Psychology of Ethnic Conflict in the Balkans.

Perhaps as an outcome of his interest in psychology, Norman became increasingly involved in the on-campus life of the students at Princeton, becoming the Master of Wilson College, one of the residential colleges where students live and take their meals. Norman loved this work and was beloved by the students, who referred to him as “Uncle Norm.” He organized regular trips to New York City to the opera (one of his passions), Broadway shows, and sporting events. He was committed to helping students become compete adults. He viewed exposure to culture and particularly to New York City as vital to this effort. Many of his innovations became standard at the other residential colleges. He served on the Committee on Undergraduate Life (CURL) which radically re-organized undergraduate life at Princeton by bringing in the residential college system. While these innovations were objected to at the time by many alumni, today they form the basis of the Princeton undergraduate experience.

Norman’s love of fencing and sports continued throughout his life. He served as a faculty advisor to the successful Princeton fencing and hockey teams. Later in life he was delighted when his granddaughter, Aliya Itzkowitz, became a champion sabre fencer.

Norman is survived by his wife of 65 years, Leonore, his son Jay and his wife Pria Chatterjee, and his daughter Karen and her husband A. Norman Redlich, and four granddaughters, Anjali and Aliya Itzkowitz and Ruby and Dvora Redlich. He is also survived by his sister Edith and various nephews, nieces, and grandnephews and grandnieces. He also leaves behind a large group of prominent Ottoman historians who studied with him over many years.

He remained fully committed to Princeton until the end, living right in town. Norman and Leonore were a familiar sight taking their usual morning walk along Nassau Street, where he would stop in to see his many friends. Perhaps because of the circumstances of his own childhood he had a way of relating to all he came in contact with, from the most august scholars at the University to its working staff. In many ways he felt closest to those who had not had his advantages and his luck, and to those who had not been surrounded by the same love and affection that he had always felt from his students, friends, and family.

Funeral services were Tuesday, January 22 at Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, Ewing, with burial at Beth Israel Cemetery, Woodbridge. The period of mourning was observed that evening at the Itzkowitz residence in Princeton.

The family respectfully requests memorial contributions to a charity of the donor’s choice.

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Mary Fedorko

Mary Fedorko died peacefully in her sleep on January 15, 2019 in her home at Acorn Glen in Princeton, New Jersey. She was 95.

Born in Bens Creek, Pennsylvania, Mary was the daughter of the late Michael and Mary (Kozemchak) Madaychik. As a young girl, Mary moved with her family to a farm on Union Road, Kingwood Township, New Jersey where she grew up.  She attended a one-room school on Union Road, followed by Frenchtown High School.

During World War II Mary served as a reporter for the Calco Diamond, a weekly newspaper of American Cyanamid in Bound Brook, NJ, doing interviews and special interest stories, many of them about Cyanamid employees serving in the war. She later reported and wrote for the Delaware Valley News in Frenchtown, NJ, and then contributed to I Remember: The Depression Years, 1929-1941, published by The Hunterdon County Office on Aging. She was also an inveterate writer of letters-to-the-editor to protest, compliment, question, or praise. An avid lifelong learner, Mary was an active member of her local book group and took college classes into her 80s.

As a long-time resident of Kingwood Township, Mary served her community as a member of the Kingwood Board of Education; president of the Kingwood Township Parent Teachers Association; Brownie leader; member of the Frenchtown and Flemington Women’s Club; and the League of Women Voters. Because of the contact with teachers that it gave her, she loved her work with the Hunterdon County Office of the New Jersey Department of Education, where she served as a Certification Consultant and secretary to the County Superintendent and the County Vocational Coordinator. Perhaps her greatest delight was serving as a hostess for over 100 Hunterdon County Adult Education tours across the United States and in Europe. Her role allowed her to travel widely, learning eagerly about the places she visited and the people she met, including her fellow travelers.

Mary is predeceased by her beloved husband of 68 years, Nick Fedorko; sister Katherine Zelenski; brother Andrew Madaychik; half-brothers Samuel, John, George, and Michael Hrychowian; and half-sisters Anne Lelo and Rose Felix.

She will be sorely missed by her daughter Kathy Fedorko and her husband Peter Macholdt of Hopewell, NJ; son Nick Fedorko, III and wife Sandra Zimmer Fedorko of Morgantown, WV; grandsons Evan Fedorko and his wife Rebecca Fedorko of Morgantown, WV, and Matt Fedorko and his wife Rachel Terman of Athens, OH; granddaughter Sarah Fedorko Macholdt of Philadelphia, PA; great-grandchildren Cormac, Elias, and Liadan Fedorko, and Juniper Fedorko Terman; many nieces and nephews; and dear friends.

A service to celebrate the life of Mary Fedorko will be held on Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 2 p.m. at the Flemington Baptist Church, 170 Main Street,
Flemington, NJ 08822. Memorial contributions may be made to the Flemington Baptist Church.

———

Peter Allington Marks

Peter Allington Marks, age 64, son of late Professor John H. and Aminta (Willis) Marks, died at home in Princeton, New Jersey, on Sunday morning, January 13th following a courageous battle with cancer.     

Born December 8th, 1954 in Princeton Hospital and educated through high school in Princeton’s public school system, Peter graduated magna cum laude from Hamilton College in 1976 with a BA in Latin, and from Wharton Business School in 1981 with an MBA in Finance. He spent summers at the St. Lawrence River’s 1000 Islands where boats, games, and time with summer friends brought him great joy.

With a knack for numbers and problem solving, Peter spent the first ten years of his professional life in Manhattan at Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, followed by positions at Banker’s Trust, and Dillon, Read & Co., where he developed a keen understanding of real estate financing. Moving then to Florida, he honed his understanding of real estate development working as Project Partner for Trammell Crow Residential and later Aoki Corporation. Wanting more freedom to pursue his own projects, however, Peter opted in 1989 to do consulting and be self-employed.   

While in Florida, Peter met his future wife, Mia Brownell Williams, whom he regularly referred to as his wise counsel, skilled proofreader, and dearest friend. They accompanied each other for the next 30 years from Florida to Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and finally to Princeton, where on December 17th, 2018 they married. 

Often skeptical of what many consider progress, Peter advocated for the preservation and dignity of tradition. It was this perspective that led him to write numerous opinion pieces in the local papers, serve as Co-Chair of the Princeton Joint Revaluation Commission and member of the Borough’s Historic Preservation Review Committee and Housing Authority, and in 2016 run for mayor of Princeton. Dignified, humble, and loving, Peter will be fondly remembered.

Peter is survived by his wife, Mia Brownell Marks; his sister Fleur (Marks) and William Rueckert and their children Cleveland and Grayson (Hellmuth) Rueckert, Elizabeth (Rueckert) and Patrick Henry, and Julia (Rueckert) and Brett Shannon, and their grandchildren Chase, Hailey, and Henry; and his brother John and Belle (Potter) Marks and their children, Phoebe, Anna, and Eliza.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, February 2, 2019, at the Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton.

Contributions may be made to the Nassau Presbyterian Church or Grindstone Methodist Church, Clayton, New York.

January 16, 2019

LaVerne Edna Deik Hebert

LaVerne Edna Deik Hebert of Kendall Park, NJ, concluded a life well lived at the age of 95 as she passed away on January 8, 2019. The youngest of several children by hard working German parents, LaVerne was a lifelong resident of NJ, and is the last of her generation. She is survived by a niece Caroline Bradbury of Vadnais Heights, MN, and nephew William Dodds of Livingston, NJ. 

A graduate of the School of Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital, LaVerne was trained as a Registered Nurse and worked in the Radiology Department. In 1957, she married Jules Hebert and together they ventured into the printing business, purchasing The Copy Cat in Montgomery Township. Upon Jules’ early death, LaVerne took over the company located in Research Park, Princeton, and it became LDH Printing. The business thrived under LaVerne’s careful control and strict quality standards. She printed stationery and business cards for hundreds of local businesses, so her connections in the community were wide and varied. LaVerne was known for bringing in young folks to work with her. She served as a role model, demonstrating dedication and the work ethic that she was known for. A scholarship is provided every year to a Montgomery High School student in memory of LaVerne’s husband. 

LaVerne was a committed community volunteer serving as the Treasurer of The Rocky Hill Fire Company for decades. She belonged to Soroptimist International and the Present Day Club of Princeton. LaVerne was an original member of the Princeton Medical Center Auxiliary, serving on the board for many years. She ran the coffee and gift shop in the original hospital. LaVerne was best known for her leadership in organizing the White Elephant Rummage Sale which raised significant funds for the hospital and was one of the longest running events in the community, held annually for 100 years. 

LaVerne will be missed by many people in our community. Her positive spirit and can-do attitude were an inspiration not to be forgotten. The burial will be private, however a Memorial Service will be held in the upcoming months to celebrate the life of LaVerne Hebert, a life well lived. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Christ the King Lutheran Church in Kendall Park or The Rocky Hill Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 

———

Walter Scott Blomeley

Walter Scott Blomeley, formerly of Sullivan, Illinois, passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 10th, 2019 at Greenbriar Nursing Home in Bradenton, Florida, at the age of 91. Visitation will be Thursday, January 17th from 5 to 7 p.m. at Reed Funeral Home in Sullivan. Funeral services will be Friday, January 18th at 10:30 a.m. at Reed Funeral Home, with internment and military rites conducted by Sullivan American Legion Post 68 afterwards at Greenhill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Wounded Warriors Project in Scott’s memory. Online condolences may be sent to the family at reedfunerahome.net.

Scott was born on February 6th, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, to Ralph and Marion Hillard Blomeley. As a young man, Scott attended Farragut Naval Academy in New Jersey. While there he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. In 1945, Scott served in the Pacific after the end of World War II. Scott later attended Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. While attending Tulane, he was called back into service to fight in the Korean War. During his time in Korea, Scott was listed as Missing in Action while engaged in fighting as one of the “Chosin Few.” Scott was a highly-decorated veteran of the USMC, receiving the bronze star and three purple hearts.

After returning from Korea, Scott worked for his father’s company, Blomeley Engineering, in New York. He married Jane Harmon on September 18th, 1954 in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and lived in Princeton, New Jersey. Scott was an active member of the Princeton community; volunteering to coach JFL, serving on the First Aid and Rescue Squad, Princeton and Kingston Fire Districts, and helping start an “Up with People” group.

In 1974, Scott moved his family to Sullivan, Illinois. He worked as a pipe fitter at Clinton Power Plant until his retirement. Scott served on the Sullivan School Board, was on the Sullivan Fire Protection Squad, and was well known for being “Santa Claus” in Sullivan and elsewhere. He and his wife, Jane, also enjoyed helping at Shelby County Community Services. He was an active member of the VFW, DAV, KWVA, American Legion, and the Marine Corps League.

Scott was a very loving, jovial, and caring person, with a zest for life. He will be missed by his family and many friends. Surviving are his children Betty Jane Boyer (Ben) of Bethany, Illinois; Kathryn Ann Cantrall (Don) of Springfield, Illinois; Cynthia Lee Selby (John) of Shelbyville, Illinois; and Scott Harmon Blomeley (Marsha) of Sarasota, Florida. Also surviving are eight grandchildren, Shannon Patterson (JP), Blake Crockett (Jana), April Reagan (Zac), Sarah Nichols (Zach), Nicholas Selby, Nathan Nielson, Miles Cantrall, Amy Cantrall; and six great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents; first wife, Jane, in 2007; and his second wife, Barbara, in 2016. The family would like to thank Greenbriar staff for their care and friendship.

———

Stuart Joseph Bellows

Stuart Joseph Bellows, born December 29, 1931, died without warning at the home he shared with his loving and devoted partner of 35 years, Gerald Mushinski, in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico on December 28th, the eve of his 87th birthday.

A born musician, had an unusual childhood, both raising chickens, which included selling eggs to Albert Einstein, and practicing the piano or organ two hours a day! (When in high school, his devoted parents bought him a pipe organ, which required tearing out the staircase in order to install it in his bedroom.)  A graduate of Princeton High School, he attended the Yale School of Music before receiving a B.A. from Wesleyan University. He studied at the North German Organ Academy with Harold Vogel, and received a Master’s Degree from New York University Business School. Stuart then joined his parents at Bellows, Inc., their retail clothing store in Princeton, where he eventually became proprietor until he sold the business in the 1980s.

He was very engaged in the arts in Princeton, as former board member of The Westminster Choir College, and of the McCarter Theatre. In the mid-nineties, he and Gerald moved to San Miguel where he had wonderful friends and an active life.

Stuart is survived by his sister, Phyllis Bellows Wender, her husband Ira Wender, five nieces and nephews, ten grand-nieces and nephews, and many cousins. Especially cherished is Francine Greenberg Carlie. It is yet to be determined if there will be a memorial service. If so, it will be announced here.

———

Mary Balogh Hultse

Mary Balogh Hultse, 92, formerly of Princeton, passed away on December 10, 2018, in Flushing, New York. A warm, bubbly person, she had an encouraging word for all she met – from maintenance men to store clerks to people on the street.

As a successful advertising executive at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Mary Hultse commuted to Princeton from an apartment on the Upper West Side, where she was a regular at Riverside Church. Then she bought a second apartment, a fourth-floor corner walkup on Palmer Square, so that she could look out over Princeton University and enjoy walking around town. She retired in 1990.

With a passion for the arts – she loved to sing, act, and dance – she joined local theater groups and played Aunt Eller in Oklahoma at Washington Crossing. She was beloved by the staff at Richardson Auditorium, where she volunteered as an usher. Devoutly faithful, she enthusiastically participated in the life of Princeton United Methodist Church (PrincetonUMC) and was in charge of the altar guild. She reveled in her Hungarian heritage and loved Nora and Edina Ban, daughters of Tomas Ban and Ildiko Rosz, as if they were her grandchildren. 

Mary insisted on seeing the best in everyone. This served her well when, in her 70s, her memory failed to keep up with her very stubborn determination to chart her own course. Her many admirers — including a 10-member team from PrincetonUMC, the Ban family, social workers at Princeton Senior Resource Center, and Palmer Square staff — rallied to help with all aspects of daily life so that a charming elder could stay independent for as long as she could. Then she was cared for in her brother’s Long Island home before transitioning to a senior living facility.

Predeceased by her parents, Anna and John Balogh, and her brother, John Balogh Jr., she is survived by her nephew (John Frank Balogh), her niece (Nancy Ann Balogh) and Margaret Krach (Nancy’s wife, who cared for Mary in her later years), and also her special friends, Tomas Ban and Ildiko Rosz.    

A memorial service will be at Princeton United Methodist Church, 7 Vandeventer Avenue, on Monday, January 21, at 1 p.m. Everyone who knew Mary is invited to this celebration of her life and to a reception afterward.

———

Lynne (Lyn) Marcia Ransom

Lynne (Lyn) Marcia Ransom of Hopewell Township, a lifelong musician and composer whose spunk, generosity, and intellect transcended genres and generations, stepped down from the conductor’s podium on December 14, 2018, at age 71.

Lyn was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., and raised in Martinsville, Ind., where her family nurtured in her a love for music and education. A graduate of Oberlin College, she followed her passions wherever they led, including teaching at universities, writing early childhood curriculum for the HighScope Foundation, directing music at the Princeton United Methodist Church, and hitchhiking to India, where she studied sitar for a year with Vilayat Kahn. Lyn later earned graduate degrees at Eastern Michigan University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cincinnati, where she received a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting.

In 1987, Lyn founded Voices Chorale, a Princeton-area ensemble that toured Europe three times and premiered dozens of new works. She also served as a guest conductor throughout the region. In 1992, Lyn was honored by the Princeton, N.J. Arts Council for her outstanding contributions to the area’s cultural life and in 2007 by the YWCA Tribute to Women. In 2017, Chorus America awarded its Education and Community Engagement Award to Voices, citing how it “exemplifies the highest commitment to education and outreach programs.” Unique among these is Lyn’s Young Composers Project in which over 500 elementary school children have created compositions and heard them performed by Voices.

After three decades as artistic director, Lyn celebrated her retirement as she conducted the Voices Chorale and full orchestra in a stirring performance of Johannes Brahms’ “A German Requiem.”

In 1998, Lyn began working with Music Together, the internationally acclaimed early childhood music program, first directing their lab school, then teacher training and certification, and finally co-authoring an adaptation for preschool. Lyn’s work has touched millions of children around the world through this program — which she got to experience first-hand as a grandma!

Diagnosed with breast cancer in early 2005, Lyn’s creative response was key to her ongoing recovery: she began composing “Cancer Coping Songs,” using humor and music for alleviation. Even after the cancer returned in 2014, Lyn thrived for years, writing and performing more Cancer Coping Songs, conducting major works with Voices, and being a loving wife, mother, sister and grandmother.

She died peacefully in her home, with her husband at her side.

Predeceased by her parents, Hugh Wrislar and Audrey Faye (Banta) Ransom, Lyn is survived by her husband, Kenneth K. Guilmartin; her son, Coray Seifert and his wife, Katie; her daughter, Sophia Seifert and her husband, Dan Lopez-Braus; her stepdaughter, Lauren Kells Guilmartin and her husband, James Barry; her grandchildren, Jackson and Alicia Seifert; her sister, Gail Sandra Ransom; her sister, Janice (Ransom) Kerchner and her husband, Jim Kerchner; and many nieces and nephews.

A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2019, at 2 p.m., at Trinity Church in Princeton, NJ, located at 33 Mercer Street.

Contributions designated for the Young Composers Project Fund may be made to Voices Chorale NJ.

January 9, 2019

Alexander Perry Morgan Jr.

Alexander Perry Morgan Jr. (Perry), architect and longtime member of the Princeton community, died peacefully on January 4th in his home after a Christmas full of family. He was 94 years old.

Perry will be remembered as a man of great integrity, with a deep, warm sense of humor who loved his work as an architect and was always helping others. He loved reading to his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, as well as sailing, playing tennis and golf, painting, and appreciating classical music. He was a loving father and devoted husband. He adored the natural world and cherished summers spent with his family on North Haven, Maine.

He was born May 8th, 1924, in Paris, France to Janet Croll Morgan and Alexander Perry Morgan. One of his earliest memories included seeing Charles Lindbergh parade through the streets of Paris after his first transatlantic solo flight. The family moved to New York City in 1927, where Perry attended the Buckley School and grew up with his two younger sisters, Margaret and Caroline.

Perry went off to boarding school, St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, where he began a love of chemistry and rowing that continued at Princeton University. His college education was interrupted by World War II. He served three years in the Army, most of which was spent in Europe, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant in the 283rd Engineering Combat Battalion.  

On returning to Princeton, he joined the Ivy Club and studied architecture like his father, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, Woodrow Wilson Scholar, and as valedictorian for the class of 1946. He was on the first Princeton Lightweight rowing team to win at the Royal Henley Regatta. After graduation he continued his studies at Princeton, earning his master’s degree in architecture in 1952, and was honored with a Fulbright Scholarship to study architecture in Italy.

Perry’s European travels brought him both education and love. While skiing in Austria, he met two American women who, on their return to New York, introduced him to their roommate, Elisabeth Harrison (Liz). During a hurricane, on August 13th, 1955, Liz and Perry were married — a formidable, happy union that was to last 63 years.

Perry and Liz settled in Princeton in his family’s longtime home, Constitution Hill, and he continued, for a short time, to work as an architect in New York City. In the ensuing years they had four children: Jamie, Lisa, Peter, and Matthew.

Perry and Phil Holt, architecture school classmates, formed a nationally recognized architecture firm — Holt Morgan Russell — where he worked until his retirement. In the 1980s, he converted Constitution Hill from a Jacobean style estate into an innovative clustered-housing community, the first of its kind in Princeton, inspired by northern European design that prioritized open space and privacy, while preserving the historic structures and grounds.

Throughout his entire career, Perry volunteered his time in the Princeton community and beyond. For many years he served on the Princeton Zoning Board and worked with Dorothea’s House, the local Italian-American organization. He was on the North Haven Golf Club Board of Directors and was on the architect’s advisory board for the design of the new North Haven Public School. He was also a longtime member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, Springdale Golf Club, and the Nassau Club.

Perry is survived by his wife Liz, his sister Margaret, his four children and their spouses, 13 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his sister Caroline.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to one of the many causes for which he cared deeply: The Ocean Conservancy (oceanconservancy.org) or Habitat for Humanity (habitat.org).

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church on Saturday, February 2nd at 1:30 p.m.  

———

Herman S. Ermolaev

Herman S. Ermolaev, Professor Emeritus of the Princeton University Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, died peacefully on January 6, 2019 at the age of 94.

Born on November 14, 1924 in Tomsk, Siberia, Herman spent his youth in the Don region of southern Russia. During the turbulent years of World War II, Herman left the USSR. He was part of the forced repatriation of Cossacks form Lienz, Austria in 1945, from which he escaped. Herman then completed Russian secondary school in Salzburg and entered the University of Graz.

In 1949, Herman came to the United States to finish his undergraduate degree at Stanford University. He then pursued doctoral work at the University of California-Berkeley, from which he earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1959.

In 1959, Herman started teaching in the Slavic Department at Princeton, where he spent his entire academic career. As an expert on Soviet literature and the Nobel-prize winning author Mikhail Sholokhov, Professor Ermolaev was widely published in both the United States and in Russia. He was particularly fond of teaching, and was known for his survey course on Soviet literature, which he brought alive through personal reminiscence, history, and literature. As many as 350 students a semester enrolled in this course. He also offered upper-level undergraduate courses on the Russian short story and advanced Russian courses. Professor Ermolaev retired in 2007.

Professor Ermolaev is survived by his loving wife Tatiana (Kusubova); son Michael Stigler (and his wife Mireille) of Lausanne, Switzerland; daughters Natalia (and her husband Theodor Brasoveanu) and Katya Ermolaeva, both of Princeton, NJ; four grandchildren, Natacha, Matthieu, Grégoire, and Nadezhda; and one great-grandchild, Alissa.   

A Russian Orthodox funeral service will be held on Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Vladimir’s Russian Orthodox Church in Jackson, NJ. Burial will follow at St. Vladimir’s Cemetery in Jackson. Flowers may be ordered through Narcissus Florals (732) 281-0333.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Timothy E. Ryan Home for Funerals (732) 505-1900. Condolences may be sent to www.ryanfuneralhome.com.

———

Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron

Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron, 96, died in Princeton, New Jersey, on December 15th, 2018. Born in Cape May, NJ, in 1922, she grew up in Cape May and Jenkintown, PA. She graduated from Swarthmore College as an English major in 1943 and joined the Navy that same year. She was a Lieutenant Junior Grade stationed at Naval Supply Depot Mechanicsburg, PA, where she worked in Communications as a coder/decoder on the Enigma machine. There she met her future husband, the well-known Princeton miler Lt. William Robert Bonthron (d. 1983), a Naval Supply Officer recently returned from a lengthy tour in Oran, Algeria. They were married in 1946, lived briefly in Williamsville, NY, and moved to Princeton, where they raised four children: Jennifer Bonthron Waters, of Easton, MD; Susan Jane Bonthron of Guilford, VT; William Deas Bonthron of Hopewell, NJ (d. 2016); and Thomas Spencer Bonthron of Pittsburgh, PA (d. 2009). She was also a beloved stepmother to William Bonthron’s son William James Bonthron of Ottawa, Ontario (d. 2002), and daughter Katherine Katama Bonthron of Munich, Germany (d. 2014), and aunt of Jill Arace of Waitsfield, VT.

Jane enjoyed bridge and golf and was a longtime volunteer with the Princeton Hospital Aid Society and Meals on Wheels. She is survived by her two daughters; four grandchildren, Beatrice Waters Kalinich, Robert Knight Waters, Caitlin Bonthron Roper, and Anna Jane Ruff; three step-granddaughters, Alexandra and Fiona Bonthron and Catriona Gannon; and great-grandchildren, Emily and Helen Kalinich and Wyatt and June Kroyer. Her life will be celebrated at a private gathering in Cape May, NJ, in the late spring.

———

Patricia Anne Peacock

August 5, 1944 – December 29, 2018

Dr. Patricia Anne Peacock (Speelman), 74, beloved mother, grandmother, and sister, passed away on December 29, 2018, after a long and bravely fought battle against cancer.

Pat was born in Crestline, Ohio, but spent her youth in Piscataway, New Jersey, where she, her three brothers and sister all participated in building their family home. She graduated from St. Peter’s High School in New Brunswick, New Jersey. An avid lifelong learner, she received advanced degrees from Colorado State University and Rutgers University, ultimately earning her doctorate in adult vocational education. She taught adult education classes at George Mason University and Strayer University. Prior to being diagnosed with cancer, Pat had gone back to school at The College of New Jersey to pursue a teaching certificate in early childhood education.

An ardent believer in working to achieve one’s dreams, Pat directed the George Mason University Enterprise Center on the Manassas, Virginia, campus. She also served as the Director of the Rutgers University Regional Small Business Development Center in Camden, New Jersey. At both of these centers, Pat helped small business owners develop business plans and launch their start-up companies.

A trailblazer for women, Pat was named Melita’s New Jersey Woman of the Year in 1993. In 1999, the YWCA honored her with the TWIN award, a Tribute to Women and INdustry.

Pat is predeceased by her parents, Daniel and Roseanne Speelman, sister Christine Spears, and brother, Jim Speelman. She is survived by her two daughters and sons-in-law, Carolyn and David Kwieraga and Kristin and Ron Menapace; her six grandchildren, Amanda and Noelle Kwieraga and Paige, Henry, Claire, and Julianne Menapace; as well as her brother Steve Speelman and brother and sister-in-law Tom and Sally Speelman.

Throughout her life, family was Pat’s inspiration and joy. She was always ready to play a game, design a craft, read a story, go on an adventure, or just spend time with her children and grandchildren. In 2011, Pat retired to join her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in Princeton to help raise their four children.

Pat cherished her Christian family in the various places she lived. As a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton, New Jersey, she spoke fondly and with affection for her fellow parishioners, especially the children that participated in the Children’s Chapel services she helped lead. She also inspired her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in supporting the Princeton community, including the opening of their gift and furniture store, Homestead Princeton. In her free time, Pat enjoyed reading, sewing, knitting, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends.

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church on Saturday, January 12, 2019, at 11 a.m., followed by a reception in the Parish House. Friends of all ages are welcome to share in the celebration of Pat’s life. Afterwards, Pat will be interred in the church’s memorial garden in a private family ceremony. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Trinity Episcopal Church children’s program.

———

Fredric J. Spar

Fredric J. Spar, 70, died at home in Princeton, NJ, on December 22, 2018.

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Fred was a student-athlete who ran track at Midwood High School and Cornell University. His career had many chapters: He worked as an elementary-school science teacher before completing a Ph.D. (1980) at Brown University, where he studied Chinese history and spent a year in Taipei, Taiwan at the Stanford Center. He lectured at Keene State College before working 36 years as a communications consultant at Kekst & Company in Manhattan. He was a member of the 2010 class at Harvard University’s Advanced Leadership Initiative and applied his experience thereafter advising or serving on the boards of environmental and education organizations: The Watershed Institute, Friends of Princeton Open Space, New York City Audubon Society, Generation Schools, and City Year New York. He was also chair of Friends of the Rogers Refuge, for which he worked tirelessly on improvements to wildlife habitat and accessibility for human visitors.

Fred moved to Princeton when he married Winifred Hughes, a fellow graduate student at Brown University. Together they spent many hours birding and hiking, rooting for the Boston Red Sox, and engaged in a lifelong intellectual discussion. Fred was dedicated to his garden and continued to read and speak Mandarin throughout his life. He shared his passion for sports and the outdoors with his children through skiing, fishing, tennis, and coaching soccer and Little League baseball. Fred will be remembered as a loving husband and father, a great intellect in both scholarship and business, an environmentalist, a man of understated wit, and a soul of exceptional kindness and generosity of spirit.

He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Winifred Hughes Spar; his sons Adam and Alex; his sister Laurie, and her husband John Pierce. He also leaves his aunt, Edith Gilitos; cousins; sisters- and brothers-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Burial was in Princeton Cemetery on December 24, 2018. A memorial service will be Sunday, January 27, 1 p.m., at the The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Donations in his memory would be welcomed at the organizations he served.

Arrangements by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing Township.

———

Elias Menachem Stein

Elias Menachem Stein, a towering figure in mathematics for over half a century, died on December 23. He was 87.

The cause of death was complications related to mantle cell lymphoma, according to his family.

Renowned for deep and highly original contributions to his field of mathematics as well as the mentor of generations of younger mathematicians, including two winners of the Fields Medal, the profession’s highest distinction. Mr. Stein was a professor at Princeton University for 55 years, teaching, by popular demand, until the age of 86.

Born on January 13, 1931 in Antwerp to Elkan Stein, a diamond merchant, and Chana Goldman, both Polish citizens, he and his family fled Belgium in 1940, following the German invasion. With diamonds hidden in the soles of his shoes as part of his father’s effort to protect the family’s assets, he entered the United States in April 1941 aboard the SS Nyassa from Lisbon, spending his first three weeks in the country living on Ellis Island. There he first witnessed boys playing “a strange game with sticks,” as he would later tell his children, something he would come to understand to be baseball, a sport he would admire for the rest of his life. It was the beginning of his fierce, if not uncritical, devotion to his adopted homeland, its strange new customs and, above all, the glorious intricacies of its democratic processes, which he monitored with what would become his signature intensity.

After his family settled on New York’s Upper West Side, he enrolled in Stuyvesant High School, where he was captain of the math team, graduating in 1949.

Stein attended college at the University of Chicago and stayed on to earn his PhD in 1955. Following teaching stints there and at MIT, where, among others, he befriended future Nobel Prize winner John Nash, turning, in a rare moment of professional overlap, to his father’s Diamond District connections to help Mr. Nash buy a ring for his future wife, according to Sylvia Nasar’s book, A Beautiful Mind. 

Later, Mr. Stein spent an academic year at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. While there, he was offered a tenured position at Princeton University, joining the faculty in 1963. For decades, he held an endowed chair as the Albert Baldwin Dod Professor; at the time of his death he was Professor Emeritus. He served twice as chair of the mathematics department.

Stein’s research was primarily in harmonic analysis — roughly speaking, the study of vibrations — a basic tool in science and technology. Mr. Stein discovered new phenomena and unsuspected connections between seemingly unrelated problems. His work led to a deeper understanding of topics as varied as sound recording, the stock market, and gravitational waves. As Charles Fefferman, one of Stein’s star doctoral students and later a colleague at Princeton, has noted of his former thesis advisor, “[his] work often combines two remarkable qualities: an understanding of several branches of math, each of which normally is known only by specialists, and an astonishing ability to find connections between them. Before Stein tells you his solution, the problems involved look utterly hopeless…. Then, with exactly the right point of view and exactly the right few words, … [his] incredible insights … link everything together.”

Stein is the author of several books, now considered classics in their field. In his 70s he devoted his time to creating a series of advanced undergraduate mathematics courses at Princeton and writing, in collaboration with former student Rami Shakarchi, a four-volume textbook to accompany the course. One reviewer of the first volume referred to Stein as “certainly one of the great avatars and developers of Fourier Analysis in modern times.”

He was a prolific author and generous collaborator. His many honors include the Schock Prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1993, the Wolf Prize in 1999, and the National Medal of Science awarded by President George W. Bush at a White House ceremony in 2002. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he received honorary degrees from Peking University in 1988 (after his effort to help rebuild the local mathematical community following the devastation of the Cultural Revolution), and from his alma mater, the University of Chicago, in 1992.

Stein is survived by Elly, his wife of 59 years; a brother, Daniel; a son, Jeremy, the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a member of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve from 2012-2014; a daughter, Karen, an architecture critic and former member of the jury of the Pritzker Architecture Prize; a daughter-in-law, Anne; and three grandchildren, Carolyn, Alison, and Jason.

As a collaborator and teacher, he was known for the clarity, elegance, and enthusiasm he brought to his research, writing, and teaching. 

Stein dated his interest in science to a memory from when he was three years old, as he watched the spinning wheel of his father’s diamond polishing machine, believing he had discovered proof of perpetual motion. He soon came to understand that his so-called theory was a youthful illusion, but one that nonetheless propelled his lifelong view of mathematics as a brilliant balance of imagination and rational investigation. His interest in solving problems never waned. When he received a lifetime achievement award from the American Mathematical Society, with characteristic modesty his response focused not on himself but on the field he so loved, saying: “We can be confident that we are far from the end of this enterprise and that many exciting and wonderful theorems still await our discovery.”

———

Lorraine Erskine Garland

Lorraine Erskine Garland, 89, of Jamestown, RI, and Bradenton, FL, died peacefully with her family present on December 28, 2018 in Medway, MA.

She was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on December 9, 1929, the daughter of Madeleine Ellis and Frank Erskine. Lorraine spent her childhood in Massachusetts, Maine, and Virginia with her mother, Madeleine, and her stepfather, Alan D. Kinsley. She was an only child. Lorraine raised her children in Princeton, NJ. Later in life, she spent winters in Sarasota, FL, and summers in Jamestown, RI.

Lorraine was a graduate of Dana Hall School in Wellesley, MA.  She met her husband, Philip (“Pete”) Lincoln Garland, Jr., while studying Landscape Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, RI. She believed in civic engagement, participated in local government, and provided leadership to local associations including the Parent Teacher Association of her daughters’ school and the annual ‘fete,’ a fundraiser for the Princeton hospital. Lorraine was also a productive real estate agent in New Jersey’s Morris and Mercer counties, working for many years at Stockton Real Estate in Princeton, NJ. 

Lorraine lived her life surrounded by many beloved four-legged companions. She was a founding member of the Irish Wolfhound Association of the Delaware Valley. She was an equestrian and able coachwoman in her younger years, and an early supporter and frequent guest at polo matches in Newport, RI, and Sarasota, FL. Her final companion was Ares, a “rescue” poodle, who never left her side.

Lorraine was a loyal and devoted mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She is survived by her former husband Philip Lincoln Garland, Jr., of Englewood, FL, and Chatham, MA, and her children, Thomas Alan Garland, Katherine Garland Presswood, and Elizabeth Garland Deardorff. She also leaves behind three beloved grandchildren, Taylor, Whitney, and Sam. Finally, she will be missed by five great-grandchildren, Winston, Madeleine, Aiden, Fiona, and Ethan.

In lieu of flowers, donations will be welcome to the memory of Lorraine Garland to the Irish Wolfhound Foundation, David Milne, Treasurer, 150 Creek Rd., Phillipsburg, NJ 08865; Florida Poodle Rescue, P.O. Box 7336, St. Petersburg, FL 33734; Salmon Hospice, 37 Birch St., Milford, MA 01757; or Milford Regional Healthcare Foundation, 14 Prospect St., Milford, MA 01757.

———

Frances Brown Yokana

Frances Brown Yokana, 92, of Princeton and Greensboro, Vermont, passed away on Saturday, December 29, 2018.  

Frances was born in Princeton, NJ, and was a lifetime resident of Princeton. She graduated from Randolph-Macon College in 1948 and married Andre Yokana in 1954. In Princeton, she served as the president of the Present Day Club and was a member of Bedens Brook Country Club, the Nassau Club, and the Contemporary Garden Club of Princeton, and volunteered for numerous charitable organizations. She spent summers with her family in Greensboro, Vermont, where she was an active member of the community, and President of the Greensboro Association. She was an avid gardener and her gardens in Vermont were legendary. Her life was filled with family, friends, and flowers.

Predeceased by her parents Frederic Hamilton Brown and Frances Churchill (Woolaver) Brown; she is survived by her husband of 64 years, Andre Yokana; her son, Davis Yokana; her daughter and son-in-law, Lisa Yokana and Blake Auchincloss; and her granddaughters, Alice and Anne Longobardo.

A memorial service will be held on January 12, 2019 at 11 a.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 08542.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Nassau Presbyterian Church.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

December 28, 2018

Martha L. “Lewie” Kingsford

Martha L. “Lewie” Kingsford, 91, of Skillman passed away on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at home surrounded by her loving
family.

Born in Baltimore, MD, she was a resident of Princeton since 1976. Lewie was very active in the Princeton community, she played tennis at Pretty Brook Tennis Club, golf at Springdale Golf Club, was in reading and bridge groups, loved to travel, and enjoyed attending the New York opera, ballet, and symphony.

Predeceased by her parents Frederick W. and Martha I. (Isaacs) Lewis, Sr.; and her husband Irving B. Kingsford, Jr.; she is survived by her three daughters and sons-in-law Anne B. and Robert G. Freestone, Elizabeth B. and Charles P. Lucy, and Eleanor (Shotsie) and Steven I. Wilson; and her brother Frederick W. Lewis, Jr.

A memorial service will be held on Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 11 a.m. at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, followed by a reception at the church. Burial will be private.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Watershed Institution at www.thewatershed.org. 

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Robert Allan Chinn

Robert Allan Chinn passed away on December 21 surrounded by his family after relentlessly battling lymphoma for eight years.  

Rob was a scholar his entire life. After earning his high school diploma in his hometown of Fresno, California, Rob graduated from the University of California Berkeley with Bachelor of Science degrees in Physiology and Anatomy in 1976. He settled in the Bay Area, where he put his meticulous nature to work in medical research before starting his career in the pharmaceutical industry. He held a design patent for custom turntable weights; studied and savored winemaking and wines; and over four decades, consistently worked at improving his game — on the court, on the baseball field (especially in helping his son Matt), and on the links. When he couldn’t play, he cheered on his favorite F1 drivers and Bay Area teams (chiefly the Warriors), memorizing stats and play calls. He learned the most about love from Karen, his wife of over 41 years.

Rob also immersed himself in the history, method, and, most importantly, enjoyment of fine cuisine. He left no culture unexplored, leading to the itineraries for his family’s trips abroad to consist solely of locales for meals and vineyard excursions. To him, though, cooking and eating was essential because of the people it brought together. The more he cooked, the more he could entertain and share with those he loved.   

He left no joke untold, no photograph untaken, no inept motorist unscathed, and no friend without someone to talk to. He will be most missed by the numerous friends and family that relied on him as their phone or email buddy as they trekked to or from work (his network spanned from Hawaii to the East Coast). For all that he learned, he taught. Laughter, good food, and steadfast thoughtfulness will continue to abound in the homes of those who knew him.  

Rob is survived by his wife Karen of Skillman, NJ; children Matthew and Monica, both of Washington, DC; his sister Gail; and brother Hank. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be sent to Angels Network Charities in Honolulu, Hawaii (5339 Kalanianaole Hwy.), where his family volunteered; the MSKCC Lymphoma Team in New York (http://giving.mskcc.org), whose dutiful and caring nurses were a comfort to both him and Karen; or the Golden State Warriors Community Foundation (http://www.nba.com/warriors/foundation), whose work helps the community Rob called home for many years, and whose team long held his heart and most ardent cheers.

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Alexander Pinelli

Alexander Pinelli, 98, of Hopewell died Tuesday, December 25, 2018 at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro.  

Born and raised in Princeton, he lived most of his adult life in Hopewell. He served in the U.S. Army in WWII, and was discharged with the rank of PFC. He received a Purple Heart and a Certificate of Merit during his service with the Seventh Armored Division (“Lucky Seventh”) in France and Holland. His military engagements included Rhineland, Ardennes, and the Battle of the Bulge. He retired as a postal supervisor with the U.S. Postal Service in Princeton after 40 years of service.

Predeceased by his parents, Henry and Jennie (Bizzaro) Pinelli; his wife, Lida Lansing Pinelli; three brothers, John, Raymond, and Libert; and one sister, Mary C. Pirone. He is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Calling hours will be held on Wednesday, January 2, 2019 from 9 to 11 a.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Burial will follow in Princeton Cemetery.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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John Tufano

John Tufano, 70, of East Windsor passed away on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton. 

Born and raised in Princeton, he was a resident of East Windsor for 50 years. He was a past treasurer of the Local 354 Carpenters Union.

Predeceased by his parents Vincenzo and Anna (Cuomo) Tufano; his wife Teresa Ann Tufano; his sister Cecilia Tufano; and his brothers Joe and Vincent Tufano; he is survived by his brothers and sisters-in-law, Frank and Emma Tufano and Richard T. and Kathie Tufano; his girlfriend Faith Rogers; and his nieces and nephew.

Visitation will be on Thursday, January 3, 2019 from 9 to 10 a.m. followed by a service at 10 a.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial will follow in East Windsor Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Liver Foundation at liverfoundation.org.

December 21, 2018

Margaret Tuchman

Margaret Ujvary Tuchman, of Princeton, New Jersey, and co-Founder and President of The Parkinson Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to funding research for Parkinson’s disease, died of pneumonia Sunday evening, December 16, 2018 at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital in New Brunswick. She was 77. 

Margaret was born on November 18, 1941 in Budapest, Hungary. She immigrated to the United States in 1956, married Martin (“Marty”) Tuchman, a businessman and entrepreneur, and had a BA in Psychology and an MA in Social Work. At age 38, Margaret was diagnosed with Parkinson’s. At that time disease treatment, information, and research was limited. Combining her thirst for knowledge and passion for helping others, she began a lifelong journey to shine a light on Parkinson’s. As she learned, she shared, using early online Internet bulletin board services to connect with people around the country.  Margaret quickly became an expert — a beacon and vital go-to resource in the Parkinson’s community.

Recognizing there was not enough research funding for Parkinson’s disease, both Margaret and Marty, along with The Tuchman Foundation, got involved. Marty joined the boards of the leading Parkinson’s organizations of the time; they both joined the cause of the Parkinson’s Unity Walk; they were early supporters of the then newly-formed Parkinson’s Action Network (which today is operating under The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research); and they were among the several key grassroots advocates who worked tirelessly to help pass the Morris K. Udall Parkinson’s Research Act of 1997. But the slow pace of the legislative process to release funds remained frustrating. That frustration motivated Marty to apply fundamental business practices to accelerate the flow of dollars into the hands of researchers. In 1999, they founded The Parkinson Alliance, dedicated to raising funds for the most promising research to find a cure and to share educational information to help improve the quality of life for those suffering with the disease. 

In 2000, ever attentive to new therapies, Margaret became one of the first people in the United States to have Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery.  Seeing the need to better inform the Parkinson’s community about the treatment, Margaret started DBS4PD.org, a website dedicated to DBS information, education, and surveys designed to give the patient a voice. With DBS now well-known, this ever-growing resource is today part of The Parkinson Alliance website under Patient Centered Research.

In the years since its inception, The Parkinson Alliance also took over the management of the Parkinson’s Unity Walk and Team Parkinson. It hosts regular events, such as the annual Carnegie Center 5K & Fun Run and the Food, Wine, & Maybe Tuscany fundraiser.  At this past November’s Food event, Margaret’s good friend May May Ali, eldest child of Muhammad Ali, was the inspiring keynote speaker. To date, the efforts of The Parkinson Alliance have raised over $30 million for Parkinson’s research.

Margaret also enjoyed gardening and flowers, especially orchids, and was an avid reader on a wide variety of topics. But championing worthwhile missions was in her soul. She was an avid animal and nature lover and took pride in supporting many organizations that fought for the rights of protecting both. For over two decades she helped fund a ranch in Texas that works with abused horses. She quietly supported beneficial programs and projects too numerous to list. At her core, Margaret consistently delighted in helping those in need while always shunning attention for doing so.

Her favorite musician Leonard Cohen wrote, “There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.”  Parkinson’s may have been the crack, but Margaret simply allowed it to spread more of her extraordinary light into the world to positively affect a myriad of people.

Ever optimistic, Margaret remained deeply involved in the work of The Parkinson Alliance. She continued to be passionate in finding ways to improve quality of life and in research that would ultimately find a cure for Parkinson’s disease. She strongly believed that the voice of people with Parkinson’s and those who love and care for them must be heard.

Margaret was predeceased by her parents, Josef and Margit Ann Ujvary.  Margaret is survived by her husband and partner of 57 years, Marty; their Coton de Tulear, Mumbo; and African Gray, Lori.  She is also survived by her cousins, George Airday and Michael Erdely;  and many friends who deeply love her.

In keeping with her wishes and generous spirit, Margaret’s body and brain were donated to the University of Pennsylvania for Parkinson’s research. There will be no funeral. We welcome you to honor Margaret and her passionate work. Memorial donations can be made to The Parkinson Alliance, Post Office Box 308, Kingston, NJ 08528 or online at parkinsonalliance.org in her memory.

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George Cordell Easter

George Easter, 84, financial executive, amazing father and grandfather, and a resident of the Princeton area for over 50 years, passed away on December 17, 2018 after a brief illness. In his final days he was surrounded by his loving family.

George was born on September 8, 1934 in Spokane, Washington to Harold and Mary Frances Easter. He graduated from Culver Military Academy, Culver, Indiana in 1952. While at Culver he was a member of the varsity boxing team. After Culver he went on to Princeton University, where he earned a degree in Public and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School. As a proud member of the PU Class of ’56, he attended many Princeton class reunions over the years, and marched in the P-rade with some of his grandchildren at his 60th reunion in 2016.

While at Princeton he met the love of his life, Sarah “Sally” Jones, on a blind date. George and Sally were married in Newtown, CT, on September 7, 1957. From 1957 to 1960, he served as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Air Intelligence Unit at the Naval Photo Interpretation Center in Washington, D.C.  While still in the Navy, he attended George Washington University Law School at night, earning a law degree in 1960. George went on to earn a Master of Business Administration at Harvard University in 1961.

George and Sally moved the family to Princeton, NJ, in 1962, and George began commuting into New York City. He held various financial posts during his career including: Analyst – American and Foreign Power Company, 1962-1968; Vice President – Finance, Waltham Industries Corporation, 1968-1971; Vice President – Finance, Church and Dwight Company, Inc., 1971-1979; Vice President – Treasurer, Associated Dry Goods, 1979-1986. In New York, he was a member of the Union League Club and the Princeton Club of NYC.  

In the early 1960s, the Easters joined the Unitarian Church of Princeton. As an active member of the congregation, George served in various volunteer roles over the years, including a term as President of the church’s Board of Trustees. He served as the Treasurer of the church for decades, only recently retiring from that role. George also volunteered for the Red Cross, the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, Meals on Wheels, and was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Princeton University Store.

George retired in 1986 and was able to travel the world with his wife Sally. Their nature and cultural trips took them to Africa, Australia, China, India, France, Spain, Portugal, Egypt, Jordan, Venezuela, Costa Rica, and Belize. In the mid-1960s, the Easter family began vacationing each summer on Star Island off the coast of Portsmouth, NH. In July, 2018, George attended the All Star I family conference on Star Island with Sally, his three children, son- and daughter-in-law, and his seven grandchildren. On the Island, he spent his days visiting with family and friends, reading, puzzling on the hotel porch, and listening to the songbirds on Lindquist Deck. He was an avid reader, birder, classic movie buff, and loved puzzles of all kinds — crosswords, Sudoku, and jigsaw puzzles. For decades, his Sundays were not complete until he had finished the New York Times crossword puzzle…in pen. More than anything else, he enjoyed spending time with his dear grandchildren.  

George is survived by his wife of 61 years, Sally; children, Sally Easter, Jr., George “Cory” Easter, Jr., and Jenny Easter Nelson; son-in-law, Derrick Nelson; daughter-in-law, Josi Easter; grandchildren, Matt and Nick Brown, Chelsea, Amanda, and Cory Jose Easter, Dell and Sarah Nelson; sister, Ellie Wakefield, brother-in-law, Hugh Wakefield and niece and nephew, Amory and Austin Wakefield.

A Celebration of George’s life is planned for spring 2019.  Donations in George’s memory can be made to the Star Island Annual Fund, Morton-Benedict House, 30 Middle Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801, The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, or the charity of your choice.