March 20, 2019

Richard Stoll Armstrong

The Reverend Dr. Richard Stoll Armstrong, 18 days shy of his 95th birthday, died peacefully at his home at the Princeton Windrows in Plainsboro Township, NJ, on March 11, 2019, surrounded by his children and beloved caregiver. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 29, 1924, he was the second child of Elsie Stoll Armstrong and Herbert Eustace Armstrong, Sr.

Dick, as he was known to his family and friends, grew up in Baltimore and attended McDonogh School, a semi-military academy in Owings Mills, Maryland, where his father was head of the upper school mathematics department, athletic director, and head coach of the varsity football, baseball, and ice hockey teams. Dick excelled at sports while at McDonogh, playing for the varsity football, basketball, and baseball teams. He was captain of the baseball team, co-captain of the basketball team, and starting left end on the football team. He was the leading pitcher and center fielder for McDonogh’s 1942 baseball team, which he led in hits, extra base hits, and runs that year.

After graduating from McDonogh in 1942, Dick was awarded a Maryland Regional baseball scholarship to Princeton University, where he majored in economics. He played varsity basketball one season and varsity baseball on five different teams, including two war-time summer seasons, and was the only freshman on the 1943 baseball team. He was awarded the Underclassman Cup in 1943.

Having enlisted in the U.S. Navy in December, 1942, Dick was assigned to a V-12 unit at Princeton as an Apprentice Seaman, and was ordered to the Navy Supply Corps School in the Midshipmen/Officers Course (MOC) at Harvard School of Business Administration in June, 1944. He was commissioned as an Ensign that October, and after graduating from the MOC in May, 1945, was assigned to the USS Chandeleur as Disbursing Officer, and later promoted to Supply Officer. Dick was Honorably Discharged as Lt. (jg) from the U.S. Navy in July, 1946 and in September of that year, re-entered Princeton University as a senior under the G.I. Bill, graduating in June, 1947 (class of 1946). Dick’s senior thesis on “The Unionization of Baseball” was cited in the Senate Antitrust Hearings on Major League Baseball in 1958.

After graduation, Dick signed with the American League’s Philadelphia Athletics as a pitcher and utility infielder and was assigned to their Martinsville, Virginia, farm club in the Carolina League, later moving up to the Lancaster, PA Red Roses in the Interstate League. In September, 1947, Dick was offered and accepted a front office position with the Athletics’ Farm Department.

In January, 1948, Dick married the love of his life, Margaret Frances Childs (Wellesley, 1947) in a ceremony held in the Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ, and together they embarked on his exciting career as a baseball front office executive during which he served as the Business Manager for the minor league Portsmouth Athletics in the Ohio-Indiana League (1948-1949), and then as the first Public Relations Director for two major league clubs, the Philadelphia Athletics (1949-1952) and Baltimore Orioles (1953-1955).

In between his stints with the two clubs, Dick accepted an offer to become Copy and Plans Director of the W. Wallace Orr Advertising Agency in Philadelphia. While with the agency, Dick’s versatile writing talents were used to create presentations for potential clients, plan and produce major advertising programs, write copy for radio and television commercials, newspaper and magazine ads, and write, produce, and participate in singing commercials. He also co-produced and directed a television sports show featuring the National Football League’s Philadelphia Eagles called The Eagles’ Nest.

In October, 1953, Dick was lured back into professional baseball when he had the opportunity to establish the first public relations department for the new American League Baltimore Orioles, where his father had also been appointed Business Manager. Among Dick’s then innovative ideas as the Orioles’ first PR Director were creating the first “live” Major League mascot, “Mr. Oriole,” who made his debut in 1954 (ten years before the creation of the New York Mets’ mascot, “Mr. Met”), and developing the first Major League club fan survey. A permanent “Dick Armstrong Collection” has been established at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, comprising photographs, correspondence, and other memorabilia from both his and his father’s years in professional baseball, as well as an oral history Dick dictated for the Hall.

A dramatic “Damascus Road” experience during spring training in 1955 led Dick to leave his promising career in baseball for the pastoral ministry, a moving first person account of which is told in his book A Sense of Being Called. After graduating from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1958, Dick began his pastorate career, serving as Pastor of both the Oak Lane Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, PA (1958-1968) and Second Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis, IN (1974-1980), and Minister of Worship at the Interdenominational Congregation of Pennswood Village in Newtown, PA (2002-2018), where he was still preaching at the age of 94 up until his retirement due to his cancer diagnosis. In addition, Dick was Interim Preacher for several congregations in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and often was a guest preacher at many different churches around the country. Dick’s book The Oak Lane Story and film that followed recount the renewal of the urban Philadelphia church he served that became a racially inclusive congregation through a service-oriented outreach to the community. The story inspired congregations throughout the United States and abroad to view their parish as a mission field.

Having first matriculated as a student, Dick returned to Princeton Theological Seminary twice, first in an administrative capacity as Director of Development and later Vice President (1968-1974) and then in a faculty position as the first occupant of the Ashenfelter Chair of Ministry and Evangelism (1980-1990). He retired with emeritus status in 1990, but continued to be active in various ministries throughout the world. He served in South Africa as a member of the advisory committee for the Centre for Contextual Ministry at Pretoria University, where he assisted with the peaceful transition for black ministers who had limited educational opportunities due to apartheid. Dick also served as vice president and then president of the Academy for Evangelism and Theological Education (1987-1991), as well as editor of the Academy’s journal (1991-1997).

Dick was an exceptionally creative person who wrote poetry and music throughout his life. His song “The Connie Mack Swing,” published in 1950 as part of the year-long Golden Jubilee celebration Dick created to commemorate legendary Philadelphia Athletics’ owner/manager Connie Mack’s 50 years with the club, became the A’s unofficial theme song while the club was still in Philadelphia. Two of Dick’s songs are in Princeton University’s songbook, Carmina Princetonia, and his first hymn, written for a music course he took at Princeton seminary, was published in the United States’ Armed Forces Hymnal. In 1996 he was commissioned to write a song commemorating the 50th reunion of Princeton University’s Bicentennial Class of 1946, which was introduced by the Princeton University Band and sung by the Princeton Nassoons. His song “Tigertown Blues,” written while he was a member of the Nassoons in 1946 and for many years the group’s unofficial theme song, was featured in the 2013 film Admission starring Paul Rudd and Tina Fey.

A prolific writer, Dick authored numerous books and articles drawing upon his varied background as a Navy veteran, major league baseball front office executive, advertising copy and plans director, radio broadcaster, development officer, journal editor, teacher, coach, and pastor. At the time of his death Dick had more than four dozen unfinished book projects, including nearly 3,000 pages of unpublished poetry.

In addition to his awards for athletic and academic achievement during his school and college years, Dick received many other honors as an adult. He was the first recipient of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ (FCA) “Distinguished Service Award” in 1965, and later received the FCA’s “Branch Rickey Memorial Award” (1973) and “Life Trustee Award” (1981). The FCA, founded in 1954, was an organization Dick was instrumental in getting established and was involved with for the rest of his life: he was an officer and member of its National Board of Trustees; established the Philadelphia, Princeton, and Livingston (NJ) chapters of the FCA and assisted in the establishment of chapters in Baltimore and other cities; and served in a variety of capacities for the organization’s annual national conferences from 1958-1974. On four separate occasions Dick was invited by the Board of Trustees to become the President of the FCA; however, work and family obligations prevented Dick from accepting the position each time.

Among Dick’s other major awards and honors were the “Outstanding Service Award” from the Indiana Chapter of the National Conference of Christians and Jews (1980); the Friends of Princeton Baseball’s “Robert L. Peters Award” (1990); the first recipient of the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education’s “Charles Grandison Finney Award” (1997); the National Council of Presbyterian Men’s “Horizon 21 Award for Leadership Service” (1999); and the Albert Nelson Marquis Who’s Who “Lifetime Achievement Award” (2017).

Dick served on the Board of many not-for-profit, religious, and sports organizations, including the FCA; Princeton Theological Seminary; McDonogh School; American Boychoir School; and the Indianapolis Indians baseball club, the AAA affiliate of the American League Cleveland Indians. He was elected to the Maryland Oldtimers Baseball Association Hall of Fame in 1994, and the McDonogh School Athletics Hall of Fame in 1997.

As busy as he was with his work and volunteer activities, Dick was devoted to his wife and family. He and Margie were married for almost 66 years, prior to her death in 2013. Dick always said that he was in love with Margie “even before I met her,” because she was the “girl of my dreams” who embodied all the qualities he admired and was seeking in a life partner. Together they had five children, three of whom survive, and at the time of his death Dick was the proud and loving grandfather of seven and great-grandfather of six, with a seventh on the way.

Dick and Margie loved to travel, taking their young family all over the United States, and in later years leading groups of family members and friends on many international tours, including to Eastern and Central Europe, Australia and New Zealand, and the Holy Land. Margie also accompanied Dick on his speaking and teaching engagements throughout North America and abroad; they were an inseparable pair, joined at the heart and through their deep faith. A poet, pioneer, pastor, preacher, professor, author, singer/songwriter, and a man of many firsts who always tried to do his best in all things, Dick will be missed by family, friends, colleagues, and former students all over the world.

Dick is survived by his son-in-law, Michael Kanarek; his son and daughter-in-law Andrew and Caroline Armstrong; his son and daughter-in-law William (Woody) and Christine Armstrong; his daughter and son-in-law the Reverend Elsie and Thomas Rhodes; his grandson Derek Kanarek and his wife Rebecca; his grandson Graham Kanarek and his wife Marnie; his grandson Orion Kanarek; his granddaughter Alyssa McGlinn and her husband Francis; his granddaughter Olivia Armstrong; his grandson Seth Olsen and his wife Mary; his grandson Samuel Rhodes; his great-grandsons Charlie, Will, Elliott, Gabriel, and Julian; step-great-grandson Chili; and a large extended family of nieces, nephews, and cousins. He was predeceased by his devoted wife of nearly 66 years, Margaret Childs Armstrong, brother Herbert Eustace Armstrong, Jr., daughter Ellen Armstrong Kanarek, and son Richard Stoll Armstrong, Jr.

Arrangements by the Mather Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ (matherhodge.com). Burial will be private. A memorial service is planned for 1:30 p.m. on May 9, 2019 at Miller Chapel, Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08542.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Childs and Armstrong Family Scholarship Fund at Princeton Theological Seminary (ptsem.edu), to the Armstrong Family Scholarship Fund at McDonogh School (mcdonogh.org), or to Seasons Hospice Foundation (seasons.org).

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Catherine C. Blackwell

Catherine C. Blackwell, 106 ½, of Hopewell, NJ, passed away peacefully on February 25, 2019, at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center, Plainsboro, NJ.

Mrs. Blackwell was married to Norman P.  Blackwell for 42 years. She met Norman when the taxi she was riding in broke down in front of the Broad Street Garage. Norman was employed at the garage and later purchased it. Mrs. Blackwell worked closely with her husband as a partner in addition to doing the bookkeeping, running errands for her husband like picking up parts in Newark and Staten Island, and she even sold cars. She loved American History, singing in the church choir and the Hopewell Valley Chorus, dogs, driving cars, and wearing hats and gloves. Mrs. Blackwell was a member of the Hopewell Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary for 77 years, and a member of the Order of the Eastern Star.

Predeceased by her parents James and Catherine (Deasy) Cunningham, her husband Norman, and grandchildren, Jon A. Zuccarello and Amy B. Dula, she is survived by her daughters and sons-in-law, Catherine B. and Joseph D. Zuccarello and Dr. Nora L. and Dr. David J. Dula; her grandchildren Michael J. Zuccarello and wife Jeannette M., Kate A. Zuccarello, Dr. Molly E. Guzic and spouse Dr. Nicholas Guzic, Dr. Brian D. Dula and Kelly M. Dula; and great-grandchildren Justin M. and Anthony J. Zuccarello, Ava E. and Emily N. Guzic, and Serena R., Ashton J., Alaina W., and Tristan B. Dula and Special Family Friend Roberta Schott.

Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 5, at Mather Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ. Visitation at 10 a.m. and service at 11 a.m. Burial will follow at Highland Cemetery, Hopewell, NJ.

Memorial Contributions may be made in her name to Hopewell Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary, P.O. Box 253, Hopewell, NJ 08525 or SAVE Animal Shelter, 1010 Route 601, Skillman, NJ 08558.

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Merlynn Hale Dixon

Merlynn Hale Dixon passed away peacefully on March 13, 2019 at the age of 95, leaving behind her three children, Cynthia, Phyllis, and Kenneth and seven grandchildren, Sarah, Sean, Jessica, Samantha, Rebecca, Madeline, and Lily, and two great-grandchildren, Fiona and Milo.

Born on August 10, 1923, Merlynn Hale Cook grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her beloved mother, Fiona. She attended Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts, and after graduation moved to Rochester, N.Y., to work for Kodak as a medical illustrator. There she married and soon thereafter returned to New England living in both Woodstock, Connecticut, and Wayland, Massachusetts, where she raised her three children. In 1970, Merlynn moved to Princeton, New Jersey, where she lived for the next 49 years and where she finished raising her family.

Merlynn spent her summers from her early childhood years to her senior years at her family’s summer home in Wales, Massachusetts, located on a beautiful country lake surrounded by generations of memories of her great-grandparents, grandparents, and her mother. Her children and grandchildren have wonderful memories of time spent with her at Wales, enjoying the summers swimming, boating, playing games, and picnicking. Merlynn was a fabulous cook!

Merlynn was a talented artist, painting countless paintings of her familiar and beautiful surroundings and her beloved pets. During her years living in Princeton Merlynn was involved in many community activities, including as a teacher of yoga at the YMCA, participating in painting classes at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, volunteering at Witherspoon Public Library, and very active in the Trinity Church of Princeton.

We will always remember the sweet companionship Merlynn had throughout her life with her cats. Each one living solo with her for up to 19 years at a time. Sunny, Christie, Lucy, then Tomas.

Merlynn’s last few years were spent living at Stonebridge at Montgomery, where she was lovingly cared for.

A memorial service celebrating her life will be held on Saturday, June 22, 2019 at 11:30 a.m. at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton.

Extend condolences and share memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Gert Paul Volpp

Gert Paul Volpp of Princeton, 88, died February 8 in Philadelphia.

Born in Lörrach, Germany, in July 1930, he was the second son of the late Anna Zeller and Otto Volpp. He received his Ph.D. degree summa cum laude from the University of Basel with a doctoral thesis on the structure of the African arrow poison ouabagenin (“Zur Konstitution des Ouabeginins”) under the direction of Nobel Laureate Thaddeus Reichstein. He arrived in the U.S. in 1958 to begin a five-year postdoctoral fellowship in chemistry at Harvard University, where he engaged in a total synthesis of colchicine with Nobel Laureate Robert Burns Woodward. At Harvard he met Ching Yuan, a postdoctoral fellow working with Nobel Laureate Konrad Bloch. The two were married in Oxford, England, where Ching, originally from Beijing, had a second postdoctoral fellowship with Sir Ewart Jones. They settled in Princeton in 1963, where they raised four children. Gert lived in Princeton for 55 years.

In 1963 Gert began a 38-year career at FMC Corporation, serving as Director of Commercial Development, Research and Development, Agricultural Products Group from 1978-2001. He traveled worldwide negotiating contracts with research laboratories for insecticide research and development. Initially focused on Japan and Western Europe, he extended the purview of FMC’s negotiations to Australia, China, Korea, India, and Eastern Europe. He held patents in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, France, Spain. Switzerland, Uruguay, the United Kingdom, Belgium, South Africa, the Philippines, Romania, and the Soviet Union.

He was predeceased by his wife Ching, and is survived by a brother, Kurt Volpp of Mosbach, Germany; a sister, Helga Reichel Kessler of Rheinfelden, Germany; three daughters, Sophie and Leti of Berkeley, Calif., and Serena of New York City; a son, Kevin, of Wynnewood, Pa.; and seven grandchildren, Daniel, Anna, Thea, Julia, Daphne, Nico, and Liliana.

Gert was an avid hiker, and loved hiking in the Alps. He spent his 80th birthday hiking in Yosemite. Until the birth of his children, he enjoyed piloting both small planes (the Cessna 182) and gliders. For his 86th birthday, he went paragliding, jumping from the Elfer mountain near Innsbruck, Austria. He was also an excellent storyteller, and a member of the memoir writing group at the Princeton Senior Resource Center, where he began his memoir, Opa Stories.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Friends of Herrontown Woods (fohw.org) in his memory.

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Laura Kruskal

Laura Kruskal, renowned and beloved creator and teacher of origami, died on February 6, 2019 at the age of 95. Laura was a sparkling personality, who drew people to her and impressed them with her unique charm. She wrote and sang origami songs, like the “International Origami Anthem,” and performed origami raps as she taught her original paper fold models, whether to students in schools and libraries or to origami enthusiasts at conventions.

Laura received her undergraduate degree with a biology major and chemistry minor from Hunter College, and her master’s degree from New York University. She was introduced to origami by her mother-in-law, the late Lillian Oppenheimer, who popularized origami in the United States. It was also through Lillian that Laura was introduced to her husband of 56 years, the late Martin David Kruskal.

Laura literally thought outside of the box, as she created origami models which could be folded from a rectangle rather than from the traditional square. She started this technique as she traveled the world, often to exotic places, with Martin David, a world-famous mathematician and physicist. It wasn’t always easy to find origami paper, but letter-sized computer paper was plentiful, and her creations worked equally well with pages from magazines, which made them very accessible. Laura taught her original origami models for years in the Princeton area and around the world, not only at origami conventions, libraries, and schools, but also in prisons, in restaurants, in buses, and anywhere where people were intrigued by her and her art.

Laura is survived by her three children, Karen Kruskal (and daughter-in-law, Sheera Strick), Kerry Kruskal, and Clyde Kruskal; five grandchildren, David Strick (and his wife, Jennifer Levy), Emma Kruskal, Alexander Kruskal, Justin Kruskal, and Rebecca Kruskal; and two great grandchildren, Ryan Strick and Lyla Strick.

(Photograph by Andrew Cribb)

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Deacon Michael David Ross, Ph.D.

Deacon Michael David Ross, Ph.D., 78, a former Professor and Academic Dean at the Pontifical College Josephinum, died Sunday evening, March 3, 2019, while hospitalized in Honolulu, Hawaii, of kidney failure and complications from severe pancreatitis. A sign in his room asked that he be addressed as “Deacon Mike,” reflecting his commitment to and love for the Church.

Deacon Mike was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1940, to Sidney Ross and Lee (Genud) Ross, both first-generation Americans of Jewish descent. As members of the Communist Party, his parents worked actively with poor and marginalized people for democracy and justice, providing role models for their children’s lifetimes of social justice service.

The Ross family moved to Baldwin, Long Island, in 1948, where Michael graduated high school. He then attended Antioch College, class of 1963, where he majored in and taught history at an Antioch summer program. Following graduation, he attended Columbia University, where he earned a Ph.D. in political science, and went on to teach and serve as Assistant Dean at Columbia College.

In college and during a year abroad at Leeds University in England, Michael was a leader in civil rights activities, helping to integrate a barbershop in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and to desegregate public accommodations in both countries. While studying and teaching, he also participated in community programs at a drug rehabilitation program for young adults in New York City.

Michael transitioned to working as an administrator for several psychiatric hospitals in New York and New Jersey. He was the Acting Chief Executive Officer of Ancora Psychiatric Hospital and the CEO of both Greystone and Marlboro Hospitals in New Jersey, from 1981–1994. 

In 1990, Michael converted to Catholicism and returned to school to enrich his education and capacity for religious service. He was ordained as a Deacon in the Church on May 14, 1994, and served diaconal ministry at St. Paul’s Church, Princeton, N.J. (1994–2003).

In 2003, he earned a second Ph.D., in theology from the Catholic University of America.In 2003, Deacon Mike moved to Columbus, Ohio, to become a systematic theology professor at the Pontifical College Josephinum. He was later appointed Josephinum’s Academic Dean and then its Provost. While in Columbus, he served at St. Mary Parish, Columbus (2003–2007) and St. Joan of Arc Parish, Powell (2007–2014). After retirement from the college, he remained active with the Josephinum Distance Learning Program, which he had founded in 2008.

Deacon Mike and his wife, Betty, moved to Kona, Hawaii, in 2014, where he served as the Coordinator of Spiritual Formation for the Deacon Program of the Diocese of Honolulu, and an instructor and advisor for the Office of Permanent Deacon Formation. During this time, he also served as the President of the Board of Directors of West Hawaii Habitat for Humanity. He was actively serving in ministry at St. Michael the Archangel Parish in Kona at the time of his death.

Deacon Mike is survived by his wife of over 45 years, Betty David Ross; his beloved son, Damon Ross; his first wife and Damon’s birth mother, Jean Ross; and Jean’s husband, John Womack; his daughter-in-law, Cylin; his grandson, August; his sister, Randy Ross; his nieces, Tara and Shivani Ganguly; his grand-nephew, Sidney Roth-Ganguly; and his godchildren, Yvette Minear, her husband, Josh, and Michael “Mowgli” Bunce. His energy, kindness and wit, and his example of scholarship, service, and love of family and community, continue to live on in those who survive him, and inspire those who have been privileged to know him. We will never forget him.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, March 30, 2019, at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Kailua Kona, Hawaii. Visitation at 9 a.m., Mass at 10 a.m., and reception at 11 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the following organizations that Michael was deeply involved in: The local chapter of Habitat for Humanity in Kailua Kona, PO Box 4619, Kailua Kona, HI 96745; or St. Michael’s Catholic Church, 75-5769 Ali’I Drive, Kailua Kona, HI 96740, in memo: debt reduction.

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Dr. Thomas John “Jack” McNeill

Dr. Thomas John “Jack” McNeill, D.D.S., at 84 years passed peacefully March 12, 2019 in Princeton Hospital hospice. He will be forever adored by his wife Peggy “My Bride” married 60 years; son Keith, wife Toffee Albina, their children Claire and Ross; daughter Karin, husband Benjamin Bashore, Ben’s son Thomas; siblings William McNeill, Samuel McNeill (passed 2016), Kathleen Coffman, and their families; Peggy’s brother Robert Davis and family; Peggy’s sister Lynn Davis; extended family across the U.S., Ireland, England, and Australia; plus friends from his dental practice and sports activities.

Jack was born in July 1934 to John and May McNeill who immigrated from Ireland in the late 1920s. Raised in Gloucester, New Jersey, he graduated from Gloucester High School, Ursinus College, and University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry. Jack served 11 years in the U.S. Army. As Lieutenant Colonel in Vietnam 1969-1970 he ran a dental MASH unit outside Saigon and joined helicopter missions retrieving soldiers injured in jungle combat.

The family moved to Princeton in 1970, where Jack was a Princeton Dental Group partner and New Jersey Dental Association officer. Jack drew respect as an excellent dentist graced with a gentle touch. In the tradition of a family doctor, he ensured his patients’ comfort 24/7.

Jack’s easy warmth, humility, generosity, and dry humor charmed all he met. Socializing, outdoor play, and a deep appreciation of nature kept Jack vibrant. A trickster, Jack wound jolly tales. He eagerly shared life’s joys with his children and especially his three grandchildren. Quite an athlete throughout life, Jack enjoyed all variety of sports with a jaunty, competitive spirit. He treasured biking with a buddy to the D&R Canal towpath and lazing along its banks, #1 hoagie and magazine in-hand. He was doe-eyed over Karin’s lakeside forest home in Vermont. Greathearted with time and strength, Jack led countless moving days when his parents and next generation changed residences. At home, Jack tended his yard in any weather, ready to chat with neighbors passing the yard edge along a historic shortcut between streets. Through Jack’s stewardship and neighbors’ efforts the path is now an official Town right-of-way. In commemoration, family and neighbors have named the path “Jack’s Peaceful Passage.”

Celebrate Jack’s life on Tuesday March 26, 5-8 p.m. at Mountain Lakes House located at 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton, NJ. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the D&R Greenway Land Trust.

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Patricia Rasche McPherson

Patricia Rasche McPherson, a resident of Princeton for 56 years, died peacefully in her sleep on March 16, 2019, at Brandywine Assisted Living in Pennington, New Jersey.  Born in St. Peter, Minnesota on September 2, 1936, Pat graduated from Northwestern School of Nursing in Minneapolis in 1957 and began a career as a registered nurse at the St. Peter State Hospital the same year.  In 1958 she moved with her husband James McPherson to Baltimore, where she worked as a research assistant in the Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Hospital while her husband pursued graduate study at Johns Hopkins University. In 1962 she came to Princeton, where Jim taught history at the university and she served as director of Princeton Homemakers Services and subsequently worked as a nurse at New Jersey Neuropsychiatric Hospital and Carrier Clinic. 

Sensitive to human needs and dedicated to a life of service, she was also a deacon and elder at Nassau Presbyterian Church and originated there the monthly hunger offering which has helped feed hungry people in many lands for more than 40 years.

Pat is survived by her husband, a brother William Rasche, a daughter Jenny Long, and three grandchildren: Gwynne, James, and Anne.

A memorial service to celebrate Pat’s life will take place at 11 a.m. April 13 at Pennington Presbyterian Church, 13 South Main Street.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Princeton Hospice, 88 Princeton-Hightstown Road, Princeton Junction, NJ 08550. Arrangements are by the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington. Condolences are welcome at www.wilsonapple.com.

March 12, 2019

William Paul Jacobs

After a long decline, William Paul Jacobs of Princeton, NJ, died peacefully at home in his sleep on Sunday, March 3 at the age of 99. He is survived by his beloved wife of nearly 70 years, Jane Shaw Jacobs; two children, Mark Jacobs of Phoenix, AZ, and Anne Jacobs of West Windsor, NJ; as well as his sister, Mary Jacobs Brown of Worcester, MA; five treasured grandchildren, Jeffrey Jacobs, Robinson Jacobs, Patrick S. Jacobs, Phoebe Brown, and Madeleine J. Jacobs; and six great-grandchildren.

Bill was born in Boston, MA, on May 25, 1919 to Elizabeth G. Kennedy Jacobs and Vincent Henry Jacobs. He grew up in West Roxbury, MA, attended Boys English High School in Boston, and was graduated magna cum laude in 1942 from Harvard University, where he later received a Ph.D. in biology. He served stateside in the U.S. Army during World War II.

While doing graduate work at The California Institute of Technology, Bill traveled for a weekend ski trip to Yosemite National Park in February 1946. He found the slopes icy, so he took what he thought was a safe trail through a woods. This strategy led to his losing his way in the mountains, surviving a blizzard and 5 degree temperatures on his first night out, spending eleven days lost in the snow, eating lichen and snowmelt, and finally being rescued only after his parents and the Yosemite ski patrol had conceded his death. 

Within two years of this misadventure, Bill met and married Jane Shaw and joined the faculty of biology at Princeton University, where he remained until his retirement in 1989. He studied the hormonal control of plant development and was an early proponent of quantitative techniques in that field. “What Makes Leaves Fall,” one of his early papers published in 1955 in Scientific American, describes how a decrease in the plant hormone auxin coming from the leaf blade creates a specialized layer of self-destructing cells, the abscission layer, which weaken a leaf’s attachment to a plant, allowing a breeze to blow the leaf away.

Bill also studied a unique alga, Caulerpa, which consists of only a single cell, yet grows to lengths of three feet and differentiates into roots, stems, and leaves. In a paper published again in Scientific American in 1994, he referred to this anomaly as “a gauntlet flung in the face of biological convention” and described the work done in his lab discovering the conditions that allow Caulerpa to develop without interior cell walls.

The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1967, Bill also received the Charles Reid Barnes Life Membership Award from the American Society of Plant Biologists in 1998. He published 165 papers, including seven after his retirement. His book, Plant Hormones and Plant Development, was published in 1979.

One of Bill’s regrets when he was lost in Yosemite was that he had not danced enough.  This was in spite of having often snuck out of his second story boyhood bedroom in West Roxbury to dance at the Roseland-State Ballroom in Boston. Bill compensated during his remaining 73 years, throwing and attending dance parties, joining Jane on the dance floor at the first trigger of a good song, and playing many Fred Astaire, John Travolta, and Gene Kelly movies for captive grandchildren.

In his last years, Bill was cared for with truly amazing grace and loving kindness by his aides and nurses from HomeWatch Care Givers and from Princeton Hospice.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests a donation to HomeFront in Lawrence Township.

A memorial service will be held at The Mountain Lakes House, 57 Mountain Avenue, Princeton at noon on April 6.

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Mary Cullens Murdoch

January 3, 1933 – February 27, 2019

Mary Cullens Murdoch, a 50-year resident of Princeton, died peacefully of complications from Alzheimer’s disease on February 27, 2019 in her home at Princeton Windrows. Born in Newtown, CT, Mary was the only child of Reverend Paul Archibald Cullens and Agnes Robinson Cullens, and the wife for over 60 years of William F. Murdoch, Jr. who predeceased her in 2018.

She is a graduate of the Dana Hall School and Wheaton College in Massachusetts, where she was recognized in 2006 with an Alumni Board award.  A standout student-athlete on Wheaton’s varsity basketball team, Mary also sang in the a cappella group Wheaton Whims. She met Bill Murdoch in Boston while teaching third grade at the Tower School in Marblehead, MA. They married in 1958. They lived together in Pittsburgh, PA, Fairfield, CT, and Baltimore, MD, before relocating to Princeton in 1968.

A former President of the Princeton Day School Parents Association and head of the local Wheaton College alumni group, Mary also served on the board of the Princeton University McCosh Health Center and more recently chaired the Windrows Welcome Committee. She volunteered for decades to host parties for Princeton alumni and co-chaired several major Princeton reunions.  She was recognized as an honorary member of Princeton’s Class of 1952. Mary spent 70 summers at her family’s wilderness retreat on the French River in Northern Ontario. She and Bill welcomed family members and guests to the beauty and tranquility of island life where they were surrounded by fresh water and Canadian wildlife.

Mary is survived by four children and their spouses, Mary (Molly) Murdoch Finnell and Samuel C. Finnell, III (Skillman); Elizabeth Murdoch Maguire and Henry C. Maguire, III (Lewisburg, PA); Timothy R. Murdoch and Pascale Lemaire (Montreal); and Kate Murdoch Kern and John W. Kern IV (Bethesda, MD).  She had nine grandchildren: Julia and Eliza Kern (San Francisco); Liliane and Maxime Murdoch (Montreal); Henry Maguire (Calgary) and Alexandra Maguire (New York City); Maggie Finnell (Princeton), Sam Finnell and Morgan Bunting Finnell (Boston), Louise Finnell Trapasso and Jon Trapasso, plus two great-grandsons, Frederick and William Trapasso (Metuchen).

The family is planning a private burial service in Wakefield, RI. In lieu of flowers, people are encouraged to donate to the Poodle Club of America Rescue Foundation, Inc: www.poodleclubofamericarescuefoundationinc.org or to a charity of choice.

———

Leonard J. La Placa

Leonard J. La Placa, 95, of Princeton died Sunday, March 10, 2019 surrounded by his loving family. Born in Jamesburg, NJ, he resided most of his life in Princeton. Leonard was the co-owner, along with his late wife Laurel, of Nassau Interiors, Princeton for over 60 years. Leonard was a devoted Husband, Father, Grandfather, and an energetic member of the Princeton Community. Mr. La Placa’s charming and warm personality touched all that knew him.

Son of the late Giuseppe and Mary (LaMar) La Placa, wife of the late Laurel (Smith) La Placa, he is survived three daughters and three sons-in-law, Laurie and James Holladay, Claudia and Michael George, and Trinna and Rachid BenMoussa; a sister, Josephine La Placa; and four grandchildren, Clayton George, Jawed BenMoussa, Noor BenMoussa, and James Holladay.

The Funeral Service will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery. Friends may call on Friday, March 15, 2019 from 4–7 p.m. at the Funeral Home.

Memorial Contributions may be made in Leonard’s memory to his favorite charity: Princeton Nursery School, 78 Leigh Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542.

———

Maureen Stevens

Maureen Stevens (Cahill) passed away at her home in Princeton, New Jersey, on Sunday, February 24, 2019. 

She was a lifelong Princeton resident and an active St. Paul’s Catholic Church parishioner. Maureen had a varied career as she was a nurse, a real estate agent, and an interior designer. However, most of her working career was spent at Telequest as an office manager — a job she loved. She considered her co-workers at Telequest as family. Maureen was proud to have a large family and numerous loyal friends.

She was predeceased by her loving husband, Michael Stevens; beloved friend David Dilts; and older brother, Daniel Cahill. She is survived by her sister, Ann Caton, and seven brothers: Thomas Cahill, Jr., Peter Lappan (wife Glenda), Richard Lappan, Charles Lappan (wife Corrie), William Lappan (wife Kelly), Robert Lappan, Gerald Lappan (wife Lorraine); as well as several nephews and nieces that she loved dearly.  Maureen was known for her contagious sense of humor and love of having a wonderful time.

A Memorial Mass will be celebrated on Saturday, April 27, 2019 at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08542.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Frank L. Tamasi

Frank L. Tamasi, 87, of Princeton died Sunday, March 10, 2019 at Princeton Care Center. 

Born in Pettoranello, Italy, he resided in Princeton for 60 years. He was a member of St. Paul’s Church. He served in the Italian Army. He was a supervisor at Princeton University and also was employed by ETS.

Son of the late Sebastiano and Elpidia (Paolino) Tamasi, husband of the late Liliana (Palumbo) Tamasi, he is survived by his daughter and son-in-law Debbra and Mark Sullivan; his sisters and brother-in-law Ersilia Nini, Esterina Toto, and Clarice and Antonino Cifelli; a sister-in-law Maria Palumbo; two grandchildren Christine Trump and her husband Ian and Kathleen Sullivan; one great-granddaughter Ellanore Mae; and several nieces and nephews.

Calling hours will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 14, 2019 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

The Funeral will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, March 15, 2019 at the funeral home.

Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. on Friday at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Burial will follow in Princeton Cemetery.

March 6, 2019

Linda M. Mondone

Linda M. Mondone, longtime resident of Princeton, died on January 2, 2019 at the    Masonic Village at Burlington in Burlington, New Jersey.

Linda, born March 18, 1938, grew up and lived in Princeton on Hamilton Avenue. She was a dedicated and enthusiastic worker at the Princeton University Library from 1965 until she retired in 2003.

Linda was the daughter of  Margaret (nee Carnevale) and Raymond Mondone originally from Parma, Italy. Raymond was a former Chief of Police of Princeton Borough. Her older sister Virginia Mondone Pegram died in 1981.

Linda was an avid reader and was passionate about scholarship and education. She loved nature, art, and writing and was a trusted friend and confidant.

She was a beloved member of Nassau Presbyterian Church for 67 years. At Nassau she made many friends and was loved and cherished by her church family. She gave of herself in every way and especially treasured conversation, prayer, and sacred music.

A Memorial Service in thanksgiving to God for Linda’s life will take place at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton on March 17, 2019 at 2 p.m. in Niles Chapel. A reception will follow.

———

Jeremy Chen Peterson

Jeremy Chen Peterson, 22, passed away on February 19, 2019 of unknown causes in Claremont, CA.

Born in Palo Alto, CA, Jeremy spent his early years in Menlo Park, California and Toronto, Canada. He went on to attend Princeton schools, Littlebrook and John Witherspoon, graduating from Princeton High. At the time of his passing, he was attending Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, CA, where he was working towards a dual degree in economics and psychology.

Jeremy had an adventurer’s passport, one with the extra pages. He traveled with family and friends to places as far-flung as Columbia, Cuba, France, Honduras, Hong Kong, Italy, Iceland, Mexico, Panama, Portugal, and Spain to name just a few. He also spent a good deal of time, especially summers, at his grandparents’ ranch in western Nebraska. 

While Jeremy had great passion for art, books, music, and films, he reserved some of his greatest enthusiasm for food. His tastes ran the full gamut from gourmand to gourmet, from hog wings at the Amish market to multi-course Michelin-starred tasting menus. His family and friends can all easily recall many meals and food runs shared and often organized by Jeremy. 

Jeremy is survived by his parents, Jason Peterson and Audrey Chen; his sister, Avery; his paternal grandparents, Pete and Jonnie Peterson; and his maternal grandmother, Effie Chen. 

A service of remembrance will be held at Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 on Friday, March 8, 2019 at 5 p.m. with a gathering of family and friends beginning at 4 p.m. 

In lieu of flowers, we are asking for friends and family to make a gift towards a scholarship fund being established in Jeremy’s name at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Mercer County. Checks can be mailed to: Boys & Girls Club, 212 Centre Street, Trenton, NJ  08611.

Please contact Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, NJ at (609) 924-0018 with questions about the service.

———

Thomas Robert Robinson

Thomas Robert Robinson passed away peacefully in his home in the evening on Sunday, February 17, 2019.

Tom met his wife of 50 years, Dina Nicol Robinson, while they were both students at The George Washington University. Tom is survived by his loving wife, as well as his two spectacular daughters, Jennifer R. Closser, a lawyer currently living in Princeton, New Jersey, and Elizabeth R. Benjamin, a trauma surgeon in Los Angeles, California, and his much-adored grandchildren, Sarah and Thomas Closser, and Isabella Benjamin.

Born in Houston, Texas, on August 23, 1943, Tom was raised in Midland, Texas. He received his undergraduate degree and PhD in Economics from The George Washington University in Washington, DC. He attended the University of Aberdeen in Scotland on a post-graduate fellowship between his undergraduate and doctoral studies. He worked for many years at Merrill Lynch and Oppenheimer & Co in New York City.

Tom was known for his devotion to his wife, children, and grandchildren, his deep love of learning, and his support of the Boys and Girls Club of New York City, Trinity Church in Princeton, New Jersey, and as a mentor to young professionals in the business community.

The family will hold a memorial service at 11 a.m. on April 4th, 2019 at Trinity Church, with reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, New Jersey.

February 26, 2019

Stanford H. Spencer

Stanford H. Spencer of Belle Mead, formerly of Princeton, died February 15 after a brief illness. He was 69 years old. A devoted son and brother, he was pre-deceased by his parents, Helen S. and James L. Spencer, both of Princeton. He leaves behind two sisters, Nancy S. Rushton (Alan), of Flemington and Linda S. McClellan (Robert), of Princeton Junction; three nephews, Andrew (Patricia), Daniel, and Garrett; niece Cassandra; and grand-niece Adelina.

“Stan” attended Miss Mason’s, Princeton Country Day School, the Chapin School, and Princeton High School Class of 1967. He earned his BS degree from The College of NJ.

Stanford served in the United States Army Reserves.

Stan was a passionate patriot, outdoorsman, and lover of animals. He would go out of his way to help anyone in need and was a very talented Mr. Fix It.

Stan was self-employed in the greater Princeton area, and was formerly employed as an engineer by Johnson and Johnson and RJ Nabisco.

Family service will be private this summer in Ohio.

Arrangements made by Mather Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

Donations in his memory may be made to Trinity Episcopal Church of Princeton, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 or SAVE Animal Shelter, 1010 Route 601, Skillman, NJ 08558, Savehomelessanimals.org/donate. Stan volunteered time here.

———

Jeanette Wong

Jeanette Wong, devoted mother, teacher, and humanitarian, passed away peacefully on February 10th at the age of 96. Friends and relatives are invited to attend her Remembrance Gathering on March 9th, 2 p.m. at Bear Creek, 291 Village Road East, West Windsor, NJ.

Born in Tianjin, China, Jeanette grew up at the Jade Pagoda near the Emperor’s Summer Palace. One of few women to attend Fudan Univ. in China, she escaped from war in 1945 and came to the U.S., got her BS at Bucknell University, a Master’s at Columbia University, and an advanced degree in teaching from the City College of New York.

Jeanette married Kit Y. Wong in 1952 and raised three children in Dover, NJ, and later moved to Princeton Junction, NJ. She was a public school teacher in NYC and commuted for 24 years and was drawn to the newly-arrived Chinese immigrants to help them transition to the U.S., based on her own life experience. Her favorite song was “God Bless America.” Jeanette opened her own home to over 14 relatives and two Vietnamese boat people to get them started for life in America.

Open, generous, warm, and kind, she was devoted to her family. Jeanette was married to Kit for 65 years until his recent passing, and she leaves behind three children, Dr. Richard Wong, Dr. Michael Wong, and Lisa Wong, along with seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Jeanette had an enchanting singing voice and loved the dance performances of her daughter Lisa. She came from humble beginnings, escaped war in China, and emigrated to America, where she embraced all of the things America represents. She led a joyous life and leaves a legacy of abundant generosity.

Arrangements are under the care of Ruby Memorial of Milltown, NJ. For full obituary and donations visit: rubymemorialhome.com.

———

Kay A. Langeland

Kay A. Langeland, of Griggstown, NJ, passed away on February 20th, after a long illness.

Kay was born in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, NY, in 1929. She spent her early childhood living in Norway. Upon returning to the United States in 1935, she settled with her family in Bay Ridge. After high school, she worked for The Mutual Insurance Co. of N.Y. in Manhattan. She retired from Princeton University after 26 years.

She married Kenneth Langeland in 1950. After the birth of her two daughters, she moved to Griggstown in 1962. During the 1960s, she was a girl scout leader for Troop 253 of the Raritan Girl Scout Council. She was active in the Griggstown Historical Society and loved the history of Griggstown. She attended Bunker Hill Lutheran Church for 57 years. She was deeply appreciative of the vast efforts of her doctors, especially Dr. Peter Yi, nurses, family, and friends that helped her fight her illness. She enjoyed gardening, traveling, photography, and loved life. She often said she felt blessed to have lived a life filled with love, kindness, faith, many dear friends, and a close loving, devoted family.

Daughter of the late Anders and Henriette Morch, she is survived by her husband of 68 years, Kenneth; two devoted daughters and sons-in-law, Lori and Lawrence Dudek of Skillman, NJ, and Dale and David Antonevich of Mechanicsville, VA; her beloved granddaughters, Susanne Dudek of Griggstown, NJ, Kristi Nelson and husband Peter and her great-grandson Avery Thomas Nelson of Pennington, NJ; her sisters Esther Spindanger of Phoenix, AZ, and Alita Fjeldsgaard of Kristiansand, Norway; and a brother-in-law, Charles Langeland of Cranbury. She had many cherished nieces and a nephew.

Her family wishes to thank “Kay’s Angels,” Elin, Kim, Alexa, Sasha, Masha, Mary, and Ginna.

The Funeral Service was held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, February 26 at the Bunker Hill Lutheran Church, 235 Bunker Hill Road, Griggstown. Burial followed in the Griggstown Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Bunker Hill Lutheran Church, 235 Bunker Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 or The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Donor Services, PO Box 98018, Washington, DC 20090.

Arrangements are under the direction of M.J. Murphy Funeral Home, Monmouth Junction.

February 20, 2019

Lalitha Harish-Chandra

Lalitha Harish-Chandra, known as Lily, passed away at home on Thursday, January 24, 2019.

Born in Warsaw, Poland, Lily spent most of her childhood in Bangalore, India, with her Polish mother and Indian father. Lily’s father was an agricultural scientist; her mother, after earning a doctoral degree in child psychology, became a teacher of French, German, and Russian at the Indian Institute of Science. When her family spent time in Italy, Lily added Italian to her language repertoire that already included English, French, and Hindi. In 1939 Lily and her mother were returning to India from Italy by ship on the day England declared war on Germany. Her father came home six months later after a long eastward journey by land, and Lily loved hearing stories of his adventures on this desert trip during her childhood.

One of Lily’s mother’s students, 22-year-old Harish Chandra, lodged in her family’s house and first met Lily when she was 11 years old. Seven years later the couple were married in Mysore; they then moved to the U.S. where Harish had a faculty position in the mathematics department at Columbia University. Subsequently Lily earned a B.S. in zoology from Barnard College and later she studied Linguistics at Columbia. Their two daughters were born in New York City. In 1963 Harish was offered a position at the Institute for Advanced Study and the family moved to Princeton. They spent many happy years here. After a long illness, Harish passed away in 1983.

During the more than 50 years that she lived in Princeton, Lily was an active participant in the town’s community life. As a faculty wife, a parent, a coworker, and later as a senior resident, she always welcomed newcomers and maintained ties to those she had known for many years. After her children left home, Lily joined the staff of the International Finance Section of Princeton University’s Department of Economics, where she worked for 11 years. Prior to this, she was a volunteer at Princeton’s Professional Roster; here Lily took a special interest in women who were returning to work outside the home after raising children. For many years Lily also served on the boards of Crossroads Nursery School and of Princeton Community Housing.

1n 2012 Lily moved to Windrows. She always wanted to maintain her independence, an aspect of life in the U.S. that she particularly liked. Amiable, inclusive, gracious, and articulate, Lily was a dear friend worth having.  Lily will be dearly missed by many.  She is survived by daughters Premala of Highland Park, NJ, Devaki of Berkeley, CA, and four grandchildren. 

A celebration of Lily’s life will be held on February 23, 2019 at 3:30 p.m. at the Institute of Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, and all who knew and loved Lily are most welcome. Her family suggests that donations in Lily’s memory may be given to the following organizations:  Doctors Without Borders, Shanti Bhavan Children’s Project, Tunnel to Towers Foundation, and Women for Women International.

———

William Dudley Jones

Lieutenant Colonel William Dudley Jones passed away, surrounded by love, on February 13, 2019 in Skillman, NJ. He was 86.  

Known for his extraordinary kindness and telling wonderful stories, Bill loved his beloved wife, children, and grandchildren above all things. He was a proud West Point graduate who served and gave unselfishly to his country, his family, his God, his friends, and community. Our hearts are broken but we are richer for being loved by him. 

Bill is preceded in death by his parents, Newton Wesley Jones and Elizabeth Dudley Jones. He is survived by his loving wife of 59 years, Nancy Dawn Zarker Jones; daughter Jennie Dawn Jones Hanson (husband Jeff Hanson) of Nashville, TN; son Wesley Zarker Jones (wife Kim Durham) of Chesapeake, VA; and four “grand” grandchildren Connor Wesley Jones, Christian William Hanson, Taylor Carolyn Jones, and Sara Dawn Hanson. 

Born May 7, 1932 in Okmulgee, Oklahoma, Bill graduated from high school in Cheyenne, Wyoming, the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1953, and Princeton University with a Master’s in Civil Engineering in 1958. He served 20 years active duty in the U.S. Army with service in Korea, Europe, Southeast Asia, and various locations in the continental U.S. He served in the Corp of Engineers and later in the Medical Service Corp. Bill received numerous military awards including Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster, Korea Service Medal, UN Service Medal, National Defense Medal with One Oak Leaf Cluster, and Ranger TAB.  

Retiring from active military service in 1973, Bill continued his service to others with a 20-year civilian healthcare administration career at Hunterdon Medical Center in Flemington, NJ, as Director of Facilities and then as Vice President of Support Services. He was a Fellow of both the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Society of Healthcare Engineers. He also served as President of the Healthcare Engineers of New Jersey, spoke nationally on leadership, and was an Instructor for The Goldfarb Institute.

Bill was a 45-year resident of Belle Mead. Known as a tremendously caring person, Bill volunteered often in his community, serving on the Montgomery Township Board of Health, School Board Management Review Committee, and Citizen’s Advisory Board. Bill was an Eagle Scott and continued his lifelong support of this program as an Eagle Scout Advisor for Boy Scout Troop 46. He and his wife were avid travelers, enjoying trips to Russia, Kenya, and Churchill Canada, and taking their family on many wonderful family reunions. 

A deeply religious man with a generous heart, Bill was a professed life member of the Third Order of Society of Saint Francis. He was Episcopalian, a past associate member of the Montgomery United Methodist Church, and most recently attended the Princeton United Methodist Church. He loved his church, gave generously to charity, and was grateful for and blessed by family and friends. 

Funeral arrangements were under the direction of the Hillsborough Funeral Home, Hillsborough, NJ.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Princeton United Methodist Church or the United States Military Academy at West Point. 

February 13, 2019

Irving Lavin

Irving Lavin, Professor Emeritus in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, passed away in Princeton on February 3 at the age of 91.

Lavin was an art historian distinguished by his charismatic and challenging teaching, rigorous search for the relationship between form and meaning in the visual arts, and the conviction that the study of the history of art was the study of the history of ideas. He was renowned for his tenacious explorations of difficult subjects, and his willingness to see all the facets and possibilities of their solutions. 

“Irving exemplified the characteristics of a world leading scholar and humanist in his generosity, enthusiasm, and curiosity, which spanned diverse disciplines,” said Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director and Leon Levy Professor. “The Institute community, where Irving made his intellectual home for 45 years, was enriched by his presence, his insights, and his dear friendship. He will be greatly missed here and around the world.” 

Lavin’s deep knowledge of Italian art and culture was the result of over 50 years of study, particularly in Rome, where he embraced the city and encouraged Italian art history to move into the world of intellectual creativity. For this gift, the city offered him many honors, including the Tercentennial Medal, commemorating the death of Gianlorenzo Bernini (1980), and the Premio Daria Borghese (1981), and appointed him Honorary Member of the Corporation of Sculptors and Marble Workers of Rome as well as Membro Straniero della Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. He also received the Premio Internazionale “Galileo Galilei,” from the University of Pisa (2005), the Sescentennial Medal, commemorating the birth of Donatello, from L’Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, Florence (1986) and was made Accademico d’Onore by Accademia Clementina, Bologna (1986). He died as he was about to fulfill his last invitation: to be plenary speaker at the Fondazione Caetani colloquium on sixteenth-century Roman sculpture (March 2019). His last article on “The Silence of David by Gianlorenzo Bernini” will be published posthumously in the periodical Artibus et Historiae, in the Spring 2019 issue.

“Irving Lavin continued to be part of the life of the School of Historical Studies until a few weeks before his passing. The breadth of his knowledge on the history of art and culture was phenomenal, as was his ability to recognize connections between seemingly disparate phenomena,” said Angelos Chaniotis, Professor of Ancient History and Executive Officer of the School of Historical Studies. “With an alert mind and youthful curiosity, he took a genuine interest in the projects of the Members, created bridges between the disciplines, and stimulated discussions.”

Lavin began his career studying philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and at the invitation of Bertrand Russell went to Cambridge University to become his tutee. He soon became aware that such a theoretical field was not for him and took up more practical studies, namely the history of art. Within ten years he had degrees from New York University and Harvard University, and had won the prestigious Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize for Scholars under 40 three times (’59, ’62, and ’68) — so often, in fact, the paradigm for the prize was changed. In 1966, Lavin began a series of discoveries, the first of which brought to light the earliest marble portrait bust made by the young prodigy Gianlorenzo Bernini at the age of 14 years. That discovery was only the first of many previously unknown Bernini busts made throughout his career. Lavin’s last contribution was a black-and-white marble sculpture of the famous Roman lawyer Prospero Farinacci (d. 1619), published in the spring of 2018.

Lavin was born on December 14, 1927, in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his B.A. from Washington University (1948), his M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1951), and an M.A. (1952) and Ph.D. (1955) from Harvard University for his dissertation, “The Bozzetti of Gianlorenzo Bernini.” He taught on the faculties of Washington Square College, New York University (1957–59; 1963–66); Vassar College (1959–61); the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1967–73); and Princeton University (1974–90). Lavin joined the Institute’s School of Historical Studies as a Professor in 1973 and became a Professor Emeritus in 2001. 

Reflecting on Lavin’s appointment and early years as a Professor in the School, the late Carl Kaysen, IAS Director 1966–76, observed in an Oral History interview, “I found it interesting that Irving could talk about nineteenth-century English art as well as about Bernini and as well about Tunisian mosaics. […] Irving fulfilled the notion of real intellectual interaction across the faculty boundary.” With John Elliott, Professor in the School from 1973–90, Lavin worked to make the School more cohesive in the 1970s, with a focus on actively encouraging the appointments of younger Members. As Elliott recalled in an Oral History interview, Lavin viewed the Institute as an international center with an international message and as “a place of refuge for younger people to get on with their own work as visiting Members.” 

Lavin’s publications show his wide-ranging intellectual interests: from late antique architecture (Triclinia) to North African, particularly Tunisian, floor mosaics, the Renaissance (Donatello, Michelangelo, Pontormo, and Giovanni Bologna), the Baroque (Caravaggio and Bernini), to the twentieth century, with essays on Picasso and Jackson Pollock. He also communicated easily with practicing artists and was close friends with George Segal, Mel Bochner, Frank Stella, and traveled with and wrote about Frank O. Gehry.

His books include Bernini and the Crossing of St. Peter’s (1968); Bernini and the Unity of the Visual Arts (1980); Past–Present: Essays on Historicism in Art from Donatello to Picasso (1993); Santa Maria del Fiore: Il Duomo di Firenze e la Vergine Incinta (1999); and Caravaggio e La Tour: La Luce Occulta di Dio (2000). The first two volumes of a projected six-volume edition of his collected works have been published as Visible Spirit: The Art of Gianlorenzo Bernini (2007–09), while the third volume has appeared as Bernini at St. Peter’s: The Pilgrimage (2012). A gathering of his essays on modern and contemporary art, The Art of Art History, has also appeared in Italian as L’Arte della storia dell’arte (2008).

Lavin was a celebrated lecturer: he gave the Franklin Jasper Walls Lecture at the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York (1975); the Slade Lectures at Oxford University in 1985; the Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures at the University of Michigan and the American Academy in Rome, 1985–86; the Una’s Lectures in the Humanities, University of California, Berkeley, 1987; and the Andrew W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., in 2004. In 1993, Lavin hosted a centennial symposium on the work of Erwin Panofsky at the Institute for Advanced Study, where Panofsky had been a Professor.

In addition to his scholarly production, he gave considerable efforts to shaping the directions of art historical research in North America. He was a founding member of the committees charged with the creation of three new institutes dedicated to research in the history of art and architecture in America and abroad: The J. Paul Getty Research Center (Los Angeles); The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA), the National Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), in Montreal, Canada.

In 2011, he and his wife, Professor Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, co-authored a small book titled Truth and Beauty at the Institute for Advanced Study, in which they explore the origin and historical framework of the Institute and its seal, designed in 1931 by French artist Pierre Turin. Lavin writes in the introduction, “It is our joint hope that, to some extent, this perhaps excessively academic study expresses the gratitude we both feel for the precious gifts we have received over the years from this wondrous place.” 

Lavin is survived by his wife of 66 years, Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, a distinguished art historian; their daughters, Amelia Lavin and Sylvia Lavin, her husband Greg Lynn; and grandchildren, Sophia Lavin Lynn and Jasper Lavin Lynn.

February 6, 2019

Linda Goldstein

Linda Goldstein passed away peacefully on January 27, 2019, surrounded by her family and friends, at the age of 67. Linda faced her long-term illness with courage, determination, and grace.

Despite coming from humble origins, Linda worked very hard and had a long and robust career in the insurance industry. While working full-time, she attended college at night, and eventually graduated with a bachelor’s degree with honors from Douglass College at Rutgers University.

In her retirement, she volunteered at Princeton Hospital and the Princeton Learning Cooperative. Her life forever changed when she met her true love, soulmate, and husband, Bruce Goldstein. The light of Linda’s life were her children, Sara Goldstein (Jordan) and Daniel Goldstein (Alyssa). Linda was an incredible mother and told her children how much she loved them each and every day. In addition to her husband and children, Linda is survived by her sister, Diane Hajdamowicz; mother-in-law, Evelyn Goldstein (Ascher, of blessed memory); and many beloved in-laws, nephews, nieces, and cousins.

Even with her health issues, Linda lived life to its fullest. She was very loved and will be missed by all who knew her. Memorial contributions may be made to Princeton Medical Center Foundation at www.princetonhcs.org/giving.

Services were entrusted to Mount Sinai Memorial Chapels, East Brunswick. To leave a message of condolence, please visit www.msmc.us.

———

Marilyn A. Lynch

Marilyn A. Lynch, 82, of Princeton died peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, on Saturday, February 2, 2019 at Brandywine Senior Living at Princeton. Born in Buffalo, NY, she was a resident of Princeton for over 46 years. Marilyn was a member of St. Paul’s Church and the Princeton-Pettoranello Sister City Foundation.

Daughter of the late Anthony and Matilda (Cramer) Monaco, she is survived by her devoted husband of 58 years, Charles A. Lynch; her daughters Nancy van der Horst and Cara Lynch; sons-in-law Jan van der Horst and Rafael Alvarez; grandchildren Rose van der Horst and Rafael E. Alvarez; two brothers and a sister-in-law Anthony and Rose Monaco, Jr., David Monaco; niece Victoria Pohlman; and nephews Paul and John Monaco. The family would also like to acknowledge the many caregivers who tended to Marilyn over the last four years.

As a child, Marilyn and her brothers spent five years at the German Roman Catholic Orphanage in Buffalo. Though sadly separated from her parents, she had many fond memories of the care she received from the Sisters of St. Francis. Her mentor, Sister Francesca, inspired her to become a teacher and a lifelong advocate for children. A graduate of D’Youville College in Buffalo, NY, Marilyn started her career as an elementary school teacher, and taught for seven years in the Buffalo area, then South Bend, IN, and Westfield, NJ. 

Marilyn went on to earn her master’s degree in Nutrition from Rutgers University in 1979 and returned to the workforce offering pre/post natal nutritional counseling for the WIC (Women, Infants and Children) program in Newark, NJ. She later joined WIC at the NJ State Department of Health in Trenton, as a Program Coordinator and then as Assistant Director for all WIC agencies in NJ for more than 25 years. She was a staunch advocate for children and breastfeeding mothers, and she pioneered policies to address and serve the homeless, those stricken with HIV/AIDS, and more. She addressed many conferences nationwide on the advances that the NJ WIC Program had instituted and she developed a mentoring and internship program to groom recent Nutrition graduates, in an effort to better prepare those joining the field for certification exams. 

Marilyn passionately and determinedly championed causes that she believed in and gave her all to realize her vision. She retired from the Health Department in 2006 and received many accolades for her contributions to the health and welfare of NJ women and children. 

Marilyn was an avid tennis player until her early 70s, and competed in local tournaments and Volvo Tennis. She often advanced to the final rounds, and faced opponents more than 20 years younger. She was a fierce competitor. 

In her leisure, Marilyn enjoyed gardening, local symphony events, going to the Metropolitan Opera in New York, fine dining, and many travels and cruises with her husband, Charles. In 1965, they famously embarked on their first trip to Europe with toddler Nancy in tow. They traveled around Europe for three months with no jobs or home to return to. That was the first of many adventures together.

A memorial mass will be celebrated at St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton at 11 a.m. on Friday, February 8th.  Burial services will be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul’s Church or to D’Youville College.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Dede Lawson-Johnston

Dede Lawson-Johnston passed away peacefully on January 28 after a 70-year love affair with her surviving husband, Peter, and decades of devotion to their family. She was born Dorothy Hammond in Owings Mills, MD, to Donald and Molly Hammond and developed a signature mischievous wit at the nearby Garrison Forest School. In 1950, she married Peter, now honorary chairman of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and chairman of the Harry F. Guggenheim Foundation, and together they extended the Guggenheim family legacy in art and philanthropy.

She was a prolific hostess and fundraiser for many causes including the Guggenheim Museum, serving as gala Co-Chair on several occasions, as well as the Princeton Medical Center, New Jersey Neuropsychiatric Institute, and Planned Parenthood. She was known for overwhelming generosity and hospitality to legions of family and friends, and especially enjoyed playing tennis, bridge, and dancing. She was a member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, The Colony Club, Edgartown Yacht Club, The Present Day Club, The Contemporary Garden Club, Bedens Brook Club, and The Jupiter Island Club.

More than anything, she will always be loved and remembered as the supportive and deeply loyal matriarch of a clan that includes four surviving children and their spouses, Wendy and Tom McNeil, Tania and Sam McCleery, Peter and Karen Lawson-Johnston, Mimi and Nat Howe; her sister Mary “Dumpsy” Hackney; more than 20 grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and a lifetime of beloved dogs of every shape, size, and demeanor. Her extraordinary life was celebrated at Christ Memorial Chapel in Hobe Sound, FL, on Monday, February 4. In lieu of flowers, donations will be gratefully accepted by the Garrison Forest School (gfs.org; 300 Garrison Forest Road, Owings Mills, MD 21117). 

January 30, 2019

Sylvia B. Mann

Sylvia B. Mann passed away peacefully on January 15, 2019 at her home at 775 Mt. Lucas Road, Princeton, with her family present. Widow of esteemed American historian, Arthur Mann, and the mother of McCarter Theatre Center’s Artistic Director, Emily Mann, and New York literary agent, Carol Mann, Sylvia leaves two grandsons, Nicholas Bamman and David Helene; two sons-in-law, Gary Mailman and Howard Helene; a granddaughter-in-law, June Lee; and a great-grandson, Oliver Arthur Bamman.

Born in New York City on April 16, 1921 (a year after women got the right to vote, as she would often say), Sylvia was a lifelong feminist. She grew up in Paterson, N.J., attended New Jersey State Teachers’ College, and moved to Massachusetts after marrying Arthur Mann. While he attended Harvard graduate school, Sylvia taught elementary school in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and was active in The League of Women Voters. After the family moved to Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1955 for Arthur Mann to teach at Smith College, Sylvia soon returned to school, receiving a Master’s degree in Education from Smith College, and became a remedial reading specialist, founding and directing a remedial reading center in the Northampton public schools. When Arthur Mann became Preston and Sterling Morton Professor of American History at the University of Chicago in 1966, Sylvia continued teaching remedial reading in Chicago, privately, to all ages — from young people to illiterate adults — and also taught at Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a consummate teacher. But her particular genius was for love. She adored her family and they her. When she turned 92, she moved to Princeton from Chicago to be nearer to her family, and her family had the great privilege of sharing her last years with her on a daily basis. A brilliant being, she was remarkably loving, wise, and profoundly intuitive. She knew the world, but her world in her later years was her family. Until the end, she maintained a fierce pride in the accomplishments and humanity of her children, grandchildren, and their spouses. We will love her and carry her with us, always.

All ceremonies will be private. In lieu of flowers, please send donations in Sylvia Mann’s name either to McCarter Theatre Center or the Southern Poverty Law Center.

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Virginia (Ginny) Petrone Goeke

Virginia (Ginny) Goeke, 84, of Kingston, passed away on January 26, 2019 at Compassionate Care Hospice at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital at Hamilton, NJ, after a brief illness, surrounded by her loving family.

Mrs. Goeke was born in Trenton and raised in Princeton before moving to Kingston 56 years ago. She was a graduate of Princeton High School, Class of ’52. Ginny retired from Century 21 Carnegie Realty to provide daycare for her grandchildren. She loved family gatherings and photography. She was a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Kingston Volunteer Fire Company.

She is the daughter of the late Victor W. and Alice Scheck Petrone, sister of the late Victor W. Petrone, Jr., and great-grandmother of the late Emilia Sophia McDonald. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Robert L. Goeke, Sr.; her son Robert Goeke, Jr. of Kingston; son and daughter-in-law, Richard and Petra (Felkl) Goeke of Bridgeport, VT; daughter Debra Goeke of Hopewell; six grandchildren, Melissa, Jennifer, Pamela, Christa, Patrick and Jeffrey; four great-grandsons; and many nieces and nephews.

A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. on Monday, February 4, 2019 at St. Paul Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Burial services will be private.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Kingston Ladies Auxiliary, PO Box 131, Kingston, NJ 08528.

Extend condolences and share memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Gavin Lewis

Gavin Edward Harry Lewis died peacefully at home, in the company of his loving wife, on January 20, 2019, in Princeton, New Jersey. He was a few days short of 76.

Born in Sutton, Surrey, England in 1943, Gavin Lewis was the son of the late Michal Hambourg, a celebrated concert pianist, and the late Edward Lewis, an architect. Gavin attended Westminster School in London and then Oxford University, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts in History. He then earned his Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. His doctoral studies took him to Vienna, Austria, and to Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, where he met his future wife Nadia Katyk. After their wedding in Bratislava in 1978, Nadia joined Gavin in New York City. Soon after, they settled in Princeton, NJ.

For over 30 years, Gavin taught Western Civilization to undergraduate students at John Jay College of Criminal Justice-CUNY. His research and publications include studies of central European history, Sumerian civilization, Athenian politics and religion, print and culture in the Renaissance, and the decipherment of Egyptian writing. With historian Thomas H. Greer, Gavin co-authored A Brief History of the Western World, a widely-used undergraduate textbook. Gavin is also the author of Church and Party in Political Catholicism: The Clergy and the Christian Social Party in Lower Austria, 1887-1907; Tomás Masaryk; Close-Ups of the Past: Western Civilization Case Studies; and WCIV. He also worked as a book editor, editing countless works of scholarship for major university presses.

Throughout his life, both professionally and personally, Gavin was a tremendous reader and writer. His commitment to the study of history and the humanities persisted well into his retirement, and he was at work on a book about the Roman Fifth Macedonic Legion at the time of his death.

Above all, Gavin Lewis cherished his family life. He was a devoted husband to his wife of 40 years. Together, they raised four children and, in recent years, took great joy in their five grandchildren. Gavin Lewis is survived by his wife, Nadia; his son Michael and his wife Irena; his daughter Anna and her husband Nicholas; his son Alexander and his wife Mandy; his daughter Dorothea and her husband Béla; as well as by five grandchildren, Nicholas, Sofia, Clara, Isadora, and Henry.

Gavin Lewis was buried at Princeton Cemetery on Tuesday, January 22, 2019. He will be greatly missed and his memory cherished.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home Princeton.

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Thomas Osborne Stanley

Thomas Osborne Stanley, 91, died on January 14, 2019 at his home in Oxford, Maryland. Born in Orange, New Jersey, he was the younger son of Edmund Allport Stanley and Emily Hasslacher Stanley.

After attending public schools in South Orange, he went to The Lawrenceville School, graduating in 1945. He served in the US Navy from 1945 to 1946, then attended Yale University, earning a BE and ME in electrical engineering. In 1951 he and Nanette Lee Grodnick of Pelham, New York, were married.

Mr. Stanley worked at RCA Corporation’s David Sarnoff Research Center in Princeton, New Jersey, for his entire career, beginning in 1950. RCA sponsored a 1958/9 sabbatical at Cambridge University, England, with Lee and family, where he studied with computer pioneer Maurice Wilkes. He had a walk-on part at the debut of color television, happily contrived the world’s first transistorized pocket radio, and was midwife at the birth in the early 1960s of the MOS transistor — the core component of microprocessors. He predicted that “the geometry and simple fabrication of these devices will someday permit integration of thousands on a single wafer.” In research management, he held titles of Staff Vice-President, Systems Research and Staff Vice-President, Research Programs, including responsibilities for laboratories in Zurich and Tokyo. He was issued 14 patents in the fields of color television, transistor circuits, video disc systems, and flat-panel television displays.

Tom and Lee made their homes in Princeton and in Mantoloking, NJ, and in Manhattan, before moving to Oxford in 1992. He was engaged with civic organizations both in Oxford and further afield, including Washington College’s Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the Maryland ACLU, and the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was a founding contributor to the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

In his wallet he carried a hand-written card stating: Listen to diverse voices / Seek new ideas / Embrace variety / Resist stereotypes / Respect diversity / Explore outward / Educate yourself.

Mr. Stanley was predeceased by a daughter, Bridget Alexandra; a son, Mark Raoul; his wife Lee; and brother Ted. He is survived by two sons, Tom and Alex; a daughter, Susan; two grandchildren, Daisy and Vishveshvara; and six nephews and nieces. A memorial celebration will be held in Oxford in May.

For online condolences, please visit www.fhnfuneralhome.com.

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Doris Ayres Brinster

Doris Ayres Brinster died peacefully at Stonebridge on Wednesday, January 23, 2019. She was 97 years old.

Doris was born in Springfield, NJ, and raised in Roselle, NJ. She excelled in school, allowing her to enter college at age 16. She attended the Women’s College Greensboro North Carolina, one of the few schools that would take young students. She earned a B.S. in Secretarial Administration.

Doris met her husband, the late John F. Brinster, in 1941 and they were married in Princeton on December 8, 1945. John graduated in 1943 from Princeton University and was working in the Palmer Laboratory. They built a home and raised their three children in Princeton. Doris was very active in town: she was a member of The Present Day Club for many years, a member of The DAR, and president of the Women’s College Club from 2002-2003. She worked for Audrey Short Realty and for the Law Board department at ETS.

She is survived by her daughters, Jaye White and Meg Michael; and her son, John E. Brinster. She is also survived by her nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. The family will be holding a private burial service. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at www.alz.org.

January 23, 2019

Norman Itzkowitz

Professor Norman Itzkowitz, 87, passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, on January 20 in Princeton, New Jersey, where he had resided for over 65 years. Norman was a beloved professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University and served as the Master of Wilson College, one of the University’s residential colleges, from 1975 to 1989. He was the author of a number of highly regarded books in his field of Ottoman and Turkish Studies, including The Ottoman Empire and Islamic Tradition; Mubadele: An Ottoman-Russian Exchange of Ambassadors, co-written with his friend Prof. Max Mote; his translation of Halil Inalcik’s The Ottoman Empire: The Classical Age, 1300-1600; Immortal Ataturk, co-written with his dear friend and collaborator Dr. Vamik Volkan; and, reflecting the wide range of his academic interests, Turks and Greeks: Neighbors in Conflict, co-written with Dr. Volkan; and Richard Nixon: A Psychobiography, co-written with Dr. Volkan and Andrew Dod. Later in life he wrote a series of children’s history books for Scholastic with co-author Enid Goldberg.

Norman Itzkowitz was born on the Lower East Side of New York City in 1931. His father, Jack Itzkowitz, was born in Lowicz, which today is in Poland. His mother, the former Gussie Schmier, was born in Bobrka, a suburb of Lviv, which today is in Ukraine.

Norman attended Stuyvesant High School in New York City and then the City College of New York, which was, at the time, known for producing great scholars and not-bad athletes. Norman was both, winning the College’s Cromwell Medal in History and playing on the varsity lacrosse and fencing teams. On graduating from City College, he was admitted to Princeton University Graduate School. At Princeton, he studied under his mentor, the great historian Lewis Thomas. Upon his teacher’s death, he completed Prof. Thomas’s fundamental Elementary Turkish, still in use today. During graduate school he married his college sweetheart, Leonore Krauss. When he was awarded a prestigious Ford Foundation grant to study in Turkey in the mid-1950s, she accompanied him and they lived there for several years. They returned to Turkey often in the 1950s and 60s, and their son Jay was born in Ankara. Their daughter Karen was born in Princeton.

Well into his traditional academic career Norman developed an interest in psychoanalysis and went back to school in New York City at the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis. He trained to become a lay analyst, eventually seeing a small number of patients in New York. He felt that becoming a practicing analyst would be the most genuine way to engage in psychohistory, a discipline which merged his two interests. It was during this period that he co-wrote his psychobiography of Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey, working with Dr. Vamik Volkan of the Psychiatry Department at the University of Virginia Medical School. The book was regarded as a groundbreaking application of psychoanalytic theory to modern Near Eastern history. He extended his academic work in the area of psychoanalysis into hands-on work in the area of inter-ethnic conflict resolution. He traveled to Estonia where he worked with Dr. Volkan on reducing Estonian-Russian tensions following Estonian independence. Prof. Itzkowitz was also one of the earliest Princeton scholars to develop online teaching materials, in particular his online lecture series The Demonization of the Other: The Psychology of Ethnic Conflict in the Balkans.

Perhaps as an outcome of his interest in psychology, Norman became increasingly involved in the on-campus life of the students at Princeton, becoming the Master of Wilson College, one of the residential colleges where students live and take their meals. Norman loved this work and was beloved by the students, who referred to him as “Uncle Norm.” He organized regular trips to New York City to the opera (one of his passions), Broadway shows, and sporting events. He was committed to helping students become compete adults. He viewed exposure to culture and particularly to New York City as vital to this effort. Many of his innovations became standard at the other residential colleges. He served on the Committee on Undergraduate Life (CURL) which radically re-organized undergraduate life at Princeton by bringing in the residential college system. While these innovations were objected to at the time by many alumni, today they form the basis of the Princeton undergraduate experience.

Norman’s love of fencing and sports continued throughout his life. He served as a faculty advisor to the successful Princeton fencing and hockey teams. Later in life he was delighted when his granddaughter, Aliya Itzkowitz, became a champion sabre fencer.

Norman is survived by his wife of 65 years, Leonore, his son Jay and his wife Pria Chatterjee, and his daughter Karen and her husband A. Norman Redlich, and four granddaughters, Anjali and Aliya Itzkowitz and Ruby and Dvora Redlich. He is also survived by his sister Edith and various nephews, nieces, and grandnephews and grandnieces. He also leaves behind a large group of prominent Ottoman historians who studied with him over many years.

He remained fully committed to Princeton until the end, living right in town. Norman and Leonore were a familiar sight taking their usual morning walk along Nassau Street, where he would stop in to see his many friends. Perhaps because of the circumstances of his own childhood he had a way of relating to all he came in contact with, from the most august scholars at the University to its working staff. In many ways he felt closest to those who had not had his advantages and his luck, and to those who had not been surrounded by the same love and affection that he had always felt from his students, friends, and family.

Funeral services were Tuesday, January 22 at Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, Ewing, with burial at Beth Israel Cemetery, Woodbridge. The period of mourning was observed that evening at the Itzkowitz residence in Princeton.

The family respectfully requests memorial contributions to a charity of the donor’s choice.

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Mary Fedorko

Mary Fedorko died peacefully in her sleep on January 15, 2019 in her home at Acorn Glen in Princeton, New Jersey. She was 95.

Born in Bens Creek, Pennsylvania, Mary was the daughter of the late Michael and Mary (Kozemchak) Madaychik. As a young girl, Mary moved with her family to a farm on Union Road, Kingwood Township, New Jersey where she grew up.  She attended a one-room school on Union Road, followed by Frenchtown High School.

During World War II Mary served as a reporter for the Calco Diamond, a weekly newspaper of American Cyanamid in Bound Brook, NJ, doing interviews and special interest stories, many of them about Cyanamid employees serving in the war. She later reported and wrote for the Delaware Valley News in Frenchtown, NJ, and then contributed to I Remember: The Depression Years, 1929-1941, published by The Hunterdon County Office on Aging. She was also an inveterate writer of letters-to-the-editor to protest, compliment, question, or praise. An avid lifelong learner, Mary was an active member of her local book group and took college classes into her 80s.

As a long-time resident of Kingwood Township, Mary served her community as a member of the Kingwood Board of Education; president of the Kingwood Township Parent Teachers Association; Brownie leader; member of the Frenchtown and Flemington Women’s Club; and the League of Women Voters. Because of the contact with teachers that it gave her, she loved her work with the Hunterdon County Office of the New Jersey Department of Education, where she served as a Certification Consultant and secretary to the County Superintendent and the County Vocational Coordinator. Perhaps her greatest delight was serving as a hostess for over 100 Hunterdon County Adult Education tours across the United States and in Europe. Her role allowed her to travel widely, learning eagerly about the places she visited and the people she met, including her fellow travelers.

Mary is predeceased by her beloved husband of 68 years, Nick Fedorko; sister Katherine Zelenski; brother Andrew Madaychik; half-brothers Samuel, John, George, and Michael Hrychowian; and half-sisters Anne Lelo and Rose Felix.

She will be sorely missed by her daughter Kathy Fedorko and her husband Peter Macholdt of Hopewell, NJ; son Nick Fedorko, III and wife Sandra Zimmer Fedorko of Morgantown, WV; grandsons Evan Fedorko and his wife Rebecca Fedorko of Morgantown, WV, and Matt Fedorko and his wife Rachel Terman of Athens, OH; granddaughter Sarah Fedorko Macholdt of Philadelphia, PA; great-grandchildren Cormac, Elias, and Liadan Fedorko, and Juniper Fedorko Terman; many nieces and nephews; and dear friends.

A service to celebrate the life of Mary Fedorko will be held on Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 2 p.m. at the Flemington Baptist Church, 170 Main Street,
Flemington, NJ 08822. Memorial contributions may be made to the Flemington Baptist Church.

———

Peter Allington Marks

Peter Allington Marks, age 64, son of late Professor John H. and Aminta (Willis) Marks, died at home in Princeton, New Jersey, on Sunday morning, January 13th following a courageous battle with cancer.     

Born December 8th, 1954 in Princeton Hospital and educated through high school in Princeton’s public school system, Peter graduated magna cum laude from Hamilton College in 1976 with a BA in Latin, and from Wharton Business School in 1981 with an MBA in Finance. He spent summers at the St. Lawrence River’s 1000 Islands where boats, games, and time with summer friends brought him great joy.

With a knack for numbers and problem solving, Peter spent the first ten years of his professional life in Manhattan at Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, followed by positions at Banker’s Trust, and Dillon, Read & Co., where he developed a keen understanding of real estate financing. Moving then to Florida, he honed his understanding of real estate development working as Project Partner for Trammell Crow Residential and later Aoki Corporation. Wanting more freedom to pursue his own projects, however, Peter opted in 1989 to do consulting and be self-employed.   

While in Florida, Peter met his future wife, Mia Brownell Williams, whom he regularly referred to as his wise counsel, skilled proofreader, and dearest friend. They accompanied each other for the next 30 years from Florida to Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and finally to Princeton, where on December 17th, 2018 they married. 

Often skeptical of what many consider progress, Peter advocated for the preservation and dignity of tradition. It was this perspective that led him to write numerous opinion pieces in the local papers, serve as Co-Chair of the Princeton Joint Revaluation Commission and member of the Borough’s Historic Preservation Review Committee and Housing Authority, and in 2016 run for mayor of Princeton. Dignified, humble, and loving, Peter will be fondly remembered.

Peter is survived by his wife, Mia Brownell Marks; his sister Fleur (Marks) and William Rueckert and their children Cleveland and Grayson (Hellmuth) Rueckert, Elizabeth (Rueckert) and Patrick Henry, and Julia (Rueckert) and Brett Shannon, and their grandchildren Chase, Hailey, and Henry; and his brother John and Belle (Potter) Marks and their children, Phoebe, Anna, and Eliza.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, February 2, 2019, at the Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton.

Contributions may be made to the Nassau Presbyterian Church or Grindstone Methodist Church, Clayton, New York.

January 16, 2019

LaVerne Edna Deik Hebert

LaVerne Edna Deik Hebert of Kendall Park, NJ, concluded a life well lived at the age of 95 as she passed away on January 8, 2019. The youngest of several children by hard working German parents, LaVerne was a lifelong resident of NJ, and is the last of her generation. She is survived by a niece Caroline Bradbury of Vadnais Heights, MN, and nephew William Dodds of Livingston, NJ. 

A graduate of the School of Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital, LaVerne was trained as a Registered Nurse and worked in the Radiology Department. In 1957, she married Jules Hebert and together they ventured into the printing business, purchasing The Copy Cat in Montgomery Township. Upon Jules’ early death, LaVerne took over the company located in Research Park, Princeton, and it became LDH Printing. The business thrived under LaVerne’s careful control and strict quality standards. She printed stationery and business cards for hundreds of local businesses, so her connections in the community were wide and varied. LaVerne was known for bringing in young folks to work with her. She served as a role model, demonstrating dedication and the work ethic that she was known for. A scholarship is provided every year to a Montgomery High School student in memory of LaVerne’s husband. 

LaVerne was a committed community volunteer serving as the Treasurer of The Rocky Hill Fire Company for decades. She belonged to Soroptimist International and the Present Day Club of Princeton. LaVerne was an original member of the Princeton Medical Center Auxiliary, serving on the board for many years. She ran the coffee and gift shop in the original hospital. LaVerne was best known for her leadership in organizing the White Elephant Rummage Sale which raised significant funds for the hospital and was one of the longest running events in the community, held annually for 100 years. 

LaVerne will be missed by many people in our community. Her positive spirit and can-do attitude were an inspiration not to be forgotten. The burial will be private, however a Memorial Service will be held in the upcoming months to celebrate the life of LaVerne Hebert, a life well lived. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Christ the King Lutheran Church in Kendall Park or The Rocky Hill Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 

———

Walter Scott Blomeley

Walter Scott Blomeley, formerly of Sullivan, Illinois, passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 10th, 2019 at Greenbriar Nursing Home in Bradenton, Florida, at the age of 91. Visitation will be Thursday, January 17th from 5 to 7 p.m. at Reed Funeral Home in Sullivan. Funeral services will be Friday, January 18th at 10:30 a.m. at Reed Funeral Home, with internment and military rites conducted by Sullivan American Legion Post 68 afterwards at Greenhill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Wounded Warriors Project in Scott’s memory. Online condolences may be sent to the family at reedfunerahome.net.

Scott was born on February 6th, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, to Ralph and Marion Hillard Blomeley. As a young man, Scott attended Farragut Naval Academy in New Jersey. While there he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. In 1945, Scott served in the Pacific after the end of World War II. Scott later attended Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. While attending Tulane, he was called back into service to fight in the Korean War. During his time in Korea, Scott was listed as Missing in Action while engaged in fighting as one of the “Chosin Few.” Scott was a highly-decorated veteran of the USMC, receiving the bronze star and three purple hearts.

After returning from Korea, Scott worked for his father’s company, Blomeley Engineering, in New York. He married Jane Harmon on September 18th, 1954 in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and lived in Princeton, New Jersey. Scott was an active member of the Princeton community; volunteering to coach JFL, serving on the First Aid and Rescue Squad, Princeton and Kingston Fire Districts, and helping start an “Up with People” group.

In 1974, Scott moved his family to Sullivan, Illinois. He worked as a pipe fitter at Clinton Power Plant until his retirement. Scott served on the Sullivan School Board, was on the Sullivan Fire Protection Squad, and was well known for being “Santa Claus” in Sullivan and elsewhere. He and his wife, Jane, also enjoyed helping at Shelby County Community Services. He was an active member of the VFW, DAV, KWVA, American Legion, and the Marine Corps League.

Scott was a very loving, jovial, and caring person, with a zest for life. He will be missed by his family and many friends. Surviving are his children Betty Jane Boyer (Ben) of Bethany, Illinois; Kathryn Ann Cantrall (Don) of Springfield, Illinois; Cynthia Lee Selby (John) of Shelbyville, Illinois; and Scott Harmon Blomeley (Marsha) of Sarasota, Florida. Also surviving are eight grandchildren, Shannon Patterson (JP), Blake Crockett (Jana), April Reagan (Zac), Sarah Nichols (Zach), Nicholas Selby, Nathan Nielson, Miles Cantrall, Amy Cantrall; and six great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents; first wife, Jane, in 2007; and his second wife, Barbara, in 2016. The family would like to thank Greenbriar staff for their care and friendship.

———

Stuart Joseph Bellows

Stuart Joseph Bellows, born December 29, 1931, died without warning at the home he shared with his loving and devoted partner of 35 years, Gerald Mushinski, in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico on December 28th, the eve of his 87th birthday.

A born musician, had an unusual childhood, both raising chickens, which included selling eggs to Albert Einstein, and practicing the piano or organ two hours a day! (When in high school, his devoted parents bought him a pipe organ, which required tearing out the staircase in order to install it in his bedroom.)  A graduate of Princeton High School, he attended the Yale School of Music before receiving a B.A. from Wesleyan University. He studied at the North German Organ Academy with Harold Vogel, and received a Master’s Degree from New York University Business School. Stuart then joined his parents at Bellows, Inc., their retail clothing store in Princeton, where he eventually became proprietor until he sold the business in the 1980s.

He was very engaged in the arts in Princeton, as former board member of The Westminster Choir College, and of the McCarter Theatre. In the mid-nineties, he and Gerald moved to San Miguel where he had wonderful friends and an active life.

Stuart is survived by his sister, Phyllis Bellows Wender, her husband Ira Wender, five nieces and nephews, ten grand-nieces and nephews, and many cousins. Especially cherished is Francine Greenberg Carlie. It is yet to be determined if there will be a memorial service. If so, it will be announced here.

———

Mary Balogh Hultse

Mary Balogh Hultse, 92, formerly of Princeton, passed away on December 10, 2018, in Flushing, New York. A warm, bubbly person, she had an encouraging word for all she met – from maintenance men to store clerks to people on the street.

As a successful advertising executive at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Mary Hultse commuted to Princeton from an apartment on the Upper West Side, where she was a regular at Riverside Church. Then she bought a second apartment, a fourth-floor corner walkup on Palmer Square, so that she could look out over Princeton University and enjoy walking around town. She retired in 1990.

With a passion for the arts – she loved to sing, act, and dance – she joined local theater groups and played Aunt Eller in Oklahoma at Washington Crossing. She was beloved by the staff at Richardson Auditorium, where she volunteered as an usher. Devoutly faithful, she enthusiastically participated in the life of Princeton United Methodist Church (PrincetonUMC) and was in charge of the altar guild. She reveled in her Hungarian heritage and loved Nora and Edina Ban, daughters of Tomas Ban and Ildiko Rosz, as if they were her grandchildren. 

Mary insisted on seeing the best in everyone. This served her well when, in her 70s, her memory failed to keep up with her very stubborn determination to chart her own course. Her many admirers — including a 10-member team from PrincetonUMC, the Ban family, social workers at Princeton Senior Resource Center, and Palmer Square staff — rallied to help with all aspects of daily life so that a charming elder could stay independent for as long as she could. Then she was cared for in her brother’s Long Island home before transitioning to a senior living facility.

Predeceased by her parents, Anna and John Balogh, and her brother, John Balogh Jr., she is survived by her nephew (John Frank Balogh), her niece (Nancy Ann Balogh) and Margaret Krach (Nancy’s wife, who cared for Mary in her later years), and also her special friends, Tomas Ban and Ildiko Rosz.    

A memorial service will be at Princeton United Methodist Church, 7 Vandeventer Avenue, on Monday, January 21, at 1 p.m. Everyone who knew Mary is invited to this celebration of her life and to a reception afterward.

———

Lynne (Lyn) Marcia Ransom

Lynne (Lyn) Marcia Ransom of Hopewell Township, a lifelong musician and composer whose spunk, generosity, and intellect transcended genres and generations, stepped down from the conductor’s podium on December 14, 2018, at age 71.

Lyn was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., and raised in Martinsville, Ind., where her family nurtured in her a love for music and education. A graduate of Oberlin College, she followed her passions wherever they led, including teaching at universities, writing early childhood curriculum for the HighScope Foundation, directing music at the Princeton United Methodist Church, and hitchhiking to India, where she studied sitar for a year with Vilayat Kahn. Lyn later earned graduate degrees at Eastern Michigan University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cincinnati, where she received a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting.

In 1987, Lyn founded Voices Chorale, a Princeton-area ensemble that toured Europe three times and premiered dozens of new works. She also served as a guest conductor throughout the region. In 1992, Lyn was honored by the Princeton, N.J. Arts Council for her outstanding contributions to the area’s cultural life and in 2007 by the YWCA Tribute to Women. In 2017, Chorus America awarded its Education and Community Engagement Award to Voices, citing how it “exemplifies the highest commitment to education and outreach programs.” Unique among these is Lyn’s Young Composers Project in which over 500 elementary school children have created compositions and heard them performed by Voices.

After three decades as artistic director, Lyn celebrated her retirement as she conducted the Voices Chorale and full orchestra in a stirring performance of Johannes Brahms’ “A German Requiem.”

In 1998, Lyn began working with Music Together, the internationally acclaimed early childhood music program, first directing their lab school, then teacher training and certification, and finally co-authoring an adaptation for preschool. Lyn’s work has touched millions of children around the world through this program — which she got to experience first-hand as a grandma!

Diagnosed with breast cancer in early 2005, Lyn’s creative response was key to her ongoing recovery: she began composing “Cancer Coping Songs,” using humor and music for alleviation. Even after the cancer returned in 2014, Lyn thrived for years, writing and performing more Cancer Coping Songs, conducting major works with Voices, and being a loving wife, mother, sister and grandmother.

She died peacefully in her home, with her husband at her side.

Predeceased by her parents, Hugh Wrislar and Audrey Faye (Banta) Ransom, Lyn is survived by her husband, Kenneth K. Guilmartin; her son, Coray Seifert and his wife, Katie; her daughter, Sophia Seifert and her husband, Dan Lopez-Braus; her stepdaughter, Lauren Kells Guilmartin and her husband, James Barry; her grandchildren, Jackson and Alicia Seifert; her sister, Gail Sandra Ransom; her sister, Janice (Ransom) Kerchner and her husband, Jim Kerchner; and many nieces and nephews.

A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2019, at 2 p.m., at Trinity Church in Princeton, NJ, located at 33 Mercer Street.

Contributions designated for the Young Composers Project Fund may be made to Voices Chorale NJ.

January 9, 2019

Alexander Perry Morgan Jr.

Alexander Perry Morgan Jr. (Perry), architect and longtime member of the Princeton community, died peacefully on January 4th in his home after a Christmas full of family. He was 94 years old.

Perry will be remembered as a man of great integrity, with a deep, warm sense of humor who loved his work as an architect and was always helping others. He loved reading to his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, as well as sailing, playing tennis and golf, painting, and appreciating classical music. He was a loving father and devoted husband. He adored the natural world and cherished summers spent with his family on North Haven, Maine.

He was born May 8th, 1924, in Paris, France to Janet Croll Morgan and Alexander Perry Morgan. One of his earliest memories included seeing Charles Lindbergh parade through the streets of Paris after his first transatlantic solo flight. The family moved to New York City in 1927, where Perry attended the Buckley School and grew up with his two younger sisters, Margaret and Caroline.

Perry went off to boarding school, St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, where he began a love of chemistry and rowing that continued at Princeton University. His college education was interrupted by World War II. He served three years in the Army, most of which was spent in Europe, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant in the 283rd Engineering Combat Battalion.  

On returning to Princeton, he joined the Ivy Club and studied architecture like his father, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, Woodrow Wilson Scholar, and as valedictorian for the class of 1946. He was on the first Princeton Lightweight rowing team to win at the Royal Henley Regatta. After graduation he continued his studies at Princeton, earning his master’s degree in architecture in 1952, and was honored with a Fulbright Scholarship to study architecture in Italy.

Perry’s European travels brought him both education and love. While skiing in Austria, he met two American women who, on their return to New York, introduced him to their roommate, Elisabeth Harrison (Liz). During a hurricane, on August 13th, 1955, Liz and Perry were married — a formidable, happy union that was to last 63 years.

Perry and Liz settled in Princeton in his family’s longtime home, Constitution Hill, and he continued, for a short time, to work as an architect in New York City. In the ensuing years they had four children: Jamie, Lisa, Peter, and Matthew.

Perry and Phil Holt, architecture school classmates, formed a nationally recognized architecture firm — Holt Morgan Russell — where he worked until his retirement. In the 1980s, he converted Constitution Hill from a Jacobean style estate into an innovative clustered-housing community, the first of its kind in Princeton, inspired by northern European design that prioritized open space and privacy, while preserving the historic structures and grounds.

Throughout his entire career, Perry volunteered his time in the Princeton community and beyond. For many years he served on the Princeton Zoning Board and worked with Dorothea’s House, the local Italian-American organization. He was on the North Haven Golf Club Board of Directors and was on the architect’s advisory board for the design of the new North Haven Public School. He was also a longtime member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, Springdale Golf Club, and the Nassau Club.

Perry is survived by his wife Liz, his sister Margaret, his four children and their spouses, 13 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his sister Caroline.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to one of the many causes for which he cared deeply: The Ocean Conservancy (oceanconservancy.org) or Habitat for Humanity (habitat.org).

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church on Saturday, February 2nd at 1:30 p.m.  

———

Herman S. Ermolaev

Herman S. Ermolaev, Professor Emeritus of the Princeton University Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, died peacefully on January 6, 2019 at the age of 94.

Born on November 14, 1924 in Tomsk, Siberia, Herman spent his youth in the Don region of southern Russia. During the turbulent years of World War II, Herman left the USSR. He was part of the forced repatriation of Cossacks form Lienz, Austria in 1945, from which he escaped. Herman then completed Russian secondary school in Salzburg and entered the University of Graz.

In 1949, Herman came to the United States to finish his undergraduate degree at Stanford University. He then pursued doctoral work at the University of California-Berkeley, from which he earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1959.

In 1959, Herman started teaching in the Slavic Department at Princeton, where he spent his entire academic career. As an expert on Soviet literature and the Nobel-prize winning author Mikhail Sholokhov, Professor Ermolaev was widely published in both the United States and in Russia. He was particularly fond of teaching, and was known for his survey course on Soviet literature, which he brought alive through personal reminiscence, history, and literature. As many as 350 students a semester enrolled in this course. He also offered upper-level undergraduate courses on the Russian short story and advanced Russian courses. Professor Ermolaev retired in 2007.

Professor Ermolaev is survived by his loving wife Tatiana (Kusubova); son Michael Stigler (and his wife Mireille) of Lausanne, Switzerland; daughters Natalia (and her husband Theodor Brasoveanu) and Katya Ermolaeva, both of Princeton, NJ; four grandchildren, Natacha, Matthieu, Grégoire, and Nadezhda; and one great-grandchild, Alissa.   

A Russian Orthodox funeral service will be held on Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Vladimir’s Russian Orthodox Church in Jackson, NJ. Burial will follow at St. Vladimir’s Cemetery in Jackson. Flowers may be ordered through Narcissus Florals (732) 281-0333.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Timothy E. Ryan Home for Funerals (732) 505-1900. Condolences may be sent to www.ryanfuneralhome.com.

———

Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron

Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron, 96, died in Princeton, New Jersey, on December 15th, 2018. Born in Cape May, NJ, in 1922, she grew up in Cape May and Jenkintown, PA. She graduated from Swarthmore College as an English major in 1943 and joined the Navy that same year. She was a Lieutenant Junior Grade stationed at Naval Supply Depot Mechanicsburg, PA, where she worked in Communications as a coder/decoder on the Enigma machine. There she met her future husband, the well-known Princeton miler Lt. William Robert Bonthron (d. 1983), a Naval Supply Officer recently returned from a lengthy tour in Oran, Algeria. They were married in 1946, lived briefly in Williamsville, NY, and moved to Princeton, where they raised four children: Jennifer Bonthron Waters, of Easton, MD; Susan Jane Bonthron of Guilford, VT; William Deas Bonthron of Hopewell, NJ (d. 2016); and Thomas Spencer Bonthron of Pittsburgh, PA (d. 2009). She was also a beloved stepmother to William Bonthron’s son William James Bonthron of Ottawa, Ontario (d. 2002), and daughter Katherine Katama Bonthron of Munich, Germany (d. 2014), and aunt of Jill Arace of Waitsfield, VT.

Jane enjoyed bridge and golf and was a longtime volunteer with the Princeton Hospital Aid Society and Meals on Wheels. She is survived by her two daughters; four grandchildren, Beatrice Waters Kalinich, Robert Knight Waters, Caitlin Bonthron Roper, and Anna Jane Ruff; three step-granddaughters, Alexandra and Fiona Bonthron and Catriona Gannon; and great-grandchildren, Emily and Helen Kalinich and Wyatt and June Kroyer. Her life will be celebrated at a private gathering in Cape May, NJ, in the late spring.

———

Patricia Anne Peacock

August 5, 1944 – December 29, 2018

Dr. Patricia Anne Peacock (Speelman), 74, beloved mother, grandmother, and sister, passed away on December 29, 2018, after a long and bravely fought battle against cancer.

Pat was born in Crestline, Ohio, but spent her youth in Piscataway, New Jersey, where she, her three brothers and sister all participated in building their family home. She graduated from St. Peter’s High School in New Brunswick, New Jersey. An avid lifelong learner, she received advanced degrees from Colorado State University and Rutgers University, ultimately earning her doctorate in adult vocational education. She taught adult education classes at George Mason University and Strayer University. Prior to being diagnosed with cancer, Pat had gone back to school at The College of New Jersey to pursue a teaching certificate in early childhood education.

An ardent believer in working to achieve one’s dreams, Pat directed the George Mason University Enterprise Center on the Manassas, Virginia, campus. She also served as the Director of the Rutgers University Regional Small Business Development Center in Camden, New Jersey. At both of these centers, Pat helped small business owners develop business plans and launch their start-up companies.

A trailblazer for women, Pat was named Melita’s New Jersey Woman of the Year in 1993. In 1999, the YWCA honored her with the TWIN award, a Tribute to Women and INdustry.

Pat is predeceased by her parents, Daniel and Roseanne Speelman, sister Christine Spears, and brother, Jim Speelman. She is survived by her two daughters and sons-in-law, Carolyn and David Kwieraga and Kristin and Ron Menapace; her six grandchildren, Amanda and Noelle Kwieraga and Paige, Henry, Claire, and Julianne Menapace; as well as her brother Steve Speelman and brother and sister-in-law Tom and Sally Speelman.

Throughout her life, family was Pat’s inspiration and joy. She was always ready to play a game, design a craft, read a story, go on an adventure, or just spend time with her children and grandchildren. In 2011, Pat retired to join her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in Princeton to help raise their four children.

Pat cherished her Christian family in the various places she lived. As a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton, New Jersey, she spoke fondly and with affection for her fellow parishioners, especially the children that participated in the Children’s Chapel services she helped lead. She also inspired her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in supporting the Princeton community, including the opening of their gift and furniture store, Homestead Princeton. In her free time, Pat enjoyed reading, sewing, knitting, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends.

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church on Saturday, January 12, 2019, at 11 a.m., followed by a reception in the Parish House. Friends of all ages are welcome to share in the celebration of Pat’s life. Afterwards, Pat will be interred in the church’s memorial garden in a private family ceremony. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Trinity Episcopal Church children’s program.

———

Fredric J. Spar

Fredric J. Spar, 70, died at home in Princeton, NJ, on December 22, 2018.

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Fred was a student-athlete who ran track at Midwood High School and Cornell University. His career had many chapters: He worked as an elementary-school science teacher before completing a Ph.D. (1980) at Brown University, where he studied Chinese history and spent a year in Taipei, Taiwan at the Stanford Center. He lectured at Keene State College before working 36 years as a communications consultant at Kekst & Company in Manhattan. He was a member of the 2010 class at Harvard University’s Advanced Leadership Initiative and applied his experience thereafter advising or serving on the boards of environmental and education organizations: The Watershed Institute, Friends of Princeton Open Space, New York City Audubon Society, Generation Schools, and City Year New York. He was also chair of Friends of the Rogers Refuge, for which he worked tirelessly on improvements to wildlife habitat and accessibility for human visitors.

Fred moved to Princeton when he married Winifred Hughes, a fellow graduate student at Brown University. Together they spent many hours birding and hiking, rooting for the Boston Red Sox, and engaged in a lifelong intellectual discussion. Fred was dedicated to his garden and continued to read and speak Mandarin throughout his life. He shared his passion for sports and the outdoors with his children through skiing, fishing, tennis, and coaching soccer and Little League baseball. Fred will be remembered as a loving husband and father, a great intellect in both scholarship and business, an environmentalist, a man of understated wit, and a soul of exceptional kindness and generosity of spirit.

He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Winifred Hughes Spar; his sons Adam and Alex; his sister Laurie, and her husband John Pierce. He also leaves his aunt, Edith Gilitos; cousins; sisters- and brothers-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Burial was in Princeton Cemetery on December 24, 2018. A memorial service will be Sunday, January 27, 1 p.m., at the The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Donations in his memory would be welcomed at the organizations he served.

Arrangements by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing Township.

———

Elias Menachem Stein

Elias Menachem Stein, a towering figure in mathematics for over half a century, died on December 23. He was 87.

The cause of death was complications related to mantle cell lymphoma, according to his family.

Renowned for deep and highly original contributions to his field of mathematics as well as the mentor of generations of younger mathematicians, including two winners of the Fields Medal, the profession’s highest distinction. Mr. Stein was a professor at Princeton University for 55 years, teaching, by popular demand, until the age of 86.

Born on January 13, 1931 in Antwerp to Elkan Stein, a diamond merchant, and Chana Goldman, both Polish citizens, he and his family fled Belgium in 1940, following the German invasion. With diamonds hidden in the soles of his shoes as part of his father’s effort to protect the family’s assets, he entered the United States in April 1941 aboard the SS Nyassa from Lisbon, spending his first three weeks in the country living on Ellis Island. There he first witnessed boys playing “a strange game with sticks,” as he would later tell his children, something he would come to understand to be baseball, a sport he would admire for the rest of his life. It was the beginning of his fierce, if not uncritical, devotion to his adopted homeland, its strange new customs and, above all, the glorious intricacies of its democratic processes, which he monitored with what would become his signature intensity.

After his family settled on New York’s Upper West Side, he enrolled in Stuyvesant High School, where he was captain of the math team, graduating in 1949.

Stein attended college at the University of Chicago and stayed on to earn his PhD in 1955. Following teaching stints there and at MIT, where, among others, he befriended future Nobel Prize winner John Nash, turning, in a rare moment of professional overlap, to his father’s Diamond District connections to help Mr. Nash buy a ring for his future wife, according to Sylvia Nasar’s book, A Beautiful Mind. 

Later, Mr. Stein spent an academic year at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. While there, he was offered a tenured position at Princeton University, joining the faculty in 1963. For decades, he held an endowed chair as the Albert Baldwin Dod Professor; at the time of his death he was Professor Emeritus. He served twice as chair of the mathematics department.

Stein’s research was primarily in harmonic analysis — roughly speaking, the study of vibrations — a basic tool in science and technology. Mr. Stein discovered new phenomena and unsuspected connections between seemingly unrelated problems. His work led to a deeper understanding of topics as varied as sound recording, the stock market, and gravitational waves. As Charles Fefferman, one of Stein’s star doctoral students and later a colleague at Princeton, has noted of his former thesis advisor, “[his] work often combines two remarkable qualities: an understanding of several branches of math, each of which normally is known only by specialists, and an astonishing ability to find connections between them. Before Stein tells you his solution, the problems involved look utterly hopeless…. Then, with exactly the right point of view and exactly the right few words, … [his] incredible insights … link everything together.”

Stein is the author of several books, now considered classics in their field. In his 70s he devoted his time to creating a series of advanced undergraduate mathematics courses at Princeton and writing, in collaboration with former student Rami Shakarchi, a four-volume textbook to accompany the course. One reviewer of the first volume referred to Stein as “certainly one of the great avatars and developers of Fourier Analysis in modern times.”

He was a prolific author and generous collaborator. His many honors include the Schock Prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1993, the Wolf Prize in 1999, and the National Medal of Science awarded by President George W. Bush at a White House ceremony in 2002. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he received honorary degrees from Peking University in 1988 (after his effort to help rebuild the local mathematical community following the devastation of the Cultural Revolution), and from his alma mater, the University of Chicago, in 1992.

Stein is survived by Elly, his wife of 59 years; a brother, Daniel; a son, Jeremy, the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a member of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve from 2012-2014; a daughter, Karen, an architecture critic and former member of the jury of the Pritzker Architecture Prize; a daughter-in-law, Anne; and three grandchildren, Carolyn, Alison, and Jason.

As a collaborator and teacher, he was known for the clarity, elegance, and enthusiasm he brought to his research, writing, and teaching. 

Stein dated his interest in science to a memory from when he was three years old, as he watched the spinning wheel of his father’s diamond polishing machine, believing he had discovered proof of perpetual motion. He soon came to understand that his so-called theory was a youthful illusion, but one that nonetheless propelled his lifelong view of mathematics as a brilliant balance of imagination and rational investigation. His interest in solving problems never waned. When he received a lifetime achievement award from the American Mathematical Society, with characteristic modesty his response focused not on himself but on the field he so loved, saying: “We can be confident that we are far from the end of this enterprise and that many exciting and wonderful theorems still await our discovery.”

———

Lorraine Erskine Garland

Lorraine Erskine Garland, 89, of Jamestown, RI, and Bradenton, FL, died peacefully with her family present on December 28, 2018 in Medway, MA.

She was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on December 9, 1929, the daughter of Madeleine Ellis and Frank Erskine. Lorraine spent her childhood in Massachusetts, Maine, and Virginia with her mother, Madeleine, and her stepfather, Alan D. Kinsley. She was an only child. Lorraine raised her children in Princeton, NJ. Later in life, she spent winters in Sarasota, FL, and summers in Jamestown, RI.

Lorraine was a graduate of Dana Hall School in Wellesley, MA.  She met her husband, Philip (“Pete”) Lincoln Garland, Jr., while studying Landscape Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, RI. She believed in civic engagement, participated in local government, and provided leadership to local associations including the Parent Teacher Association of her daughters’ school and the annual ‘fete,’ a fundraiser for the Princeton hospital. Lorraine was also a productive real estate agent in New Jersey’s Morris and Mercer counties, working for many years at Stockton Real Estate in Princeton, NJ. 

Lorraine lived her life surrounded by many beloved four-legged companions. She was a founding member of the Irish Wolfhound Association of the Delaware Valley. She was an equestrian and able coachwoman in her younger years, and an early supporter and frequent guest at polo matches in Newport, RI, and Sarasota, FL. Her final companion was Ares, a “rescue” poodle, who never left her side.

Lorraine was a loyal and devoted mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She is survived by her former husband Philip Lincoln Garland, Jr., of Englewood, FL, and Chatham, MA, and her children, Thomas Alan Garland, Katherine Garland Presswood, and Elizabeth Garland Deardorff. She also leaves behind three beloved grandchildren, Taylor, Whitney, and Sam. Finally, she will be missed by five great-grandchildren, Winston, Madeleine, Aiden, Fiona, and Ethan.

In lieu of flowers, donations will be welcome to the memory of Lorraine Garland to the Irish Wolfhound Foundation, David Milne, Treasurer, 150 Creek Rd., Phillipsburg, NJ 08865; Florida Poodle Rescue, P.O. Box 7336, St. Petersburg, FL 33734; Salmon Hospice, 37 Birch St., Milford, MA 01757; or Milford Regional Healthcare Foundation, 14 Prospect St., Milford, MA 01757.

———

Frances Brown Yokana

Frances Brown Yokana, 92, of Princeton and Greensboro, Vermont, passed away on Saturday, December 29, 2018.  

Frances was born in Princeton, NJ, and was a lifetime resident of Princeton. She graduated from Randolph-Macon College in 1948 and married Andre Yokana in 1954. In Princeton, she served as the president of the Present Day Club and was a member of Bedens Brook Country Club, the Nassau Club, and the Contemporary Garden Club of Princeton, and volunteered for numerous charitable organizations. She spent summers with her family in Greensboro, Vermont, where she was an active member of the community, and President of the Greensboro Association. She was an avid gardener and her gardens in Vermont were legendary. Her life was filled with family, friends, and flowers.

Predeceased by her parents Frederic Hamilton Brown and Frances Churchill (Woolaver) Brown; she is survived by her husband of 64 years, Andre Yokana; her son, Davis Yokana; her daughter and son-in-law, Lisa Yokana and Blake Auchincloss; and her granddaughters, Alice and Anne Longobardo.

A memorial service will be held on January 12, 2019 at 11 a.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 08542.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Nassau Presbyterian Church.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

December 28, 2018

Martha L. “Lewie” Kingsford

Martha L. “Lewie” Kingsford, 91, of Skillman passed away on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at home surrounded by her loving
family.

Born in Baltimore, MD, she was a resident of Princeton since 1976. Lewie was very active in the Princeton community, she played tennis at Pretty Brook Tennis Club, golf at Springdale Golf Club, was in reading and bridge groups, loved to travel, and enjoyed attending the New York opera, ballet, and symphony.

Predeceased by her parents Frederick W. and Martha I. (Isaacs) Lewis, Sr.; and her husband Irving B. Kingsford, Jr.; she is survived by her three daughters and sons-in-law Anne B. and Robert G. Freestone, Elizabeth B. and Charles P. Lucy, and Eleanor (Shotsie) and Steven I. Wilson; and her brother Frederick W. Lewis, Jr.

A memorial service will be held on Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 11 a.m. at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, followed by a reception at the church. Burial will be private.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Watershed Institution at www.thewatershed.org. 

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Robert Allan Chinn

Robert Allan Chinn passed away on December 21 surrounded by his family after relentlessly battling lymphoma for eight years.  

Rob was a scholar his entire life. After earning his high school diploma in his hometown of Fresno, California, Rob graduated from the University of California Berkeley with Bachelor of Science degrees in Physiology and Anatomy in 1976. He settled in the Bay Area, where he put his meticulous nature to work in medical research before starting his career in the pharmaceutical industry. He held a design patent for custom turntable weights; studied and savored winemaking and wines; and over four decades, consistently worked at improving his game — on the court, on the baseball field (especially in helping his son Matt), and on the links. When he couldn’t play, he cheered on his favorite F1 drivers and Bay Area teams (chiefly the Warriors), memorizing stats and play calls. He learned the most about love from Karen, his wife of over 41 years.

Rob also immersed himself in the history, method, and, most importantly, enjoyment of fine cuisine. He left no culture unexplored, leading to the itineraries for his family’s trips abroad to consist solely of locales for meals and vineyard excursions. To him, though, cooking and eating was essential because of the people it brought together. The more he cooked, the more he could entertain and share with those he loved.   

He left no joke untold, no photograph untaken, no inept motorist unscathed, and no friend without someone to talk to. He will be most missed by the numerous friends and family that relied on him as their phone or email buddy as they trekked to or from work (his network spanned from Hawaii to the East Coast). For all that he learned, he taught. Laughter, good food, and steadfast thoughtfulness will continue to abound in the homes of those who knew him.  

Rob is survived by his wife Karen of Skillman, NJ; children Matthew and Monica, both of Washington, DC; his sister Gail; and brother Hank. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be sent to Angels Network Charities in Honolulu, Hawaii (5339 Kalanianaole Hwy.), where his family volunteered; the MSKCC Lymphoma Team in New York (http://giving.mskcc.org), whose dutiful and caring nurses were a comfort to both him and Karen; or the Golden State Warriors Community Foundation (http://www.nba.com/warriors/foundation), whose work helps the community Rob called home for many years, and whose team long held his heart and most ardent cheers.

———

Alexander Pinelli

Alexander Pinelli, 98, of Hopewell died Tuesday, December 25, 2018 at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro.  

Born and raised in Princeton, he lived most of his adult life in Hopewell. He served in the U.S. Army in WWII, and was discharged with the rank of PFC. He received a Purple Heart and a Certificate of Merit during his service with the Seventh Armored Division (“Lucky Seventh”) in France and Holland. His military engagements included Rhineland, Ardennes, and the Battle of the Bulge. He retired as a postal supervisor with the U.S. Postal Service in Princeton after 40 years of service.

Predeceased by his parents, Henry and Jennie (Bizzaro) Pinelli; his wife, Lida Lansing Pinelli; three brothers, John, Raymond, and Libert; and one sister, Mary C. Pirone. He is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Calling hours will be held on Wednesday, January 2, 2019 from 9 to 11 a.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Burial will follow in Princeton Cemetery.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

John Tufano

John Tufano, 70, of East Windsor passed away on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton. 

Born and raised in Princeton, he was a resident of East Windsor for 50 years. He was a past treasurer of the Local 354 Carpenters Union.

Predeceased by his parents Vincenzo and Anna (Cuomo) Tufano; his wife Teresa Ann Tufano; his sister Cecilia Tufano; and his brothers Joe and Vincent Tufano; he is survived by his brothers and sisters-in-law, Frank and Emma Tufano and Richard T. and Kathie Tufano; his girlfriend Faith Rogers; and his nieces and nephew.

Visitation will be on Thursday, January 3, 2019 from 9 to 10 a.m. followed by a service at 10 a.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial will follow in East Windsor Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Liver Foundation at liverfoundation.org.

December 21, 2018

Margaret Tuchman

Margaret Ujvary Tuchman, of Princeton, New Jersey, and co-Founder and President of The Parkinson Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to funding research for Parkinson’s disease, died of pneumonia Sunday evening, December 16, 2018 at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital in New Brunswick. She was 77. 

Margaret was born on November 18, 1941 in Budapest, Hungary. She immigrated to the United States in 1956, married Martin (“Marty”) Tuchman, a businessman and entrepreneur, and had a BA in Psychology and an MA in Social Work. At age 38, Margaret was diagnosed with Parkinson’s. At that time disease treatment, information, and research was limited. Combining her thirst for knowledge and passion for helping others, she began a lifelong journey to shine a light on Parkinson’s. As she learned, she shared, using early online Internet bulletin board services to connect with people around the country.  Margaret quickly became an expert — a beacon and vital go-to resource in the Parkinson’s community.

Recognizing there was not enough research funding for Parkinson’s disease, both Margaret and Marty, along with The Tuchman Foundation, got involved. Marty joined the boards of the leading Parkinson’s organizations of the time; they both joined the cause of the Parkinson’s Unity Walk; they were early supporters of the then newly-formed Parkinson’s Action Network (which today is operating under The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research); and they were among the several key grassroots advocates who worked tirelessly to help pass the Morris K. Udall Parkinson’s Research Act of 1997. But the slow pace of the legislative process to release funds remained frustrating. That frustration motivated Marty to apply fundamental business practices to accelerate the flow of dollars into the hands of researchers. In 1999, they founded The Parkinson Alliance, dedicated to raising funds for the most promising research to find a cure and to share educational information to help improve the quality of life for those suffering with the disease. 

In 2000, ever attentive to new therapies, Margaret became one of the first people in the United States to have Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery.  Seeing the need to better inform the Parkinson’s community about the treatment, Margaret started DBS4PD.org, a website dedicated to DBS information, education, and surveys designed to give the patient a voice. With DBS now well-known, this ever-growing resource is today part of The Parkinson Alliance website under Patient Centered Research.

In the years since its inception, The Parkinson Alliance also took over the management of the Parkinson’s Unity Walk and Team Parkinson. It hosts regular events, such as the annual Carnegie Center 5K & Fun Run and the Food, Wine, & Maybe Tuscany fundraiser.  At this past November’s Food event, Margaret’s good friend May May Ali, eldest child of Muhammad Ali, was the inspiring keynote speaker. To date, the efforts of The Parkinson Alliance have raised over $30 million for Parkinson’s research.

Margaret also enjoyed gardening and flowers, especially orchids, and was an avid reader on a wide variety of topics. But championing worthwhile missions was in her soul. She was an avid animal and nature lover and took pride in supporting many organizations that fought for the rights of protecting both. For over two decades she helped fund a ranch in Texas that works with abused horses. She quietly supported beneficial programs and projects too numerous to list. At her core, Margaret consistently delighted in helping those in need while always shunning attention for doing so.

Her favorite musician Leonard Cohen wrote, “There is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in.”  Parkinson’s may have been the crack, but Margaret simply allowed it to spread more of her extraordinary light into the world to positively affect a myriad of people.

Ever optimistic, Margaret remained deeply involved in the work of The Parkinson Alliance. She continued to be passionate in finding ways to improve quality of life and in research that would ultimately find a cure for Parkinson’s disease. She strongly believed that the voice of people with Parkinson’s and those who love and care for them must be heard.

Margaret was predeceased by her parents, Josef and Margit Ann Ujvary.  Margaret is survived by her husband and partner of 57 years, Marty; their Coton de Tulear, Mumbo; and African Gray, Lori.  She is also survived by her cousins, George Airday and Michael Erdely;  and many friends who deeply love her.

In keeping with her wishes and generous spirit, Margaret’s body and brain were donated to the University of Pennsylvania for Parkinson’s research. There will be no funeral. We welcome you to honor Margaret and her passionate work. Memorial donations can be made to The Parkinson Alliance, Post Office Box 308, Kingston, NJ 08528 or online at parkinsonalliance.org in her memory.

———

George Cordell Easter

George Easter, 84, financial executive, amazing father and grandfather, and a resident of the Princeton area for over 50 years, passed away on December 17, 2018 after a brief illness. In his final days he was surrounded by his loving family.

George was born on September 8, 1934 in Spokane, Washington to Harold and Mary Frances Easter. He graduated from Culver Military Academy, Culver, Indiana in 1952. While at Culver he was a member of the varsity boxing team. After Culver he went on to Princeton University, where he earned a degree in Public and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School. As a proud member of the PU Class of ’56, he attended many Princeton class reunions over the years, and marched in the P-rade with some of his grandchildren at his 60th reunion in 2016.

While at Princeton he met the love of his life, Sarah “Sally” Jones, on a blind date. George and Sally were married in Newtown, CT, on September 7, 1957. From 1957 to 1960, he served as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Air Intelligence Unit at the Naval Photo Interpretation Center in Washington, D.C.  While still in the Navy, he attended George Washington University Law School at night, earning a law degree in 1960. George went on to earn a Master of Business Administration at Harvard University in 1961.

George and Sally moved the family to Princeton, NJ, in 1962, and George began commuting into New York City. He held various financial posts during his career including: Analyst – American and Foreign Power Company, 1962-1968; Vice President – Finance, Waltham Industries Corporation, 1968-1971; Vice President – Finance, Church and Dwight Company, Inc., 1971-1979; Vice President – Treasurer, Associated Dry Goods, 1979-1986. In New York, he was a member of the Union League Club and the Princeton Club of NYC.  

In the early 1960s, the Easters joined the Unitarian Church of Princeton. As an active member of the congregation, George served in various volunteer roles over the years, including a term as President of the church’s Board of Trustees. He served as the Treasurer of the church for decades, only recently retiring from that role. George also volunteered for the Red Cross, the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, Meals on Wheels, and was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Princeton University Store.

George retired in 1986 and was able to travel the world with his wife Sally. Their nature and cultural trips took them to Africa, Australia, China, India, France, Spain, Portugal, Egypt, Jordan, Venezuela, Costa Rica, and Belize. In the mid-1960s, the Easter family began vacationing each summer on Star Island off the coast of Portsmouth, NH. In July, 2018, George attended the All Star I family conference on Star Island with Sally, his three children, son- and daughter-in-law, and his seven grandchildren. On the Island, he spent his days visiting with family and friends, reading, puzzling on the hotel porch, and listening to the songbirds on Lindquist Deck. He was an avid reader, birder, classic movie buff, and loved puzzles of all kinds — crosswords, Sudoku, and jigsaw puzzles. For decades, his Sundays were not complete until he had finished the New York Times crossword puzzle…in pen. More than anything else, he enjoyed spending time with his dear grandchildren.  

George is survived by his wife of 61 years, Sally; children, Sally Easter, Jr., George “Cory” Easter, Jr., and Jenny Easter Nelson; son-in-law, Derrick Nelson; daughter-in-law, Josi Easter; grandchildren, Matt and Nick Brown, Chelsea, Amanda, and Cory Jose Easter, Dell and Sarah Nelson; sister, Ellie Wakefield, brother-in-law, Hugh Wakefield and niece and nephew, Amory and Austin Wakefield.

A Celebration of George’s life is planned for spring 2019.  Donations in George’s memory can be made to the Star Island Annual Fund, Morton-Benedict House, 30 Middle Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801, The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, or the charity of your choice.

December 20, 2018

Jaqueline Conrath

Jacqueline Fern Conrath, aged 86, died peacefully of natural causes on October 3, 2018. Her family was with her at the time. Jackie lived in Princeton for almost 48 years, from 1966 to 2013. She and her husband left in 2013 to live in an assisted living facility in Westford, Massachusetts, to be near her elder daughter.

Jackie was born in Dupree, South Dakota, and grew up in Portland and Pendleton, Oregon. She moved first to Chicago and then to the northeast coast in the 1950s.  She was educated at the University of Oregon (B.S.), Bryn Mawr College (M.S.S.), and Rutgers University (Ph.D., Anthropology). At different periods of her life, she worked as social worker, a psychotherapist, and an independent scholar in anthropology.

Jackie was remarkable for her interest in other cultures and places, her adventurous travel, her empathy for the intricacy of other people’s lives, and her profound love for her family. She wrote copiously — letters, journals, poetry, scholarly articles. She traveled widely, often by herself, to places such as India, Burma, Nepal, Pakistan, and New Mexico, and lived in India and Italy. She loved many things: the woods she lived in; swimming in
natural bodies of water, especially the Hopewell quarry; animals, wild and tame; all kinds of weather; and books and movies.

Jackie was married for almost 53 years to Dennis Wrong, a sociologist; he died five weeks after she did. She is survived by two daughters from her first marriage to Surinder Mehta (Jaya Mehta, son-in-law Sunand Bhattacharya, and grandchildren Ishan and Ila; Sheila Mehta, son-in-law Michael Squillacote, and grandchildren Anna and Nicholas), and a stepson (Terence Wrong, daughter-in-law Marisa Guthrie, and step-grandchildren Edward — by a previous marriage – and Olivia). She is also survived by nephews Paul and Mike Conrath, and niece Denise Fortin.

Jackie was much loved and is keenly missed.

———

Alfred Wild Gardner

Alfred Wild Gardner died peacefully at home on December 3, 2018. He was born at home in Princeton, New Jersey, on December 17, 1929 to Sarah Spencer Morgan Gardner and Henry Burchell Gardner. Alfred attended Princeton Country Day School, The Forman School, and graduated high school from St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire in 1948. Gardner was Class of 1952 from Princeton University, where he excelled on the varsity hockey team. Gardner worked for The First National City Bank, now Citi Group, during which he attended a Harvard Business School Management Program.  Gardner worked for years in the Personal Banking Division, and later in the Commodities Division as Vice President.  In 1972, Gardner moved to Colorado, and in 1976 he started his own real estate firm, which later merged to become Basalt Realty. A fanatical fly fisherman, in 1969 Gardner purchased and developed Otto Creek Ranch along the Frying Pan River, near Aspen, Colorado. His other hobbies included wildlife and landscape photography, and of course, golf.

Gardner was a member of The Mantoloking Yacht Club, The Nassau Club, and The Old Guard of Princeton. He was a past member of the Eagle County, Colorado Planning Commission, Bedens Brook Club, and The Princeton Club of New York. Gardner served as an usher at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in Palm Desert, California and was member of the Rancho La Quinta Country Club, where he lived with his second wife, Katharine Gulick Wert, whom he married in 1998. 

Alfred Gardner was predeceased by his first wife, Sandra Hebard Gardner, and son, Burchell Gardner, in 1996 and 1977, respectively. He is survived by two sons, Alfred Gardner (Susan) of Denver, CO, and Frederick Gardner (Debra) of Denver, CO; one daughter, Mary Gardner of Fort Collins, CO, and also by his grandchildren, Morgan, Caleb, Katherine, and Sean Gardner and by his wife, Katharine Gulick Gardner.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Dr. Arthur R. Lyding

Dr. Arthur R. Lyding, beloved father, brother, and grandfather and a resident of Princeton for 49 years, recently passed away at the Merwick Rehabilitation Center following a short illness at the age of 93.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Lyding lived with his family about a block away from Ebbetts Field, home of the Brooklyn Dodgers, and Arthur was a steady attendee of Dodgers’ games. In fact, his Mother often was able to obtain choice seating at the games by enticing the ushers with her famous homemade salami sandwiches. After graduating from Boys High School, Dr. Lyding attended Cornell University, where he obtained a bachelor of arts degree in chemistry in 1945. Upon his graduation from Cornell, Dr. Lyding served in the United States Navy during World War II as an expert in sonar and radar technologies. After the War ended, Dr. Lyding pursued graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania from where he obtained a Master of Science in organic chemistry in 1948 and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1951. He began working as a senior research chemist for Olin Matheson in New Haven, Connecticut. During this period, he was also an associate professor of organic chemistry at Southern Connecticut State College and the University of New Haven.

He met the love of his life, Harriet, on a blind date in 1956 and married in 1957. Following the birth of their son, Christopher, in 1960, Arthur continued to work at Olin Matheson until 1969. That year he transferred to FMC Corporation, the site of the current Medical Center of Princeton, and moved his family to Princeton. From 1975 to 1987, Dr. Lyding was a supervisor at NL Industries, in Hightstown, New Jersey, where he supervised the development of new organic and polymeric additives for the plastics, textile, and paint industries. By the time he retired, Dr. Lyding had received 12 patents in organic and polymer chemistry.

Dr. Lyding was an ardent fan of the Gilbert and Sullivan operettas and would try to attend as many performances as possible. He was completely mesmerized by the combination of the exquisite lyrics of Sir W.S. Gilbert put to music by Sir Arthur Sullivan. He often lamented how today’s youth had no appreciation for such culture, but instead seemed to be only interested in the indecent and vulgar lyrics of modern music.

Dr. Lyding was also an avid philatelist and model train enthusiast. During the summers, he was a constant fixture at the Community Park Pool.

Of course, Dr. Lyding was also well-known for being a diehard Chicago Cubs fan. When he was growing up in the 1930s and 1940s, the Cubs were indeed a power house in the National League. Despite their long drought from winning a pennant that began in 1945, Dr. Lyding steadfastly rooted for the Cubs through all the lean years until his patience and loyalty were finally rewarded with a World Series Championship in 2016. He was even cremated wearing his favorite Chicago Cubs jacket.

But perhaps Dr. Lyding saved his greatest passion for the hundreds of middle and high school students he aided over the years in such courses as Algebra, Geometry, Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, Latin, German, and SAT/AP prep. He fully enjoyed interacting with these students because doing so kept his mind active and in touch with the young generation. He also made many lifelong friends with the students’ parents. Indeed, his success with these students can be measured by the extraordinary amount of complimentary letters he received from the students and their parents.

Dr. Lyding was predeceased by his parents Charles and Irene Lyding and by his wife of 46 years, Harriet, in 2003. Dr. Lyding is survived by his son, Christopher S. Lyding, Esq. of Plainsboro; a grandson, Charles T. Lyding; and his brother, Peter W. Lyding of Riverdale, N.Y.

A memorial service was private. The family will hold a public celebration of life ceremony in the spring. In the meantime, please extend condolences and share remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

———

James Lawrence Martin

James Lawrence Martin, age 88, of Hopewell, New Jersey, passed away on Sunday, December 9, 2018, from complications of Parkinson’s. Jim’s mother was Catherine Irene Keough, and his father was Lawrence Edward Martin. Jim graduated from Montclair High School and received an Engineering degree from the Virginia Military Institute in 1952 before serving in the United States Army in Germany. He received advanced engineering degrees from Rutgers University and Pennsylvania State University, and subsequently taught at VMI, NJIT, and TCNJ. 

He married Kathleen Clarke in 1963, and they raised three daughters, Christine Martin Buck, Jennifer Martin-Kochis, and Catherine Martin Luginsland. He leaves seven granddaughters and many nieces and nephews to cherish his memory. 

A mass of Christian burial was celebrated by Msgr. Michael Walsh at St. Alphonsus church on Thursday, December 13, 2018, followed by a gathering at the Hopewell Bistro. Interment will be at Washington Crossing National Cemetery, December 27, 2018 at 11 a.m. The family requests that in lieu of flowers donations be made to Hopewell Fire Department or St. Alphonsus parish.

Arrangements are under the direction of Hopewell Memorial Home, Hopewell.

———

Alan H. Kane

April 19, 1955 – December 10, 2018

Alan H. Kane died in Boca Raton, Florida, on December 10, 2018 after a brief battle with esophageal cancer.

Alan was born in W. Hartford, Connecticut, and moved to Princeton with his parents, Herbert and Phyllis Kane, in 1956. Alan attended Princeton public schools until high school. He attended the Hun School of Princeton for high school, graduating in 1973. He received a B.A. from Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut in 1977.

Alan lived and worked in Boca Raton for the last 30 years. For the past few years he worked in adult education and found his calling as a teacher and tutor. Prior to that Alan was involved in several small business ventures.

He is survived by his beloved wife, Eva Fellows, his children Justin and Rebecca, their golden retriever Layla, his parents Herbert and Phyllis Kane of Princeton, and his sister Julie Kane of San Francisco, among many other loving extended family members and devoted friends. 

Alan’s family and friends will celebrate his life at a gathering in Boca Raton in January 2019.

———

Robert S. Davison

Robert S. Davison, Tykie, 61, of Princeton, New Jersey, passed away Thursday, December 13, 2018 surrounded by his loved ones at home. He was the husband of Polly H. Davison. They shared 37 years of marriage together.

Born and raised in Princeton, he was a lifelong resident. He was the son of late Robert S. Davison, Sr. and Helen (Hallinger) Davison.

He was a member of Princeton Engine Company #1 and a member of Local #9 Plumbers and Pipe Fitters Union of Tinton Falls. He will he remembered for his generosity, his skilled hardworking traits, integrity, and most of all the unconditional love he had for his family and friends.

We will continue to remember what he loved most. His grandchildren were his absolute world, the beach was his home away from home, his love for fishing, and his occupied set days or weekends on his couch at home, his B-1 seat at the Ivy Inn, or on a game field or in the stands watching his favorite sports teams, Dallas Cowboys, Notre Dame, or the New York Yankees.

He is survived by his wife Polly (Houston) Davison; a son and daughter-in-law Robert S. Davison, lll and Jamie Davison; a daughter and son-in-law Carrie and Ryan Jenkins; five grandchildren, Ryan Jenkins Jr., Danyale Jenkins, Bryce Davison, Reese Davison, and Emery Davison; his father-in-law Darby Houston; a sister and brother-in-law Kim and Tim Allshouse; and brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Will and Michelle Houston, Peter and Mary Houston and Rick McKee; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral Services were held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 at the at Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions may be made to Christine’s Hope for Kids, PO Box 190, Hopewell, NJ 08525, www.christineshope.org or Good Grief, 5 Mapleton Road, Princeton, NJ 08540.

———

Katherine M. McCarthy

Katherine M. “Kathy” McCarthy, 97, passed away peacefully at home in Plainsboro on Sunday, December 16, 2018. 

Born in Binghamton, NY, on December 24, 1920, Kathy and her family moved to Plainsboro when she was a child, and she lived the rest of her life in the Princeton area. Her mother, Veronica (Hickey) Holohan, was a schoolteacher, and her father, John K. Holohan, immigrated to this country from Ireland and went on to serve as a lay magistrate in Plainsboro. She lost her younger brother, John E. Holohan, in World War II, and she remained close to her sister Mary “Holly” Waldron until Holly’s death in 2015.

Kathy attended Princeton High School, where she met the love of her life and future husband, Jack McCarthy, Jr. She graduated from high school in 1938 and Connecticut College in 1942. After college, she taught at the Ashley Hall School in Charleston, SC. She waited for Jack while he left for wartime service with the Army in Europe, and they married after his return at St. Paul’s Church in Princeton in December 1945. They were happily married until his death in 2012. 

Kathy devoted her life to her husband and family. After her two sons passed childhood, she took up tennis and became an accomplished player. She played golf infrequently, but well enough to sink a hole-in-one at the Bedens Brook Club. Kathy carried herself with an understated grace and beauty; her college yearbook appropriately described her as “demure.” She had a fine sense of humor and a steadfast devotion to close friends. Her five grandchildren loved their time with Nana, and late last year she was able to welcome her great-grandchild into the world.   

Predeceased by her parents, husband, brother, and sister, Kathy is survived by her two sons and daughters-in-law, John “Jack” F. McCarthy, III and Susan G. Anable, and Kevin E. and Patricia M. McCarthy; her five grandchildren, Megan K. McCarthy, John F. McCarthy IV, Kaitlin M. McNamara, Caroline A. McCarthy, and Michael J. McCarthy; and her great-grandchild Olivia G. McNamara. 

Visitation will be on Saturday, December 22, 2018 from 9:30-10:30 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. Burial will follow in St. Paul’s Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests consideration of a contribution in Kathy’s memory to Catholic Charities of Trenton. 

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.   

———

Nicholas L. Carnevale

Nicholas L. Carnevale, 91, of Monmouth Junction died Thursday, December 13, 2018 at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center of Plainsboro. Born in Princeton, he was a lifelong Princeton resident. He was a graduate of Princeton High School and Rutgers University. Nicholas was a United States Korean War Army Veteran serving second in command of military medical field services. Mr. Carnevale worked for many years in the Insurance Industry including The Equitable Life Assurance Society, he was a district manager and then a regional manager for The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company. Nicholas was a partner in the Walter B. Howe Insurance Company from 1966-1989. He was Vice President, Active Chairman, and Chairman Emeritus of Carnevale Consulting Corporation, Mergers and Acquisitions from 1983 to present. He was also on the Board of Directors of the Trust Company of Princeton 1985-1989, The Summit Bank Advisory Board, Chairman of the Board of Global Value Investors Corporation, and an associate of The Lear Alliance from 2002 until present.

Nicholas was also a member of Nassau Presbyterian Church for 65 years, where he served as Deacon, Elder, Trustee, Sunday School Teacher, and Assistant Sunday School Superintendent. He also was a Boy Scout Leader, President of the Delaware Valley Life Underwriters Association of NJ, Vice President of the Somerset County Red Cross, Member and Past President of The Chamber of Commerce of Princeton, and on the Board of Trustees of the American Boy Choir of Princeton. Nicholas was a member of Princeton Rotary and Rotary International from 1969 until present, serving as president in 1980 and having perfect attendance somewhere in the world for 37 years. He also helped start 10 Rotary clubs in the state of New Jersey over a 16-year period. He was also Foundation Member and Chairman of the Thomas Edison State College Foundation, Co-Founder and Past President of the Princeton-Pettoranello Foundation and Pettoranello Gardens Project leader, Past President and Trustee for over 25 years of the Nassau Club, Trustee of the Princeton Historical Society, and Advisory Board Member of the Greater Princeton Youth Orchestra.

Nicholas received many awards including Citizen of the Year in 1976 from the Chamber of Commerce, 16 service awards and three Paul Harris Fellow Medals from The Rotary Club of Princeton, The Matty Matthewson Award “Rotarian of The Year, 1994,” The Humanitarian Award in 1983 from the National Council of Christians and Jews, Community Service Honors in 1999 from Princeton Township, the Extraordinary Service to Princeton award from the Princeton-Pettoranello Foundation, the Heritage Medal in 2001 from the Italian-American National Hall of Fame, Community Leader Award in 2002 from The Rotary Club of Princeton, and The Cavalerre Medal for National and International Service to Humanity from the Federal Republic of Italy.

At the time of his death Mr. Carnevale was on the Advisory Board of Investors Bank and was on the board of the Roma Foundation.

Son of the late Angelo and Christine Amalia (Palumbo) Carnevale, brother of the late Ango Carnevale, Alfonso Carnevale, he is survived by his wife Marjorie Mary Lee (Roseborough) Carnevale; two sons and a daughter-in-law Lawrence F. Carnevale, Douglas E. and Peita Carnevale; sister Evelina Gargione; and four grandchildren William, Christopher, Gabriella, and Stephanie.

The Funeral Service will be held 11 a.m. on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery.

Friends may call on Friday, December 21, 2018 from 5-8 p.m. at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to: Thomas Edison State University Foundation – Nicholas and Marjorie Carnevale Endowment for University Excellence.

December 11, 2018


Fred I. Greenstein

Fred I. Greenstein, 88, of Princeton, NJ, died peacefully at home, from complications from a form of Parkinson’s disease, on December 3, 2018. His family was with him in his final days.

He was Professor Emeritus of Politics at Princeton University. He received his BA from Antioch College in 1953 and served in the Army during the Korean conflict. After discharge, he attended Yale University on the GI Bill, earning his PhD in 1960, ​and pursued postdoctoral study at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute (1961-62). Professor Greenstein ​was best known for his contributions to the systematic study of political psychology and for its application to presidential decision-making and leadership. ​During his long career, he wrote numerous scholarly articles and seven books. His early work related to children’s political development. His most well-known books are ​The Hidden Hand Presidency: Eisenhower as Leader, a break-through assessment of Eisenhower’s presidential leadership style, and ​The Presidential Difference: Leadership Style from FDR to Barack Obama, in which he used six criteria to judge a president’s effectiveness in leading the nation. He received numerous professional awards. His work is often cited by both scholars and journalists, and he was frequently sought out by the press for his keen political insight and analysis. 

Prior to joining the faculty at Princeton in 1973, Professor Greenstein taught at Yale 1960 to 1962 and at Wesleyan University from 1962 to 1973. He was an active member of the American Political Science Association, serving on many committees and panels. He was a charter member of the International Society of Political Psychology, serving as vice president from 1990 to 1992 and as president from 1996 to 1997. He mentored numerous graduate students and was known for his willingness to provide prompt, meticulous, and constructive comments on any work submitted to him by students and colleagues.

After he retired from Princeton in 2001, Professor Greenstein continued to write and publish scholarly works. Avocationally, he was a jazz aficionado, enjoyed classic and foreign film, traveling, and walking in the woods with family or friends.

In addition to his wife of 61 years, Barbara E. Greenstein, he is survived by his son Michael Greenstein and wife Nettie Kurtz Greenstein, and their children Emma and Nathan; his daughter Amy Greenstein Dahn and husband William O. Dahn, and their children, Ryan and Cory; and his daughter Jessica Greenstein and husband Eric Hollman, and their children, Benjamin and Sam. He is also survived by his sister, Betty Greene, as well as a large extended family of nieces, nephews, and cousins.

A private service for family will take place on December 16, 2018 at Kimble Funeral Home, with interment following at Princeton Cemetery. A public memorial service will take place in the spring.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, or to a charity of your choice.

———

Margaret Ellen Peebles

Margaret Ellen Peebles died October 28, 2018, at the age of 56, after a long struggle against alcohol addiction.

Ellen was born in Princeton, attended Princeton public schools, and graduated from Princeton University in 1984. She was a talented writer and worked for a variety of publishing companies during her life, beginning with a summer in Town Topics’ front office when she was at Princeton High School, and culminating at Harvard Business Review where she was a senior editor.

She is survived by her parents, Jim and Alison Peebles of Princeton; sisters Lesley Peebles of Northampton, MA, and Marion DeMaria of Boise, ID; her sons, Alex Peebles-Capin and Henry Peebles-Capin of Brookline, MA, and their father, John Capin of Mexico City; and many friends.

A memorial service is planned for January 5 in Brookline, MA. Donations in her memory may be made to Planned Parenthood.

———

Martha Graves DeBardeleben

Martha Graves DeBardeleben, 92, passed away on December 8th at home after a brief illness. She was a resident of Princeton and Lawrenceville for the last 42 years. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, she grew up in Nashville, Tennessee, where she was graduated Summa Cum Laude from Vanderbilt University. She also completed a Master’s degree from Huntingdon College, published two books, and was granted a patent by the U.S. Patent office. She was trained as a counselor at the Christian Counseling and Educational Foundation and Rider University and saw people on a weekly basis in her home office. 

She married John T. DeBardeleben Jr. and raised three children, JohnThomas III, Charles Graves, and Eve DeBardeleben Roebuck. She enjoyed 14 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.  

A committed Christian, she was a longtime member of Stone Hill Church in Princeton (formerly Westerly Road) and served there in many capacities. A funeral service will be held at Stone Hill Church of Princeton on Saturday, December 15 at 11 a.m., preceded by visitation with her family at 10 a.m. in the library. 

Graveside services and interment will be held at Woodlawn Cemetery in Nashville, Tennessee, with her parents and older brother who preceded her in death. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

———

Pamela V. Hargrave

Pamela V. Hargrave, 92, of Princeton, NJ, passed away peacefully on December 3, 2018 at home surrounded by her loving family. She is survived by her children, Noeline Baruch, David (Anne) Hargrave, and Gillian (Michael Leone) Hargrave; grandchildren, Andy, Alexander (Anna), and Wyck Baruch; Charles, Mackenzie, and Caroline Hargrave; sibling, Noeline Delahunt; sister-in-law, Peggy Frame; brothers-in-law, Tom Hargrave and Bud Frame; and numerous nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by Richard D. Hargrave.

Pam’s journey began in Cape Town, South Africa, born to a loving and supportive family that encouraged her strong and independent spirit. The same spirit that allowed her, at 25, to sail to America as one of only two female crew members on The Yankee, a famous clipper ship. Pam’s elegance and charm drew people to her and fostered many lifelong friendships. It also sparked her relationship with Richard, whom she married, and decided to call America her new home. She was an avid tennis player, fabulous dancer, brilliant cook, and enjoyed entertaining her friends and family. Pam also dedicated many years to volunteering for numerous charities, in particular Princeton University’s Art Museum and McCarter Theatre.   

However, Pam’s greatest love and joy was her children and grandchildren. Through her love, support, and teachings, she shared her strong and independent spirit. She taught them how to be good people who are both resilient and caring. Pam taught them about the beauty and fun we can embrace during life’s journey — a legacy that continues to be passed on. After 92 years her journey has ended, but her spirit lives on.   

A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, December 15 at 2:30 p.m. at Trinity Church in Princeton, NJ. Interment will be at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association, Inc., 225 N. Michigan Ave., 17th Fl., Chicago, IL 60601.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

December 4, 2018

Ellen Armstrong Kanarek

Ellen Armstrong Kanarek, 69, of Princeton, NJ, died from complications of pneumonia on Thanksgiving night, November 22, 2018 at Princeton Medical Center. 

Ellen was born in Princeton on March 24, 1949, and was a longtime resident. She was a 1966 graduate of Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia, PA, where she excelled academically, teaching herself Greek as an independent study, and was a leader in the highly-regarded GFS traveling choir. During her years in Philadelphia, she was an active participant in the youth group at her father’s church, the Oak Lane Presbyterian Church. 

At Wellesley College, Ellen majored in French, minored in German, and was named a Durant Scholar, graduating with honors in 1970. She received her PhD in Education, specializing in Institutional Research, at the University of Michigan in 1978, where she was a professional monograph editor and statistics consultant, and was recognized with the Burke Aaron Hinsdale Scholar award by a formal vote of the faculty, for “unusual academic proficiency and high professional ideals.” She was also active as a performer in the drama program, especially Gilbert & Sullivan musicals, and sang in the choir of the First Presbyterian Church of Ann Arbor. 

Between college and graduate school, Ellen served as Registrar, and then Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Students, at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, where she also sang in one of their choirs. Later, she became the alto soloist at Trinity Episcopal Church and then All Saints’ Episcopal Church, both in Princeton. Most recently, Ellen was a member of Trinity United Church of Warren, NJ, where she directed the Bell Choir and was a leader in many other church activities. 

Ellen began working as a Research Analyst at Rutgers University shortly before completing her PhD thesis. Later, as the proud parent of three Rutgers Honors Program graduates, she remained an enthusiastic RU sports fan, especially of the Rutgers Women’s Basketball team.

In 1989, Ellen accepted a position at Applied Educational Research, Inc. (AER) in Princeton, advanced to Vice President in 1995, and continued in that role to the present, leading institutional research projects for secondary school systems, colleges, and universities nationwide. Her best known annual research project in the higher education community was the Admitted Students Questionnaire (ASQ) on behalf of the College Board, to which hundreds of colleges and universities subscribed, where she polled tens of thousands of students to explore the reasons why they selected their college to attend.

Ever a volunteer, Ellen was committed to giving back to her profession. She joined the Association for Institutional Research (AIR), in 1986. It was quickly evident that Ellen was a future-focused, passionate, and fully engaged member, heavily involved in coordinating the AIR Forum which is the world’s largest gathering of higher education professionals working in institutional research, assessment, and planning. Ellen was a frequent facilitator, track chair, convener, presenter, and author, led member outreach efforts, and was Chair of the millennium Forum conference in 1999-2000. Ellen also was very active in the regional North East Association for Institutional Research (NEAIR) where she served as President. 

Ellen was a woman of many remarkable talents, whose countless accomplishments included the annual baking project she and her family loved to do together and with friends each holiday season, to the gastronomical delight of dozens of friends, family, and colleagues. Each year, the “Kanarek Cookie Factory” baked, individually packaged, and delivered as many as a thousand dozen cookies at Christmas, of many varieties. The label of every package read, “There is no such thing as too many cookies.”

Music infused every aspect of Ellen’s life, as a professional singer and with her children. She was actively engaged with the American Boychoir School (ABS) in Princeton, where she served as a parent volunteer in many capacities while two of her sons attended and her third son served in administrative and teaching positions. Two of her favorite projects that she led for the ABS students were staged Shakespeare readings, and tournament bridge instruction. Through her work with the Development Office, Ellen’s projects raised over $250,000 for ABS. She also served on parent committees for the music and drama programs of Franklin High School in Somerset, NJ, where all three sons attended.

Ellen loved bringing her family and friends together. She and her husband Mike were gracious and generous hosts throughout the year, welcoming guests from all over the world into their home, especially during the holiday seasons when all 12 Kanareks came home to stay.

Ellen was a talented performer, who excelled as a pianist, singer, and sight reader. She was a Life Master bridge player, and loved playing in tournaments with her family. She was a professional researcher at work, and a nonprofit volunteer and fundraiser for schools, churches, and music organizations at home. Ellen was a voracious reader, particularly of mysteries and fantasy novels; a highly knowledgeable sports fan, especially of her grandfather’s and father’s team the Baltimore Orioles; and most of all, a dedicated daughter, sister, wife, mother, aunt, and grandmother.

Throughout her life, Ellen brought a keen sense of humor and boundless mental energy to every task. In later years her physical energy was slowed by adult onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, a progressive genetic condition of neuropathy leading to muscular atrophy, and then by a lung condition that led to her pneumonia. Her many accomplishments were in spite of the fact that for the last 15 years of her life she had decreasing strength in her extremities due to the effects of CMT and often needed a wheelchair, a weakness later compounded by failing lungs. Nevertheless, her courage, bravery, and determination to continue her many projects were a source of inspiration to her family and friends.

Ellen will be especially missed by her husband, children, and grandchildren, who were the great joy of her life. She will be remembered for her strong, clear, vibrant contralto voice; her full rich liquid laugh; her generous spirit; her sparkling eyes; her enormous heart; her commitment to service; as a quick-quipper; baker par excellence; and the level-headed lady who always put others first. Brilliant, strong, verbal, passionate about life, loved children, knew how to commit, humorous, musical: she was worth knowing for a lifetime.

Predeceased by her mother, Margaret Childs Armstrong, and brother, Richard Stoll Armstrong, Jr., Ellen is survived by her father, the Rev. Dr. Richard Stoll Armstrong; husband Michael Allan Kanarek; her son Derek Decker Kanarek, his wife Rebecca Shell Kanarek, and their children Charlie, Will, and Elliott; her son Dr. Graham Childs “Gray” Kanarek, his wife Marnie Kanarek, and their children Gabriel and Julian; her son Orion Fire “Ryan” Kanarek; her siblings Andrew Childs Armstrong and his wife Caroline Armstrong, William Harwood “Woody” Armstrong and his wife Christine Armstrong, and the Rev. Elsie Armstrong Rhodes and her husband Thomas Rhodes; and a large extended family of loving nephews, nieces,  and cousins.

Arrangements are at the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton. Burial will be private. A glorious memorial service including some of Ellen’s favorite choral music will be held at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road, Princeton NJ 08540, on Saturday December 29, 2018 at 2 p.m. It is a celebration of Ellen’s life rather than a funeral; black is not required; Ellen’s favorite color was blue; business casual dress. The service will also be live-streamed via the free GoToMeeting app on https://www.gotomeet.me/TrinityUnited and on Facebook; visit the Trinity United Church page at https://www.facebook.com/TUCNJ/ for more Facebook streaming instructions to be announced.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Ellen’s memory to some of her favorite causes that she supported: Trinity United Church in Warren, NJ (www.trinityunitedchurch.org), Heifer International (www.heifer.org), the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association (www.cmtausa.org), or the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (www.lls.org).

———

Newell Bertram Woodworth Jr.

Newell Bertram Woodworth Jr., 95, passed away peacefully on November 23 at his home in Princeton, surrounded by his loving family. Newell was born on June 14, 1923, the first son and third child to Lois and Newell Bertram Woodworth in Syracuse, New York. His father was a lawyer active in the civic affairs of the city and former President General of the Sons of the American Revolution. He died of pneumonia one year after Newell was born.

Growing up in Cazenovia, New York, Newell graduated from high school in 1941, receiving the sportsmanship award for his class at graduation. He attended the University of Virginia before enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1943. He graduated from flight school in the class 44D and received the top pilot award in the graduation exercises for the 205 pilots who received their wings. Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, he was sent to the 9th Air Force, 19th Tactical Command in Europe and flew close support missions for the ground forces, including support for George Patton’s 4th Armored Division, in a P-47 Thunderbolt fighter-bomber. He flew 80 sorties and 44 missions, became the Squadron Operations officer, and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters. He completed his service on August 9, 1946 as a Captain.

Newell returned to civilian life and began a 42-year career in the textile industry, holding successive senior executive positions with Deering Milliken (25 years), Dixie Yarns, and Dan River, retiring in 1988. During his career, he served on the Boards of New York Board of Trade, Textile Division, the United Way of Greater Mercer County, Princeton Day School, Pretty Brook Tennis Club, and the Richardson Corporation. He was also a member of the Union League Club of New York and the Springdale Golf Club.

Married in 1950, Newell and Enid led very active lives in Princeton. He was an avid sailor, golfer, and racquets player. When his children were growing up, Newell taught his family how to sail. They spent weekends and summer vacations aboard their sailboat, Brabant, exploring the New England coastline. He was as at home on the water as he was in the backyard playing catch or golfing with his children and grandchildren.

Newell is remembered warmly for his remarkable vigor, his infectious smile, his outgoing personality, and his effusive good spirits. He was thoroughly engaged with the lives of those that mattered to him – supporting with a nod, a pat on the back, a “that’s just marvelous.”  When asked his advice for a long, happy life he advised,” learn to play golf” and “don’t worry about things you can’t control.” 

Newell, a longtime resident of Princeton, New Jersey, was predeceased by the love of his life, his wife of 65 years, Enid (Richardson), and his two sisters, as well as his sister and brother from his mother’s second marriage. He is survived by his dear friend Dede Webster and his four children — Pam, Buzz (Newell B. III), Sarah, and Sam and their families, including 12 grandchildren. 

At Newell’s request, memorial arrangements are private. In lieu of flowers, donations in his honor may be sent to the Princeton Friends School, 470 Quaker Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 or Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton, NJ 08540.

———

Juris Apse

Juris Apse passed away on November 15, 2018, very peacefully, and in his sleep.  He died of kidney failure at a Portland, Maine area hospice where he was surrounded by his three children and lifelong friend Karen in his final days.

Juris was born July 10, 1945 at a Displaced Persons camp in the British sector of Allied-occupied Germany, after his parents Arvids and Gaida Apse fled Latvia with his older siblings during World War II. The family left Germany in 1951 and Juris spent his early years in Rochdale, Lancashire, UK. At the age of 13, Juris, his parents, and his four siblings moved to Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Juris quickly proved himself a remarkable student, graduating from high school at the age of 16 and enrolling in the University of Toronto.  Juris began a lifelong love of chemistry at University, which led to him pursue a doctorate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in chemical engineering.  While at MIT, Juris became a standout scorer for the MIT Rugby Club, finding a passion for sports that stuck with him through life.  

At a bar in Cambridge, Juris was quick to notice Astrida Strazdins wearing a traditional Latvian ring, who was equally intrigued to see him wearing one, too. Astrida was teaching in Boston, and upon completion of his PhD, Juris and Astrida were married at the MIT Chapel and moved to Princeton, New Jersey. Juris took a research and development position at Union Carbide (and eventually Dow Chemical), where he had a long and successful career. In Princeton, Juris and Astrida had three children and raised them in a wonderful environment where education was as prized by the community as it was by them. After retirement, Juris’ last decade was spent in Brunswick, Maine, where he volunteered for the Curtis Memorial Library, served on the Restoration Advisory Board for the former Brunswick Naval Air Station, and volunteered as an AARP tax preparer for those in need. He was also an avid student at the Midcoast Senior College.

Juris was accepting of his death and in his last days he spoke with gratitude about his full and fortunate life. He was extremely proud of his three children and the lives they have built. He, and his recently deceased wife Astrida, benefited greatly from living their last decade in New England among their children and spouses including Colin (Rachelle), Kira (Jeremy), and Stefan (Leigh) as well as grandchildren Margot, Tobin, Graeme, Mara, and Miles.  

The family will celebrate Juris’ life in a private ceremony. Memorial donations in memory of Juris may be made to Curtis Memorial Library (http://www.curtislibrary.com/annual-fund/) or Midcoast Senior College (https://midcoastseniorcollege.org/donation-form/). Arrangements were by Stetson’s Funeral Home 12 Federal Street, Brunswick, ME 04011, where memorial condolences may be expressed at stetsonsfuneralhome.com.

———

Martha L. “Lewie” Kingsford

Martha L. “Lewie” Kingsford, 91, of Skillman passed away on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at home surrounded by her loving family. 

Born in Baltimore, MD, she was a resident of Princeton since 1976. Lewie was very active in the Princeton community, she played tennis at Pretty Brook Tennis Club, golf at Springdale Golf Club, was in reading and bridge groups, loved to travel, and enjoyed attending the New York opera, ballet, and symphony.

Predeceased by her parents Frederick W. and Martha I. (Isaacs) Lewis, Sr.; and her husband Irving B. Kingsford, Jr.; she is survived by her three daughters and sons-in-law Anne B. and Robert G. Freestone, Elizabeth B. and Charles P. Lucy, and Eleanor (Shotsie) and Steven I. Wilson; and her brother Frederick W. Lewis, Jr.

A memorial service will be held on Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 11 a.m. at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, followed by a reception at the church.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Watershed Institution at www.thewatershed.org. 

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Micky Morgan

Micky Morgan, 69, of Princeton, passed away at her home on November 25, 2018. She will be mourned by her many friends in the Princeton area and beyond, and by her devoted partner, Len Swanson. She was known by all whose lives she touched to be caring, loving, and compassionate.

Micky was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio. She came east in the late 1970s and has lived in Princeton for the last 40 years. Her career was spent in entrepreneurial activities and in business development for high-tech companies.

In her free time, she was an avid gardener and enthusiastic traveler.

At her request, Micky will be buried privately at the Princeton Cemetery. 

In lieu of flowers, friends may make a contribution in her name to the charity of their choice.

Extend condolences and share remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

———

Audrey D. Mason

Audrey D. Mason, 82, of Lawrenceville passed away on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at Brookdale Nursing Home of Hamilton, NJ. 

Born and raised in Princeton, she was a resident of Lawrenceville for the last 45 years. She worked for about 10 years at Princeton Bank and Trust, worked at Princeton Savings and Loan, and other various local banks, and retired from Princeton Hospital. She was a member of St. Paul’s Church, Princeton.

Predeceased by her parents Alfred Baker and Carrie (Mullen) Mason; her brother Alfred; and her sisters Anita Barbara and Sarah Ann; she is survived by her sister and brother-in-law Carol Mason and John Perego; her aunt Donna Mason; her special niece Michelle Wallace and nephew Jonathan Perego; and many other nieces and nephews.

Services were held on Saturday, December 1, 2018 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Burial was in Rocky Hill Cemetery.

November 28, 2018

Diana Morgan Olcott


Diana Morgan Olcott passed away at her home in Manchester, VT, surrounded by her family, on November 18, 2018, just shy of her 90th birthday. She was born November 25, 1928 in the beautiful Georgian house designed by her father, Professor Sherley Warner Morgan, Director of the Princeton University School of Architecture. Her mother, Ethel Palmer Morgan, was the daughter of Lowell Mason Palmer, of Brooklyn, NY, and Stamford, CT, where he had a large botanic garden estate. This heritage imbued Diana with a lifelong love of architecture and horticulture. Her father’s parents were Mr. and Mrs. Asa Bushnell Morgan of Cincinnati, Ohio.

Having attended Miss Fine’s School in Princeton and graduated from The Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, PA, in 1946, she embarked on a life of, as she put it, “Chronic Volunteerism.” Her first volunteer position was as a courier with the Frontier Nursing Service in Kentucky.

Diana married Alfred Van Santvoord Olcott, Jr. of Riverdale, NY, on April 21, 1951. They lived and raised their family in an 18th century farmhouse in Hopewell, NJ, and created a lovely rose garden amidst the ruins of its large stone barn. After the death of her parents, the Olcotts returned to Princeton and enjoyed restoring and enlarging her ancestral home and gardens.

Two organizations shaped her life: The Garden Club of America and The Colonial Dames of America. Over the years she served the GCA as its Zone IV (NJ) Director; Representative to the Conservation, Flower Show, and Horticulture committees; and Vice Chairman of the Judging Committee. She compiled and authored the GCA 75th Anniversary history: “Winds of Change.” She was also a Flower Arrangement and Horticulture Judge and a Master Judge for the National Council of State Garden Clubs. She toured the USA, from Maine to California, giving lectures on horticulture, abstract flower arranging, and how to judge them. She was President of the Hopewell Valley Garden Club, President of the Garden Club of Princeton, Co-president of the Garden Club of Manchester, and a member of the Bennington Garden Club.

As a descendant of three Royal Governors (two from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one from Connecticut) she was a member of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America and President of the NJ Society. She also served for 14 years as a regent of Gunston Hall, the 18th century home in Lorton, VA, of George Mason, where she chaired the Garden Committee and was President of the Gunston Hall Foundation.

In 1985 the Olcotts purchased “Glebelands” in Manchester, VT. Diana revitalized and enhanced the lovely and unique Italianate gardens complete with statuary, fountains, and two ponds. For several years, she opened the gardens to the public to benefit the Garden Conservancy.

A voracious reader and an intrepid world traveler, she was also a great lover of music. She served as a trustee of the American Boy Choir for many years. Following the death of her beloved husband in 1990, she moved permanently to Manchester, VT, in 1996 and became greatly involved in the community. She was a trustee of the Manchester Music Festival and served twice as President. A member of the Village Planning Committee for 14 years, she retired after being Chairman for 10 of those years, always advocating to keep the beauty and historical quality of the Village intact.

Diana was predeceased by her husband Van (A.V.S. Olcott Jr.), her sister Eleanor (Mrs. Wells Drorbaugh Jr.), and her brothers, Arthur P. Morgan and Dr. Richard S. Morgan. She is survived by her devoted children C. Townsend Olcott II (wife Jody and grandchildren Lowell Palmer Olcott (wife Jessica) and Olivia Easton Olcott), Richard Melville Olcott (wife Betsy and grandchildren Emma Claire Olcott and Sarah Ruth Olcott), and daughter Leslie Harrison Olcott (partner Tracy Sloan).

A memorial service will be held at First Congregation Church of Manchester, VT, at 2 p.m. on Saturday, December 29.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Manchester Community Library, 138 Cemetery Street, Manchester, VT 05255; Taconic Music P.O. Box 732, Manchester, VT 05254; or the Community Food Cupboard, P.O. Box 864, Manchester Center, VT 05255.

———

Dorothy A. Martin

Dorothy A. Martin of Ledyard, CT, died on November 19, 2018 at her home. She was born in Waterbury, CT, on June 2, 1929 to George and Cora Wagner. Dorothy proudly served in the military from 1949 to 1953.

She is survived by her children Deborah Martin Norcross of Princeton, NJ; Samuel (Mickey) Martin of Hope Valley, RI; and Kim Martin of Plainfield, CT. She is also survived by six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. After raising her family, Dorothy obtained her LPN nursing degree and worked until retirement at the Westerly Hospital.

Dorothy will be buried with full military honors at a later date in West Cemetery, Bristol, CT.

November 20, 2018

Dr. Alkis Constantinides

Dr. Alkis Constantinides, 77, passed away peacefully on November 10 surrounded by loved ones, following a long battle with myelofibrosis. He was born in Limassol, Cyprus, in 1941. During the early years of his life he lived in Nicosia, Paphos, and Larnaca, Cyprus. He graduated in 1959 as Valedictorian from the American Academy of Larnaca. Immediately after graduation, he came to the United States to study Chemical Engineering at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. He spent five years at Ohio State where he obtained Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in 1964. He excelled in all subjects at the University and he received several awards.  

Upon graduating from the Ohio State University, he started his career as an engineer with Esso (now Exxon) Research and Engineering Company in Florham Park, New Jersey. Two years later, Alkis decided that he wanted to obtain a Ph.D. degree in order to teach at the University level. He enrolled at Columbia University in New York in the fall of 1966, where he studied under the tutelage of Prof. Elmer Gaden, the Father of Biochemical Engineering.  

Following the completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Constantinides accepted a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Over the next 45 years, while teaching chemical engineering to several thousand students, Alkis advanced quickly from Assistant to Associate to Full Professor. He did research in his field, and also published many scientific papers as well as three textbooks in Numerical Methods that have been adopted at many universities worldwide. During his career at Rutgers University he held all teaching and administrative positions in the Department: he was Chair of the Department for six years, Director of Alumni Relations for twelve years, Director of the Graduate Program for nine years, and Director of the Undergraduate Program for one year. In recognition of his teaching abilities, Prof. Alkis Constantinides (known as “Dr. C.” to his students) received the “Best Teacher of the Year Award” eight times from the graduating seniors; he was also honored with the Rutgers University Warren I. Susman Teaching Excellence Award, a prestigious university-wide award for which several thousand professors were eligible to compete.  

Before his retirement in 2015, he established the Dr. Alkis Constantinides Endowed Scholarship Fund for the purpose of providing financial assistance to deserving students in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. Several high performing students have already benefited from his scholarship.

Throughout his life, Alkis Constantinides was an excellent tennis player and skier, and won trophies in both sports. At Ohio State University, he was the founder and President of the Ohio State Ski Club. Alkis was also an avid photographer who filled his home with pictures of his family and the many places he visited.  He is survived by his wife, as well as his son and his son’s family, and his son’s mother.  

In lieu of flowers, please contribute to the Dr. Alkis Constantinides Scholarship Fund at the following link: https://cbe.rutgers.edu — choose “Giving” from the menu and then select “Dr. Alkis Constantinides Scholarship Fund.”

———

Denyse E. Reid

Denyse E. Reid died on November 14, 2018 at the Acorn Glen Assisted Living Facility in Princeton, NJ, where she has been a resident for eight years. She had been a Princeton, NJ, resident since 1954. 

Born to Jacques and Germaine Van Hove in Brussels, Belgium on September 28, 1922, Denyse attended school at Grasbeec School from K through 12. After one year at the Catholic St. Louis College in Brussels, she then attended three years at a school of design before and during the war, where she won first prize in clothes design.

Her father was a career soldier who eventually he became colonel of the King’s regiment. Denyse’s favorite memories of the war and its aftermath were seeing the Belgian flag for the first time, after five years of German occupation, on a British Tank as it drove down the Boulevard and answering the door as her father returned from prison camp.

Due to her English skills, Denyse held various positions in service to the allied forces, including as assistant to the British military Mayor of Brussels.

She met her future husband John Reid when he was assigned as an air aide to the SHAEF headquarters in Brussels two months before battle of the Bulge. Jack and Denyse were married on July 24, 1946 in Manhattan. The couple lived in Charlotte, NC, and East Hampton, NY, before finally settling in Princeton in 1954.

Denyse served as a Grey Lady aide in the hospital at Fort Dix. She served as the chairman of several international festivals at the Princeton YWCA. Later, she joined the Princeton Township Advisory Board for open space. Denyse also chaired the Princeton Planning Board Site Plan Review Advisory Committee for many years. Denyse became aware of the Federal Clean Water Act and recommended to the Princetons that they start a regional sewer plan. She became a member of the regional sewer operating committee and came to be known as the “Sewer Lady.”

Denyse enjoyed her many travels around the world.

Denyse and Jack summered in East Hampton, NY, and after Jack’s death in 1990, she spent more and more time there before moving to Acorn Glen.

Denyse is survived by her sons John and Archibald, Archibald’s wife Karen, grandsons John and Thomas Reid, her sister Ann Marie, and her nieces Pascal and Ariane Hoyois. Her daughter Anne died in 1976. Grandson John was particularly attentive to her in her final years.

Loved and loving, surrogate mother to may lost souls, Denyse leaves a legacy of community service and intense curiosity.

———

Helen Joyce Curran Warren

Helen Joyce Curran Warren, 91, died on November 12th, 2018. She had been a resident of Princeton since 1968.

Helen was born in Abington, PA, and grew up in Jenkintown, PA, the daughter of Dr. Francis Joseph and Margaret Barry Curran and sister to her twin Patricia, Joan, Jane, and brother James, all of whom predeceased her. Helen graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English from Arcadia University (formerly Beaver College) in Jenkintown in 1948, where at different times she was the editor-in-chief of the school newspaper and the literary magazine. Helen was selected to appear in the 1947-48 edition of Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges. She worked in the summer as a counselor at one of the country’s first interracial camps, founded in the Catskills by a Harlem doctor. One of her favorite campers grew up to be the playwright and screenwriter Michael Weller, with whom she reconnected in recent years. After graduation Helen worked in New York City as a magazine researcher and volunteered at Dorothy Day’s Catholic Worker Movement, an association she maintained throughout her life. During a time in Cleveland, Ohio, she was the editor for The Ohio Observer, Shell Oil’s company newspaper.

Helen obtained a Master’s degree in Education from The College of New Jersey and taught Senior English for many years at Montgomery High School in Skillman, NJ, where she advised the school newspaper as part of her lifelong love of journalism. Among her other enthusiasms were Frank Sinatra’s music, Anthony Hopkins’ acting, and Jay Lamont’s radio show All About Real Estate. With her close circle of teacher friends, Helen made many overseas trips, including to her ancestral homeland of Ireland.

Helen was married to John Edward Warren, who worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a Supervisory Special Agent in the New York field office and predeceased her. They had three sons, Timothy and John of Princeton and Richard of Lambertville, NJ. Other beloved survivors include her daughters-in-law Maryann and Ellen; grandsons Patrick (his wife Jolene), Philip (his wife Ruth), and Davis; two great-grandsons Oliver and Ethan; her sister-in-law Cathy; and many nephews and nieces, including Jane and Kathryn Monahan and James McIlvaine who were very involved in their aunt’s care in her last year.

Condolences and any inquiries can be sent to tswarr@yahoo.com. A memorial gathering will be held in Princeton some time in early January.

November 14, 2018

Kathleen Nelles McClure

Kathleen Nelles McClure, 87, died on October 26th, 2018 in Portland, Maine. She had been a resident at Piper Shores in Scarborough, Maine since 2006.

Kay, as she was known, grew up in Rockville Center, NY, the only daughter of Roy and Kathleen Nelles, and the sister to three brothers, Roy, Barry, and Peter. A self-proclaimed “tomboy,” she was always picked first for any team game in school or the neighborhood. She graduated from Connecticut College in 1952. It was there that she met her future husband, Doug McClure, a Yale student, on a blind date. They proceeded to spend the next 54 years together, continuously moving westward as their lives took them from Pomfret, Connecticut to Congers, New York to Princeton, New Jersey to Sewickley, Pennsylvania and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Eventually they returned east and retired to Maine, a state dear to both their hearts and which they had come back to every year after spending a summer studying the Russian language at Colby College in 1962.

Kay was a true “Renaissance woman,” who was equally adept using a lathe as she was with a needle. She was an avid miniaturist, expert cruciverbalist, and a “hostess with the mostess.” She loved gardens, traveling, mysteries, and artists of all types. Over the years, Kay was involved in many organizations, including the Rome Yacht Club, of which she was the founding commodore, and the Manamore artists’ group of Minnesota.

Kay is predeceased by her husband, brothers, and parents. She is survived by her sister-in-law Mary Lou Nelles; children Kathy Lowell, Ann Noel, Douglas McClure and Peter McClure and their spouses; as well as her eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, who all knew her affectionately as Meemah.

Kay was a loving and creative soul, who was always ready for anything and happiest when she was with family and friends. She played by her own rules and lived a full life.

A memorial service will be held in Princeton, New Jersey on December 8th, 2018. In lieu of flowers, please feel free to honor Kay with a donation to the Maine Community Foundation, Rome Scholarship Fund, 245 Main St. Ellsworth, Maine 04605.

Arrangements entrusted to Hobbs Funeral Home, South Portland ME. Online condolences may be expressed at www.hobbsfuneralhome.com.

———

Millard M. Riggs, Jr.

Millard M. Riggs, Jr., age 76, of Princeton, New Jersey, died on Friday, November 9, 2018 surrounded by his family. He was a proud resident of Princeton for 37 years.

The family held a private graveside service at Princeton cemetery with Pastor David Davis, Dr. Allison Boden, and The Reverend Paul Jeanes III officiating. 

Millard was born on July 9, 1942, in Durham, North Carolina, elder son to the late Dr. Millard. M. Riggs and the late Letha Mae Cagle. Millard grew up in Morganton, NC, graduating from Morganton High School. He attended Duke University and graduated from Dickinson College with degrees in Organic Chemistry and Psychology.

He went to work immediately with the Celanese Corporation, holding key management positions in the Specialty Chemical Division. He served as President of the Specialty Chemical Trade Association and was President of Wilmington Chemical Corporation, a specialty polymer manufacturer with worldwide sales in Wilmington, Delaware. Professionally, Millard transitioned in 1981 when he joined Merrill Lynch for 27 years in Princeton. He was recruited to Smith Barney’s Princeton/Lawrenceville office where he was First Vice President of their Wealth Management division.

Millard had many community interests that included Friends of the Princeton University Library, Chair of the Princeton YMCA Executive Club, Vice Chair of Princeton Township Zoning Board of Adjustment, and Vice Chair of the Council for the Princeton University Concerts Committee. His past leadership positions include Chairman of the Princeton Family YMCA, President of the Princeton Rotary Club, Trustee of Stoney Brook Watershed Association, and Finance Committee Member for the Nassau Presbyterian Church. He also co-founded Job Seekers, a venture of Trinity and Nassau Churches. He received the Volunteer of the Year Award from the YMCA Brandywine Region in 1991, the Paul Harris Award in 1991, and the Francis G. Clark Award in 1989.

Millard was a man that enjoyed every aspect of life as he traveled the world, had an abiding love of music, and was an avid collector of rare and antiquarian books. He formed deep, meaningful relationships with people all over the world and always made a positive impact on everyone he met. He had a tremendous ability to cultivate in nature with appreciation of beautiful gardens, and seeing all of God’s creatures. Millard was generous to others in need and an inspiration and role model to all ages. He derived great pleasure from all his activities with Grolier Club of New York, The Caxton Club in Chicago, The Morgan Library & Museum in New York City, and the Brandywine Museum in Chadds Ford, PA. He was a member of Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton, NJ.

Beloved survivors include Jinous Jafari, life partner who resides at the home along with his loving children Elizabeth Riggs Pace of Louisville, KY, and David Wilson Riggs of Livingston, MT; brother David Lee Riggs (Marie) of Fuquay Varina, NC; sisters Nancy Mazza (Mark) of Greensboro, NC, and Jan Riddle (Lee) of Durham, NC; and two grandchildren Emily Elizabeth Pace of Charlotte, NC, and Grayson Glenn Pace of Louisville, KY.  Millard has nieces and nephews along with great nieces and great nephews and the special children of Jinous that include Yash Jafari of New York City and Idin Jafari of Princeton, NJ.

His Labradors Lady and Aspen were dear companions to him. 

The family thanks the entire medical team from Princeton Medical Center and Capital Health Medical Center for their professional service and gracious attention to his care. 

Memorials may be directed to K9 Care Montana, Inc. PO Box 490, Livingston, MT 59047 (www.K9CareMontana.org) or to the charity of your choice.

———

Joseph Dresner

Joseph Dresner, of Princeton, NJ, died on November 7, 2018. He was born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1927. After serving in the U.S. Army, he received B.S.E. and M.S. degrees in Engineering-Physics from the University of Michigan in 1949 and 1950, respectively, and a Ph.D. in Physics from New York University in 1958. From 1950 to 1954, he worked in medical physics, improving the use of high energy X-rays in cancer therapy. He joined RCA Laboratories in Princeton, New Jersey in 1958, where he worked until retiring in 1995. His basic research involved almost every electronic property of vitreous and organic semiconductors, particularly in thin films. He was also active in device work in the areas of solar energy, television displays, and thin film transistor circuits.

Dr. Dresner was a fellow of the American Physical Society and the author of 44 scientific papers, and he was granted 10 U.S. patents. During the 1971-1972 academic year, he was Visiting Professor at the Institute for Physics and Chemistry in São Carlos, Brazil. He and his family came to have much love for the people of that country and made many long-lasting friendships there.

He enjoyed a long marriage with his beloved wife, Esther, who predeceased him. He was a lover of music who tried to become learned in every aspect of world culture. He was proud of being literate in seven languages. He was a skilled and passionate sailor, often treating his friends to day cruises on his little sloop, “Fleurette.” In his later years, he developed a love of poetry, which gave him comfort after the loss of his wife, and he worked hard at crafting his own poems, over 100 of them.

He leaves behind his daughter, Lisa M. Dresner, and a large network of extended family and friends.

Services were held Sunday, November 11, 2018 at The Jewish Center, Princeton, NJ, with burial in Princeton Cemetery.

Donations in his memory to Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, 72 Escher St, Trenton, NJ 08609, are appreciated.

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Rita Ludlum

Rita Ludlum, a longtime resident of Princeton, passed away suddenly on November 4 at the age of 94 at her residence, Stonebridge at Montgomery.

In addition to raising six children, Rita was a prolific community volunteer, most notably for The League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area, where she was an active member for over 50 years. Her league activities included serving as president in the early 1980s and as co-chair in 2008–2009. The organization created the Rita Ludlum Citizenship Award in her honor. She led the voter registration efforts for many years and until recently was active at the registration table at the farmer’s market in Skillman.

Rita also ran the catechism program at St. Paul Parish, helped produce the curriculum for the Princeton Adult School, organized English classes for spouses of local graduate students, and assisted with the administration and awards for various scholarship funds, among numerous other activities.

She was born and raised in Milford, Massachusetts, the second in the family of four daughters of Bernard and Catherine Byrne Manion. At age 8, she spent most of a year in bed due to rheumatic fever and received the last rites of the Catholic Church before recovering. As an honor student at St. Mary’s High School, she won a local essay contest addressing “Duties and Privileges of Citizenship,” and in another one run by the Ancient Order of Hibernians was runner-up statewide and received honorable mention nationally.

Upon graduating from Regis College in nearby Weston, Massachusetts, she taught high school English in a nearby town for two years. As she wrote in a short biographical sketch a few years ago, “Thinking life could be more interesting, I left for Boston. The Boston theater was the last stop before New York and the second balcony was affordable. I volunteered to teach English as a second language to the many refugees flooding the city.”

In Boston she worked for the American Meteorological Society. She described her work there as chiefly “keeping track of members, helping them with any problems — being nice to members.” One of them was David Ludlum. “I guess I was nice to him,” she wrote, “because in less than a year, we were married and I was off to Philadelphia and New Jersey.” 

David and Rita lived in Holmdel, New Jersey for a few years before moving to Princeton in 1957 where they built a house in the newly developed Riverside area. There she continued raising her children and as their needs subsided, devoted increasing time to community service. David died in 1997 and Rita became one of the original residents of Stonebridge in 2005.

She is survived by five children, the youngest, Kathy, having died from an automobile accident in 1980. They are Ken of Foster City, Calif.; David of Princeton; Peter of Mission Viejo, Calif.; Stephen of Brunswick, Maine; and Carol of Trappe, Pa. There are nine grandchildren; one surviving sister, Dorothy Saunders of Bowie, Maryland; and 12 nieces and nephews.

Memorial services are to be held on November 24 at 11 a.m. at St. Charles Borromeo Church in Skillman, N.J. and January 12 at a time to be announced at Stonebridge.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Catholic Relief Services, 228 W. Lexington St., Baltimore, Maryland 21201-3443.

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Memorial Service
Jerry Lee Crawford

Jerry Lee Crawford, 86, passed away on October 17, 2018 at Atrium Post Acute Care nursing home in Princeton. A memorial service will be conducted on Saturday, November 17, 2018 at First Baptist Church of Princeton, John Street and Paul Robeson Place at 11 a.m., with prior calling hours from 10 to 11 a.m.

November 9, 2018

Burnett Henry Sams, III
Burnett Henry Sams, III, 87, went peacefully to be with our Lord on May 25, 2018. Born in Seattle, Washington in 1931, he received his BS in Physics from the University of Washington (1951), and his M.S. (1953) and Ph.D. (1958) in Mathematics at the University of Illinois.

There he married Dorothy in 1956. His professional career began as an instructor at Dartmouth College and a computer researcher at MIT in Boston, and continued to include manager of data systems research and ACSI-MATIC program at the Space Laboratory of RCA in NJ, professor of engineering and computer science at Stevens Institute of Technology, Program Management of FCC Licensing and Regulations at the Pentagon, and many years in management of integrated systems at NBC television studios, both in Rockefeller Center and Burbank. He was a pioneer in computer systems related to broadcasting, satellites, high definition television, and spectrum utilization. Among his work, he developed systems using fiber optic networks, microprocessors, and internet protocols, to control multiple remote analog and digital servers to simplify a TV director’s job in composing and combining recorded and live action material. He enjoyed being present at many national conventions and at Olympic games to oversee smooth broadcasts. He was the first employee at NBC Studios to utilize a desk top personal computer. Among his awards was the David Sarnoff Achievement Award of Science. In his free time he enjoyed time spent with his family sailing, camping, traveling, and square dancing, as well as hobbies of amateur radio, international chess games, gardening, and marathon running.

He will be remembered not only for his technical brilliance, dry sense of humor, and his peaceful and patient demeanor, but most importantly for his faithfulness to our Lord Jesus and his desire to give other people the opportunity to hear the Bible taught and respond in faith to Jesus Christ. As a young scientist he himself wrestled with being able to accept the Bible’s inerrancy and God’s gift of forgiveness through Jesus, but soon thereafter, committed his life to follow Jesus and lived out his faith in various ways. Over his 55 years residing in Princeton, he served Nassau Presbyterian, Kingston Presbyterian, and Princeton Alliance churches in various capacities. He co-founded the Living Word nonprofit organization, under which he co-founded the Lamplighter Christian Bookstore, providing Christian books to the university community prior to internet retail. He also served the Princeton community through Big Brothers, Family Service Agency, the United Way, Princeton Community Action Council, and the Gideons. He and Dotty opened their home to foster children and many international students. In his later years he served on the Christian Union Princeton Community Advisory Board, whose mission is to advance the Gospel of Christ on the 8 Ivy-League campuses, and he created endowed scholarships for seminary students at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

Burnett was the great grandson of a Baptist circuit riding preacher in NC who co-founded the Mars Hill College. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Dorothy Sams; his two daughters, Barbara Becker of Andover, MA, and Deborah Smith of Port Republic, NJ; their husbands Gordon Becker and John Smith; and seven grandchildren, Cassandra (Becker) Suarez, Kyle Becker, Davidson Becker, Evelyne Becker, Daniel Smith, JoAnna Smith, and Jacqueline Smith. Burnett spent his last few months living with his wife at his daughter Deborah’s house, along with several grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be made to The Burnett H. and Dorothy F. Sams Visiting Professor Preaching Fund at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, 130 Essex Street, South Hamilton, MA, 01982. A service celebrating his life will be held at Princeton Alliance Church Saturday, November 24, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Condolences extended to the family, and any inquiries, can be sent to Barbara.X.Becker@gmail.com.

Henry Edward Nyce
Henry Edward Nyce, 86, of Skillman died on Saturday, November 3, 2018, just three weeks after the passing of his wife, Marjorie K. Nyce. Born in Sellersville, PA, he resided most of his life in West Windsor and Princeton before moving to Skillman five years ago. Ed was a member of Stone Hill Church, Princeton and very involved in the Stonebridge at Montgomery community.

Son of the late Lloyd and Madeline (Luehrs) Nyce, he is survived by daughters Deborah Flanagan, Karen Bruno, Brenda Nyce-Taylor and a son, Thomas Nyce, 10 grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter.

Friends may call on Saturday, November 10, 2018 from 10 until 10:45 a.m at Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive, Princeton, to be followed by a Memorial Service at 11 a.m.
Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton, matherhodge.com.

Dr. Francis C. Oglesby
Dr. Francis C. Oglesby, 86, passed away on Saturday, November 3, 2018, in Springfield, VA. Frank was born in New York City, NY and raised in Bloomfield, NJ. He was the youngest of four brothers. He graduated from Dickinson College and received a Masters and Ph.D. in Mathematics from Lehigh University.

In 1961, he moved his family to Princeton, NJ, where he resided for 57 years. Frank was an associate professor of mathematics at Princeton University for six years. He then served as a chief officer at Applied Logic, working on artificial intelligence before returning to teaching at Rider University. Frank loved music, to read, play tennis, and interact with people. He was an active member of the Barbershop Harmony Society, where he sang tenor.

He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Victoria; daughter, Elizabeth Scanlon (Brian); grandchildren Michael and Deirdre Scanlon; and niece and nephews, Karen and Zachary Eisenhart and Patrick Heller.

A memorial service will be held at Greenspring Chapel on Friday, November 16, 2018 at noon. 7420 Spring Village Drive, Springfield, VA 22150. Please join the family for a lunch reception following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to the Alzheimer’s Association and St. Jude’s Hospital.

October 31, 2018

Marlene G. Brown

Marlene G. Brown of West Windsor passed away peacefully at home on October 26, 2018, after a long battle with breast cancer. 

Marlene was born in Queens, New York, on February 11, 1961, and moved to Great Neck, Long Island as a child.  She graduated from Great Neck High School South in 1979, and from Brown University in 1983.  After college, Marlene worked in Paris, New York, and Washington, DC, before enrolling in Rutgers Law School-Newark, where she earned a J.D. in 1989.

At law school, Marlene found a passion for tax law, which she followed throughout her professional life.  Following a stint at the accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche, she clerked for Judge Lawrence Lasser, the Presiding Judge of the New Jersey Tax Court, and then began a long career with the State of New Jersey – Division of Law, most recently as Senior Deputy Attorney General and Section Chief. She argued several significant cases before the New Jersey Supreme Court, and served as a fellow with the National Association of Attorneys General U.S. Supreme Court Fellowship Program in Washington, DC.

Marlene was the loving mother of two sons, Mark and Benjamin, who were the lights of her life.  She enjoyed music, theater, traveling, and swimming, and was a patient observer of her husband’s and sons’ various outdoor pursuits. After spending an academic year in Paris as an undergrad, and a year clerking at a Paris law firm, Marlene was a fluent French speaker, and loved visiting both Paris and Montreal. She was active in Congregation Beth Chaim, serving as Sisterhood president, a Board member of the Central Jersey Youth Orchestra, and an active volunteer and fundraiser for the Breast Cancer Resource Center.

Marlene is survived by her parents James and Barbara Brown of East Windsor, NJ; husband David McMillin of West Windsor; sons Mark Brown-McMillin of New Brunswick, NJ, and Benjamin Brown-McMillin of Ithaca, NY; siblings Caren Haase (Robert) of West Windsor and Michael Brown (Lillie) of Chappaqua, NY; nieces Allison Haase and Mia Brown; and beloved aunts Michele Buslik and Anita Brown of Manhattan.

Funeral services were Tuesday, October 30, at Congregation Beth Chaim in Princeton Junction, with burial at Princeton Cemetery.

The period of mourning will be observed Wednesday, October 31 from 7-9 p.m. at the home of James and Barbara Brown in East Windsor. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Breast Cancer Resource Center in Princeton, NJ, or to the Newport Jazz Festival c/o Newport Festivals Foundation, Essex, MA. Funeral arrangements are by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing.

———

Kevin J. Embert

Kevin J. Embert passed away on Thursday, October 25, 2018 at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center. He was 60 years old.  Born in Abington, PA, in 1958, he grew up in Levittown, PA. 

He is predeceased by his parents Donald and Mary (Malloy) Embert, and his brothers Donald Embert, Jr. and Eugene Embert. He is survived by his partner, Kimberly Budd Doub, her sons Jason, Nicholas, and Sam; his daughter Heather Embert; sister Sharon (Jack) Holleran; and brother Dennis (Amy) Embert.

Kevin has lived in the Princeton area for the last 20 years and was employed at the Institute of Advance Studies for over 15 years.

He also leaves behind his greatest friends, his two cats, Mr. B and Stella, and his beloved dog, Dakota.

A Memorial Service will be held on Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 11 a.m. in the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542.  Friends and family may gather from 10 a.m. until the service time.

Extend condolences and share remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Henry Alexander Galitzine King

After a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, Henry Alexander Galitzine King, age 85, died on October 27, 2018 at Meadow Lakes, East Windsor, NJ.  He was a long-time resident of Princeton, NJ.  Henry was born on October 3, 1933 in Princeton and moved to Baltimore in 1934 when his father Edward joined the new Walters Art Museum. His mother, Princess Tatiana Galitzine, was born in Russia, and lived there in splendor before the revolution and great hardship after the revolution. She wrote a memoir of her family’s life in Russia during this period, The Russian Revolution, Childhood Recollections.

Henry attended Calvert and Gilman Schools in Baltimore and, like his father, went to Princeton University, Class of 1955.  He was in ROTC at Princeton, received his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Air Force, and entered duty in 1956.  After his discharge in early 1959, he stopped in Aspen, Colorado for a week of skiing. The planned week in Aspen stretched into a ski-bum season where he met Yolanda Swee from Hurley, Wisconsin. They shared their love of sports, the outdoors, and an adventurous desire to see the world.  They married in July of that year, beginning their 59 years together.

Henry began his 33-year career with Citibank in New York City. Three years later they happily accepted a transfer to London where they lived for five years. Henry then became the branch manager in Dublin, Ireland where they began riding horses and hunting to the hounds. Three years later he became branch manager of the Milan office. They loved Italy, with its proximity to skiing in the Alps. These two years were followed by a return to New York where he joined the Petroleum Department, financing the Alaskan Pipeline.

In 1978, they took another Citibank opportunity to go back to Europe, this time to Geneva, Switzerland.  This turned out to be an 11-year stretch, lasting to 1989.  Time spent in the Alps, skiing and hiking, brought great joy. They did high-mountain ski touring with guides including parts of the Haute Route using randonnée skis, skins, couteaux, and sleeping in mountain huts. His public service in Geneva included two years as the President of the American International Club, and serving on the Ecolint school board.

While in Geneva, Henry got to know some of the largest art collectors in the world. Upon their return to New York in 1989, he headed up the Citibank Art Advisory Service. He retired from Citibank in 1992, followed by consulting for Christie’s, and then retirement “for good” in 1995. 

Most summer vacations were spent in Greensboro, Vermont, filled with lots of tennis, golf, and friendships.  During Henry’s five-year Presidency of Mountain View Country Club, he spearheaded the building of a new clubhouse. 

Henry was on the board of The Royal Oak Foundation (the American arm of the British National Trust), the Friends of the Princeton University Art Museum, and the Copley Hospital Foundation in Morrisville, Vermont.  He was a long-time member of the Pretty Brook Tennis Club, Springdale Golf Club, the Old Guard of Princeton, and The Nassau Club.

He is survived by Yolanda (Lanny), his wife and two sons: Christopher of Lenox, Massachusetts (Carolyn Guenther King) and two grandchildren Ella and Andrew; and David of Geneva, Switzerland (Minna Poutanen King) and three grandchildren Julian, Isabelle and Timo. He was predeceased by his daughter, Nicola Tatiana.

A celebration of Henry’s life will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church at 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (609-924-2277) on November 3, 2018 at 3 p.m.  Memorial contributions may be made to the Nicola Tatiana King Memorial Fund at the Vermont Community Foundation, 3 Court Street, Middlebury, VT 05753 or to The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, Church St. Station, P.O. Box 780, New York, NY 10008.

———

Saul Yermie Levy

Saul Yermie Levy passed away peacefully at the age of 83 on October 23, 2018, surrounded by family and friends. He was the son of the late Sidney and Eve Levy. He was predeceased by his wife of 52 years, Janet Levy. He is survived by: his brother, Richard Levy, of Stroudsburg, PA; his daughter, Linda Levy-Wood and her husband Ronald Wood, of Philadelphia, PA; his son, Jonah Levy and wife, Helga Ying; grandchildren, Ian Raydo and wife Chrissy Raydo, of Mechanicville, NY; Candis Lupietuu and husband Jason Lupietuu, of Philadelphia, PA; Rachel Raydo, of Philadelphia, PA; Milo Levy, of Brooklyn, NY; Julien Levy, of Philadelphia, PA; Refathun Momo, of Philadelphia, PA; Elijah Levy, of Piedmont, CA; Charlotte Levy, of Piedmont, CA; great-grandson Jonah Raydo, of Watertown, NY; Mila Raydo, of Mechanicville, NY; and Keira Raydo, of Mechanicville, NY.

A brilliant student, Professor Levy studied Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on a full scholarship, before earning a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Yeshiva University. In one of his first jobs, Levy helped install one of the first computers used by an insurance company in New York. He worked at RCA in Princeton, NJ until 1971 when he joined the newly formed Computer Science Department at Rutgers University. Professor Levy taught courses in computer architecture for almost 40 years and served as Associate Chair of the Department. He was known for his clarity of exposition and dry wit.

He was an avid traveler. In 1970-71, he lived in Paris, France with his family. He continued his world travels into his 80s. He had a passion for art and art history, never missing an opportunity to visit a museum. Also, very dear to him was his Jewish community at Kesher Israel, where he was a member for more than 25 years, and he attended services regularly.

A devoted husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, he loved to spend time with his family, and he was adored across the generations. He possessed an exceptionally dry, dark sense of humor, which he passed on to all of his family members, and his family has no doubt that Professor Levy is making jokes about his own passing from the Great Beyond.

Services were held Thursday, October 25, 2018 in the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542, followed by burial in Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, NJ. 

Extend condolences and share memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com

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Angelina L. Mattera

Angelina L. Mattera, 89, of Princeton died Monday, October 22, 2018 at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center in Plainsboro.

Born in Pettoranello di Molise, Italy, she came here to the United States in 1943 at age 14 and settled in Princeton. She was a member of St. Paul’s Church. She was a seamstress for various shops, Prep Shop, Verbest Dry Cleaners, Gail Dry Cleaner, and Lux Dry Cleaner. Angelina was a devoted, loving wife and mother who protected everything she loved. She enjoyed cooking for family and friends. She had the soul of an angel and everyone that met her was touched by her kindness and love. A very faithful woman, she had an extreme faith of the Lord. She was a cancer survivor and fighter of various illnesses in her life.

Daughter of the late Arturo and Marie (Rossi) Lise, wife of the late Giovanni Mattera, sister of the late Alex Lise, she is survived by her daughter and son-in-law Sylvana and David Acolia; four sons and daughters-in-law, Joseph and Debbie, John M. and Marie, Anthony R. and Rose, Mario S. and Coleen; her twin sister Clara Sferra; a sister-in-law Olympia Lise; seven grandchildren, Jolene and husband Marty Manion, Theresa Mattera, Anthony and wife Sarah Mattera, Nicholas Mattera, Michael Mattera, Daniel Mattera, and Grace Mattera; four great-grandchildren, Johnny Millard, Liliana Mattera, Gabrielle Mattera, Jacob Mattera; her grand dogs Bingo and Buddy; and several nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Calling hours were held on Sunday, October 28, 2018 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

The Funeral was held at 9 a.m. Monday, October 29, 2018 at the funeral home. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau St., Princeton. Burial followed in Princeton Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made in Angelina’s memory to Fox Chase Cancer Center.

———

William Howard Becker

William H. Becker, 94, died on October 20, 2018 at his home in Princeton, NJ.

Bill was born in Brooklyn on January 12, 1924 to Morris and Ethel Becker. A bright, curious, lively young boy, he played sports and possessed a natural gift for making friends. He also enjoyed being a devoted older brother to sister Renie.

Bill graduated from high school in Rosslyn, New York, and studied at Queens College. After a year in the U.S. Navy, he attended New York University, then progressed to Virginia Commonwealth University Dental School. A newly-minted dentist in 1949, Bill settled in Norfolk, Virginia. Some years later he was introduced to Merle Skoler, a music teacher and fellow New Yorker, on a blind date. She quickly became the love of his life; and they married in 1959, eventually raising four sons.

Bill went on to serve the Norfolk community as a dentist for over five decades. Many of his patients grew up and brought their own children to him. Bill also volunteered his services to underserved communities in Israel.

After a long and satisfying career, Bill retired from dentistry at age 85. He and Merle moved north from Virginia Beach to be closer to their sons. In Princeton, Bill built a new life, continuing to collect friends of all ages. He enjoyed family dinners, people-watching in Hinds Plaza, jaunts to Parx Casino, and playing pool, poker, and Scrabble with his grandchildren and friends.

Bill was humble, generous, loyal, and a man of the highest integrity — in other words, a true mensch. He always put family and friends first. We learned from his example every day and are eternally grateful to have loved and been loved by him.

Bill is survived by his cherished wife Merle; his sons Richard (Rachel), Paul (Lori), Daniel (Madeleine), Sam (Jennifer); his sister Renie (Becker) Teitelman; and nine grandchildren: Olivia, Ben, Hannah, Joshua, Sophia, Corey, Robbie, Emily, and Kate. The family wishes to thank Bill’s dedicated caregivers and companions: Ashaki, Kayla, Jessie, Sophie, and Mary Kate as well as his poker and Scrabble buddies. A special debt of gratitude is owed to his dear friend Marty Austin.

Funeral services were held on October 22, 2018 at the Star of David Memorial Chapel in Princeton. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Alzheimer’s Research Foundation at www.alzfdn.org.

———

Charles Edward Stenard

Charles Edward Stenard, 82, passed away at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center on October 23, 2018 after a long and courageous fight against Parkinson’s disease.  He was born on February 3, 1936 in Watertown, New York. He was predeceased by his parents, John and Irene Stenard, and his brother, John Stenard.  He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Kirby Stenard, of 59 years as well as sons Steven, wife Lysa of Cincinnati, OH; Andrew and wife Jennifer of Manalapan, NJ; daughter Deidre of Princeton, NJ;  and five grandchildren, Alexandre, Kirby, Andrew, Elizabeth, and Katherine.

Charles attended Harvard University on a NROTC scholarship (AB ‘58).  After serving three years as a Research Naval Officer at the National Security Agency, he earned a PhD in Mathematics from Princeton University.

He had an accomplished 30-year career at AT&T Bell Laboratories in research and development management, where he worked on many diverse national security programs. The span of his work included supervising ABM missile tests in Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, and machine learning and neural network software tool development for natural handwriting recognition for the U.S. Postal Service.

Having moved to Stonebridge Retirement Community, he kept active.  As an accomplished cellist, Charles enjoyed playing chamber music and giving concerts. He enjoyed activities such as lectures, musicals, attending various community activities, and being active with his grandchildren.  He was a member of Trinity Church, The Old Guard, and on the board of Crisis Ministry where he volunteered for many years. 

The funeral was held at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ, on Saturday October 27, 2018.  In lieu of flowers, donations to the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s research or other charities are greatly appreciated.

———

Marcia E. Baunach

Marcia E. Baunach, age 70 of Princeton, NJ, died Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at the Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.   

Born in Somerville, NJ, she was the daughter of the late Michael T. and Antoinette (Calio) Russo. Marcia grew up in Whitehouse Station and graduated from Hunterdon Central High School. She lived in Pennington for 47 years before moving to Princeton 10 months ago.

Marcia was a medical assistant at Princeton Hospital before retiring in 2010.

She enjoyed traveling and spending time at the beach. But it was spending time with friends and family that meant the most to Marcia. You would often find her on the phone chatting away with friends.

Marcia is survived by her husband of 50 years, Gerald Baunach; her son, Michael Baunach of Wilmington, DE; and her daughter, Abigail Weigelt and her husband, Justin of Medford, NJ and her precious granddaughter, Adelaide Weigelt. She is also survived by many cousins who were like siblings to her.

A funeral service will be held on Friday, November 2, 2018 at 11 a.m. at the Kearns Funeral Home, 103 Old Highway 28, Whitehouse, NJ 08888.

Flowers are welcome or memorial donations may be made through IN MEMORY OF at www.inmemoryof-memorial.org/marcia-e-baunach for the benefit of Womanspace Inc., which provides help for people dealing with domestic abuse.

Visit www.kearnsfuneralhome.com for more information or to send condolences to the family.

October 23, 2018

Harrison Jerome Uhl Jr.

Harrison Jerome Uhl Jr., 88, of Princeton, died on October 3, at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.

Born in Elizabeth, N.J., on November 10, 1929, “Jerry” was the only child of Harrison J. Uhl and Elizabeth Reed Buchanan. He attended The Pingry School and Princeton University, where he graduated in 1952 with a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture.

After graduating from Princeton, he married Palmer Beverley of Millwood, Va., whom he had met several years before on a double date in Westport, N.Y. They moved together to Pittsburgh, Pa., where he attended Carnegie Tech and graduated with a Bachelor of Architecture degree in 1954.

After college, he enlisted in the U.S. Army. He attended Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia, served in the Corps of Engineers, and was honorably discharged as a First Lieutenant.

In 1957, he returned to Princeton, N.J., to work for a local architect he had met while attending school. He settled in the Port Mercer neighborhood along the D&R Canal, where he lived until his death.

In 1962, he became a partner in a new firm named Collins Uhl Hoisington, Architects and Engineers. Early on, the new firm made a name for itself by winning a design competition for the NJ Pavilion at the 1964 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows, Queens, N.Y.

Over the years, the firm grew and by the mid 1970s, it was taking on international projects. Eventually, the name was changed to CUH2A to avoid additional name changes each time partners joined or left the firm. Jerry was the managing partner for a number of years before his retirement at the end of 1987.

Jerry was an outdoorsman, a talented gardener, a builder of homes and chicken coops, and a soulful guitar player. After retirement, he and Palmer spent half of the year in the Adirondacks, in Westport, N.Y. on Lake Champlain, where they enjoyed wonderful friendships, a home on the lake, a big vegetable garden, and an apple and peach orchard. The other half of the year they would return to Princeton, where he took up wood carving and created a number of beautiful birds.

He is predeceased by his wife, Palmer; and survived by his children, Harrison J. Uhl III, Palmer B. Uhl, and William B. Uhl; daughter-in-law, Dorinda Uhl; and by his grandson, William B. Uhl Jr.

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, N.J., on November 10th at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to The North Country SPCA, PO Box 55, Elizabethtown, N.Y. 12932, or the World Wildlife Fund.

———

Katharine Bretnall

February 5, 1920 – October 5, 2018

Katharine Bretnall, a longtime resident of Princeton, New Jersey, passed away on October 5, 2018 at Pennswood Village, Newtown, Pennsylvania. She was 98 years old. She was the great-granddaughter of the Reverend George Hale, Pastor of the Pennington, New Jersey Presbyterian Church from 1839 to 1869.

During her nearly half-century as a Princeton resident, Katharine became known throughout the community as a tireless and respected journalist chronicling the historic, social, and political events throughout the Princeton area during her 32 years as a reporter and assistant editor of Town Topics, one of Princeton two weekly newspapers.

She began her career at Town Topics in 1952 writing a column titled It’s New to Us, which surveyed newly arrived merchandise in the stores along Nassau Street. Her role quickly expanded to reporting duties in which she covered events in and around Princeton. She regularly attended, and reported on, meetings of both the Princeton Borough Council and the Princeton Township Committee (at the time, Princeton was two separate communities), earning the respect of mayors, councilmen, and committeemen for her honest, straightforward, and dispassionate reporting. Many of the government leaders in both communities became her lifelong friends. She also covered and reported on School Board Meetings and earned the same respect from School Board members that she did from Borough Council and Township Committee.

Her reporting, however, was not limited to governments and school boards. She reported on a wide range of activities throughout the Princeton area, and as a devotee of the theater (she was a passionate fan of Shakespeare) wrote many Town Topics reviews of productions at McCarter Theater, Theater Intime, and other venues.

She worked closely with the founders of Town Topics, Dan D. Coyle and Donald C. Stuart, rising to the level of Assistant Editor under Donald Stuart and, following Stuart’s death, Stuart’s son, Donald (Jeb) Stuart, Jr. She retired from Town Topics in 1984, yet her legacy within the community continued. Thirteen years later a longtime resident of Princeton, in a letter to the editor of Town Topics, lauded her for helping to “…establish a standard for reliable, accurate, and interesting reporting.”

Her work as a reporter gave her an intense interest in community affairs to which she devoted much time and energy following her retirement. She served as a Board Member of both the Family Service Agency of Princeton and the Friends of the Princeton Public Library. She served as both Secretary and President of the Mercer Street Friends Center in Trenton and was President of Princeton Community Housing.

In 1993 she received the coveted Gerard B. Lambert Award, the highest honor the United Way – Princeton Area Communities can present to a community volunteer. The Award was established in 1954 to honor Gerard Lambert, a noted benefactor of the Princeton community.

During her retirement she traveled throughout the world; she was conversant in Spanish and spent a significant portion of her travels in Spanish-speaking countries.

In 1995 she moved to Pennswood Village, a retirement community in Newtown (Bucks County), Pennsylvania not far from Princeton, where she spent the remainder of her life, all the while maintaining her ties to Princeton friends.

Katharine Bretnall was born in Denver, Colorado, on February 5, 1920, the only child of Joseph and Elizabeth Hale Hanly. Following graduation from Denver’s East High School, she enrolled in New York’s Barnard College, earning her Bachelor of Arts Degree in 1942. She then enrolled in the Columbia University School of Journalism from which she earned her Master of Science Degree in 1943, then worked at the Foreign News Desk of the United Press in New York in 1943 and 1944.

In 1943 she married William (Bill) Bretnall of Brooklyn, New York. Following her husband’s discharge from the Army in late 1945 and the subsequent completion of his studies at Columbia University, the couple moved to Princeton where Bill joined Educational Testing Service (which at the time was part of the College Entrance Examination Board). He served ETS in a variety of executive positions, including Director of Test Administration, until his untimely death in 1981.

Katharine Bretnall is survived by her son, Bill Bretnall of Avon Lake (Cleveland), Ohio; her daughter, Anne Bretnall Steen of Fenton (St. Louis), Missouri; three grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.  Those wishing to honor her memory are invited to make contributions to Mercer Street Friends Center, 151 Mercer Street, Trenton, New Jersey 08611.

———

Wen Fong

Wen Fong, a renowned art historian and Princeton University alumnus who spent more than four decades on the Princeton faculty, died of leukemia on October 3 in Princeton, New Jersey. Fong was the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Art History, Emeritus, and professor of art and archaeology, emeritus. He was 88.

Fong was born in Shanghai in 1930, and received a classical Chinese education, including training as a calligrapher. In 1948 he came to the United States to study physics at Princeton, but soon changed his major to European history, graduating in the Class of 1951. He continued at Princeton as a graduate student in the Department of Art and Archaeology, focusing on medieval art history before earning a Ph.D. in 1958 in Chinese art history. He joined Princeton’s faculty in 1954 as an instructor, was named professor in 1967, and the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Art History in 1971. He transferred to emeritus status in 1999.

“Wen Fong was a giant in the field of Chinese art history, and his long tenure at Princeton ensured our department’s significance in the field,” said Michael Koortbojian, the M. Taylor Pyne Professor of Art and Archaeology and department chair. “Generations of students benefited from his mentoring at Princeton, and the discipline as a whole is all the richer for his teaching, his scholarship, and his example.”

Fong was instrumental in shaping the study of Asian art at Princeton, teaching graduate and undergraduate classes on Chinese art history, as well as medieval architecture. In 1959, he and the late Professor Frederick Mote, professor of East Asian studies, emeritus, established at Princeton the nation’s first Ph.D. program in Chinese art and archaeology, and shortly afterward expanded the program to include Japanese art and archaeology.

While chair of the department in the early 1970s, Fong established the history of photography and the history of pre-Columbian art as integral parts of the department’s program. As faculty curator of Asian art at the Princeton University Museum, Fong involved his graduate students in pathbreaking exhibitions and related publications. He helped to build the museum’s holdings in many fields, including the photography collection of the McAlpin family and outstanding holdings of Chinese art, most notably the John B. Elliott Collection of Chinese Calligraphy. He established Princeton’s Far Eastern Seminar Archives in 1958, which include more than 50,000 photographs of Chinese and Japanese paintings, as well as one of the world’s finest libraries of Asian art.

Concurrent with his contributions at Princeton, Fong served nearly 30 years — from 1971 to 2000 — as The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s first consultative chairman of the Department of Asian Art. He often brought his students to The Met to view artwork from its collections.

In 1998, Fong received the College Art Association’s distinguished teaching award, and in 2013 the CAA honored him with a Distinguished Scholar Session at its annual meeting. In 2008, he was awarded an honorary degree from Harvard University. He was a member of the Academia Sinica in Taipei, the American Philosophical Society, the Chinese Art Society of America, and the College Art Association of America, among others.

After his retirement, Fong served as a professor in China at Tsinghua University in Beijing from 2004-7 and at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou from 2009-12.

Fong is survived by his wife, Constance; two sons, Laurence and Peter; a daughter, Serena and her husband, Philipp von Weitershausen; and two grandchildren, Landon and Matteo.

The Department of Art and Archaeology will hold a memorial service at 11 a.m. on April 13, 2019 in Princeton Chapel.

In lieu of flowers, donations could be made to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS.org).

———

Esther Ebenhoe Jenkins

Esther Ebenhoe Jenkins died peacefully at 97 on Sept. 19, 2018.  She is survived by her daughter Hilarie Jenkins of New York and her niece Regina Hancock Vindiatis of Connecticut.

She is the daughter of Sara Melenzer and Andrew Ebenhoe, and is originally of Belle Vernon, PA. She attended Monessen High School where she graduated Valedictorian, then graduating Allegheny College, Meadville, PA. B.A. cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa with majors in English Literature and Drama.

Esther then married artist Paul Jenkins, and they lived in New York City and Paris, France.

Once divorced, Esther returned to New York City where she worked as a direct mail executive for the companies Reuben H. Donnelley, Random House, and Clairol.

Esther was one of the founding members of the successful Off-Off-Broadway group, Theater Practice, that performed original productions by Theo Barnes.

She relocated to Princeton, NJ in 1983. She worked for the environmental research firm Environ. She helped create the theatre group Princeton Rep Company, where she acted in principal roles.

Esther retired from Environ in 1999, living the rest of her days in Princeton happily reading as many books as she could.

Memorial services for Esther will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church at 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (609-924-2277) on November 3, 2018 at 1 p.m.

———

Joseph Foster Studholme Jr.

Joseph Foster Studholme Jr. passed away peacefully on October 3, 2018, after a long illness. Born August 2, 1936 in Binghamton, NY, to Joseph F. Studholme Sr. and Donna (Hall) Studholme, Joe and his brother Peter grew up in Port Allegany, PA. He was a star student and athlete at Port Allegheny High School, where among other achievements he played on both sides of the line for the football team. He spent some of his school years with his family in Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia, where his father worked for Chicago Bridge and Iron. He attended Harvard and Columbia University, focusing on political science and making many lifelong friends.
In 1959 he married Anne Luning and after the birth of their first child, Joseph Bruns, in 1960, the family moved from New York City to Plainfield, NJ, where their second child, Hal Luning, was born in 1964, before finally settling in Locust, NJ, where Joe served on the vestry of All Saints’ Church. Joe worked at a variety of interesting jobs in New York City, including writing for MD magazine and analysis work for S&P, before beginning a long and successful banking career which continued through a number of senior positions with both national and international institutions. He was a member of the Bank Credit Associates of New York, taught a variety of training and introductory courses on credit analysis, and worked on behalf of NGOs overseas.

Joe was a widely-read student of American and World history, finance, and politics and, after retirement, settled in Princeton, New Jersey where he was an active auditor of courses at the University. A devoted husband, father, and grandfather, he was a constant presence in the lives of his Princeton grandchildren. 

Predeceased by his parents and his brother, Joe is survived by his wife, Anne; his sons, Joe and Hal; his granddaughter, Betsy; and his grandsons, Joey and William. Joe’s great heart and sense of humor, his intellectual curiosity and intelligence, wonderful stories, character, and unvarying kindness to his family, colleagues, and friends will be deeply missed.

———

Dr. Peter J. Wojtowicz

Dr. Peter J. Wojtowicz of Princeton, NJ, went to his eternal rest with close family by his side on October 13, 2018. He was 87 years old.

Peter is survived by his children, Catherine Terroni (John) of Yardley, PA; Cynthia Bartlett (Edward) of Ft. Lauderdale, FL; and James Wojtowicz (Helen) of Crosswicks, NJ; his six grandchildren, Bart, John, James, Amy, Kelly, and Olivia; and his special longtime companion Patricia Scott of Cranbury, NJ.  He is preceded in death by his wife, Barbara McCluskey Wojtowicz and his brother David Wojtowicz.

Peter was born on September 22, 1931, in Elizabeth Port, NJ, to Joseph and Helen Wojtowicz. He lived his early life in Linden, NJ, where he enjoyed visiting the train yard with his father and brother, and crabbing with his Uncle Frank. He graduated from Rutgers University and then moved with his young wife to New Haven, CT, where he graduated from Yale University with a doctorate in Physics. Upon graduation, he was employed with RCA – David Sarnoff Research Lab in Princeton, NJ, where he was granted several patents. During this time, Peter fulfilled a lifelong dream of obtaining a private pilot’s license and spent many happy hours flying. He also enjoyed boating in the rivers and back bays of NJ with his wife and family. He retired from RCA 1992.

Peter was very active after retirement. He worked as a consultant and was able to have the time to pursue his love of traveling. He and Pat enjoyed many adventurous trips together by boat and rail including several to Alaska, their favorite destination. 

Peter will be remembered as a wonderful and caring father, grandfather, friend, traveler, and storyteller.

A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on October 20 at the Church of St. Ann, 1253 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville. Burial followed in Ewing Church Cemetery, Ewing

In lieu of flowers, donations in Peter’s memory to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia would be appreciated, as CHOP held special meaning for him. Arrangements are by the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington. Condolences are welcome at www.wilsonapple.com.

October 16, 2018

Emanuel Rhodes

Emanuel Rhodes, a devoted husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, great-great grandfather and World War II Veteran, peacefully passed away on October 9, 2018 at the age of 97.

Emanuel Rhodes was born on January 23, 1921 in Palmrya, North Carolina. Emanuel was the first of two sons born to Playton and Roberta Clark Rhodes. He relocated to Princeton, NJ with his father and brother Oscar when he was 12 years old. Emanuel loved Princeton and resided there for over 85 years as he always knew it was a wonderful place to live and raise his family.

Emanuel was educated in the Princeton school system and was drafted in to the United States Army in 1942. He completed his basic training at Fort McClellan in Alabama and was later transferred to Fort Huachuca in Arizona. Corporal Rhodes was stationed in Italy where he was assigned to the Army’s “All Black”- 92nd Artillery Division from 1943 to 1945. He was responsible for the placement of communication lines between the Artillery Division Headquarters and its organic and attached units. 

In daylight operations, Corporal Rhodes serviced and placed the communication lines under direct enemy observation and the ever-present threat of hostile fire. During one mission, with enemy artillery repeatedly destroying the communication lines at an important intersection, Corporal Rhodes instructed his Commanding Officer to move the Platoon to the safety zone as he voluntarily remained at the location, continuously repairing the communication lines. Nearly a half day later, Corporal Rhodes walked several dangerous miles back to headquarters.  Corporal Rhodes was cheered on and embraced by his entire Platoon, who were stunned in amazement that he completed the heroic mission and survived the heavy enemy fire.

Corporal Rhodes was awarded a Bronze Star on May 29, 1945 for his devotion to duty and meritorious service while in combat. He was also decorated with honors that included the American Theater Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Ribbon, and a Victory Medal.

After being honorably discharged from the Army in 1945, Emanuel met his wife Hazel Vivian Winn in the spring of 1947 and married her three months later.  Emanuel and Hazel’s love story went on for over 71 years. They loved to travel and spend time with their large family.

Emanuel enjoyed fishing, hunting, cooking, playing cards, and board games. His fondest activity was going to the race track with his brother Oscar. Emanuel was an avid sports fan of the New York Yankees, Giants, and Knicks. He also loved to watch classic Army and Western movies. Emanuel was meticulous about his yard, so much so that he would end up spending his entire Saturday working on it because he would stop and talk to every passerby.

Emanuel began his career with the Matthew’s Construction Company.  In 1984, he retired from his father’s hauling business and 20 years of service with RCA.

Emanuel was preceded in death by his parents Playton and Roberta Clark Rhodes, brother Oscar Rhodes, step-mother Minnie Rhodes, and lifelong friend Barbara Hill.

Emanuel is survived by his wife Hazel and his four children, H.Patricia Rhodes, Lynet Dugger, Emanuel Derrick Rhodes, and Lisa Miles; son-in-law Paul Miles; six grandchildren, Gina Jackson-Beale (Corey), Ralph Jackson III, Mia Johnson (Gary), Nina Dugger (Melvin), Emanuel Jackson (Nicole), and Skyler Dugger; 17 great-grandchildren, Shana Jackson, Sharesse Jackson, Gary Johnson Jr. (Erika), Sheldon Jackson (Ramona), Canaan Johnson, Chanel Johnson, Shaan Johnson, Cameron Johnson, Mayke Pegram, Amirah Jackson, Yoana Jackson, Kayla Jackson, Emanuel Jackson, Jr., Aaron Pegram, Antonio Jackson, Zamarrion Gantt, and Shada Jackson; and five great-great-grandchildren, Kayden Taylor, Jai Johnson, Gavin Johnson, Kailee Taylor, and Kamryn Taylor. 

He is also survived by sister-in-law Juanita Rhodes; step-siblings Dexter Liverman, Bonita Leadem (Richard), Denise Isley (James), Lance Liverman (LaTonya), and Rev. Elliott Liverman (Karen); cousins Dorothy and Ralph Stevens; and special friends Melva and Willie Moore, John Clark, Jerry Crawford, and Mardean Epps.   

For over 72 years he was a member of American Legion Post #218 and Veterans of Foreign War.

A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 11 a.m. at Washington Crossing National Cemetery, 830 Highland Road, Newtown, PA.

In lieu of flowers the family requests memorial contributions be sent to Wounded Warrior Project, PO Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675-8517 www.woundedwarriorproject.org.

———

Marjorie K. Nyce

Marjorie K. Nyce, 85, of Skillman died Thursday, October 11, 2018 at Capital Health System at Fuld surrounded by her loving family. Born in Souderton, PA, she resided most of her life in West Windsor and Princeton before moving to Skillman five years ago. Marjorie was a member of Stone Hill Church, Princeton and very involved in the Stonebridge at Montgomery community.

Daughter of the late Melvin and Elsie (Jones) Kratz, she is survived by her husband of 64 years Henry Edward Nyce; a son, Thomas Nyce; daughters Deborah Flanagan, Brenda Nyce-Taylor, and Karen Bruno; ten grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

A Memorial Service was held on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at the Stone Hill Church, 1025 Bunn Drive, Princeton.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to International Students, Inc. at www.isionline.org/Home/JohnandArunaDesai.aspx.

———

Edmund C. Weiss, Jr.

Cherished husband, dad, and grandpa

Edmund C. Weiss, Jr., 75, passed away peacefully on Friday October 12, 2018 at Stonebridge at Montgomery from complications after suffering a major stroke. 

Ed was raised in Whippany, NJ and graduated from Hanover Park High School where he met his wife Carol. He attended Lehigh University, graduating with a degree in accounting. After marrying Carol in 1965, Ed served in the U.S. Army as a First Lieutenant stationed at the Pentagon. He raised his family in Parsippany, NJ for 25 years and was very active in the community, including serving as President of Par-Troy Little League North. After moving to Skillman, NJ in 1995, Ed remained active in the community as a Board Member of the Cherry Valley Homeowners Association and Finance Committee Member at Trinity Church-Princeton.

Ed was a Forensic CPA and Banker, most recently Managing Director with Protiviti specializing in Internal Audit Services. Previously he served as Executive Vice President and General Auditor for Summit Bancorp (formerly UJB Financial). He also served in a number of leadership positions within a variety of industry associations, including Trustee, Vice President and Chairman of the Members in Industry Committee of the New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants. He was also a Director and President of the National Association of Financial Services Auditors (now part of Institute of Internal Auditors). Additionally, in 1989 he founded the MAX General Auditor’s Group, a national group of chief audit executives that was recently renamed the Weiss MAX Group in his honor.

Ed was a lifelong Yankees fan. The joys of his life were his children and grandchildren, and he especially enjoyed watching them play sports and vacationing with them throughout the years. He also enjoyed playing golf and attending Old Guard-Princeton lectures with his closest friends.     

Ed was predeceased by his parents Edmund and Elsie Weiss. In addition to Carol Weiss, his loving wife of 53 years, Ed is survived by his children Kimberly (Ron) Payne and Edmund (Trish) Weiss III; and grandchildren Ryan, Kevin, Rees, Landon, Riley, and Griffin. He is also survived by his sister Elizabeth Santomier.

A celebration of his life will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday October 27, 2018 at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Cycle for Survival (http://mskcc.convio.net/goto/InLovingMemoryofEdWeiss). 

October 9, 2018

Rosemary O’Brien

Rosemary O’Brien, 93, died on September 29, 2018 at her home at Princeton Windrows, in Princeton, NJ, after a long struggle with Parkinson’s disease.

She was born June 6, 1925 in South Bend, Indiana, the eldest child of Dr. Peter Birmingham and Sarah Birmingham. She graduated from Saint Mary’s College in 1947 and earned a master’s degree in Far Eastern Studies from the University of Michigan in 1979.

In 1948 she married James L. O’Brien of Beloit, Wisconsin, with whom she raised three children in South Bend, Indiana and Ann Arbor, Michigan, before moving to Princeton in 1968. She greatly enjoyed spending summers, over more than 50 years, at their cottage in Harbor Springs, Michigan.

Rosemary had a passion for reading and a great talent for writing, culminating in the publication of a book on the diaries of Gertrude Bell, who was an early female Middle East explorer. She enjoyed travel around the globe with her husband Jim, who was an attorney and executive with Bendix International. Rosemary also developed an increasing interest in other women’s issues and published articles and chapters on women’s historical and cultural topics. Wherever she lived, she enjoyed participating in various book groups and reading clubs. She always showed flair for entertaining. Rosemary was active in many civic activities in Princeton. She was among the first women to be inducted into the Old Guard of Princeton Nassau Club.

She was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, James L. O’Brien, who died in 2002; her parents; and her brother Richard and his wife Jeanne. She is survived by daughter and son-in law, Anne and Dr. Stephen Bauer of Rochester, New York; son and daughter-in-law, Dennis and Wendilee (Health) O’Brien of Winter Harbor, Maine; son and daughter-in-law David and Sara (Howard) O’Brien of Reston, Virginia; five grandchildren, Erica (Bauer) Evert and her husband Corey Evert and Benjamin, Luke, Charleen, and Gabe O’Brien; and one great-grandson, Jack Evert.

Visitation for family and friends will be held on Friday October 12, 2018 from 4-6 p.m. at Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. The burial will be private in Princeton Cemetery.

A gathering to celebrate Rosemary’s life will be held Saturday, October 13, 2018 from 2-4 p.m. at Princeton Windrows, 2000 Windrow Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Rosemary’s honor to the Michael J. Fox Foundation, P.O. Box 5014, Hagerstown, MD 21741-5014.

———

Chi Lung Kang

Chi Lung Kang, 97, Princeton resident of 51 years, died September 30, 2018. Born and raised in Shanghai, China, his college education at the National Chiao Tung University was interrupted by the World War II Japanese invasion of Shanghai. He and his family fled to Chungking, where he went to work in a munitions factory building arms. At the end of the war, he returned to Chiao Tung where he completed his degree in mechanical engineering. In 1947 he immigrated to the United States to get advanced degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering at the University of Illinois Champaign/Urbana. It was there that he met his loving wife-to-be Chia-chen Chu (Cecilia) who was also pursuing her advanced degrees. After graduating, in 1951 they moved to New Jersey and married. They happily lived there for the rest of their lives; raising their family and helping their siblings, nephews, and nieces immigrate to the United States.

Chi Lung worked at Boonton Radio Corporation, Remington Rand Univac, Princeton University (Forrestal atomic accelerator group), and General Electric conducting high energy engineering research. With family and friends he championed kindness to all, intellectual curiosity, and a love for China — the “motherland.” From the beginning to the end of his life he enjoyed and promoted Chinese philosophy, literature, and poetry. Survived by his son and daughter-in-law Jeff and Brenda Kang, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; son and daughter-in-law, Ray and Kim Kang, Orono, MN; five grandchildren, Lee Kang, Chelsea Kang, Harrison Kang, Eleanor Kang, and Rachel Kang; two sisters Ji Qin Kang, Plainsboro, NJ, and Ji Cheng Kang, Chengdu, China; and numerous nieces and nephews.

A visitation and memorial service will be held Saturday, October 13, 2018 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ.; immediately followed by a reception at Shanghai Park Restaurant, 301 N. Harrison Street, #33, Princeton, NJ from 2-4 p.m. An interment service and reception will be held in Princeton at a future date. Condolences can be submitted online at www.thekimblefuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Chi Lung Kang Endowment at the University of Illinois Foundation, 1305 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801.

———

Mary Josephine McCloskey

Mary Josephine McCloskey, known as Bridie to all that knew her, 85, passed away peacefully on Friday, October 5th, 2018, at the Brookdale assisted living facility in Hillsborough, NJ.

Bridie was born on October 6th, 1932 in Gurteen, Ireland. The oldest of three children, Bridie grew up in Gurteen with her two brothers and completed her schooling in Halifax, England. Bridie developed a lifelong love of horses and swimming during her childhood. She trained to swim the English Channel and often swam on Long Beach Island and at the Community Park Pool. She treasured trips back to Ireland to visit friends and family.

Bridie was a resident of Princeton for nearly 60 years. Bridie immigrated to the United States in 1954 to live with relatives in Trenton before meeting her husband William (Dave) McCloskey. She worked for Bell Telephone Company until the birth of her first child, Michael (Kevin). She loved being a mother to Kevin and her daughter, Maureen (Missy), and devoted herself to supporting her children throughout their adult lives. Bridie could sing — at the great delight of others she could be found singing “Danny Boy” by her mother’s side at a pub in Gurteen or family birthday parties in Princeton. Bridie was very talented in needlepoint and this transitioned into a love of drawing in her later years. Bridie and her husband Dave spent countless falls and winters cheering for the Tigers at Princeton football and basketball games.

Bridie was a light to all that knew her. She defined selflessness as a beloved daughter, sister, wife, mother, grandmother, cousin, aunt, and friend. Daughter of the late Martin and Mary (Mulligan) Callaghan, sister of the late Tony Callaghan, mother of the late Michael Kevin McCloskey. She is survived by her husband William David McCloskey; daughter Missy and her husband Ken; and her two grandchildren, Kelly and Ryan. She is also survived by her brother, Peter Callaghan and sister-in-law Mary Callaghan of Manchester, England; and special nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Friends may call on Wednesday, October 10th, from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at Mather-Hodge Funeral Home. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Thursday, October 11th, at 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul’s Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542.

———

Jill Ann Gowen Weatherill

Jill Ann Gowen Weatherill, longtime resident of Princeton NJ, died September 30, 2018, at her son’s home in Connecticut after a long battle with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). She was 85 years old.

Born in East Dereham, Norfolk, UK, Jill was the first in her family to attend university, studying food science at Queen Elizabeth College in London. After university she worked for British food companies Lyons and Walls, before moving to New York City in the late 1950s where she continued work as a food scientist.

Jill met her husband, Derek Weatherill, in 1960 while on a sailing holiday in England. As Derek also happened to live in New York they arranged to meet upon their return to the States, and married in June 1961.

Jill was always extremely active and never without a ‘project.’ She was a passionate gardener, knew all the Latin names of plants, and created a spectacular garden over a 40-year period at the family home in Princeton. It was much admired by all, visited by gardening clubs and painted by artists. Friends rarely left without gifts of plants, cuttings, or flowers.

Jill’s love for children led her to spend many years teaching nursery school. Later she worked as a docent at the Princeton University Art Museum giving tours to children and also adults. In her free time, she enjoyed visiting art museums, playing the piano and recorder, and attending classical concerts. With Derek, she shared a love of the ancient world, and wrote a small book of Greek myths in verse. She kept herself informed about current events and always had a stack of newspapers by her bed.

Her husband Derek was diagnosed with cancer shortly after he retired, ending dreams of traveling together in retirement. Derek struggled with the illness for eight years before passing away in 2004. After falling at home in October 2013, Jill moved to an apartment in Boston in early 2014 to be closer to family. She moved into a memory care assisted-living facility in Boston in 2015.

She is survived by her brother Roger of Tahiti, her four children — Sally, Simon, Julian, James — and five grandchildren, Oliver, Emily, William, Ben, and Sophia. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, www.theaftd.org.

She has been buried alongside Derek at Princeton Cemetery. A memorial is being planned, for details please email MemorialForJill@gmail.com.

———

Joyce Marie Albers-Schonberg

Joyce Marie Albers-Schonberg died on October 6 after a long, bravely fought illness in her 76th year and the 50th year of an incredibly happy marriage. 

Joyce was born in Linden, NJ to Mary D. and Andrew R. Kovatch. After high school, she went to Douglass College in New Brunswick, New Jersey and graduated with a degree in Biochemistry. She then joined the Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in Rahway NJ in 1965, where she was part of several important projects. After 12 years, she decided on a career change, obtained a Master’s Degree in Business Administration at New York University, and joined the First Boston Investment Bank in Manhattan as a Healthcare Securities Analyst. In her field, she ranked first in the country in the Institutional Investor magazine for several years. In the 1990s she made one more career change, joining the very young healthcare investment firm, Deerfield Management, where she found wonderful, lasting friends. In 1999 she retired to join her husband, Georg Albers-Schonberg, whom she had met in her first few weeks at Merck and who was now also retired.

Joyce had the rare gift to always put others before herself. She continued to care very deeply for Douglass College and its Alumnae Association, for the Princeton Healthcare System Foundation and many other charitable causes. In 2012, Joyce was awarded the NJ Women of Achievement Award. 

Joyce is survived by her husband, her mother, age 95, her brother Richard A. Kovatch, two sisters Jo Ann Kuser and Andrea Correia, their growing families, and Georg’s many relatives in Europe.

Joyce and Georg enjoyed extensive travel throughout the world and spending time on the Jersey shore. They had a deep appreciation for the fine arts, and could regularly be found at the Metropolitan Opera, or attending a concert given by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

Visitation will be at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ, Friday, October 12th from 3-6:30 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Paul’s Catholic Church, 216 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ, Saturday, October 13th at 11 a.m.

In lieu of flowers the family requests memorial contributions be made in Joyce’s memory to any of the following organizations: Columbia University Medical Center; the Princeton Medical Group P.A.; Princeton Healthcare System Foundation; Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer; the Associate Alumnae of Douglass College; or the Community Foundation of Collier County (Naples, Fl).

———

Georgine Hall Stauffer

Georgine Hall Stauffer, 93, died peacefully on Monday, October 1, 2018, at the Acorn Glen assisted living residence in Princeton.

Georgine was born and raised in Princeton, the daughter of George Gilson Fleming and Grace Elizabeth Titus, and she spent most of her adult life there. She graduated from Wilson College in Pennsylvania in 1946 and later earned a master’s degree in English from Columbia University.

Her calling was in the theatre. She performed in summer and regional plays during college and went on to enjoy a long acting career with appearances in a wide variety of stage, TV, and movie productions. Her Broadway credits include a performance with George C. Scott in Present Laughter and a role as understudy to Anne Pitoniak in Night Mother. Off-Broadway, she appeared in Moliere’s Learned Ladies with Jean Stapleton; in Sam Shepard’s True West with Peter Boyle and Tommy Lee Jones; and in Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party. Her regional theatre roles included Henry V, Buried Child, and Tartuffe. In the early 1960s, she pioneered a children’s television program entitled Once Upon a Day, which aired on WNET in New York. Later in her career, she appeared in several TV series, including Law and Order and The Good Wife. And she played Melvin Douglas’s secretary in the movie Being There with Peter Sellers and Shirley MacLaine. Georgine also taught English and drama in the Princeton public schools for years, and until recently, she worked at The Lewis School of Princeton teaching drama to students with dyslexia and other learning challenges.

Her first marriage was in 1949 to Herbert J. Hall, a prominent physicist and environmental scientist and the father of her three children. Later husbands included Ralph Freedman, former Chair of the Department of Comparative Literature at Princeton University, and David DuVivier, a former assistant district attorney in Manhattan and member of the Coudert Brothers law firm in Paris. In her 80s, Georgine rekindled a college-era romance with Daniel Stauffer, a Princeton graduate and civil engineer from Texas, and the two were married in August of 2010. Their loving companionship ended with Daniel’s passing in May of 2017.

Not only an accomplished actress, Georgine was a champion of civil rights, a devoted mother, a gourmet cook, a lover of English Bulldogs (Guinevere and Lancelot), and a loyal and generous friend to many, from actors and academics to the caregivers on staff at Acorn Glen. Her love of life, grit, and humor will be sorely missed.

She is survived by three children and their spouses (Molly Hall and husband Emilio Tavernise; John Hall and wife Kate Hall; and Stephen Hall and wife Margaret Dailey); two stepsons and their spouses (Mark Freedman and wife Alison Meyer; and Jonathan Freedman and wife Sara Blair); seven grandchildren (Kate Berenson, Aaron Berenson, Hannah Berenson and husband Ryan Stafford, Sarah Berenson, Conrad Hall, Jennifer Hall, and Margot Hall); six stepgrandchildren (Weli Freedman, Michael Freedman, Sarah Freedman, Ariel Freedman, Benjamin Freedman, and Miriam Freedman); and two great-grandchildren (Grace Stafford and Caleb Stafford).

The family held a burial service at the Princeton Cemetery on October 8th, with a memorial to follow on a date to be determined. Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home in Princeton.

Donations in Georgine’s memory may be made to The Actors Fund, 729 Seventh Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10019; The Lewis School of Princeton, 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540; or C-Change Conversations, PO Box 1206, Princeton, NJ 08542.

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Elinor T. Riddle

Elinor T. Riddle, 77, of Princeton, NJ passed away Friday, October 5, 2018 from cancer. She died at home, quietly in her sleep.

Born in Elmhurst, NY, Elinor graduated from Marymount Manhattan College in 1962 with a bachelor’s degree in English Literature. In 1965 she married Larry Riddle, with whom she raised a family of three children. They have lived in Princeton since 1973. In 1986 she joined the Princeton Public Library where she worked as a library assistant for over 20 years. Beauties of nature have been joys in her life, and she and her husband have been avid birders.

Elinor was predeceased by her parents, Edmond and Margaret Kelly Tyne. She is survived by her husband; her two daughters, Margaret Gillingham and Adele Feldstein; her son, George; her six grandchildren, Ellen and Ben Gillingham, Jean Strickland, Hazel, Ava and Eloise Feldstein; and her sister Catherine Bingay.

Services will begin on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 10:15 a.m. in the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ followed by a 10:45 a.m. funeral mass at St. Paul Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Interment will be in Princeton Abbey and Cemetery, 75 Mapleton Road, Princeton.

Please share your thoughts and memories at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

October 3, 2018

Nicole L. Gordon

It is with great sadness that the family of Nicole L. Gordon announces her passing on Monday, October 1, at the age of 42 years. After fighting for 11 years to recover from a series of devastating strokes, her body no longer had the strength to continue.

Nicole, widow to Seward Wojciech Piasecki, will be lovingly remembered by her mother and step-father, Joanne C. Gordon and Elias Malavet; her father and step-mother, Elliot B. Gordon and Linda Gordon; her brother and sister-in-law, Gregory P. Gordon and Dr. Freya Emspak; her sister and brother-in-law, Elizabeth A. Hall and Christopher Hall; and her niece and nephews, Simone Gordon, Dexter Gordon, Charles Hall, and James Hall.

Nicole attended the Chapin School, Princeton Day School, and graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa from Connecticut College with a BA in Art History. She was talented, artistic, had a flare for high fashion, and was a free spirit who loved her family, horses, Magic Mike, and Ancient Aliens.

A Funeral Service in memory of Nicole will be held on Friday, October 5th at Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ. Visitation starting at 10 a.m., service at 2 p.m. followed by burial at Princeton Cemetery.

Share memories and extend condolences at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Diane E. Glinka

Diane E. Glinka, of Dunstable, MA, passed away September 23, 2018, surrounded by her family, after a sudden illness. Loving mother, sister, teacher, and friend.

Born in Princeton, NJ to Elizabeth N. Glinka and Matthew J. Glinka, Diane was a graduate of Princeton High School and Boston University School of Fine Arts, and received her Master’s in Education from UMass Lowell.

Devoted mother to her adored children, Michael McAuliffe and Emily McAuliffe of Dunstable, MA; loving sister of Elaine Glinka of Cartersville, GA, Charlotte Glinka and brother-in-law Charles Alexander of Boston, and Sarah Glinka-Endicott of Ann Arbor, MI. Also survived by her newfound love, Eric Leonard, as well as her niece, nephews, cousins, and many close friends.

Vibrant and talented school teacher, and creative and supportive colleague, most recently at the Groton-Dunstable Regional Middle School. Her students often said she was their favorite teacher.

Avid golfer with a great group of friends at the Long Meadow Golf Club. Passionate about music, especially Motown, Aretha, the Beatles, and Jazz. Private piano teacher, accompanist at St. John’s Baptist Church in Woburn, MA, and former piano player with the Old Enuff to Know Better Band.

A star has gone out in the night sky, and the world is dimmer now for all who love her.

Celebration of Diane’s life was held Thursday, September 27, 2018, at the Long Meadow Golf Club, 165 Havilah Street, Lowell, MA. In lieu of flowers, you may make a donation to a fund that will be used to help teachers pay privately for school supplies that are not in the school’s budget: Groton-Dunstable Regional School District, 344 Main Street, Groton, MA 01450, memo line: Diane Glinka Fund. Arrangements by McGaffigan Family Funeral Home, 37 Main Street Pepperell, MA. Please see www.mcgaffiganfuneral.com.

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Margaret Frances Nilsen Galick

Margaret Frances Nilsen Galick, 90, of Griggstown died Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.

Born in Brooklyn, NY, she was a resident of Griggstown for over 80 years. Frances was the church secretary for Griggstown Reformed Church. She was a nature enthusiast, folk artist, and painter.

Daughter of the late Frode Winter Elias and Margaret (Ruud) Nilsen, wife of the late Vincent T. Galick, she is survived by two daughters Barbara L. Campbell and Wendy Neusner, and three grandchildren Katherine Neusner, Claire Campbell, and Christian Campbell.

Funeral services were held at Griggstown Reformed Church. Frances was buried alongside her late husband Vincent in the Rocky Hill Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made to Griggstown Reformed Church, 1065 Canal Road, Princeton, NJ 08540.

Arrangements were under the direction of M.J. Murphy Funeral Home, Monmouth Junction.

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Memorial Service for Jean Millis Gilpin and Professor Robert George Gilpin Jr.

A memorial service will be held to remember and celebrate the lives of Jean and Bob Gilpin on Saturday, October 13, 2018, at 11 a.m. in the Princeton University Chapel, followed by a reception hosted by the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination at Princeton University.

Please RSVP by Monday, October 8 to princetonmemorial@gilp.in; for more information visit www.perkinsparker.com/obituary/robert-gilpin-jr.