August 26, 2015

Obit Aye 8-26-15Evelyn Aye

Rev. Dr. Evelyn Birkel Thompson Aye, 94, of Newtown, Pa. died on August 18, 2015 at St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne, Pa.  Born in Kuling, China, she worked in the mission field in Egypt and served Presbyterian Churches in Princeton, Bound Brook and Trenton.

Wife of the late Rev. Dr. John Alexander Thompson, she is survived by her children, Henry Thompson, Daniel Thompson, Ann Thompson; and Carol Thompson Hartpence; and a granddaughter Alexandra Bracey.

Memorial services will be held at a later date under the direction of the Swartz/Givnish Funeral Home, Newtown, Pa  (215) 968-3891.

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Obit Blumenfeld 8-26-15Ruth Blumenfeld

Ruth Blumenfeld (100) died peacefully in her home on Randall Road in Princeton on August 18, 2015. She was born on January 15, 1915 in New York City. In 1938 she married Max David Blumenfeld (1911–1994), and in 1957 they moved to Princeton.

She was a wonderful, deeply loved and loving wife, mother, and homemaker, and a superb cook and pastry chef. In her youth, she was actively involved in progressive politics, an interest she maintained all her life.

Endowed with a remarkable memory, Mrs. Blumenfeld was an expert on old-time Hollywood films, and she knew everything about the movie stars who appeared in them. She was surrounded by her family when she died, and she will be sorely missed.

She is survived by her three sons, Robert Blumenfeld; Richard H. Blumenfeld and his wife Ming; Donald S. Blumenfeld-Jones and his wife Kathryn, and their children Benjamin and Rebecca.

August 19, 2015

Obit Byrne 8-19-15Jean F. Byrne

Jean F. Byrne, of Princeton, died peacefully on August 9, 2015, at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro surrounded by family members. The cause was complications from Babesiosis (a tick-borne disease of the red blood cells), and her illness was brief. Jean was New Jersey’s first lady from 1974 to 1982.

Jean was born in 1926 in Newark, New Jersey, and spent her childhood in West Orange, where she lived until 1974 when she moved to Princeton upon her former husband’s election as governor. She graduated from West Orange High School and earned a bachelor’s degree from Bucknell University where she majored in Spanish. As an undergraduate, she also won academic awards in English composition and literature. She subsequently earned a master’s degree in education from New York University.

Like her mother, she was deeply committed to education. As a student teacher, she taught in public schools in Harlem and elsewhere in Manhattan. Jean then taught second grade in West Orange until required to retire when she became pregnant with her first child. She remained a lifelong proponent of quality education and civil rights.

During her time as New Jersey’s first lady, in addition to raising her children and carrying out her official obligations, Mrs. Byrne was active in the Princeton public schools as a teacher’s assistant and coordinator of special programs. While Jean’s priority remained her family, she supported her husband’s policies in frequent public engagements and in an influential letter to the editor defending his record. She also appreciated the rarity of opportunities the role brought to her: to dance with Prince Philip, to attend operas with one of its greatest stars, Maria Jeritza, and to host Princess Grace and her family at Morven, the governor’s residence in Princeton at the time. But she was most grateful to come in contact with amazing people quietly working to address a variety of education, health, and other welfare needs of the state’s citizens.

Mrs. Byrne remained a Princeton resident after her years in the governor’s mansion, but she retained throughout her life many friendships formed as early as kindergarten in West Orange. Jean was an avid bridge player, gardener, cook, music and opera lover, dog lover, traveler, reader, tennis player, and tennis fan. Jean was also a member of the Nassau Club, past member of the Orange Lawn Tennis Club, and active in the Presbyterian Church of Lawrenceville. She remained active and independent throughout her life, and she will be remembered by all who knew her for her simple graciousness.

Jean is predeceased is by her parents, George and Jane (née Crysler) Featherly; an older sister Anne Phinney; and a daughter, Susan. She is survived by her son Brendan Thomas Byrne, Jr. and his wife Barbara Moakler Byrne; daughter Nancy Byrne Reinhart and her husband Peter; son Timothy J. Byrne and his companion Mercy Salaz; daughter Mary Anne Byrne; daughter Barbara Byrne Stefan and her husband Albert; son William K. Byrne, and their children and stepchildren Meaghan, Erin, Brendan, and Kelly; Matthew and Anna; Jack, Lukas, and Saiya; and Alexandra and Scarlett; as well as her beloved nieces and nephews and her extended family and close friends.

A memorial service for Jean will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, September 18, at the Presbyterian Church of Lawrenceville. In lieu of flowers, the family would welcome contributions in Jean’s memory to the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, P.O. Box 872, Trenton, NJ 08605 or SAVE Animal Rescue, 900 Herrontown Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, or another worthwhile cause of which Jean knew there are many.

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Obit Miles 8-19-15Elizabeth Bryant Miles

Mrs. Elizabeth Bryant Miles (Lid), 102, a resident of Princeton, died of natural causes on Friday August 14, 2015. She was a loving mother and wife, grandmother, drama teacher, and enthusiastic community leader. She lived with her family in Orinda, Calif., Old Greenwich, Conn., Houston Tex. and Princeton.

Lid was born on May 7, 1913 in Kansas City, Mo. to Dr. Carl Herbert Bryant and Mary Tanner Shannon Bryant of Independence Mo. Her father was a member of the class of 1904 at Yale and, according to her, an author of the Whiffenpoof Song, which she sang and played on the piano her whole life, up to the day before her death. She grew up with her four younger brothers in Atascadero, Calif. and attended Mills College, where she majored in drama, performing many roles, often as the male lead, since she was tall relative to the other girls. Her memorable roles included Romeo in Romeo and Juliet, the lines of which she always remembered and recited often. After graduation from Mills she taught drama at Anna Head School (Now Head-Royce School) in Berkeley, Calif. and served as Miss San Louis Obispo County at the San Francisco Golden Gate International Exposition. In 1939 she met Thomas Kirk Miles (Kirk), a resident at her boarding house in Berkeley. He was a civil engineering graduate from Stanford University with a master’s degree from MIT and worked for Shell Development in Emeryville, California. They were married at the Stanford Memorial Church on May 13, 1939. They settled in Orinda, Calif. where they lived until 1962, with the exception of a few years in Washington D.C. during World War II. Their first son, Thomas Kirk Miles, Jr. was born on October 5, 1941 in Oakland. He died in an automobile accident in 1964 during his senior year at Pacific University, Oregon. His dedication to theater and acting led Pacific University to name the Tom Miles Theater in his memory. Their second son, Richard Bryant Miles, was born July 10, 1943 in Washington D.C. He is currently Robert Porter Patterson Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Emeritus at Princeton University. In 1962 Kirk was transferred to Shell’s head office in New York City, and they moved to Old Greenwich Conn., a short commute from the city, where, with the exception of five years in Houston Tex., they lived until 1995. That year they moved to Princeton next door to their son, Richard, and his family.

Lid was always engaged in community affairs. She co-directed the comic review, Absurdia in Suburbia, and put on children’s performances of the Nutcracker Suite, Sleeping Beauty and other favorites to the delight of the Orinda community. Their friends included many Shell families. They gathered around her Steinway piano on many occasions, singing old favorites late into the night. Most of these families were also transferred to the east coast and remained close friends. In Old Greenwich she was active in the garden club of Old Greenwich, the First Congregational Church choir and the Mills Alumnae Association. Her Parties to Picnics cookbook presented one meal for each week of the year with recipes from Mills Alumnae and friends as a fund-raiser for the Mills College Club of New York. She and Kirk enjoyed tennis and sailing and their wonderful Lucas Point neighbors. They were members of the Riverside Yacht Club, and sailed their 35-foot sloop, Sea Otter, in Long Island Sound and “down East” to Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. In 1971 they sailed Sea Otter all the way to Houston, Texas when Shell moved its New York offices there, sailing back again in 1975 after Kirk retired. They moved to Princeton after their home in Old Greenwich was flooded by a nor’easter. In Princeton, Lid participated in the Let’s Talk group at the Senior Resource Center, making many new friends there. Every evening she played the piano after dinner and before climbing the stairs to bed. She had a piano piece for each of the beloved men in her life, always ending with Good Night Sweetheart for Kirk.

She is survived by her son, Richard Miles; his wife, Dr. Susan McCoy Miles, of Princeton; and her grandchildren, Thomas Nelson Miles of Princeton and Julia Elizabeth Miles of Fredericksburg, Va.

Services will he held at the First Congregational Church in Old Greenwich Connecticut on Saturday, August 22 at 3 p.m.

Donations may be made in her memory to the Tom Miles Endowment for the Performing Arts at Pacific University, 2043 College Way, Forest Grove, Oregon 97116, to Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Blvd. Oakland, California, 94613, or to the Princeton Senior Resource Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton NJ 08540.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Obit Hosea 8-19-15Timothy M. Hosea

Timothy Michael Hosea, MD, orthopaedic surgeon, and Rutgers University Football team physician of Princeton, passed away suddenly at the age of 62 on Saturday, August 8, 2015. Born in Grosse Pointe, Mich, to Elizabeth R. Hosea and the late Thomas J. Hosea, Tim is survived by his wife of 40 years, Elizabeth (Libet) Murray Hosea, and three daughters, Hadley Elizabeth Hosea, Mary Whitney Hosea, and Katherine Kirby Hosea. Tim is also survived by three brothers, David (Valerie) of Palm Coast, Fla.; Mark (Sharon) of Orchard Lake, Mich.; and Paul (Crisi) of Laguna Beach, Calif.; along with numerous nieces, nephews, and a wide and wonderful circle of friends.

A longtime resident of Princeton, Tim attended Harvard University where he was a member of the Harvard crew team, training under legendary Harvard coach Harry Parker and competed in the boat that won the Ladies Challenge Cup at Henley-on-Thames in 1973. Twenty-five years later as an avid master’s oarsman, Tim won gold in an epic race against a Russian eight at the Nike World Masters Championships. Following his graduation from Harvard, Tim enrolled in medical school at the University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine. Tim returned to Boston completing his internship at Peter Brent Brigham Hospital, his residency at the Harvard Combined Orthopedic Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and a fellowship in sports medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Tim and Libet moved to Princeton in 1985 where he began his orthopaedic practice with University Orthopaedic Associates, specializing in sports medicine. Tim had affiliations with five hospitals: the University Center for Ambulatory Surgery, Center for Ambulatory Resources, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Saint Peter’s University Hospital, and The Medical Center at Princeton.

Tim’s affinity for sports shone through in his professional life, serving as the team physician for the USRowing national team at 12 world rowing championships and multiple Olympic Games over the past two decades. He was also the U.S. Olympic team physician for the Rowing, Canoe/Kayak, and Cycling teams at the XXVIIth Olympiad in Sydney, Australia and the U.S. Olympic team physician for the Rowing and Athletic teams at the XXX Olympiad in London, England. In addition, Tim was the orthopaedic consultant and team physician for Rutgers University, where he traveled with the football team for 30 years.

Tim was the president of the Princeton National Rowing Association, authored numerous articles and presentations on sports medicine, and was a member of several orthopaedic and sports medicine societies, including the Herodicus Society and the Thomas B. Quigley Society. He was a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, a chair of the Sports Medicine Commission, a member of the United States Rowing Association, and a Clinical Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at UMDNJ — Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Tim also enjoyed work as a committed board member for various organizations, including a trustee of the Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart.

A dedicated sportsman, Tim had a love of the outdoors and was a golf, rowing, skeet shooting, hunting, and fly fishing enthusiast. Tim’s passion extended beyond his own enjoyment, as he took enormous pleasure in sharing his knowledge by teaching, as well as learning from others. He exemplified the finest qualities of a sportsman — cherishing the community and camaraderie of sport, but also giving of himself so that others could enjoy the rewards of sport. He tirelessly offered himself, his time, his connections, and his expertise for the benefit of everyone he met. Tim will be remembered for enriching the lives of others and his warm dimpled smile, contagious laugh, self-effacing nature and witty sense of humor.

Tim was a member of the Pine Valley Golf Club, the Bedens Brook Club, the United States Seniors Golf Association, as well as the Philadelphia Gun Club, Nassau Gun Club, and the Blooming Grove Hunting and Fishing Club where he served on the Board of Directors.

Per Tim’s wishes, there will be a private family service. Tim asked that those lives he touched spend time doing what he loved: golfing, shooting, fishing, rowing and being with family.

In lieu of flowers, the Hosea family graciously welcomes contributions to the Timothy M. Hosea Memorial Fund at the Princeton National Rowing Association.

Donations may be sent to: Princeton National Rowing Association, Timothy M. Hosea Memorial Fund, 1 South Post Road, Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 or visit www.rowpnra.org/polDonate.cfm.

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Zelda Lynn Bogdonoff

Zelda Lynn Bogdonoff, 65, died August 8, 2015 at St. Luke’s Hospice House in Bethlehem, Pa. She was born in Princeton and attended Princeton public schools. She graduated from Connecticut College and then earned a Masters in early childhood development from Leslie College.

Zelda moved to Bethlehem to work at Head Start, Community Services for Children. She spent nearly 40 years there, ultimately becoming director for early childhood development. Her career was dedicated to helping young children by giving them an educational head start and by nurturing the teachers required to do so.

She was a valued and long-time member of congregation Brith Shalom, a community that she cherished.
Zelda will be deeply missed by all she touched. She is survived by her mother, Harriet Bogdonoff, of Portland, Me.; a sister, Sondra Bogdonoff and spouse Jamie Johnston of Portland, Me.; a brother Alan Bogdonoff and spouse Estelle Bogdonoff of Niantic, Conn.; nieces and nephews Emma, Noah, Nemo, Caitlin and Jake; and grand niece, Scout.

Contributions in her memory can be made to: Community Services for Children, Head Start, 1520 Hanover Avenue, Allentown, PA 18109.

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Obit Long 8-19-15Laurence G. Long

Laurence (Larry) G. Long was peacefully called to heaven on August 14, 2015 at home surrounded by his beloved family. He is survived by Gail Foley Long, his loving and devoted wife of 37 years; his three children, Kathleen Toto and her husband Albert Toto III; Laurence Long Jr. and his wife Anna; and Pamela Niederer and her husband Brady Niederer; and his three adored grandchildren Alby, Ava, and Andrew Toto. Larry is also survived by his siblings Gail Smith, David Long Jr., Noel Long, and Matthew Long.

He began his career at Pleasantville Ford and in 1979 became a proud founder of Long Motor Company in Princeton and retired in 2011.

Larry’s extraordinary devotion to his friends, family, and his work was recognized by all who knew him. He was a consummate family man and professional with an unshakable spirit and bravery. He lived his life as if every day was a blessing, which he encouraged others to do on a daily basis. His virtue, faith, and love for life and those around him will be forever remembered.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960 and Compassionate Care ALS, P.O. Box 1052, West Falmouth, MA 02574.

Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on Saturday August 22, 2015 at Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach, Florida. Arrangements are under the direction of Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guest book is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Obit Bol 8-19-15Kees Bol

Kees Bol passed away Saturday, August 8, 2015 at his residence in Montgomery Township, New Jersey. Kees was predeceased by his wife of 65 years, Markee, who passed in 2013. He is survived by two brothers, Joor and Morris Bol; four children, Peter (Satomi) Bol, Stacy (John) Stahl, Christina Bol, and Faith (Harlan) Fish; and his four grandchildren, Christopher Bol, Rebecca Stahl, Alison Stahl, and Daniel Fish.

Kees was born on June 16, 1925 and was the oldest of the six sons of Cornelis and Josina Bol. In 1936 the Bol family emigrated from Eindhoven, the Netherlands, where Kees’ father was a leading research scientist at Philips, to Palo Alto, California, where his father continued his scientific work at Stanford University. Kees looked back to his childhood in Eindhoven as a mixture of the idyllic, a life at home romping with his brothers in the family gardens, and the less-than-pleasant experience of enduring a strict and stultifying elementary school. Family life in California was built around his father’s entrepreneurship, ranching and farming, riding horses, and education in a system that he found more open and creative. Kees studied physics at Stanford, graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1945, and he earned his PhD from Stanford in 1951 at the age of 26.

From the time he was in college Kees was a political activist. He was committed to social justice and equality; it was as a counselor and riding instructor at Frank and Josephine Duveneck’s Hidden Villa camp, one of the earliest interracial summer camps, that he fell in love with fellow counselor Markee. Together they joined the Society of Friends, in no small part because of the Quaker commitment to racial equality and pacifism. Eventually Kees also joined the Fellowship of Reconciliation and would serve as Clerk of the Princeton Friends Meeting.

In 1949 Kees moved east to take a position with the Sperry Gyroscope Company on Long Island. However, his previous summer job at Hidden Villa interracial camp was seen by the FBI as a sign of communist leanings, and his security clearance was revoked in 1954. Sperry had no choice but to terminate Kees’ employment. Kees then took a job teaching physics at Adelphi College. In 1957 he succeeded in gaining a grant from the National Science Foundation for an experimental study at the Gordon McKay Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Two years later Kees was recruited to work on Project Matterhorn at what was later to become the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Former colleagues remembered his quiet professionalism and his role as a mentor in a career that spanned the beginning of the controlled fusion program at PPPL through the 1980s. His kindness and thoughtfulness made early graduate students that he mentored feel welcome and part of the team.

Kees retired from PPPL in 1987, after which he and Markee spent as much time as possible traveling around the world. Summers were spent at their cabin on beloved Lake Willoughby in Westmore, Vermont. Kees enjoyed hiking, and was active in creating and maintaining hiking trails in Vermont and later at Stonebridge.

Kees was a skilled craftsman and woodworker. After having a house designed and constructed for them in Skillman, New Jersey, he finished the interior and built all the furniture. He and Markee moved to Stonebridge in 2004, where he continued to enjoy reading, gardening, hiking, and woodworking. He was active in the workshop at Stonebridge, building assorted items for the Stonebridge community and his children and grandchildren.

Kees will long be remembered for his intellect, patience, kindness, sense of humor, and his natural ability to teach. He was adept at gently turning errors into opportunities for learning. Kees cherished the close friendships he made later in life.

There will be a memorial service for Kees Bol at Stonebridge at Montgomery in Skillman, New Jersey on August 29, 2015 at 2 p.m.

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Joseph Leddy

Dr. Joseph Patrick Leddy MD, 75, passed away peacefully at home in Mantoloking, N.J. on August 15, 2015.

Born in Bayonne, N.J., he was the first son of the late Joseph and Helen Leddy. Joseph is a graduate of Xavier High School (’57) in New York City and The College of the Holy Cross (’61) in Worcester, Mass. He attended Jefferson Medical College and received his medical degree in 1965. His surgical internship was at New York Hospital, Cornell Medical Center, and orthopaedic training completed at New York Orthopaedic Hospital at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Canter. Joseph then completed a fellowship in hand surgery with an NIH grant at USC Medical Center with Dr. Joseph Boyes MD and Dr. Herb Stark MD. He proudly served his country in the U.S. Air Force.

Dr. Leddy was a renowned orthopaedic surgeon, devoted to the care of his patients and the training of his residents in orthopaedic surgery at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. The dedication to his profession is evidenced by countless original publications and contributions to medical textbooks and surgical reference literature like Green’s Operative Hand Surgery. He was a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, American Orthopaedic Association, and the American Society of Surgery of the Hand. He was a Diplomat of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, a member of the AOA Honor society, former president and member of the New York Society for Surgery of the Hand, the Irish American Orthopedic Society, the Stinchfield Orthopaedic Club, and a founding member of the Joseph Boyes Hand Surgery Club.

Dr. Leddy retired as chairman of the department of orthopaedic surgery at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital in 2005. He served as chief of staff at St. Peters Hospital and chief of the hand surgery service at both hospitals in the past while also maintaining hospital privileges at Princeton Medical Center. He was a longtime resident of Princeton before moving to Mantoloking, N.J. and Hobe Sound, Fla. Dr. Leddy was an avid golfer, and former member of the Loblolly Golf Club, TPC Jasna Polana, The Bedens Brook Club, and Spring Lake Golf Club. In honor of his eldest son, the late Joseph P. Leddy, Jr, Dr. Leddy founded the Joseph P. Leddy, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund at The Lawrenceville School and the Joseph P. Leddy Jr. Trophy for Princeton Peewee Hockey. He was also a member of the Princeton Investment Group.

A former parishioner of Our Lady of Princeton R.C. Church, he attended Sacred Heart Church in Bay Head and St Christopher’s Church in Hobe Sound, Fla. Dr. Leddy was a man dedicated to his profession and community, but most of all, a husband, father, and grandfather who’s legacy of caring and integrity will live on for generations to come. He spent his entire life with a loving generosity that would be difficult to duplicate.

Surviving are his wife of 49 years and best friend, Mary Jo Leddy; his sons, Timothy and wife Georgiana; Terence and wife Megan; Christopher; and Robert. Dr. Leddy has two brothers Mark and Brian; and his grandchildren, J.P., Grace, Topher, and Willy.

Dr. Leddy is predeceased by his son, Joseph P. Leddy, Jr. on March 2, 1984.

A Mass of Christian Burial at Sacred Heart Church in Bay Head is held for family and close friends with a private interment. Services are under the direction of the O’Brien Funeral Home, Brick, N.J.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Dr. Leddy’s memory to the Joseph P. Leddy, Jr. Scholarship Fund c/o The Lawrenceville School, 2500 Main St, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648

For condolences, please visit www.OBrienFuneralHome.com.

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August 12, 2015

Obit Dawe 8-12-15Joan Dawe

Joan Budny Jenkins Dawe passed away on July 25, 2015 of natural causes at age 83. She died peacefully in her home in Hinchley Wood, Surrey, England.

Joan, formerly of Princeton, was born September 5, 1931. Her parents were Edward and Joan Budny.

In 1949, Joan graduated from Miss Fine’s School in Princeton, and in 1951 she graduated from Harcum College in Bryn Mawr, Pa.

She was known for her social and organizational skills. Joan loved bridge and singing. She was in the glee club at Miss Fine’s and Harcum. She sang in various church choirs in London until just recently. She was very active in the Princess Alice Hospice charity, which later paid her back with excellent palliative care during her last days.

After college, Joan moved to New York City, where she was executive secretary for the architect I.M. Pei.

In 1960 she married Anthony Jenkins, who was a director of R. K. Harrison and Co. Ltd. and an underwriting member of Lloyds, London. After a Princeton wedding at the Present Day Club, the couple took the Ile de France to London, where she lived ever since.

In the 1970’s, Joan was very active as the president of the American Women’s Club in London.

Mr. Jenkins passed away in the early 1990’s and Joan later remarried Roger Dawe, comptroller of Bovis, the international construction company. Later he was Lord Mayor of Westminster. The couple then lived in Sotogrande, Spain as well as London. Mr. Dawe passed away in April 2011.

Joan had no children and is survived by her brother Roger of Stuart, Fla.; nephew Trevor Budny of Philadelphia; niece Joslin Parris of Barbados; and great-nephew Carl Muller of Richmond, Va. Joan was pre-deceased by her brother Carl, niece Karen Muller, and great-nephew Ryan Muller.

On her English side, she is survived by nephew, Col. Barry W. Jenkins and niece Victoria Jenkins Blunt; and nephews Barnaby and Lucas Dawe.

Funeral services were held at the Church of the Holy Name in Esher August 10 and a “Celebration of Life” ceremony will be held at the Royal Automobile Club in Epsom on September 16.

Joan’s ashes will be brought from England and interred with a small ceremony at the family plot at St. Paul’s Cemetery in Princeton on October 6, 2015 at 11:15 a.m.

Online condolences may be sent to budny@comcast.net. In lieu of flowers, please visit Joan’s grave sometime in the future. The plot is in the far northeast quadrant of the cemetery close to the intersection of Spruce Street and Moran Avenue.

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Obit Levy 8-12-15Joy C. Levy

Joy C. Levy died peacefully in her home in Princeton on May 20, 2015. Born in Galveston Texas on August 23, 1924, she attended Wellesley College, where she majored in mathematics, then did graduate work in fine arts at Harvard, where she studied the origins of mathematical perspective in northern medieval art. She taught art history at Bryn Mawr College, then mathematics to middle school children, focusing especially on children with learning differences. Joy taught for many years at Princeton Day School and at the Educational Therapy Clinic in Princeton.

Beginning in 1967, with the arrival of a Komondor puppy from Hungary (Ch. Szentivani Ingo (“Duna”)), Joy became a tireless scholar and breeder of the Komondor, a rare and ancient livestock guard dog from Hungary. She co-founded the Middle Atlantic States Komondor Club with her husband, sociologist Marion J. Levy Jr. (1918-2002). She edited, published, and was chief writer for the M.A.S.K.C. News from 1974-2005. Joy was noted repeatedly for her contributions to canine journalism. In 1977, Joy published The Komondor in the United States, 1937-1976, the first history of the breed in English. Beyond breed-specific issues, Joy addressed health problems of all kinds, from hip dysplasia to bloat and torsion, from skin infections to the parvovirus. In gratitude for arranging the delivery of parvovirus vaccine to Hungary during an epidemic, Joy received the Hungarian Kennel Club Gold Medal Master Breeders award for “saving the breed in Hungary.” She also dedicated herself to learning Hungarian in order to be able to correspond with experts in their native language. Joy translated many crucial Hungarian works into English (c.f. Irene Evers, Our National Treasure, the Hungarian Komondor; and Zoltan Kenez The Komondor Defined and a Description of the Shepherd Dog, 1992). She also translated works from the French (Anna and Laurent Rasz-Caroff, An Incredible Dog: the Komondor and Other Hungarian Shepherd Dogs [with Charlotte Bell], 1991). In 2006, Joy published Komondor: a Comprehensive Owner’s Guide, which covers history, breed characteristics (including detailed descriptions of the corded coat and its care), breed standard, and all aspects of breeding and health care from birth to old age. It is regarded as the definitive publication of this distinctive breed.

She is survived by 3 children: Dore J. Levy of Providence, R.I.; Noah R. Levy of Whitehouse Station, N.J.; Amos M. Levy of New York City; and 7 grandchildren. A gathering at her home will take place on October 10, 2015. Please contact one of the children for information. Contributions in her memory should be sent to the Middle Atlantic State Komondor Club Rescue Fund, care of M.A.S.K.C., Inc., 10 Lafayette Avenue, Voorhees, N.J. 08043.

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Obit Hamingson 8-12-15Mary Brown Hamingson

Mary Brown Hamingson, known to all as Sandy, died on August 6, 2015. Born Mary Elsie Dunn in Terre Haute, Ind. on January 6, 1923, she was the only child of Della and William Dunn. In 1946, she married Donald G. Brown, who died in 1985. They had three daughters, Beverly Louise Brown of London, England; the late Elizabeth Brown Pryor; and Peggy A. Brown of Philadelphia. In 1989 she married Donald F. Hamingson who died in 1998. A graduate of Purdue University, Sandy was an architectural historian, specializing in New Jersey. She was co-author of Gateways to Architecture in Union County, New Jersey and a co-founder of Preservation New Jersey. She lectured throughout the state at various universities, the Newark Museum, and the South Orange-Maplewood Adult School. She was one of New Jersey’s representatives to the National Trust for Historic Preservation and served on the board of advisors as regional vice-president. She was also an active docent and member of the board of trustees at Drumthwacket, the governor’s residence. Arrangements are by Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton, N.J.

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Terry David Vaughn

Terry David Vaughn, 68, of Princeton, died last Thursday, August 6, 2015 of a stroke suffered three days previously. He died at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. Born in Denver, Colo. on January 9, 1947, he is survived by his children, Alexander and Elizabeth, and his sister, Genevieve.

A graduate of Colorado State University, Terry earned a master’s degree in English from the University of Michigan, and an MBA at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

He was a powerful force in scholarly publishing, an unfailingly thoughtful, cheerful, and generous friend, and a caring father and brother.

Terry began his publishing career in 1971 as a sales representative for the then-college department at Oxford University Press (OUP). He served as Eastern Regional Sales Manager and as Acting National Sales Manager at OUP until 1984, when he left for Boston, and had a one-year stint as an international treasury consultant at Digital Equipment in Acton, Mass.

Terry returned to publishing in the grand manner in 1985 when he joined The MIT Press, first as economics editor and later as executive editor for economics, finance, and business. During his 15 years at MIT, he built an economics and finance list that was considered the gold standard for its time and remains one of the truly outstanding lists in all of scholarly publishing. Terry’s list of authors at MIT Press included numerous Nobel Prize-winners as well as many other distinguished economists, and Terry was the epitome of the trans-Atlantic editor. Intellectually, his MIT list was marked by an extraordinary combination of eminent European as well as North American authors, reflecting the exciting interplay of international ideas that marked the field during those years. The MIT Press economics list under Terry’s direction achieved worldwide distinction.

Following his MIT years, in 2000 Terry moved to Princeton, where he joined Princeton University Press and served as PUP’s editor-in-chief until July of 2003. While at Princeton he helped oversee the integration of the Press’s U.S. and European editorial operations. Then, later that year, Terry returned to Oxford University Press, his original publishing home, and concluded his career there as Oxford’s economics editor. He retired from OUP in 2013.

Terry’s sudden passing is a terrible loss for all of us, family and colleagues. Those who knew Terry professionally — his authors as well as his fellow publishers — will remember him as a model economics editor, intensely interested in the content and direction of the field, possessed of the highest standards and superb taste, and fiercely competitive. But most of all everyone in his life will remember him as a friend: warm, considerate, and big of heart. Last but certainly not least was his whimsical sense of humor, appreciated by all who knew him.

Funeral services will begin on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 at 4:30 p.m., starting with the Rosary at Mather Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, N.J. 08542, followed at 5 to 7 p.m. with a viewing at the same location.

A Funeral Mass will be held on Thursday, August 13, 2015 at 9:30 a.m. at St Paul’s Catholic Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 08542, followed immediately by a reception at Princeton University Press, 41 William Street, Princeton (one block from St. Paul’s Church).

He will be buried in Plymouth, Mass., next to his late wife, Anne Patenaude.

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Obit Wiggins 8-12-15Grant Wiggins

Grant Palmer Wiggins, born Grant Palmer Gittinger, died suddenly on May 26, 2015 in West Hartford, Connecticut. He was 64 and had recently moved from Hopewell Township where he had lived for 13 years. He and his family previously resided in Pennington.

Grant Wiggins became a professional provocateur in the field of education following an uneven academic performance in prep school, at St. John’s College, and at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His unwillingness to toe the line in high school, college, and graduate school may have given his adult professional perspective a freshness and believability that stoked the fire of his admirers. He seemed to identify with those students who didn’t, or couldn’t, rise to meet certain challenges. He understood that often there was more learning and cognitive stimulation to be found in band practice and soccer games than in the rote performance standards of conventional coursework. His voice seemed to resonate among many students and their teachers. While it didn’t strike a happy chord with all listeners, by many accounts at his public memorial gathering at Harlem Village Academies in New York on August 1, 2015, he listened and responded to every person who cared to comment on his views.

He was born on August 16, 1950 in New York City to William and Dorothy Katz Gittinger. Raised in Queens until the age of nine when his father died in a commercial aviation accident, he was then adopted by his stepfather, Guy Wiggins. With his mother and stepfather, Grant then lived in Washington, D.C., Mexico City, and Switzerland as his new father’s postings with the State Department required.

Following college at St. John’s in Annapolis, Maryland, Grant returned to his alma mater Loomis Chaffee, by then a coed independent school, in Windsor, Connecticut. For nearly 10 years he taught courses in philosophy and religion and coached baseball, soccer, and cross country.

His work as a provocateur may have taken root at Loomis Chaffee. It fully flowered during his years with the Coalition of Essential Schools at Brown University and then in consulting work and writing he did in partnership with Holly Houston, Jay McTighe, and many gifted teachers who were drawn to his message about curriculum design undertaken with the explicit expectations for student learning foremost in the designer’s mind. His workshops were in demand by educators across the country and internationally.

Grant wrote and co-authored several books, including Educative Assessment, Assessing Student Performance, Understanding by Design, Schooling by Design, and more than a dozen texts published by Pearson Publishing.

Grant leaves four children: Alexis Shaak Wiggins (Juan Diego Estrada) of Spain and Saudi Arabia; Justin William Houston Wiggins of New York; Ian Richmond Houston Wiggins of New York and New Jersey; and Priscilla Sarah Houston Wiggins of New Jersey, New York, and California. Two grandsons, Elios and Amadeo. His mother and father, Dorothy and Guy Wiggins, of New York. Brothers Guy (Rose) and Noel (Shoshana) of New York, and nieces Anya and Leah, and nephew Jack.

Grant’s widow, Denise Wilbur, survives him. His previous marriages ended in divorce. He was loved by his family and admired by the many teachers who experimented with and enhanced his thinking through their application of ‘backwards design’ in their classrooms.

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Obit Brown 8-12-15James Brown

James Brown age 80 of Princeton passed away on August 6, 2015 at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro.  He was born on March 15, 1935 in Philadelphia, Pa.

He was educated at BOK Vocation High School in Philadelphia and then started his career working for Princeton University, Cytogen, and Pharmacopia until his retirement.

James joined Refuge Church of Christ in Philadelphia where he was a member of the Usher Board and Ministry of Music, playing the trombone and singing. He attended Mount Pisgah AME in Princeton and then became a member of Morning Star of Princeton serving as a Deacon.

Son of the late George and Estelle Brown, husband of the late Jennie Brown, father of the late Diane Brown, and Melvin Miller.

James leaves to cherish him two sisters Margaret Brown and Mildred Rogers and one brother-in-law Hilliard Rodgers; one daughter Harriet Brown; three sons James Brown Jr., William M. Brown Sr. (Sonya) and Charles E. Brown; 20 grandchildren; 11 great grandchildren; a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives; and friends.

The funeral service will be at 11 a.m. on Friday, August 14, 2015 at Mt. Pisgah A.M.E Church, 170 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, N.J. Calling hours will be from 9 a.m. until the time of service at the church. Interment will take place at Princeton Cemetery. Arrangements are by the Hughes Funeral Home of Trenton, N.J.

August 5, 2015

Obit Birch 8-5-15George Terry Birch

George Terry Birch of Westport Island, Maine, formerly of Princeton, passed away on July 26, 2015. He was 82. Born in Trenton on September 20, 1932 to Eunice Terry Birch and Frank Birch, who predeceased him, Terry was a lifelong resident of Skillman and Princeton, having cared for his parents before retiring to Maine.

A graduate of the The Lawrenceville School, in addition to his academic successes, he also enjoyed telling the story of how he jumped out of a window as an extra in the “Free Pancakes!” scene in the 1950 film The Happy Years, a movie depicting life at Lawrenceville based on the writings of fellow Lawrentian Owen Johnson.

He majored in English at Duke University and later enlisted in the army during the Korean War using his artistic and writing skills to produce manuals that instructed pilots how to fly helicopters.

He later worked at Educational Testing Service for 18 years as a technical illustrator and concluded his career drawing detailed illustrations of the cold-fusion reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, many of which were used for budgeting proposals in Washington, D.C.

He built the home in which he raised his family in Skillman. He was a devoted husband and father as well as a dedicated gardener and landscapist. He was active in the local community including Boy Scout Troop 46 of Blawenburg and the Nassau Presbyterian Church.

A lifelong artist, he held several galleries and exhibits throughout the 1970’s and taught art to the elderly in local retirement homes. He was also a volunteer mentor at the Mercer County Correctional Facility.

An avid fisherman and boater, he spent much time fishing and boating the waters around the Barnegat Bay before focusing most of his free time enjoying a lakeside woodlot in Vienna, Maine.

A constant reader, he was particularly fond of the writings of Thomas Wolfe, whose influence showed in his moving storytelling and the poetry that Terry wrote throughout his life.

Most recently, Terry was a deacon at the Mid-Coast Presbyterian Church in Topsham, Maine. He and his wife Madge served as ushers reliably every Sunday except Easter and the occasional snow cancellation.

He leaves behind his wife, Magdalene of Westport Island, Maine; his brother Wayne and his wife Beth of Cumberland Center, Maine; former wife Bettie Cotton of Wilmington, NC; four sons and seven grandchildren: Kevin and his wife Mary and their children, Cameron and Marissa of Skillman, NJ; Kyle and his partner Raymond Matthews of King of Prussia, Pa.; Keith and his wife Rachel and their children, Maxwell and Catherine of Havertown, Pa.; and Wayne and his wife Beth and their children Maclaine, Grayson, and Bryant of Fayetteville, N.C.; as well as the countless friends whose lives he touched with his sensitivity and caring.

Funeral services will begin on Friday, August 7, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ followed by a 12:30 p.m. burial at Ewing Church Cemetery, 100 Scotch Road, Ewing Township, NJ.

Viewing hours are Thursday, August 6, 2015 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

In September, the Mid-Coast Presbyterian Church will host a separate memorial service of worship songs and the traditional hymns that were Terry’s favorites.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in memory of Terry Birch to the Arthritis Foundation at www.arthritis.org.

Extend condolences and remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Obit Sheppard 8-5-15Margaret B. Sheppard

Margaret B. Sheppard, 89, died Friday, July 31, 2015 at Stonebridge at Montgomery. Born and raised in Washington, D.C., Margaret earned the “Bachelor of Commercial Sciences” degree from Benjamin Franklin University in Washington (now part of George Washington University). She moved to Princeton in the early 1950s and began a career in banking at Princeton Bank and Trust Company, retiring as assistant vice president and assistant comptroller at Horizon Bank in the late 1980s. Margaret was an active member of Princeton’s Nassau Presbyterian Church — and its predecessor First Presbyterian Church — serving for a time as secretary/registrar of the Sunday school and as treasurer of the Women’s Association. She was a generous financial contributor to many worthwhile causes.

Margaret loved flowers and music, particularly Lawrence Welk. She was a collector of stamps, coins, and frogs (glass, ceramic, plastic, metal, wooden, stuffed and singing frogs (from less than one inch to more than one foot tall). Margaret loved to travel with her long-time apartment mate Bernice Persing and with members of Princeton area travel clubs: to New York for a Broadway show, to Bermuda on a cruise, to “The Shore” and other nearby spots by car or bus, to Florida by train or plane. And she loved the excitement of horse racing, especially the three “Triple Crown” races. A few years ago (well into her 80s), she and her sister were the only two females watching the Belmont Stakes race in a Southern Maryland MEN’S sports bar.

Having no children of her own, Margaret loved, encouraged, and supported her nine nieces and nephews (and later 19 great nieces and nephews) as they grew. Known to one branch of the family as Aunt Mimi and to the other as Aunt Margie, she was much beloved in return. Predeceased by her sister Mary Beth Lowry of Cincinnati, Margaret is survived by her other sister Helen Duncan and husband Robert of Princeton; Mary Beth’s husband David of Cincinnati; and her nieces and nephews.

Family members attended a private burial on Tuesday, August 4, 2015 at Fort Lincoln Cemetery near Washington, D.C., where her parents are buried. A memorial service at Nassau Church will be scheduled at a later date. The family suggests that contributions in Margaret’s memory be made to a charity of your choice.

Extend condolences and remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Obit LaBar 8-5-15Marion Moll LaBar

Marion Moll LaBar died on August 1, 2015 at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The cause was pneumonia followed by septic shock.

Marion was born in 1934 in Abington, Pa. where she also spent her childhood years. She graduated from Abington High School and later earned a Bachelor of Arts in Music from Bucknell University. During her college years, she sang in the Chapel Choir where she met her husband.

Marion is predeceased by her parents, George and Ethel Moll and two older brothers, George and Howard Moll. She is survived by her husband, Bruce LaBar (Princeton); a brother Richard Moll (Abington, Pa.); two children, Philip LaBar (Kingston) and Jeanette MacCallum (Nashville, Tenn.); and three grandchildren, Christina and Jacob Jezioro (Nashville, Tenn.) and Bruce LaBar (Kingston).

In addition to raising her two children, Marion was an active volunteer, assisting in the library at Littlebrook School, acting successively as deacon and elder at Nassau Presbyterian Church, singing in its choir for 47 years, and engaging in committee work at Princeton Windrows where she lived for the past nine years. Marion’s work life included substitute teaching at Princeton High School, acting as a legal secretary, and working as a sales associate and inventory control manager at Talbots in Princeton. For recreation, Marion enjoyed bridge, tennis, and travelling.

Marion’s life will be celebrated at a memorial service at Nassau Presbyterian Church on Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to The Ammons Music Fund at Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton, N.J.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Alice Pinelli

Alice Beverly Hickey Pinelli, of Princeton, died peacefully at home on Friday, July 31, 2015, with her daughter, Michelle, at her side. She would have been 82 years old in September.

Beverly Hickey was born and raised in Princeton and moved to Levittown, Pa. in the 1950’s upon her marriage to Michael Pinelli.

In the journey of her life and while raising her young family in Pennsylvania, Beverly was dedicated to her community and was heavily involved in many philanthropic activities. As president of the PTA and Oaktree Women’s Group of Levittown, Beverly spearheaded a fundraiser, which benefitted the Bucks County Association for Challenged Children, by paying the rental of the facility that housed a workshop for the children. Additionally, as a member of the Oaktree Women’s Group they raised money which went to the Trendler Nursing Home to provide funding for equipment for the day-care of mentally challenged children.

When the house that she always treasured was available for purchase, Beverly and her family moved back to Princeton, where she continued her community service by becoming one of the founding members of the West Windsor Volunteer First Aid Squad.

Beverly was also heavily involved with numerous community groups including being the co-chair of the West Windsor PTA. Among their activities, the PTA organized events to fund the purchase of sets of encyclopedias for the Maurice Hawk and Dutch Neck Schools. As a member of the West Windsor PTA, she coordinated efforts with St. Paul’s PTA and the Princeton Chapter of the American Association of University Women to sponsor a benefit fashion show at Clayton’s in Palmer Square.

Beverly was thrilled to hear of the recent preservation of the porch on Lytle Street of which she has fond memories. As a young girl, when visiting her grandmother, she would often run across the street to sit on the porch with her cousins Sonny and Wee Tash.

Beverly had a contagious enthusiasm for life. Friends will always remember her in her VW bug, happily taking anyone home regardless of the time of day (or night), music playing all the way. Beverly’s musical repertoire included the Mamas and the Papas and Stevie Nicks, but her favorite song was Richard Harris’ “Cake Out In The Rain.” An avid reader, her favorite book was Gone With The Wind, from which she would frequently quote, “I can’t think about that now, I’ll think about it tomorrow.”

Beverly’s garden is and always was filled with a multitude of flowering plants and shrubs, from her daffodils and wisteria in the spring to her Rose of Sharon and hydrangea in the Summer. Her garden would be aglow in the fall when her maple trees burst into a beautiful bright red, bringing a warmth to her yard and the neighborhood.

Always ahead of the decorating curve, Beverly had a talent for decorating her ceilings in such a way that Michelangelo would be proud of. She loved to embellish her house with beautiful touches everywhere, including having peacock feathers and flower petals on her ceiling. The entire community loved to see her birdcage and gnome in her front yard, which were always seasonally decorated for all to enjoy.

Beverly’s pride and joy was her family, who knew her as “Eggetts” and as her grandchildren grew and made friends, the name Eggetts remained to all who knew her.

Most of all, Beverly was dedicated to her grandchildren and was always ready to help a friend. She embraced life fully and energetically. Beverly will be sorely missed with a heavy heart, but most of all fondly remembered with a grand smile on our faces.

Beverly was predeceased by her husband, Michael Pinelli, sister Briteen Gregory, parents Alice Tash Hickey McNamee and T. Donald Hickey and dear cousins Sonny and William (Wee) Tash.

Beverly is survived by two daughters: Michelle Caponi, son-in-law Frank and grandsons Michael, Frank Jr., Jonathan and Parker, and Robin Shangle, son-in-law Russell and grandchildren Tasha, Charles IV and Brandon, sister Linda Heller, brother Thomas Hickey, cousins Bill Hickey, Betty Ann MacSherry and Walter Tash, and several nieces and nephews, and her dear dedicated companion and friend Robert Anderson.

A celebration of Beverly’s life will take place on Thursday, August 6, 2015 at her home from 2 to 4 p.m.

Extend condolences and remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Obit Warfield 8-5-15George Warfield

Professor George Warfield, formerly of Princeton, died peacefully at his home in Vermont nine days after celebrating 70 years of marriage to the love of his life, Lauraine Serra Warfield. Their children, grandchildren, and great grandchild had all joined them for the anniversary. He was 96.

George was born in Piambino, Italy to Vincent Warfield and Ada Donati on April 21, 1919. He and his brother were raised in the Masonic Home in Elizabethtown, Pa., and later took turns caring for their widowed mother. George graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Franklin and Marshall College, worked on Proximity Fuses, during World War II, earned his PhD in physics from Cornell University (where he studied under Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman), and was recruited by Lyman Spitzer to help integrate the departments of electrical engineering and solid state physics at Princeton University.

There he taught, mentored, and partnered with many of the brightest minds at the beginning of the computer age: George Heilmeier, Steve Hofstein, Al Waxman, Karl Zaininger, and Pete Warter among others. The current applications of the MOS transistor and liquid crystal display might have taken many more years in development without his visionary leadership and insistence on practicality. In gratitude, his student George Heilmeier dedicated Princeton’s first full technology classroom to him in 2002. George remained Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering until his death.

In 1974 he became executive director of the Institute for Energy Conversion at the University of Delaware. Later he served as a director of the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colo. Over the years he provided technical consultation for RCA, Bell Labs, and the Siemens Corporation. He traveled extensively in Asia and the Middle East exchanging photovoltaic consultation, work he continued long after retiring to Vermont, where he dedicated 25 years to driving for Meals on Wheels.

George and Lauraine delighted in welcoming people of all ages, nationalities, races, religions, points of view, and abilities into their home. They helped many find successful pathways in life. More than anything, George loved to help people. He brought his students (especially foreign students) home to become part of the family, joined his wife’s efforts on behalf of civil rights and disability rights, advocated for practical and experiential learning, helped Chinese and Japanese students enter college, found asylum for refugees, and totally supported his extended family and friends. George could be counted on to see the potential in each person and work tirelessly until it was achieved.

He leaves behind his three children: Richard Warfield of Dallas, Tex.; Pamela Elizabeth Warfield of Prescott, Ariz.; and Cheryl Warfield Mitchell of New Haven, Vt.; their extended families; and his beloved wife Lauraine. Ever the scientist, he made an anatomical donation of his body to the medical school at the University of Vermont. The family plans to hold a Service of Remembrance at a future date in Princeton.

Gifts in George’s honor may be sent to Meals on Wheels (call (800) 642-5119 to donate). At his memorial service in Vermont on August 1, 2015: the four characteristics that were consistently mentioned about George were: Brilliant, Compassionate, Hard-Working, and Humble.

July 29, 2015

Obit Anderson 7-29-15Albert Wayne Anderson

Albert Wayne Anderson, 74, died peacefully in his sleep the morning of July 23, 2015. Wayne was born and spent his early years in Ettrick, Virginia. His parents, Albert Cornelius Anderson and Estelle M. (Floyd) Anderson predeceased him. Wayne is survived by his wife Susan and their sons Brian, his wife Krissa and their daughters Emma and Kelsea of Pawcatuck, CT, and Todd, his wife Carrie and their children Nathan and Natalie of Middlebury, VT, his son Michael and his wife Elena and their daughters Alexis and Zoe, and his daughter Carrie and her husband Jim and their children Samantha, Brittany, James, and Joshua, and 6 great grandchildren, all of Canada. A kind, gentle, and generous man, Wayne loved and was loved in return and will be greatly missed.

Wayne graduated with a BA from Nyack College in 1966 where he majored in philosophy and minored in science, and earned an MA from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1968 where he majored in education with a minor in religion. He loved the publishing world and worked for John Wiley & Sons from 1968 to 1988, working his way from textbook sales rep (back when sales reps visited campuses in person) to Promotions Manager and then to Acquisitions Editor. He was Vice President/General Manager of the Publishing Group at Peterson’s Guides from 1988 to 1991. Wayne returned to Wiley to complete his career as Publisher for Engineering, Mathematics, and Statistics from 1991 to 1996. He loved publishing and technology and enjoyed nurturing staff and authors.

Wayne was an assistant coach in the minor leagues of Hightstown-East Windsor Youth Baseball League for eight years and enjoyed watching baseball all his life. He particularly enjoyed his time with his companions at the Princeton Senior Resource Center discussion groups on Great Decisions and Currents. Wayne loved the Outer Banks of North Carolina, which he started visiting as a child in 1950, and will serve as the final resting place for his ashes.

Family and friends may call on Saturday, August 1, 2015, from 1 to 3 p.m. at A.S. Cole Son & Co., 22 N. Main St., Cranbury, NJ.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in memory of Wayne Anderson to the Scholarship Fund at Peddie School, 201 South Main Street, Hightstown, NJ 08520-3349. www.saulfuneralhomes.com.

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Frances Crandall

Frances Freer (Lown) Crandall, 87, of Princeton, NJ, died on July 14, 2015.

“Frankie” to college friends and “Mère-Mère” to her grandchildren.

Fran was born on November 26, 1927 to Dr. Morton Lown (Cornell class of 1910) and Hazel Freer Lown in Kingston, NY. Her older brother once recounted that she was a total surprise to her two older siblings. One day they were told to go their neighbor’s house, and when they returned, there she was!

She met her future husband, Max, on his birthday (what a present!) in 1950 and they were later married in 1952 in Kingston, NY.

She is survived by her husband Maxson Crandall Jr., and children/spouses:  Maxson Crandall III (Anita), Brooks Crandall (Jill), Christopher Crandall (Ellen) and grandchildren: Cabe, Grant, Anya, Paige, Dane, and Beck Crandall.

Developing an interest in the arts from a young age, she always felt a connection to her great uncle and art collector, Charles Lang Freer (Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, DC). Fran’s aspirations to expand her horizons beyond her small town and develop her artistic talents led her to Cornell University after graduating from Kingston High School in ’45. While at Cornell, “Frankie” was involved in a number of activities including the Riding Club (a passion that she maintained throughout her life), Sorority (Pi Beta Phi), The Sage Chapel Choir (she truly loved singing Hymns), and the design of the 1949 yearbook cover (which was proudly printed on t-shirts at their class reunions).  She graduated in ’49 with a BS in Human Ecology/Design and Environmental Analysis (Interior Design).Her first job was in the Big Apple working as a secretary at the leading manufacturer of fine woolen in America, Forstmann Woolen Company.  She later began her official interior design career as a junior designer at Jo Nesbitt Interior Design in Darien, CT. She moved onto advertising sales for “Shopping With Jane” in New Canaan, CT (notable for bringing her beagle Punch to sales calls). Not only a talented interior designer, Fran was also an accomplished watercolor painter and began to paint professionally in Holden, MA.  A true renaissance woman, she also applied her creative skills as a copywriter for Paoli and Sweeney, Cherry Hill, NJ.  In the late ‘80s, Fran began her own interior design business (FLC Interiors) in Brookfield Center, CT, and after moving to Princeton, NJ in the mid ‘90s, she continued working with clients up until her recent passing.

To say that Fran was active in her community would be a huge understatement. While living in Cherry Hill, NJ, she was co-chairperson for the “Friends of Barclay Farmstead” (colonial era historic site) and helped bring history back to life in the site’s restoration and preservation.  She also founded and functioned as chairperson for the Center for the Arts of Southern NJ and was a member of the Philadelphia Water Color Society. After moving to Princeton, she became a member of the Junior League of Greater Princeton and had the privilege of designing several rooms at various show houses over a five-year period.

Fran was an Award-winning watercolor painter and member of “Watercolorists Unlimited.” She studied under Lucille Geiser. She was also a Francophile and equestrian. Loving horses since her youth, Fran participated in the Riding Club at Cornell and cherised her horse “Beau Cheval,” a gift from her husband Max. Fran was also active in various churches throughout her lifetime.

A memorial service will be held for Frances Lown Crandall on August 1, 2015 at Princeton Meadow Church at 12:30 p.m.  Reception to follow at the church.

July 22, 2015

Obit Crone 7-22-15Patricia Crone

Patricia Crone, whose pioneering and innovative approach to the history of Islam has brought about lasting change in the field, died at the age of 70 on July 11, 2015 in Princeton, New Jersey, after a courageous fight against cancer. She was Professor Emerita in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, where she served as the Andrew W. Mellon Professor since 1997, before retiring in 2014.

Crone’s insightful work compellingly conveyed in her adventurous and unconventional style, shed important new light on the critical importance of the Near East — in particular on the cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Islam — in historical studies. Her influence is strongly felt at the Institute, where, along with Oleg Grabar (1929–2011), Crone helped to establish the Institute as a recognized center for the pursuit of the study of Islamic culture and history. Crone was succeeded in 2014 by Islamic intellectual historian Sabine Schmidtke, who is advancing important scholarship across Islamic culture and history.

Born in Kyndeløse, Denmark, on March 28, 1945, Crone studied at Copenhagen University before receiving both her undergraduate education (1969) and PhD (1974) from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. Upon earning her PhD, Crone became Senior Research Fellow at the University of London’s Warburg Institute. In 1977, she accepted a position as a University Lecturer in Islamic History and Fellow of Jesus College at the University of Oxford, where she taught for 13 years. Following her time at Oxford, Crone moved to the University of Cambridge and served as an Assistant university lecturer in Islamic Studies and was a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College from 1990-92, after which she was University Lecturer until 1994. Crone was then a University Reader at Cambridge until 1997, when she joined the faculty of the Institute.

Crone’s first book, Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World (Cambridge University Press, 1977), written with Michael Cook, had a profound impact on the study of the early centuries of Islam.

This was followed by work that closely related to her doctoral thesis, resulting in two books — Slaves on Horses: The Evolution of Islamic Polity (Cambridge University Press, 1980) and Roman, Provincial and Islamic Law (Cambridge University Press, 1987) — in which Crone explored tribes and tribal culture in early Islam and investigated Roman, provincial, and Islamic law and its connections to Near Eastern legal systems. Crone’s Meccan Trade and the Rise of Islam (Princeton University Press, 1987) challenged the widely accepted understanding of Mecca as a major trade center and presented a powerful perspective on the beginnings of Islam.

In addition to her book awards, Crone’s work has been acknowledged by many honors, including the Giorgio Levi Della Vida Medal for Excellence in Islamic Studies (2013) and the Middle East Medievalists Lifetime Achievement Award (2013), which recognizes scholars who have served the field of medieval Middle Eastern Studies with distinction. She was made an honorary member of Gonville and Caius College at the University of Cambridge (2013) and received honorary doctorates from Leiden University (2013) and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (2014). She was a member of the American Philosophical Society and Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy, as well as the founder and editor of the book series Makers of the Muslim World, which highlights scholars, artists, politicians, and religious leaders who made the Muslim world what it is today.

Crone is survived by her siblings Camilla Castenskiold, Clarissa Crone, Diana Crone Frank, and Alexander Crone. The documentary, For the Life of Me: Between Science and the Law, created by Diana Crone Frank, depicts Crone’s diagnosis of cancer and follows her quest to research and employ marijuana’s potential cancer-fighting properties and to contextualize its longstanding legal prohibition.

There will be an event at the Institute this fall to celebrate Crone’s life and work, and details will be shared in the near future.

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Helena Tenev

Helena Tenev, 90, of Princeton, New Jersey, died Wednesday, February 25, 2015.

Born in Jedrzejów, Poland, she was a resident of Princeton for many years.

She attended schools in Jedrzejów and Warsaw and, during the period of Nazi occupation when Poland ceased to exist, secret schools organized by the Polish Underground. After the war, she attended the Hochschule für Welthandel (now Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien) in Vienna, Austria.

During World War II, she became separated from her family and was conscripted into labor in Warsaw. A Polish patriot, she supported the Home Army, the Armija Krajowa; she survived the Warsaw Uprising in 1944, escaped deportation, and returned to her family.

In Poland, during the war, she met the late George Tenev, a medical corpsman serving in a Bulgarian Red Cross sanitary train. He returned to find her as hostilities were ending and in 1945, in Prague, they married and lived together for 70 years.

After the war, she moved to her husband’s native Bulgaria. An opponent of the communist regime, her husband was imprisoned periodically and tortured; her family was persecuted; her father-in-law was executed in 1955. In 1957, the couple illegally left Bulgaria with their children, a crime punishable by death. The family lived in a displaced persons camp in Vienna, Austria, and eventually came to the United States.

They settled in Yonkers, New York. She worked as a medical technician and became supervisor of the electrocardiogram department at Misericordia Hospital (now Our Lady of Mercy) in New York City. She worked closely with AIDS patients for many years.

She was a frequent visitor to New Suffolk, New York and Westerly, Rhode Island and, in retirement, to Menton, France and Cambridge, England. She traveled extensively throughout Europe and South America. She enjoyed music, art, nature, and reading, especially poetry; she was deeply religious. She played an active role in raising her grandchildren. She was devoted to friends and family.

Daughter of the late Jozef and Marianna Marzec, she is survived by a daughter, Marie Pepper of Cambridge, England; a son Jovi Tenev and daughter-in-law Nancy Hingston of Princeton Junction, New Jersey; a granddaughter Tara Pepper Goldsmith and her husband Charles Goldsmith of Cambridge, England; a grandson Sean Pepper of New York; a grandson Liam Pepper and his wife Bic Hoang Leu of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; a grandson Nicholas Tenev of Madison, Wisconsin; grandchildren Christopher and Helena Tenev of Princeton Junction; great grandsons Charles, Thomas, and Jonathan Goldsmith of Cambridge, England; and sisters Janina Wachsberger Witkowski of Washington, D.C. and Danuta Wernik of Oceanside, California.

A choral funeral Mass will be celebrated 4:30 p.m. Saturday, July 25, 2015 at Miller Chapel, Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, with interment at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton.

In lieu of flowers, the family has suggested donations to the Red Cross, Trinity Church, Princeton, or the Church of the Holiest Saviour (Kosciół Najswietszego Zbawiciela) in Warsaw.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home,
Princeton.

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George Tenev

George Tenev, 95, of Princeton, New Jersey, died Sunday, February 22, 2015.

Born in Aitos, Bulgaria, he was a resident of Princeton for many years.

He attended schools in Aitos and Kotel, and Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski, Bulgaria, the University of Vienna, and the New School for Social Research in New York.

During World War II, he served as a medical corpsman in a Bulgarian Red Cross sanitary train operating across Europe; he was wounded twice and witnessed the firebombing of Dresden.

During the war, in Poland, he met the late Helena Marzec. He returned to find her as hostilities were ending and in 1945, in Prague, they married and lived together for 70 years.

After the war, he returned to Bulgaria with his wife. An opponent of the communist regime, he was imprisoned periodically and tortured; his family was persecuted; his father was executed in 1955. In 1957, he illegally left Bulgaria with his wife and children, a crime punishable by death. The family lived in a displaced persons camp in Vienna, Austria, and eventually came to the United States.

They settled in Yonkers, New York. He worked for Radio Free Europe for many years and, after its New York offices were wound down, for financial institutions in Manhattan. He was a frequent visitor to New Suffolk, New York and Westerly, Rhode Island and, in retirement, to Menton, France and Cambridge, England. He traveled extensively throughout Europe and South America. He enjoyed reading, gardening, music, art, nature, swimming and skiing, and was a keen student of the political scene. He played an active role in raising his grandchildren. He was devoted to family and friends.

Son of the late Jovi and Paraskeva Tenev, he is survived by a daughter Marie Pepper of Cambridge, England; a son Jovi Tenev and daughter-in-law Nancy Hingston of Princeton Junction, New Jersey; a granddaughter Tara Pepper Goldsmith and her husband Charles Goldsmith of Cambridge, England; a grandson Sean Pepper of New York; a grandson Liam Pepper and his wife Bic Hoang Leu of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; a grandson Nicholas Tenev of Madison, Wisconsin; grandchildren Christopher and Helena Tenev of Princeton Junction; and great grandsons Charles, Thomas, and Jonathan Goldsmith of Cambridge, England.

A choral funeral Mass will be celebrated 4:30 p.m., Saturday, July 25, 2015 at Miller Chapel, Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, with interment at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton.

In lieu of flowers, the family has suggested donations to the Red Cross, Trinity Church, Princeton, or St Dimitri of Thessaloniki Church in Aitos.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home,
Princeton.

———

Obit Tash 7-22-15Sharon Lynn Tash

Sharon Lynn (Davison) Tash, 68, of Felton, Delaware passed away on July 15, 2015.

Mrs. Tash is survived by her husband of 46 years Walter “Bud” Tash; three children: Jeffrey P. Tash and his wife Kathleen Meyers of Berwick, Maine; Kathleen L. Tash of Felton; Christopher W. Tash and his wife Michele of Hamilton, New Jersey; one brother: Robert Davison and his wife Polly of Princeton, New Jersey; one sister: Kim Allshouse and her husband Tim of Hopewell, New Jersey; and four grandchildren: Meghan, Ryan, Colin, and Ben. Mrs. Tash was predeceased by her sister Robyn McKee of Princeton, New Jersey.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, where friends may visit with the family a half hour prior. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to the Bayhealth Foundation, 640 South State Street, Dover, DE 19901. The family wishes to extend their sincere gratitude to Bayhealth Kent General Hospital for their exceptional care.

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July 15, 2015

Obit Holt 7-15-15Helen Froelich Holt

Helen Froelich Holt, wife of a U.S. Senator, mother of a U.S Congressman, college science teacher, first woman in statewide office in West Virginia, and federal housing official appointed by seven U.S. presidents, died July 12, 2015 at age 101 in Boca Raton, Florida. She lived in Boca Raton and Washington, D.C. The cause of death was heart failure.

Helen Froelich was born in the central Illinois farming town of Gridley in 1913, the year of the introduction of parcel post delivery and the year of the completion of the Panama Canal. A dutiful student, she graduated from Stephens College, then a two-year college for women in Columbia, Missouri, and went on to earn bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in zoology from Northwestern University. She studied at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and she was hired to set up the science library at Stephens College.

In her long life, Holt’s experiences ranged widely: from flying as a young girl with then little-known barnstorming pilot Charles Lindbergh, to modeling for an agency in the new Rockefeller Center, to serving in the West Virginia legislature, to founding and running a national program that resulted in the building of 1,000 high-standard nursing homes with 100,000 beds, to receiving an honorary doctorate at age 99 from a Big Ten university with a standing ovation following her commencement speech. Many people who knew her were more impressed by her deep, unobtrusive religious faith than by her remarkable professional accomplishments.

As a young woman, some of the senior faculty at Northwestern attempted to dissuade her from studying zoology, saying that she would have to go through the mud and handle insects and amphibians. That was just the challenge she relished. She completed her Master of Science degree in zoology with a thesis on artificial insemination of the Japanese salamander. From 1938 to 1941, Holt taught biology at the prestigious National Park College for women in Forest Glen (Silver Spring), Maryland, where she also led field trips and taught hygiene and etiquette.

In 1940, her students contributed her picture to Life magazine for a photo spread of teachers and the dynamic young bachelor, U.S. Senator Rush Holt of West Virginia, happened to see the spread and pointed to Helen’s picture. His sister said she knew that teacher from a national sorority association and could arrange a meeting. The Senator and the teacher met, soon married, moved back to West Virginia, and following his re-election defeat, they began raising three children, including a nephew who joined their family.

In 1955, Rush Holt died of cancer at age 49. Helen, left with three small children, resumed teaching at Greenbrier College for Women, and finished her husband’s term in the West Virginia legislature. In 1957, Governor Cecil Underwood appointed her to fill a vacancy as Secretary of State, and Holt became the first woman to hold statewide public office in West Virginia. In 1958, she ran unsuccessfully for a full term as a Republican, but was her party’s leading vote-getter in the state that year. Subsequently appointed West Virginia’s assistant commissioner for public institutions, she oversaw state long-term care facilities and the women’s prison. Holt got acquainted with Dwight Eisenhower, first when he was a candidate and later as president, and toward the end of his second term, he appointed her to implement the newly authorized program in the Federal Housing Administration to set standards for long-term care facilities and to provide insured mortgages for the construction of nursing homes meeting those standards. Her work setting up that program and advancing other housing programs for the elderly was so successful that Holt was reappointed to positions in the Department of Housing and Urban Development by six subsequent presidents, from Kennedy through Reagan.

In retirement, Holt devoted herself especially to church activities. She also campaigned with enthusiasm and determination for her son, Rush D. Holt, Jr., in his eight successful races for U.S. Congress. In 2013, when her son campaigned unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate from New Jersey, she decided that he was not running well in the southern part of the state, and so, at age 99 she set off on a tour of South Jersey — going from diner to diner with her walker to talk with patrons and encourage them to vote for her son.

Holt credited Natalie Tennant, the current West Virginia Secretary of State, with resurrecting her professional reputation. Holt said that no one remembered what she had done until 2009, when Secretary Tennant inquired about the portrait in the State Capitol of an attractive, young former secretary and discovered that Holt was still alive. Tennant’s public interviews with Holt drew attention and resulted in several public appearances of the nonagenarian. In 2013, West Virginia University awarded her an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. As the 99-year-old concluded her speech, which was delivered without notes due to poor eyesight, the large audience rose to its feet in ovation.

Holt was predeceased by her husband Rush Holt, Sr. and daughter Jane Holt Seale. She is survived by her son, Rush Holt, and his wife, Margaret Lancefield, of Hopewell; David Chase, a nephew whom she raised, and his wife Patricia, of Syracuse, N.Y.; her grandson, Rush Seale, his wife Katie Sheketoff, and their children Nathaniel and Emerson; step-grandchildren Dejan Miovic, Michael Miovic, and Rachel Novsak; and nine great-grandchildren.

Memorial services will be held in Boca Raton on Sunday, July 19, 2015 and in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, August 15, 2015. Further information about memorial arrangements in Florida and in Washington, D.C. can be obtained from rush@rushholt.com.

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Obit Hannon 7-15-15Martha Hannon

Martha Hannon, 78, died suddenly on Sunday, June 28, 2015 at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. She was a resident of Princeton for over 50 years, had retired from Princeton Regional Schools and was a parishioner of St. Paul Roman Catholic Church.

Martha was born in Glens Falls, New York, to Arthur F. and Adele Brown. She was a graduate of St. Mary’s Academy and Pembroke College (Brown University). She loved Lake George in the Adirondacks and spent time there nearly every summer of her life.

Survivors include her children: Jessica Martin (Galen) of Camp Hill, Pennsylvania; Matthew of Princeton, New Jersey; and Tim (Jennifer) of Seattle, Washington. She had one grandchild, Andrew. She is also survived by her sister, Brenda Rew of Queensbury, New York.

A funeral mass was held at Our Lady of the Annunciation, in Queensbury, New York on July 14, 2015 with a private burial afterwards. In addition, a memorial gathering in memory of Martha will be held in Princeton, New Jersey in September. If you’re interested in attending, please contact the family through marthahannonmemorial@gmail.com after August 1.

Please consider making a memorial donation in lieu of sending flowers. Martha supported the Lake George Association (PO Box 408, Lake George, NY 12845 or www.lakegeorgeassociation.org), Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad (237 North Harrison Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 or www.pfars.org) and the 101: fund, a scholarship fund at Princeton High School (151 Moore St, Princeton, NJ 08540 or fund101.org).

The family would like to thank Kimble Funeral Home for their help with the arrangements.

———

obit Juega 7-15-15Rosario (Charo) Uruñuela de Juega

A loving wife and mother, Rosario (Charo) Uruñuela de Juega passed away peacefully on June 30, 2015, in Madrid, Spain. She had celebrated her 92nd birthday two weeks earlier. Born in Vigo, Spain, one of five children, she was raised in Bilbao in the devastating period during and after the Spanish Civil War, and survived a prolonged bout with typhoid fever in her teens. She abandoned her nursing studies and moved to Madrid after her marriage in 1945 to Jose Juega Boudon, then an officer in the Spanish Air Force Academy. In 1966, she moved to Montreal, Canada, following her husband’s appointment as the Spanish representative to the International Civil Aviation Organization. She spoke French, having learnt it in school and having been raised in a household where it was frequently used, but in Montreal she took on the challenge of learning English, well into her 40s. Upon her return to Madrid, she enrolled in the Official School of Foreign Languages in Madrid, and obtained a diploma in English. She was an avid reader, a wonderful cook, a creative knitter, and an active member of her church. She and her husband traveled extensively upon his retirement. After her husband’s death in 1991, she visited Princeton frequently for extended stays with her daughter. While in Princeton, she made many friendships, through her charming and graceful character. She particularly loved to spend time browsing and reading in the Princeton Public Library and walking in the gardens and many open spaces in the area.

She is survived by her three children Maria (Charo) Juega of Princeton, New Jersey; Jose Juega (Dolores) of Madrid; and Antonio (Montserrat) of Bescanó (Girona), Spain; her brother Ignacio (Nano) Uruñuela and sister Pilar (Ipis) Uruñuela; nieces, nephews and cousins. Her remains were cremated in Madrid. The 7 p.m. Spanish masses at St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Princeton will be offered for the repose of her soul on the five consecutive Sundays beginning July 12. Her ashes will be interred at St. Paul´s Cemetery at a later date.

———

Obit Metzger 7-15-15Howard Martin Metzger

Howard Martin Metzger, 85, a longtime resident of South Brunswick, New Jersey, died peacefully on March 3, 2015 in Canton, Ohio. Born May 23, 1929 to the late Hazel and Louis Metzger in Floral Park, New York, he was the second of two sons. He graduated from Valparaiso University in 1951 with a BA in biology and later studied insurance at the College of Insurance, New York, N.Y. and Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Howard served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War from December 1952 to December 1953, achieving the rank of Second Lieutenant. He began a 40 year career in the property and casualty insurance industry in 1954 at Marsh & McClennan and retired after 20 years with Johnson & Higgins in 1996 as a senior vice president in risk management.

Howard was actively involved in fundraising and for 11 years, from 1986 to 1997, rode the Anchor House Ride for Runaways, a 500-mile bike ride founded after federal funding was cut in 1986 and Anchor House risked closing its doors. In 2005, he received an award from Anchor House for his dedication and commitment in aiding runaway, homeless and abused youths. Howard was also actively engaged in supporting his alma mater and in 1991 he received the Alumni Service Award from Valparaiso University Alumni Association.

Howard was the beloved husband of the late Mary Jean Metzger. He is survived by his children: Jean Larson (Robert); Howard Jr. (Bobbi Barchiesi); Patricia Metzger (Jeff Reed); Kathryn Metzger Fucarino (Andrea); and Kristen Dodge (Sumner); and 14 grandchildren.

A memorial service is scheduled for Saturday, July 18, 2015, at 2 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, Princeton, New Jersey.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Valparaiso University — Advancement Office, 1100 Campus Drive South, Valparaiso, IN 46383.

———

July 8, 2015

Obit Perry 7-8-15Elizabeth Perry

Elizabeth Stuyvesant Perry (formerly Pyne) died Wednesday, July 1, 2015 at her Princeton home of more than 60 years with her devoted husband, Dr. Venkatesan Perry, and a son by her side. She was 92.

A shrewd and highly successful investor, Mrs. Perry was also a Silver Life Master in bridge, an enthusiastic gardener, and an early supporter of environmental and women’s reproductive health causes. But most important to her, she was a loving and supportive mother to her five children: Peter, Elizabeth (“Lyn”), Russell, Lawrence (“Lucky”), and John (“Jay”) Pyne. She was a strong, independent woman who worked tirelessly to ensure that they received the best possible education and start in life.

She was born October 26, 1922 in Washington, D.C., the first child of Grace Chapin and the Hon. Hamilton Fish. As the young daughter of a long-time member of the U.S. Congress, she had many experiences in pre-war Washington that seem improbable today. She regularly helped her mother host notable statesmen; was asked by President Calvin Coolidge to throw the switch for one of the first national Christmas trees with electric lights; and, along with her friends, played regularly at Blair House and on the grounds of the White House.

She attended St. Timothy’s School in Maryland, where she won several prizes, but was largely self-educated. She was a voracious reader, and had a sharp mind and an infectious love of learning.

During World War II, she worked for the U.S. State Department before marrying Lt. John Insley Blair Pyne in 1943, who was a carrier-based pilot in the U.S. Navy. After the war, they moved into G.I. Bill housing so modest that one bathroom served several apartments. While Mr. Pyne continued his studies at Princeton University, she listened closely to him and the experts in the emerging field of computer science in which he later worked, and she successfully identified companies in which to invest their then meager savings.

Over the years, she developed an analytical approach to investing that outperformed most stock indices, and she came to understand state and federal tax codes better than many CPAs. She never forgot her childhood during the Great Depression and was a lifelong saver, but she was generous with her wealth, which she shared with her extended family.

In 1981, she and Mr. Pyne were amicably divorced after a separation of many years, and in 1991 on the island of Kauai she married Venkatesan Perry, PhD, a pioneer with several patents in fuel cell and fiber optic technology. They were steadfast bridge partners, great friends, and frequently traveled together, with India and Brazil being two favorite destinations. She also enjoyed becoming close with Dr. Perry’s family in the United States, including brothers Seshan and his wife Lalitha; Balu and his wife Radha, and Natarajan and his wife Sudha.

In addition to her husband, she is survived by her sons, Russell B. Pyne, a venture capitalist in Atherton, California; his wife Helen C. Pyne and their children Thornton Hamilton, Russell Stuyvesant, Nicholas Fish, and Elizabeth Cooke Pyne; Lawrence S. Pyne, an outdoor journalist and on-air personality for Vermont PBS in Middlebury, Vermont; and his children Grace Chapin, Nathan Stuyvesant, and Jacob Perry Pyne; and John Pyne, MD, an orthopedic hand surgeon in Dixmont, Maine; his wife Sandra W. Pyne; and their children Sarah Morris, Abigail Stebbins, and Chapin Reed Pyne.

She is also survived by her late brother Hamilton Fish Jr.’s four children: Hamilton Fish III, Alexa Ward, Nicholas Fish, and Peter Fish.

A celebration of her life will be held later this summer in Princeton. Her ashes will be scattered in her garden at her Princeton home, at her ancestral churchyard in Garrison, New York, and the Ganges River in India.

Arrangements are by Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

———

Dorothy Fletcher Alexander

Dorothy Fletcher Alexander, 88, life-long resident of Princeton, New Jersey, was called to rest on July 1, 2015 in Merwick Care Center, Plainsboro, New Jersey. Her mother, Queen Elizabeth Black, died in 1995 in Bronx, New York. Dorothy was raised in Princeton by loving parents John and Mary Fletcher. She graduated from Princeton High School in 1946. She studied organ and voice at Westminster Choir College in Princeton while playing organ for First Baptist Church Sunday school, and singing in the Youth and Senior Choirs. For 52 years, Dorothy was the organist at First Baptist Church in Princeton. In addition to her church responsibilities, Dorothy worked full-time in the laundry department at Princeton Hospital for 42 years.

Dorothy received numerous awards and honors for her tireless years of service, including serving as an Executive Board member of the Hampton Institute Ministers and Musicians Conference, “Distinguished Service Award” from the Deacons Union of Trenton and Vicinity, the Service Appreciation Award “For Your Faithfulness in Using Your Musical Gifts to Serve the Lord,” President of Progressive National Baptist Women’s Department of New Jersey, State Organist of the New Jersey Convention of Progressive Baptist, and the Progressive Women’s Fellowship of First Baptist Church. She travelled throughout the country playing the organ at numerous conventions, church services, and programs. Dorothy loved the First Baptist Church and will be missed by her church family.

In 1947, she married William Alexander of Virginia. They had three sons, William Jr. (Billy), Roland, and Dennis. She is also survived by a grandson Jared Alexander; sister Carmelita Moore; brother in-law Joe Moore; aunts Carmelita Reed, and Julia Roberts; nephews Tony Black, David Black, Kurt Black, and Woodrow Alexander; nieces Shannon Martin and Karen Alexander; many cousins including Fletchers and Alexanders. Susie Tindall, who was Dorothy’s best friend for 30 years, is also a very close family member. Predeceased sisters are Carmen Black and Betty Jean Black. Dorothy is also predeceased by her step-brother Robert Fletcher.

Funeral services will be held on Thursday, July 9, 2015 at First Baptist Church Princeton at John Street and Paul Robeson Place. Viewing is at 9 to 11 a.m. Service is at 11 a.m.

———

Rosemary Miles Blair

Rosemary Miles Blair died on July 2, 2015 in Princeton, New Jersey at the age of 84.

Rosemary, the youngest of three children, was born on February 22, 1931 in Brooklyn, New York to Catherine Gannon Miles and George Bernard Miles.

Rosemary received her BA from the College of New Rochelle and Master’s from Columbia University Teacher’s College. In 1954 she married David William Blair, of Rogue River, Oregon, a graduate student in mechanical engineering at Columbia. They were married in the Lady Chapel of St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

In 1958 they moved to Princeton. Rosemary became an art teacher in the Princeton School system where she taught for 30 years. They had six children.

Rosemary was active in the community of Princeton and an accomplished artist. She was instrumental in bringing bike paths to Princeton in 1978. She was on the small Catholic study group that led to the establishment of Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. Rosemary was passionate about preserving open space in both Princeton and New Jersey. She was a founder of the D&R Greenway Land Trust after serving as president of the Friends of Princeton Open Space. Under her stewardship, the Land Trust preserved in excess of 15,000 acres in New Jersey for the enjoyment of future generations.

Rosemary is survived by her husband of 61 years, David; five daughters and one son and their spouses; Karen and Tom Horn, Moretown, Vermont; Barbara Blair Randall, Brooklyn, New York; Maria and Eric Belliveau, Hinesburg, Vermont; Amanda and Peter Nichols, Hopewell, New Jersey; Bernice (May) and David Belmont Olav Blair, Washington, D.C., and Rachel and Terrence McGregor, Dedham, Massachusetts. Rosemary was proud of her 16 grandchildren who are spread far and wide at university or working from San Francisco to Zurich, Switzerland. They are Ben, Amos, Catherine, Henry, Philip, Lucy, Willie, Blaire, Zachary, Becca, David, Edith, John, Norah, Sam, and Charlie.

Rosemary was a practicing Catholic and feminist. Rosemary rested at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, New Jersey. Visiting hours were on Tuesday, July 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. A Roman Catholic mass will be said on Wednesday, July 8 at 10 a.m. at the Princeton University Chapel.

The family requests that in lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

———

Obit Hook 7-8-15Frances Hayes Hook

Frances Hayes Hook, 90, of Elon, North Carolina passed away, Sunday July 5, 2015 at the Cottage at Blakey Hall, surrounded by family and friends.

A native of Warren County, Mrs. Hook attended Norlina High School. She earned a degree in biology from Elon College, and afterward taught chemistry at a nursing college while working as a lab technician in Wilmington, North Carolina. Soon after, she married Harvey Hook, of Elon and moved to Princeton, New Jersey where they raised their four children. Mrs. Hook did extensive volunteer work in New Jersey with the Appalachian Service Project through the Princeton United Methodist Church. She was also an active volunteer with CONTACT of Mercer County, where she became the director of training and served on the board of directors. In 1989, she and Mr. Hook returned to Elon where she became a member of the Elon Community Church, the Alamance County Antique Automobile Club, and the Alamance Piecemaker Quilt Guild.

Mrs. Hook was the daughter of the late Martin Frederick Hayes, Sr. and the late Lanie McCullers Hayes. She was preceded in death by her husband Harvey O. Hook. She is survived by her four children and their spouses Bruce G. Hook (Ceil) of Rochester, New York; Ellen Hook Tyler (Mike) of Lynchburg, Virginia; Nancy Hook Auel (Conrad) of Monessen, Pennsylvania; and Anne Hook Lewis (Alan) of Elon, North Carolina; 11 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Visitation will be at Rich and Thompson Funeral Home in Burlington, North Carolina, 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday, July 9, 2015. Her funeral service will be held Friday, July 10 at 2 p.m. at the Rich and Thompson Funeral Home Chapel. Officiating will be Pastor Conrad G. Auel of Monessen, Pennsylvania. Burial will follow at Magnolia Cemetery, Elon.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Habitat for Humanity, of Alamance County, North Carolina.

Condolences may be offered at www.richandthompson.com.

———

Elizabeth Marie Pirone

Elizabeth Marie Pirone, 82, of Princeton, New Jersey died Thursday, July 2, 2015 at Merwick Care and Rehabilitation Center, Plainsboro, New Jersey. Born in Trenton she was a resident of Princeton for over 63 years. Elizabeth was co-owner, along with her husband, of Pirone Paving Company. She also worked for many years as a secretary for Benson and Benson of Princeton. She was an avid swimmer and instructor at the YWCA Princeton. Elizabeth was the past-president of P.I.A.S.C. Ladies Auxiliary. She had an undying love for her German Shepherds Simba, Toby, and Bear.

Daughter of the late Salvatore and Mary (Camiso) DeAngelo, sister of the late Patrick DeAngelo, Rachel DeAngelis, Sophie Falcey, she is survived by her husband of 63 years Felix V. Pirone; 2 daughters Felisa Scannella, Pamela Pirone Verdi; a son Umberto Pirone; a brother Louis DeAngelo; 2 sisters Mary Kane, Rose Keefer; 2 sisters-in-law and 2 brothers-in-law; Marie DeAngelo, Christina and Teodoro Tamasi, Anthony Pirone; 9 grandchildren Laurence, Larisa and Steven Scannella, Francis Verdi, Nicholas, Julia, Salvatore, Joseph, Thomas Pirone; and several nieces and nephews.

The funeral will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, July 9, 2015 at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m., St. Paul’s Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery.

Friends and family may call on Wednesday, July 8, from 4 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

Memorial contributions may be made to the ASPCA.

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Kathleen Neuer Blumenthal

Kathleen died in her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico after a long, well-lived life. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, she graduated from Goucher College and then moved to New York City, the city of her dreams. She lived and worked in New York for Mademoiselle Magazine as a writer, then editor. She met and married Jack Blumenthal, and moved to Princeton, New Jersey where she raised her son, while fighting for women’s equality and social justice. Kathleen continued writing and authored The Inn Book.

Her love of writing led her to poetry, which she continued to write her entire life. Moving to New Mexico, she based herself first in Taos, then Santa Fe. Kathleen continued to travel and write.

Kathleen lived through the Great Depression and World War II.

She is survived by her son Adam of Deering, New Hampshire; grandsons Jacob and Joseph; nephews Carl Socolow, Roy Socolow and Jeff Socolow; as well as numerous friends.

Interment will be in the Beth Israel Cemetery in Woodbridge, New Jersey. Memorial donations in her name may be made to the charity of one’s choice.

July 1, 2015

Obit Willis 7-1-15Joyce Willis

Joyce Willis died June 20, 2015 in Philadelphia after a long struggle with Chronic Pulmonary Lung Disease.  She was the former librarian at the Mary Jacobs Library, Rocky Hill, New Jersey, Matteson Public Library in suburban Chicago, and Trenton Public Library, Trenton, New Jersey.

She was born Joyce Lorraine Fink in Walla Walla, Washington on July 19, 1943, and grew up in Topeka, Kansas.  She graduated from Topeka High School, received a B.A. from University of Colorado and a Masters in Library Science from C.W. Post College, Long Island University.

Among her many accomplishments, she created an international design competition at Matteson Public Library in suburban Chicago and supervised the construction of the new library.  A strong advocate for public schools, Willis brought computers to Trenton school libraries.

She had a passion for social justice, sharing her love of good books and reading, and was an avid traveler.  She is survived by her children, Chanda Szczeblowski (Steve) and Jacob Willis, both of Chicago, her two granddaughters, Naomi and Violet Szczeblowski, and her sisters Hannah Fink (Martin Oppenheimer), Princeton, New Jersey and Elaine Blumenthal, Atlanta, Georgia.  Her sister Marcia predeceased her.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Visiting Nurses Association of Philadelphia, the American Civil Liberties Union or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

———

Paul Raffiani

Paul Raffiani, 85, of West Windsor, New Jersey passed away on Thursday, June 25, 2015 at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro.

Born in Lodi, New Jersey he lived most of his life in Fairlawn, New Jersey before moving to West Windsor 20 years ago.

Early in his life, Paul owned and operated PJ’s Florist in Fairlawn. Subsequent to that, he began appraising and selling real estate before taking the position of Tax Assessor in Edison Township, New Jersey from 1985 until his retirement in 2005.

Mr. Raffiani was honorably discharged from the US Army after serving his country during the Korean War and successfully completing OCS.

In his leisure time, Paul enjoyed gardening, yard work and canoeing. His multiple, almost daily trips to Lowes endeared him to the many employees who would lightheartedly ask “Why don’t you become a stockholder.” A devoted Dallas Cowboy fan, he especially liked watching them play the NY Giants, with his wife, Joan, who is a NY Giants
fan. When not watching football, they enjoyed yearly trips to the beautiful island of Corsica to visit relatives and appreciate all it has to offer.

Paul was predeceased by a brother Louis Raffiani. He is survived by his wife, Joan R. Dambach Raffiani, sons Greg Raffiani, Marc, David and Anthony Centrelli, step-son Richard Dambach, eight step-grandchildren, a brother Joseph Raffiani, his beloved cat, Bella and several nieces and nephews.

Private cremation arrangements are entrusted to Kimble Funeral Home of Princeton.

Burial will be on his cherished island of Corsica at a future date.

Extend condolences and remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Lucia Brown Dudley

After a brief illness, Lucia Brown Dudley died peacefully on Saturday, June 20, 2015 at Heron Point Community, Chestertown, Maryland, following several days of meaningful visits with her loving family and many friends including the caring staff of Heron Point.

Lucia was born in Boston, Massachusetts on August 28, 1927, first child of Daniel Lucius Brown and Bettina True Brown (née Savage). She graduated from Milton Academy and at age 15 placed first in Vermont’s 100-mile horseback trail ride, a considerable feat still today. Eager for a new horizon, she attended Stanford University in Palo Alto, California and received a B.A in 1949 with a major in French. Over the years, Lucia traveled intrepidly touring the country and the world accompanied by family and friends. She enjoyed collecting art, “what is attractive and pleasing.” For twenty years, she summered with her parents, siblings and children in Duxbury, Massachusetts, residing in their beloved “Cable House.” Since the 1990’s, Lucia raised and trained Portuguese Water Dogs and handled her favorites, Salty and Rosie, to blue ribbons in regional and national trials and thoroughly enjoyed the lively camaraderie of her fellow dog lovers.

As a mother, Lucia was patient, generous, supportive, insightful, and always encouraged her children and grandchildren to be presentable, honorable and respectful of others. She endowed them with the virtues of fairness and service to others exemplified by her many decades of involvement in charities, churches, museums, and social service agencies. For her entire life, Lucia was a loyal friend to many and particularly devoted to long-time confidantes, Nancy Eills, Mary Rose Markowitz, the late Lucille Gaigngault and Eleanor Hoisington with whom she shared a monthly luncheon in various undisclosed locations.

Lucia is preceded in death by her husbands, William L. Lewis, H. Kempton Hastings, Frank S. Dudley, as well as sister Betsy Brown Bower. She is survived by brother Eric Brown (Lynn) of Dataw Island, South Carolina; and sister Deborah Brown Burklund of Ridgefield, Connecticut and her children: Daniel Lewis of Centreville, Maryland; Cindy Usilton (Glenn) of Tavers, Florida; Leverett Lewis (Amanda) of Sebastian, Florida; Diana Abbott (Mark) of Northfield, Minnesota; Brewster Hastings (Pamela) of Abington, Pennsylvania; and Eric Hastings of Duluth, Minnesota; and eight grandchildren (Amity, Grace, Alexander, Sarah, Christopher, Sophia, Maegan, Max) as well as five stepchildren; Clark Hastings, Neil Hastings, Peter Dudley, Wick Dudley and Clay Dudley Evans and their families.

A Liturgy of Remembrance and Thanksgiving will be celebrated at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Centerville, Maryland, on Monday, July, 13, 2015 at 11 a.m. Burial will be private. The family suggests memorial donations be given to Crossroads Community for Mental Health, 120 Banjo Lane, Centreville, MD, 21617.

June 24, 2015

Obit Parnes 6-24-15Sybil Parnes

Thirteen days before her 90th birthday, June 25, wife, mother, teacher, sports fan, world traveler, and lover of the arts, Sybil Parnes passed peacefully on June 12, 2015 in Louisville, KY. A Princeton, New Jersey native, Sybil graduated from Penn State University, where she was President of Sigma Delta Tau sorority, before later receiving a Masters Degree in Counseling from The College of New Jersey. For 22 years she taught social studies at Princeton High School, where she also served as Assistant Principal.

One of three daughters of Julius and Laura Peskin, a founding family of the Jewish community in 1930 and owners of the Princeton News Service, Sybil attended Princeton High School. In 1948 she married David Parnes and lived in New York until 1956, when they moved back to Princeton. Sybil was actively involved in her Princeton community. She was on many committees at The Jewish Center. Seeing a need for jobs for young people she co-founded in the 1960’s The Youth Employment Service. Later on she co-originated The Roster for Women, for women needing employment. Volunteering at The Princeton Historical Society, especially as a docent for the house tours, was a special interest of hers. Early on, Sybil was part of Community Without Walls-House and a member of Hopewell Valley Golf Club.

In 2010 Sybil moved to Louisville’s Treyton Oak Towers retirement community to be near her daughter and son-in-law, Susan and Tom Sobel. During her Louisville years she grew to love her adopted hometown, extended family, and new friends. Continuing her interests from Princeton, she became a tireless volunteer, donating time to The Old Louisville Visitor’s Center, taking Veritas classes at Bellarmine University, and attending as many arts events as she could fit into her always busy schedule. Happily involved at Treyton Oak Towers, she was Vice President of The Residents Council and served on the Compassion Committee and Stretching the Minds series.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Julius and Laura Peskin, sister, Diane Elice, and husband, David Parnes. She is survived by her sister, Rosalie Hersh of Tampa, FL, son Mitchel Parnes of Palm Springs, CA, son Dr. Neil Parnes (Diana) of Spartanburg, SC, daughter Susan Parnes Sobel (Tom) of Louisville, KY, four grandchildren, Molly Parnes, Sydelle Elshenawy (Tarek), Max Parnes, Lisa Sobel-Berlow (Benji), and great grandson, Jacen Parnes.

A celebration of Sybil’s 90th birthday was already planned for June 25, 2015 and will still be held, now as a loving memorial, on that date at 2 p.m. at The Temple, 5101 US Highway 42, Louisville, KY. In early fall she will be interred by her husband at Beth Israel Cemetery in Woodbridge, NJ.

Expressions of sympathy may be directed to The Princeton Historical Society and The Jewish Center-Princeton.

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Margaret Helen Cox Stange

Margaret Helen Cox Stange, a longtime Princeton resident, died peacefully on Tuesday, June 2, 2015 at Princeton’s Acorn Glen Assisted Living Residence. She was 94 years old.

Helen, as she was known to all, was born on January 25, 1921 in Fort Wayne, Indiana where she grew up and where she was valedictorian of her graduating class at Fort Wayne’s South Side High School in 1938.

Helen attended Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois and graduated in 1942 having majored in mathematics with a minor in classical Latin and Greek. At Northwestern, she was a member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority. While only a junior, she was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa honor society. She later attended graduate school also at Northwestern and earned a masters degree in mathematics in 1946.

It was as an undergraduate at Northwestern that she met her future husband, Hugo Stange of Wilmette, Illinois. The two were married in September 1942 and remained married until Dr. Stange’s death in December 2007.

Mrs. Stange is survived by her five children, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. They are: Mark Stange of Shoreview, Minnesota and his two children, Erik and Jennifer Stange and Erik’s two children Greta and Henrik Stange; Paul Stange of Newark, New Jersey and his three children Anna, Vivian and Ted Stange; Karl Stange of Los Angeles, California and his two children, Justine and Celeste Stange; Martha Stange Borkan of Melrose, Massachusetts and her son Daniel Borkan; and Tom Stange of Princeton and his two children, William and Jack Stange.

Before moving to Princeton in 1956, Mrs. Stange was active in the Parent Teachers Association of Niagra Falls, New York, serving there as president of the 93rd Street Elementary School’s PTA. In Princeton she served as den mother to several of her sons’ Cub Scout packs, and was active as a Girl Scouts troop leader. She also volunteered her time to Recordings for the Blind. An accomplished and proficient knitter, Mrs. Stange often created her own sweater patterns based solely on old photographs of Irish fishermen.

A memorial service will be held at a later date.

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Obit Reimers 6-24-15Rev. Carl D. Reimers, Jr. 

Rev. Carl D. Reimers, Jr. passed away peacefully at his home on June 17, 2015.  He was born on January 17, 1930 in Richmond Virginia.  He spent his formative years growing up in Fort Worth, Texas with loving parents Charles Dietrich & Ray Saunders Reimers.  After graduating from the St. Marks School of Texas he went on to graduate from Northwestern University.  Realizing that he desired a career to serve both Man and God, he received a Masters of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary and further graduate studies at Harvard Divinity School.

After his formal education, he became the Minister at the First Presbyterian Church, Coleman, Texas.  Three years later in 1959, he was recruited to become the Assistant Dean of the Chapel, Princeton University serving as minister and professor.  In 1970 he went on to become the Chairman of the Religion Department at Princeton Day School where he remained until he retired in 1993.  He loved his years at Princeton Day School as a teacher, advisor and later Dean of Students.  The “Rev”, as his students at PDS affectionately called him, was a beloved teacher, mentor, and friend.  Many former students would contact him well after retirement for advice and to officiate at their weddings and children’s baptisms.  He had an infectious personality with an abundant sense of humor.

Carl served on various Boards including Princeton Day School, Historic Morven, Princeton University Art Museum, and the Council for Religion in Independent Schools.  He was a member of the Century Association in New York and an honorary member of the Princeton Ivy Club.

He is survived by his son Carl D. Reimers III, his son’s wife Pamela, and their children Grace Pauline and Charles Damon Reimers of Greenwich, CT.  He cherished his two stepsons from his marriage to the late Jane G. Irwin, Watt W. and Thomas B. Reynolds of Fort Worth, Texas.

His Memorial Service will be held at the Princeton University Chapel on July 9 at 11 a.m.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Obit Moore 6-24-15Ai Constance Handa Moore

Ai Constance Handa Moore died in her home at sunrise on June 13, 2015.  Born and raised in Seattle, she lived and worked in Princeton over the course of thirty-three years before moving to Monroe Township in 1985. She was 90 years old.

Ai’s young life was shaped, like that of most other Japanese Americans on the West Coast, by the dislocations of the Second World War.  She was a student at Garfield High School when she and her family were forcibly “evacuated” from their homes in the mass relocation of Japanese to internment camps in the interior West.  Her family’s incarceration began at the Puyallup Fairgrounds before transfer to the internment camp in desolate Minadoka, Idaho, where Ai completed her secondary school studies and received her high school diploma.

Thanks to the American Friends Service Committee, Ai was permitted to leave the internment camp to pursue a college education on the East Coast at Beaver College (now Arcadia University) in Pennsylvania. At the war’s end, when she and her family were allowed to return to Seattle, she transferred to the University of Washington and earned her bachelor of arts in the department of sociology, a degree that was formally conferred only in 2015.  At the university she was a co-founder of Valeda, a Japanese-American sorority, at a time when established on-campus sororities did not welcome non-white co-eds.

During summers while at the University of Washington, Ai did volunteer social work in Harlem, New York, and then became a resident volunteer with inmates at the New Jersey State Reformatory for Women, at the time an open correctional facility at Clinton Farms.  Ai served as a volunteer aide on an Indian reservation in Washington before becoming a junior case worker for the King County welfare department, Seattle. She was a member of the Japanese Presbyterian Church in Seattle and served on the boards of the Seattle Fellowship of Reconciliation and the Seattle Urban League.

In 1952 Ai moved to Princeton, New Jersey. In Princeton she joined the Witherspoon Presbyterian Church, where she served as church secretary in 1950s, and married James W. Moore. She worked at the Educational Testing Service when it was headquartered on Nassau Street, Princeton, and as a social worker with Mercer County Neighborhood Youth Corps.  She launched Handa Food Management in Princeton, providing food catering services to individual and corporate clients.  Ai was a contributor to a Time-Life volume on international cuisines and taught cooking at the Princeton Y adult school.  As Handa Food Management’s owner-operator, she ran the dining facility of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for many years.  She retired in 1987.

Ai was active in the Princeton community, serving on the boards of the Princeton Nursery School, Princeton Homemakers, and the Princeton Day School Parents Association, and was active in the Soroptimist Club.  With a teaching diploma in Japanese tea ceremony and flower arrangement, she pursued Japanese paper arts through her entire adult life.  Her other interests included interior design and travel, particularly to Japan and Italy.

Ai was preceded in death by her parents, Yuki and Takeyoshi Handa, originally of Fukushima and Niigata, Japan, respectively; a sister, Shizuko Nakashima Handa of Koriyama, and brother Michihiko Handa of Los Angeles; and her former husband James Moore.

She is survived by a daughter, Yuki Moore Laurenti, and her husband Jeffrey; a grandson, Mario Laurenti; a brother, Yoshihiko Robert Handa of Bellevue, Washington; nephews Dan Handa and David Handa, respectively of Gig Harbor and Seattle, Washington, and Doug Handa of Poway, California; and cousins in Seattle and in Koriyama and Tokyo, Japan.

A funeral and memorial to Ai’s life will be celebrated at Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton, at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 18, 2015.  Ai requested that, in lieu of flowers, friends might make donations to the Mario Laurenti ‘03 Financial Aid Endowment at the Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart, 1128 Great Road, Princeton 08540.

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Dr. Alfred S. Cook, Jr. 

Dr. Alfred S. Cook Jr., formerly of Princeton, died in Fort Myers, Florida on June 15, 2015.  He was 91.  Born and raised in Princeton, he had a medical practice in Princeton and was on the staff of Princeton Medical center from 1954 to 1996.  He was educated in the Princeton Public Schools and graduated from The Hun School.  He attended Lehigh University and received his medical degree from the Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University and the University of Pennsylvania post-graduate program in internal medicine.  He served his internship and residency at Mercer Hospital in Trenton, New Jersey.

Dr. Cook served in World War II and as a doctor in the Korean War where he was stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina serving as the head of the clinic for dependent families.

Dr. Cook loved to garden and was noted for his vegetable and flower gardens.  He especially took pride in his “pumpkin patch” which became a regular visit for the nearby elementary school kindergarten classes every fall.  He was also an avid fly fisherman who loved his fishing trips to Maine and also enjoyed surf fishing on Long Beach Island.

He was the son of the late Alfred S. Cook Sr. and Leah Suydam Cook.  He is survived by his wife Mary Elise, also born in Princeton, daughters Mary Ann Cook of Princeton, Margaret Farley of Fort Myers, Florida and son Raymond Cook of Princeton and 4 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren.  He was pre-deceased by daughter Sandra Labaree of Wiscasset, Maine and his sister Marjorie Mason of Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

The family will hold a memorial service to be announced at a later date.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in his memory to the Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University or to a charity of your choice.

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Phyllis M. Simone 

Phyllis M. Simone (Dalton), 65, of Hamilton died Tuesday, June 16, 2015 at home surrounded by her loving family. Born in Legga, Moyne, Co. Longford, Ireland, she has been a resident of Hamilton for over 40 years. Phyllis was co-owner along with her husband of Hulit’s Shoes of Princeton. Daughter of the late John and Winifred (Whelan) Dalton, sister of the late Frances Mahon (Eamon), she is survived by her husband of 43 years Charles V. Simone, two sons and their wives, Christopher and Jessica, Ryan and Maria, her brother Sean and Marion Dalton, her sisters Elizabeth Butler, Mary Jo and Seamus Conboy, Patricia and John Mellody, Marie and Thomas Mulligan, Joan and David Walsh, her grandchildren Amelia, Penelope and John Francis and many nieces and nephews.

Phyllis was a devoted wife, mother and granny. She loved her family and friends and lived her life always thinking of others. Some of her favorite moments were spent at many of her large family gatherings and at the shore in Lavallette, New Jersey. We will miss her laugher, Irish wisdom and her caring heart. She leaves a void that cannot be replaced.

A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 11 a.m. on Monday, June 22, 2015, St. Paul’s Church, located at 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Burial followed at Princeton Cemetery. Friends were asked to call on Sunday, June 21, 2015 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, NJ. Memorial Contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society.

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Charles Homer Burkman

Charles Homer Burkman of Pennington, New Jersey died Sunday, June 21, 2015 surrounded by his loving family with prayers from around the world at Compassionate Care Hospice at St. Francis.  Born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, he was the son of the late Eric and Ethel Berry Burkman, he had lived in Pennington for many years.  Charles attended Pingry School in Elizabeth, New Jersey and in 1944 was enrolled as a member of Princeton University’s Class of 1948.  He served in the U.S. Navy Hospital Corps, 1944-1946, before returning to Princeton, from which he graduated in 1952.

He traveled and lived in France for over a year, and worked at ETS for several years upon his return.

August 1959 was a watershed: He began graduate studies at Rutgers Library School, began working at Princeton University Library, and met his wife-to-be, Sally Wilt of Towanda, Pennsylvania, in Seabright, New Jersey.  They were married in 1960.  After receiving his Masters in Library Service, he served his alma mater for 34 years, both as a Reference Librarian and a Cataloger, retiring in 1993.

He and his wife loved to travel, making several road trips to all the contiguous states, as well as Eastern Canada and Newfoundland.  They were especially fond of cruising: the Caribbean and the North Atlantic, Iceland, Scandinavia and Great Britain.  Perhaps the best holiday was by train across Canada, by ship up the Alaskan Inside Passage, two weeks with family on the Kenai Peninsula, then retracing the whole trip!

He was an avid reader of literature, history and religion, a lover of classical music and opera, a great bird watcher, and a cat afficianado!  He loved being with all his family, especially sharing his special love of Maine.  He was a faithful member of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Pennington for many years, serving on its Vestry and on the Music and Worship Adult Education Committees.

He is survived by his wife of 55 years, 3 daughters and sons-in-law, Katherine Burkman-Mole (Theodore) of Alaska, and their three sons, Matthew, Andrew and Nathanael of Alaska; Elisabeth Burkman Bielski (Edwin) of Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania; Sarah F. Burkman (Anthony Shelborne) of Sterling, Virginia.

A Requiem Eucharist and Celebration of Life will be held Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 11 a.m. at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, 300 S. Main Street, Pennington with the Rev. Canon John C. Belmont Rector officiating.  In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Princeton University Library or St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church or Compassionate Care Hospice.

Arrangements are by the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington.  Condolences are welcome at wilsonapple.com.

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Irwin Gordon

Irwin Gordon passed away peacefully in his sleep on Monday, June 15, 2015.

Beloved husband and treasured companion to Lenore; doting father to Mark (Susan), Princeton, NJ and Sara (London, England); grandfather “Pop” to Thea Colman (Craig), Winchester, MA, Alene Pearson (Val Jordan), Albany, CA, and Melissa Gordon, Somerville, MA; and great-grandfather to Eli, James, Maya and Zoe.

Irwin began life in Brooklyn, NY and soon moved to Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he was raised by his parents, Benjamin and May Gordon.  He was a big brother to Allen (deceased), Highland Park, IL and Larry, Houston, TX.
Irwin was a grateful graduate of Rutgers where he completed his PhD in Ceramics after returning from distinguished service in World War II, primarily in Europe.  He served in the U.S. Army’s Company A 179th Engineer Combat Battalion. Irwin received two Purple Hearts and later was honored by the French government with membership in the Legion of Honor for his military service. Irwin’s mother was ever-optimistic when he was shipped out to war and wrote in her diary, “Irwin is spending the summer in Europe.”

Irwin was immersed in research at the David Sarnoff Research Center throughout his career.  In the early days of color television, he worked on its development.  Over time, he came to hold a number patents for his efforts.  Given his generation and upbringing, much free time was spent as a volunteer for various local charities and organizations.  In particular, he melded his scientific knowledge with a melodious voice to be a reader/volunteer for Recording for the Blind for 35 years.  He served as President of The Jewish Center of Princeton in its formative years as well as the Chairman of United Jewish Appeal.  His Jewish heritage was a strong basis of his character which saw an artistic outlet when he took courses at the Jewish Museum in NYC for many years to craft beautiful Judaica (some of which were donated to The Jewish Center of Princeton).  Combining his passion for helping the blind with his artistry, Irwin designed and crafted a Braille mezuzah which is on permanent display at the Grand Synagogue in Jerusalem.

Irwin’s sunny disposition was matched by a smile which rarely set.  In his later years, Irwin would remark upon the wonder and pleasure of his travels with Lenore to 42 countries.  He would greet the immigration official on his return with a smile and announce, “G-d Bless America!”  Despite failing health over the past few months, Irwin greeted each day with his usual smile and gentle demeanor.  He died peacefully in his sleep one week short of his 67th wedding anniversary.

The funeral was attended by immediate family only.  If you would like to share in his memory, belt out a chorus of his favorite, “G-d Bless America”, and make a contribution to a charity of your choice.

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Obit Sylvan 6-24-15Elliott Howard Sylvan

Elliott Howard Sylvan, age 87, who passed on Tuesday June 2, 2015 left an indelible mark around his original residence on Long Island through his volunteer service and participation in senior sports. So, when he moved to his new home in New Jersey, he wasn’t going to stop.

He and his beloved wife Lenore retired to the Princeton area in order to experience the enriching life that the area offers such as attending numerous classes at Princeton University and delivering books for the Princeton Public Library to nearby homebound citizens. He could also be found fundraising and working on special events at the Princeton Senior Resource Center.

In addition, on any given day, Sylvan who had been a star baseball player at Jamaica High School in Queens, New York and was drafted and played in the New York Giants system, could be seen coaching young people. This included working for Autism New Jersey/COSAC and Special Olympics athletes in addition to playing with children at the YMCA after school athletic programs.

Sylvan, who married his high-school sweetheart and “Life” cheerleader, Lenore Cohen, served in the Army occupation forces in Japan post World War II. In 1990, Sylvan renewed his love for baseball by playing First Base on Senior Softball teams in New York, winning 10 championships in 11 years. He was inducted into the ISSA Hall of Fame and National Senior Softball Hall of Fame, won Senior Olympics and Senior Softball World Series.

His career focused on the trucking industry as President of the NYC Garment Center trucking company, Empire Carriers Corp., then with NJ-based Supermarkets General Corp. and finally in his own brokerage firm. He used these skills in his volunteer work for Island Harvest and more recently, securing and delivering food for the PSRC Breakfast at Home Fundraiser.

Loving husband of Lenore, father of Harlan (deceased), Sanford, Gwen, and Seth, their spouses Ann, Mark, and Carol. Devoted grandfather to Jason and his wife Rosalynn, Alex, Kristen, and Matthew, and great grandfather to Theo.

Memorial Services will take place at the Princeton Senior Resource Center in the Fall.

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June 17, 2015

Obit Noden 6-17-15Merrell Noden

Merrell Noden passed away May 31, 2015, in Princeton, New Jersey, peacefully and in the loving company of his family. The cause was lung cancer. He was 59.

Born in Trenton, New Jersey on July 31, 1955, Merrell was the oldest child of Judge J. Wilson and Mrs. Cecily Noden. With his siblings, Hilary and Geoffrey, Merrell loved athletics of all kinds and especially running. As a student at The Lawrenceville School, Merrell ran a 4:11.9 mile on a distance medley team that set a U.S. high school indoor record; and, on his own, he set an Eastern high school indoor 880 record of 1:54.0. He is a member of the school’s Alumni Athletic Hall of Fame, and in Lawrenceville’s Lavino Field House, many bronze plaques bear Merrell’s name; his records for the 1-mile run; 2-mile run; and 880 yards still stand.

Merrell was a summa cum laude graduate of Princeton, where he ran cross-country for four years. After college, he taught for several years at Princeton Day School before earning an MPhil in English Literature at Oxford University. While at Oxford he trained and raced with the North London Athletics Club and earned an Oxford Blue. He would continue to run for pleasure and competition throughout his life.

Merrell wrote his Oxford master’s thesis on the work of Charles Dickens, and he was as passionate about literature — especially Shakespeare, Dickens, and the British poets — as he was about sport. Fittingly, his long career as a journalist began with a celebrated article for Sports Illustrated about Dickens’s practice of walking up to 20 miles per day.

Merrell was intensely intellectually curious — quick to laugh, to critique, and to praise — and deeply committed to racial equality and social justice. He had many passions, and as a writer, he took great pleasure in writing about topics that allowed him to bridge his interests, research deeply, celebrate human genius, and explore broader social issues. He wrote about sports and eating disorders, steroids, the science of comedy, the sport of word play, and great Americans, including Chuck Berry and Louis Armstrong. Through writing about Oprah Winfrey for People Magazine, he was hired to help write a memoir of the segregated South. Locally, he was honored to edit The Lawrenceville Lexicon, a history of The Lawrenceville School, and some of his most cherished experiences in recent years were his interviews with Princeton alumni and professors whose talents he celebrated in articles for Princeton Alumni Weekly. Through his writing he was able to keep learning about new subjects, supporting causes and institutions dear to him, and meeting people he admired so much.

Merrell was accompanied on his many journeys by his wife, Eva Mantell, a native of Princeton, whom he met while he was a graduate student, and she an undergraduate, at Oxford in 1984. On May 27, 1990, they were married in Central Park, in a service presided over by the musician Sun Ra. Merrell and Eva lived in Manhattan until 2002, when they moved with their two children, Miranda and Sam, back to Princeton.

In both New York and Princeton, Merrell served the community as a teacher and coach. He taught literacy for The Fortune Society in New York City and at Trenton State Prison. He worked with many individual runners. He coached Little League in Princeton. Since 2011 Merrell coached cross-country at Princeton Day School, where his children were students.

Merrell was known and revered especially for his love of family and gift of friendship. He made deep and lasting friends wherever he went. He stayed in close touch with and enjoyed personal visits from close friends even to the very end of his life. His loss is felt keenly by literally hundreds of classmates, colleagues, and dear family friends.

Merrell is survived by his wife, Eva; daughter Miranda; son Sam; parents Wilson and Cecily, sister Hilary and sister-in-law Kelly Hanson; brother Geoffrey and sister-in-law Suzette; mother-in-law Marianne Mantell; brother-in-law Michael Mantell and sisters-in-law Ann Mantell, Harriet Fier, Sonia Mantell; and many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Friends and family are encouraged to celebrate Merrell’s life by giving a gift to the Merrell Noden Fund at HomeFront, an organization that helps families in New Jersey break the cycle of poverty. Donations to the fund may be made online at www.homefrontnj.org/Donate.cfm or mailed to HomeFront, 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648-4518.

In the words of William Shakespeare, one of Merrell’s literary touchstones: “He was a man, take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again.”

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Jane Ellen Groth

Jane Ellen Groth, née Stevenson, born in Champaign, Illinois on April 12, 1946, moved with her family to Santa Monica, California at the age of eleven. She earned a degree in English at the University of Southern California and after graduation in June 1968 married Edward John Groth, III and moved to the Princeton area where she spent the remainder of her life. After starting her family, Jane earned a degree in accounting from Rider College in 1983 and passed the CPA exam in 1988.

Jane worked at the Los Angeles airport, the Prince-ton airport, Educational Testing Service, Techne Inc., Arnold Associates, Lewis W. Parker, III, CPA, and as a self-employed tax preparer. She served on committees of the Society of CPAs, volunteered at the YWCA, was active with Little League, Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts, including serving as a Brownie Troop Leader.

Jane was a warm, caring, and generous person who loved and supported her family and friends and had a smile for everyone. Whether it was the physics department, the neighborhood, the workplace, or even a cycling club, Jane made friends everywhere and it was important to her to make everyone feel special. In addition to spending time with loved ones, Jane enjoyed art, reading, puzzling, decorating, entertaining, and traveling.

Jane died in her sleep on June 12, 2015. She was predeceased by her parents, George Thomas Stevenson, Jr. and Alice Marjorie Stevenson, née Hilderbrand. She is survived by her husband; their son, Jeffrey Todd Groth of Saratoga Springs, New York; their daughter, Amy Carina Groth of North Windham, Connecticut; and by her siblings Julia A. Rogers, of Banning, California; G. Thomas Stevenson, III of Marietta, Georgia; Betsy J. Cleavinger of Garland, Texas; and many other relatives and friends.

An informal remembrance will be held from 2 to 4:30 p.m., Sunday, June 21, 2015 at Jane and Ed’s home, 15 Elm Ridge Road, Pennington, NJ, 08534. Details may be found at the web site http://EdandJane.net. Parking may be limited, so carpooling is encouraged.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Arrangements are by the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington. Condolences are welcome at  www.wilsonapple.com.

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Obit Salkind 6-17-15Alvin J. Salkind

Dr. Alvin J. Salkind, 87, of Princeton died Tuesday, June 9, 2015 at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital of New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Born in New York City, he had resided in Princeton since 1958. After service in the U.S. Navy during World War II from 1945 to 1946, he returned to his academic studies at Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. In 1958 he received a DChE in chemical engineering, chemistry, and x-ray physics. Dr. Salkind was an emeritus professor of bio-engineering in the department of surgery at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick and emeritus professor of chemical engineering at Rutgers University. He was also a visiting professor at the University of Miami, Case Western Reserve, and CUNY. From 1989-2001, he served as the associate dean for research in the school of engineering at Rutgers. He was co-author along with Uno Falk of Alkaline Storage Batteries and co-author with Ernest Yeager of Techniques of Electrochemistry. From 1970 to 1979, he was vice president of technology at Electric Storage Battery in Yardley, Pa. He was a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the Electrochemical Society, and the N.J. Academy of Medicine. Dr. Salkind held numerous patents and played a pivotal role in the development of technologies ranging from heart pacers, defibrillators, electric vehicles (both terrestrial and lunar), and fuel cells. Outside of his professional life, he loved his family, skiing, swimming, and sailing. He had been a member of the Miramar Yacht Club in Brooklyn since 1949 and was a founding member of the Princeton Ski Club.

He will be remembered fondly by former students, colleagues, friends, and family around the world.

Son of the late Samuel and Florence (Zins) Salkind, he is survived by his wife Marion (Koenig) Salkind of Princeton; a son James Salkind of Jersey City; a daughter Susanne Salkind of Washington, D.C.; a brother Chester Salkind of Durango, Colorado; and two grandchildren Abigail Salkind-Foraker and Jacob Salkind-Foraker.

The funeral service was held on Friday, June 12, 2015 at Star Of David Memorial Chapel of Princeton, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Burial was in Mount Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, New York.

June 10, 2015

Obit Townsend 6-10-15Charles Townsend

Charles Townsend, long-time Princeton resident and professor at Princeton University, died peacefully at home surrounded by his family on June 7, 2015. Charlie, as he was commonly known, was born to Charles E. Townsend and Lois Townsend (nee Fukushima) on September 29, 1932 in New Rochelle, N.Y. His only sibling and identical twin, Peter, predeceased him.

Charlie spent his early years on a farm in Vermont, before moving to New York and attending Trinity School on a full scholarship. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Yale University, where he majored in German, in 1954. Charlie then spent a year in Germany on a Fulbright scholarship. On the boat over, he met his future wife and fellow Fulbright scholar, Janet Linner. They were married in 1957.

Drafted into the U.S. Army, Charlie served three years, studying Russian at the Army Language School in Monterey, Calif. and working in the U.S. counterintelligence corps in Nuremberg, Germany. He was chosen as a Russian-speaking guide to the U.S. National Exhibition in Moscow in the summer of 1959.

Charlie did his graduate work at Harvard, where he earned an MA in Soviet Regional Studies, followed by a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1961. He was an assistant professor at Harvard for five years before coming to Princeton, where he chaired the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures for 32 consecutive years, until his retirement in 2002.

Two early sabbaticals were spent with his wife and young daughters in Prague, Czechoslovakia, where he developed his lifelong interest in the Czech language, of which he was a preeminent scholar. Over his academic career, Charlie published nine books and innumerable articles; taught linguistics, Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, and Polish; and was a tireless mentor to his students, many of whom went on to distinguished careers.

Charlie’s research took him to Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union/Russia many times. He and Janet loved to travel together and enjoyed many trips throughout the U.S. and Europe as well as to Asia and Africa.

Charlie played basketball and football as a youth, was an avid tennis and squash player, and loved watching sports. He was a Red Sox fan to the end. He played piano, guitar, and banjo by ear and loved singing with family and friends. After his retirement, he volunteered with the Princeton Hospice Program, and particularly enjoyed leading a weekly “singfest” at the Acorn Glen assisted living facility.

Charlie is survived by his wife of 57 years, Janet; and his daughters Erica Appel (Charles), Sylvia Townsend (Charles Cowens), and Louise Townsend (Ben Schmidt). He leaves behind his five beloved grandchildren, Rose and Alice Cowens; Justine and Stephen Appel; and Isabel Schmidt; and his nephews Ross Adler (Pam) and James Townsend (Jenny); and nieces Sara Poumerol (Gilles) and Laura McWright (Glen), and their children.

A memorial service will be announced. In lieu of flowers, donations may be mailed to Princeton Hospice, 88 Princeton-Hightstown Rd, Ste 201, Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 (“Attn. Hospice”) or made online at princetonhcs.org.

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Daniel M. Wise Jr.

Daniel M. Wise, Jr., 95, died peacefully May 23, 2015, at his home in Meadow Lakes, a retirement community in Hightstown, New Jersey. He leaves behind a loving family and a trove of experiences and memories he generously shared professionally as a writer/filmmaker, and personally as a well-practiced and engaging storyteller.

The son of Daniel M. Wise, Sr. and Lydia Cranmer Wise, he was born October 28, 1919, in Washington, D.C. The family later lived in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania; Palmyra, New Jersey; and Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, where Daniel graduated from Upper Darby High School. He attended Franklin Pierce business school in Philadelphia and graduated from Bucknell University in 1942.

As an officer in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II, he led the ordnance supply unit of a fighter-bomber squadron, beginning after D-Day at some of the first forward airfields in Normandy, and continuing through northern France and into Germany.

He parlayed his college French into many great experiences, most notably the courting of the love of his life, Janette Mail, a ballerina in the Paris Opera, whom he met while both were vacationing in the alpine resort of Talloires in August 1945 and to whom he was a devoted husband for 65 years.

After the war he worked for the Office of the Foreign Liquidation Commissioner in Paris and married Janette in 1947. They returned to the United States on the SS De Grasse later that year, and settled in Philadelphia. Daniel became a writer and film producer with TelRa Productions, making programs for the NFL, Sports Illustrated, and Major League Baseball in the new medium of television, eventually becoming president of the company. He was an independent producer for several years and later worked for the American Kennel Club where he made award-winning training films and documentaries before retiring in the early 1980s. The family moved to Princeton in 1976 where, in semi-retirement, he served as a driver for Beck & Call, a limousine and courier service.

A lifelong athlete, he started running before it became popular, competing in many races, including the Penn Relays and a marathon at age 59. He was a fixture on the streets and paths of Princeton and surrounding towns, running with his beloved golden retriever, Coda, and posted a personal record of running consecutive days that extended for nearly three years. Later, he became an avid biker with the Princeton Freewheelers, and did several bike tours in the U.S. and overseas with his son, Christian.

For over 40 years he was a fixture in the Philadelphia Eagles press box where he collaborated with the statistics team to write a detailed play-by-play narrative of every home game for use by the media and the NFL.

Predeceased by his wife who died January 14, 2012, Daniel is survived by his three children: Anita Wise and her husband TJ Tindall, of Pennington; Daniel R., and his wife, Lillian Doucet Wise, of Concord, New Hampshire; and Christian Wise, and his wife Hannah Fuller-Boswell, of Montague, Massachusetts; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Daniel will also be lovingly remembered by an extended family that includes his brother, Joseph, of Hanover, Pennsylvania; a cousin, Sam Wise, of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania; and numerous nieces and nephews from his late sisters, Dorothy, and Harriett, and Janette’s sister, Léone Mail of France.

Daniel donated his body to the Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center for the education of medical students.

His life was celebrated at a service at Meadow Lakes, 300 Etra Road, Hightstown, New Jersey at 1 p.m., Sunday, June 7, 2015. His remains will be buried with his wife at Princeton Cemetery.

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Obit Garrison 6-10-15Alice M. Garrison

Alice M. Garrison, a life-long resident of Princeton, passed away at age 90 on Thursday, June 4, 2015 in the house where she was born.

Alice was a graduate of Princeton High School, Class of 1942. In 1943, she married Philip Garrison, her husband of 64 years whom she first met at Nassau Street Elementary School when the two were in kindergarten.

Alice worked for two years at the Institute for Advanced Study as a secretary to Albert Einstein and John von Neumann. In 1944, she went to work for Princeton University, where she was employed for 43 years, first in the Department of Romance Languages and later in Latin American Studies and European Civilizations. She was particularly proud to administer the Helen Lee Wessel Fellowships in Public Affairs, established to support scholars of inter-American affairs. Long after she retired in 1987, she remained in touch with students she had met at the University.

Alice was predeceased by her husband, Philip, by her younger sister, Nancy Blaney, and by a long string of loyal German Shepherds. She is survived by her daughter, Sharon Worthington of Princeton; her son, James Garrison of Dublin, Ohio and his spouse, Peggy. She had four grandchildren: Ross Worthington of Washington, D.C.; Julie Worthington of Somerville, Mass.; Kimberly Gatton of Atlanta, Ga; and Amy Garrison of Cleveland, Ohio.

A private burial service was held at Rocky Hill Cemetery in Rocky Hill, N.J. under the direction of the Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, N.J. 08540.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at www.alz.org. Condolences may be sent online by visiting www.thekimblefuneralhome.com.

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Margaret A. Scott

Margaret A. (Spohn) Scott died on June 3, 2015 at the age of 80 in the Merwick Care and Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro. She was the daughter of the late Llewellyn N. and Dorothy Seyfert Spohn. She was predeceased by her husband, Dr. Eric J. Y. Scott.

Marge was born in Reading. Pa. and was a graduate of Reading High School and Cedar Crest College. After graduation, she was employed as a social worker in Philadelphia until her marriage.

Marge and her husband shared a great love for music. They enjoyed English contra dancing and made many good friends from this activity. They also enjoyed and attended many concerts. Marge had a beautiful alto voice and was a member of Elaine Brown’s chorus when she resided in Philadelphia. She was a pianist and artist.

One of her outstanding hobbies was quilting. She organized friends and family members in producing quilts for many occasions. She was a beloved family member and a good friend.

Marge is survived by her sister, Dorothy R. Rapp, wife of Vernon G. Rapp; her niece Lynanne R. Hesse, wife of Stephen R. Hesse and nephew Jeffrey D. Rapp all of Berks County, Pa.; as well as her nephew Gregory A. Rapp husband of Karen L. of Ocean County, N.J. She is also survived by Lynanne’s children, Christine A. Scheipe of Columbia, S.C. and Benjamin W. Scheipe of Berks County, Pa.

A private celebration of her life will be held by her family.

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Obit Griffin 6-10-15James Quigley Griffin

James Quigley Griffin of Hopewell, New Jersey died peacefully on June 2, 2015 after a brief illness.

A revered husband, father, grandfather, farmer, sportsman, and friend to countless individuals, Mr. Griffin had a diverse and inspiring career in banking, museum administration, finance, and as a trustee of numerous cultural institutions.

Son of Helen Quigley and Donald Worner Griffin, Mr. Griffin was born in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania on August 23, 1932. He grew up on the Princeton University campus where his father was general secretary of the Alumni Association. He was a graduate of the Gilman School of Baltimore, Maryland and earned an AB in history from Princeton University in 1955. After serving as Captain in the U.S. Army, he began a 25-year career at First National City Bank where he rose to be a vice president and head of personnel for Citibank’s international division. In 1979, Mr. Griffin joined the Metropolitan Museum of Art as treasurer and vice president for finance. Upon leaving the Metropolitan Museum he joined Patterson, Belknap, Webb, and Tyler LLP as treasurer. After 35 years commuting to New York City, Mr. Griffin chose to work closer to home and his family, and joined Wilmerding, Miller & Co., Inc., an investment advisory firm in Princeton, as vice president and secretary from 1992 until the present.

Mr. Griffin served as treasurer on the Boards of the New York Historical Society, the New York Society Library, International School Services (ISS), AMIDEAST (America-Mideast Educational and Training Services, Inc.), and as a trustee at Morven Museum and Garden. Mr. Griffin was deeply committed to The Ivy Club in Princeton, where he served as the graduate board president from 1982 until his death. He was a long-standing member of the Century Association, the Anglers Club of New York, and Pretty Brook Tennis Club.

Mr. Griffin is survived by his wife of 56 years, Barbara Moorehead Griffin; his three daughters, Barbara Griffin Cole, Cynthia Griffin Ferris, and Sarah Griffin Thompson; his sons in-law, Christopher A. Cole, Timothy G. Ferris, Newell M. Thompson; and nine grandchildren.

He and his wife lived on a working sheep farm in Hopewell where he was a passionate amateur stonemason. When not working on his legendary argillite stonewalls, he could be found in the vegetable garden or on his tractor mowing the fields. He loved nothing better than to prepare a homegrown feast for his family and friends in their warm, welcoming kitchen. In the winter, after the first cold snap, the call went out, “Ice at Jimmy’s!” Skaters of all ages joined with him to play fast and furious shinny hockey on the Griffin’s pond.

He was widely known for his gentle, gracious and selfless manner, his work ethic, and his unwavering values. An optimist with a keen appreciation for individual talent in all walks of life; he was a rare person who inspired others to be better.

A memorial service celebrating the Life of James Q. Griffin will be held at the Princeton University Chapel on June 22, 2015 at 11 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, friends may contribute to the James Q. Griffin Memorial Fund at the Princeton Area Community Foundation (15 Princess Road, Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08525), which will support education, leadership, and Jim’s other charitable interests.

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Obit Lawrence 6-10-15Mark Lawrence

Mark MacKenzie Lawrence, 59, passed away on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at his home in Holmdel, New Jersey. He was born in East Liverpool, Ohio to the late Frederick and Barbara (MacKenzie) Lawrence.

Mark grew up in Princeton, New Jersey, where he moved to in 1961. He graduated from Denison University in 1977 and moved to Florida, where he pursued his passion for scuba diving and underwater photography for many years, cultivating his lifelong fascination with and love of the ocean and marine life. In addition to working at Pro Dive in Fort Lauderdale and Ocean Dive in Key Largo, he worked for Scuba Diver magazine, reviewing the best locations for coral reef exploration in the Gulf and the Caribbean. He loved to regale his friends and family with tales of his many adventures from this time in his life, including close encounters with sharks and morel eels. He moved to New York City as a commercial photographer, later moving to New Jersey and working for a digital photography equipment company, and most recently, in cyber security with Protected Mobility.

He was devoted to his son, Alexander, who filled his life with joy and with whom he shared his love of science and exploring nature. He was the enthusiastic leader of Cub Scout Den 7 in Holmdel, with whom he shared many adventures and his gift for encouraging those around him to try new things with patience and humor. His laugh and love of life will be greatly missed.

He is survived by his loving son Alexander Schlag Lawrence; his former wife, Elisabeth Schlag Lawrence; his two sisters, Lisa Porter Lawrence and Deborah MacKenzie Lawrence and her husband Peter TenEyck Clinton and a niece, Comfort MacKenzie Clinton.

A Celebration of Life was held at Christ Church Shrewsbury Episcopal on Saturday, June 6, 2015 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be sent in Mark’s memory to www.Reef.org to support Mark’s immense passion for reef conservation and underwater life. Please visit Mark’s memorial website at www.johnedayfuneralhome.com.

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Obit Goodman 6-10-15Ruth Goodman

Ruth Goodman, 87, of Princeton passed away Thursday June 4, 2015 at Merwick Care and Rehabilitation Center, Plainsboro following a long illness. Born in Antwerp, Belgium, she had resided in Princeton since 1968. She was a self-employed artist who worked for many years with Michael Graves.

Daughter of the late Harry and Louise Sandhouse; she is survived by her husband, Lionel Goodman, a son and daughter-in-law, Steve and Sandy Goodman of Montclair, New Jersey, a daughter and son-in-law, Debbie and Jack Harnatkiewicz of Swansboro, North Carolina, and five grandchildren, Justin, Jessica and Joey Harnatkiewicz, Sarah and Sydney Goodman.

Friends were asked to call on Tuesday June 9, 2015 from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington. The interment will be private. Condolences are welcome at www.wilsonapple.com.

Contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association (www.alz.org).

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Obit Brown 6-10-15Elizabeth Brown

Noted fashion historian, Elizabeth Logan Schmeck Brown died on May 19, 2015 at her home in Skillman, New Jersey with family at her side.

Known to her friends as Rikki, Elizabeth was born on September 7, 1918 in Ancon Canal Zone, Panama, the daughter of Henry Penuel Schmeck and Pansy Blossom Logan. Henry was a civil engineer, employed by the Panama Canal Company during the construction of the canal; Pansy was a proper Kentucky belle.

Her family lived in California and Oklahoma, then settled in Texas, where she attended the University of Texas at Austin. Elizabeth transferred to Cornell University in Ithaca New York, which became one of the most significant moves of her lifetime. She loved Cornell, and there began a life-long fascination and love affair with fashion and fashion history. She developed that interest more deeply, spending a year in New York City working at Lord & Taylor and attending the Art Student’s League. Upon returning to Cornell, she received her Bachelors’ Degree in 1940 and her Masters’ Degree in 1945. She taught textiles and clothing and curated the university’s extensive costume collection. It was at Cornell that she met her husband Walter D. Brown, who was teaching Naval students in the V-12 program during World War II. They married at Cornell’s Sage Chapel and were together for 62 years, until Walter died in 2006.

Her passion for costumes and all things related, especially sewing machines and patterns, began to manifest itself at this time and continued throughout her life. After Cornell, Elizabeth and her husband lived in the Solomon Islands, Maryland, then Pittsburgh. They raised four boys, born between 1946 and 1953. The family lived in Chicago, Philadelphia, and finally settled near Princeton, New Jersey in the 1960’s.

Elizabeth was a teacher at heart, and dedicated her life to enriching the lives of her family and community. Her vast knowledge of fashion and textiles was indispensable not only to her own professional development but also to the many institutions that she contributed to and advised. Never content to be a bystander, she was an active participant in many professional organizations, especially the Costume Society of America (CSA), of which she was a founding member. She was named a Fellow of the Costume Society in 1992. She served on the CSA Board of Directors and as the Parliamentarian for many years.

She worked in the fashion industry for McCalls, Butterick, and Uno. She lectured, appraised, and amassed a huge collection of costumes, sewing machines, and all manner of related objects. In her collecting, she had a loving co-conspirator in her late husband Walt; and her sons David, Ned, Ken, and Walt Jr. indulged her interests and supported them. Ultimately, she amassed a renowned clothing collection which is now housed at several institutions, including The Elizabeth Schmeck Brown Gallery at Cornell University, the Smithsonian Institution, Houston Community College, the Fashion Institute of Technology, The Museum of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the University of Rhode Island, and numerous others. Her sewing machine collection grew to the hundreds and was featured by the International Sewing Machine Collectors Association, of which she was a proud member.

She was an inspiration to so many in her field and reveled in meeting new members and continuing to learn from everyone she met. She also belonged to a panoply of organizations that supported women in colleges, Cornell alumni, and the value of family education in schools.

She was an active member of many organizations including the American Association of University Women, Princeton United Methodist Church, New Jersey Association Family and Consumer Sciences, American Association Family and Consumer Sciences, Van Harlingen Historical Society, Historical Society of Princeton, International Textile and Apparel Association, Daughters of the American Revolution, New Jersey Association of Museums, International Sewing Machine Collectors Society, Costume and Textile Group of New Jersey, American Association of State and Local History, Cornell Alumni Association, Cornell Women’s Club, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Omicron Nu, and Alpha Lambda Delta. She served as chair of the Somerset County School Boards Association and president of the Montgomery Township Board of Education.

She is survived by David H. Brown and Wendy L. Brown, and their son David M. Brown and his wife, Heather P. Brown; Walter D. Brown, Jr.; Ned L. Brown and Karen Murphy; and Kenneth M. Brown and Rebecca G. Brown, and their children, Johanna, Peter, and Sarah.

Memorial contributions in Elizabeth’s name may be made to the Costume Society of America Endowment, P.O. Box 1723, Mendocino, CA 95460-1723.

A private ceremony will be held in Princeton Cemetery.

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Obit Balmer 6-10-15Patricia Klensch-Balmer

Long-time Princeton resident Patricia Klensch-Balmer died on April 27, 2015 at the age of 89 after a long illness. Pat was born March 6, 1926 in Little Rock, Arkansas, the eldest of 5 children to Frederick Balmer and Gertrude (Banister) Balmer.

Her father, a Swiss born restaurateur who operated restaurants in Switzerland, Arkansas, and Illinois was a talented musician known for playing every instrument in the band. He inspired Pat’s life-long appreciation of music while her mother — a one-room school teacher in the rural south — instilled her with a love of learning. From 1931 to 1935 Pat and her family lived in Switzerland, before moving back to Arkansas and eventually settling in Chicago in 1942. After graduating from Wright Junior College with a degree in English, Pat worked for a time as a reporter at a local newspaper.

In July 1953, Pat married Richard Klensch at Saint Paul’s Church in Princeton. While married, Pat worked at the Institute for Advanced Study where she became acquainted with Albert Einstein and was proud to have typed some of his papers. Following her divorce in the late 1960’s, Pat worked for Mathmatica, a notable think-tank of the time located in Princeton Junction. In the mid-1980s Pat went on to work for the Carnegie Institute for the Advancement of Teaching as an assistant librarian.

On a personal level, Pat collected books and was equally passionate about music, learning to play the cello and attending performances of the New York Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Tanglewood regularly. She was famous for her baking skills, especially her fudge, which inspired tears of appreciation at first taste.

Throughout her life Pat embraced adventure, from learning to fly a Piper Club aircraft to exploring North America, Africa, and Switzerland. Julia Bernheim, Pat’s friend of over 40 years and travel companion on safari in Africa, said the two talked almost every day and just laughed together. Her youngest brother Guy, recalls “she imbued me with a sense of wonder and was more like a mother than a big sister,” exposing him to the arts and bringing the outside world of learning and history into their home.

Pat is survived by her brothers, James, Ronald, and Guy Balmer, along with her nephews Guy and Mark Balmer, and Sean Bolen. Memorial Mass will be held in her honor on June 13, 2015 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Paul’s Church in Princeton, New Jersey followed by a reception.

June 3, 2015

Obit Nash 6-3-15John Nash Jr.

John Nash Jr, a legendary fixture of Princeton University’s department of mathematics renowned for his breakthrough work in mathematics and game theory as well as for his struggle with mental illness, died with his wife, Alicia, in an automobile accident May 23, 2015 in Monroe Township, New Jersey. He was 86, she was 82.

Born in Bluefield, West Virginia, in 1928, Nash received his doctorate in mathematics from Princeton in 1950 and his graduate and bachelor’s degrees from Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) in 1948.

During the nearly 70 years that Nash was associated with the University, he was an ingenious doctoral student; a specter in Princeton’s Fine Hall whose brilliant academic career had been curtailed by his struggle with schizophrenia; then, finally, a quiet, courteous elder statesman of mathematics who still came to work every day and in the past 20 years had begun receiving the recognition many felt he long deserved. He had held the position of senior research mathematician at Princeton since 1995.

Nash was a private person who also had a strikingly public profile, especially for a mathematician. His life was dramatized in the 2001 film A Beautiful Mind in which he and Alicia Nash were portrayed by actors Russell Crowe and Jennifer Connelly. The film centered on his influential work in game theory, which was the subject of his 1950 Princeton doctoral thesis and the work for which he received the 1994 Nobel Prize in economics.

At the time of their deaths, the Nashes were returning home from Oslo, Norway, where John had received the 2015 Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, one of the most prestigious honors in mathematics. The prize recognized his seminal work in partial differential equations, which are used to describe the basic laws of scientific phenomena. For his fellow mathematicians, the Abel Prize was a long-overdue acknowledgment of his contributions to mathematics.

For Nash to receive his field’s highest honor only days before his death marked a final turn of the cycle of astounding achievement and jarring tragedy that seemed to characterize his life. “It was a tragic end to a very tragic life. Tragic, but at the same time a meaningful life,” said Sergiu Klainerman, Princeton’s Eugene Higgins Professor of Mathematics, who was close to John and Alicia Nash, and whose own work focuses on partial differential equation analysis.

Although Nash did not teach or formally take on students, his continuous presence in the department over the past several decades, coupled with the almost epic triumphs and trials of his life, earned him respect and admiration, said David Gabai, Princeton Hughes-Rogers Professor of Mathematics and department chair.

Since winning the Nobel Prize, Nash had entered a long period of renewed activity and confidence — which coincided with Nash’s greater control of his mental state — that allowed him to again put his creativity to work, Klainerman said. He met Nash upon joining the Princeton faculty in 1987, but his doctoral thesis had made use of a revolutionary method introduced by Nash in connection to the Nash embedding theorems, which the Norwegian Academy described as “among the most original results in geometric analysis of the twentieth century.”

Despite their divorce, Alicia, who was born in El Salvador in 1933, endured the peaks and troughs of Nash’s life alongside him, Klainerman said. Their deaths at the same time after such a long life together of highs and lows seemed literary in its tragedy and romance.

“They were a wonderful couple,” Klainerman said. “You could see that she cared very much about him, and she was protective of him. You could see that she cared a lot about his image and the way he felt. I felt it was very moving.”

Nash is survived by his sister, Martha Nash Legg, and sons John David Stier and John Charles Martin Nash. He had his younger son, John Nash, with Alicia shortly after their marriage in 1957, which ended in divorce in 1963. They remarried in 2001.

Readers are welcome to view or share comments on a memoriam page created by Princeton University at http://johnnash.princeton.edu.

A memorial service will be planned at the University in the fall.

Editor’s Note: From a story published on Princeton University’s website and written by Morgan Kelly

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Obit Isaac 6-3-15Henry Otto Isaac

Henry Otto Isaac died peacefully, surrounded by his family on May 30, 2015.

Born in Cologne, Germany in 1922, his father managed a family manufacturing industry and his mother Alice was a concert pianist. Henry left the country at 15, first for England and then the United States at the onset of the Second World War. He joined the U.S. Army and saw service from the landing at Normandy until he was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge. He returned to New York and graduated from City College of New York and did graduate studies in economics at New York University.

He met and married Rhoda Kassof, an artist, art educator, and later analytical psychologist; and raised two sons, Jan Luss and Jeffrey Isaac. They moved to Switzerland for many years where Henry worked as the head of the English translation department at the Union Bank of Switzerland. After retirement, he and Rhoda settled in Princeton near family. They were long-time residents at Stonebridge.

An avid student of history and lover of good humor and travel, especially in Italy, Henry was a devoted husband, loving father and grandfather, and dear friend to many who will remember his sweet and generous nature.

He is survived by his wife Rhoda, son Jeffrey, daughter-in-law Sophie, grandson Elias, cousin Eva, brother-in-law Allen and several nephews and nieces.

A memorial service will be announced.

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Obit Coffin 6-3-15Nancy Nesbit Coffin

Nancy Nesbit Coffin, Mrs. David R. Coffin, formerly of Princeton, New Jersey, passed away peacefully May 9, 2015 on Nantucket Island. Born April 25, 1925 in Montgomery, Alabama, Nancy attended various schools as she moved with her mother and stepfather following construction jobs during the Depression. She graduated high school in upstate New York, attended one year at Syracuse University, before taking a job during the war years as a clerk with the Army at Fort Drum. There she met a young soldier, recently graduated from Princeton University, who would continue to write her letters from his time serving abroad with the U.S. Army Air Corps.

Nancy was married at the Princeton Chapel in June of 1947, honeymooned on Nantucket, and settled down in Princeton as a faculty wife. She first set up house in graduate housing in the Butler Project, later moving to Guyot Avenue, then finally to McCosh Circle in 1960. Her first job after raising four children was with the Princeton Red Cross. She then worked as a secretary at the Institute for Advanced Study and, finally, registrar and secretary for the Robert Taylor Rare Books Collection at Firestone Library.

Nancy enjoyed travelling with her husband, needlework, oil painting, good conversation, Victorian Literature, and all things English. She is predeceased by her husband, David; and her daughter, Lois C. Jenny. She will be greatly missed by her surviving children; Elizabeth Coffin Allerhand, D. Tristram Coffin, and Peter Gerald Coffin; her sons- and daughter-in-law: Hershel Allerhand, Peter Jenny, and Julie Noonan Coffin; her grandchildren Victoria J., and John Baboval, Peter David Jenny, Rebecca Jenny, D. W. Coffin, Jethro Coffin Allerhand, Rebekah N. Coffin, Joshua C. Coffin, Emma S. Coffin; and her great-grandson, Arthur Baboval.

Funeral services will be held graveside, later this summer on Nantucket, at Prospect Hill Cemetery.

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Obit Johnson 6-3-15Margaret Kennard Johnson

Margaret (Maggi) Kennard Johnson, artist, lived a vibrant life into her 97th year. She was still creating artworks, exhibiting, giving talks, and participating in three art groups: Princeton Artists Alliance, MOVIS, and Roots, the first two of which she was a founding member. Always bubbling with enthusiasm, she loved friends, family, and life.

Her art is in museum collections in the U.S.A., Japan, and Europe, including The British Museum in London, the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and the Tochigi Museum in Japan. She co-authored the book, Japanese Prints Today: Tradition with Innovation. She also wrote articles for Printnews, Journal of the Print World, and in Japan, Hangwa Geijutsu (International Quarterly on Prints).

She received a BFA from Pratt Institute and a Master of Design from the University of Michigan, then studied with Josef Albers, at the Summer Art Institute at Black Mountain College.

For 23 years, she taught at the Museum of Modern Art, for Victor D’Amico, one of the top art educators in the country. For three years, she taught at Pratt Institute, for Alexander Kostellow, who was legendary in the field of industrial design.

Johnson was greatly inspired by her mother, who taught art at the College of Wooster. Her father was a scientist in agricultural research. Thanks to her older brother whom she greatly admired, she developed a deep love of science. While he was in college majoring in physics, she, a senior in high school, was studying physics. As the only girl in the class, she was determined to beat the boys. Studying hard, she placed in the state competition in physics. Having also gone to the state competition in mathematics, she had considered a career in physics.

She was married to the late Edward O. Johnson, electronics engineer at RCA and Corning Glass. They were close companions on the many adventures they had together, including a year in Zurich and eight and a half years in Tokyo.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, June 13, 2015, at 2 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, N.J. Parking is limited. Carpooling is recommended.

Memorial contributions may be made to Arts Council of Princeton, (609) 924-8777, www.artscouncilofprinceton.org and Princeton Public Library, www.princetonlibrary.org.

Memorial Announcement:

Mark MacKenzie Lawrence

Mark MacKenzie Lawrence, 59, passed away on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at his home in Holmdel, New Jersey. A Celebration of Life will be held at Christ Church Shrewsbury Episcopal on Saturday, June 6, 2015 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be sent in Mark’s memory to www.Reef.org to support Mark’s immense passion for reef conservation and underwater life. Please visit Mark’s memorial website available at www.johnedayfuneralhome.com.

May 27, 2015

Leslie Spruill Jr.

Leslie Spruill Jr., 83, a long-time resident of Columbia, North Carolina and Princeton, New Jersey departed this life on May 17, 2015.

Leslie was raised in Alligator, North Carolina where he had fun with his sister, cousins, and friends, and developed a mean sweet tooth. But nothing made him happier than when his mother surprised him with a car out of the blue when he was just 15 years old. He loved his independence. By then he was already working … hard. Years later, after getting married and having children, Leslie moved his family to New Jersey for a better employment opportunity.

He went on to become a dedicated Public Works serviceman in Princeton, New Jersey. He retired from that post after 25 years of service during work hours, nights, and weekends, whenever duty called.

If you knew Leslie, you know he enjoyed a good western, a nice liver dinner, and he had a great, big laugh. Leslie was known to work hard and play hard, and near the end he was happy to be with his children, grandchildren. and great grandchildren.

Leslie was predeceased by his mother Mollie “Lucille” Spruill; his father, Leslie “Junior” Spruill; his wife Virgil Lee Spruill; and is survived by his sister Lula; his aunt Lue; his son Larry Allen Spruill (Fern); his daughter Dale Spruill Redding (Leon); four grandchildren; five great grandchildren; and several beloved in-laws, stepchildren, cousins, nieces, nephews, and close friends.

He will be greatly missed.

A service was held Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 11 a.m. at St. John Baptist Church in Columbia, North Carolina.

Arrangements are by Kimble Funeral Home (TheKimbleFuneralHome.com) in Princeton, and Rowsom Funeral Home in Columbia, North Carolina.

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Leonard Punia

Leonard P. Punia, 88, passed away at his home on May 18, 2015. Born and raised in Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn, New York, Leonard married Renee Denmark in 1950 and moved to Trenton, New Jersey in 1953.

Leonard served in the Army during World War II. After returning from the war, Leonard oversaw the construction of several developments of single-family homes, apartment buildings, and shopping centers in Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and Long Island. In 1950, he started building single-family homes in Mercer County. Thereafter, Leonard together with his brother Herbert, built numerous residential and commercial properties throughout the tri-state area. Leonard was a licensed real estate broker in New Jersey and New York. He was involved in many professional organizations and received several awards for his work in real estate. Leonard was especially proud of his involvement with the Sunnybrae Little League, which was created on land carved out of one of his developments.

During his lifetime, Leonard generously donated to many charities including Greenwood House, The American Cancer Society, The Jewish Federation, The Israel Tennis Centers, Israel Bonds, and other worthwhile charities. Upon the death of his wife Renee, Leonard made several significant donations to the Princeton HealthCare System Foundation, The Hun School of Princeton, Abrahamson Family Cancer Center at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Mass General Hospital (MGH) Fund in his wife’s memory. In addition, Leonard donated to the Greenwood House Hospice which was renamed the Renee Denmark Punia Community Hospice.

Leonard was predeceased by his wife Renee. He is survived by his daughter Leslie Punia Schwebel and son and daughter-in-law Joseph and Sheryl Punia; grandchildren Elyse and Andrew Rosenfield, Charles Punia, Mathew and Dale Schwebel, Michael Schwebel and Mallory Schwebel; brothers Herbert Punia and Jerome Punia; and many nieces and nephews.

Funeral services took  place on Wednesday, May 20 at 11 a.m. at The Jewish Center, located at 435 Nassau Street in Princeton. Burial followed at Floral Park Cemetery in Deans, New Jersey.

The period of mourning was observed Wednesday and Thursday at the Punia Residence, located at 170 Gallup Road in Princeton.

The family requests that in lieu of flowers or fruit baskets memorial contributions be made to Greenwood House.

Funeral arrangements were under the care of Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road in Ewing.

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Obit Rashada 5-27-15Mahasin Rashada

Mahasin Rashada (formerly Patricia Ann White-Flenoid) died suddenly on October 27, 2014. She was born on June 26, 1951 to the late Olivia Magnum-White and Elisha White Sr. She was preceded in death by her sister Beverly Ann White.

Mahasin was born and raised in Princeton where she graduated from Princeton High School. She then moved to California and married Harlen Flenoid Sr.

She loved live concerts and plays, sewing, vintage stores, and flea markets. Upon being hired by United Airlines, she realized that her dream of travel would become a reality. Her children were now adults and off she went! She visited many parts of the world. Later in life, her struggle with multiple sclerosis slowed her down. She maintained a wonderful attitude as she was determined to live life to the fullest. She joined the Senior Citizens Club which was just minutes from her apartment. She found fulfillment in assuming the duties of “Promotions Coordinator” and the members truly appreciated her skills and energy. She will be sorely missed in California and New Jersey.

Mahasin’s memory will be cherished by her children, sons Lance Sr. (Trekina), Harlen Jr. (Destiny), Muhammed (Kiera), and daughter Atiya of California. She is also survived by her sisters, Cynthia Fisher (Gilbert) of Princeton, New Jersey; Shirlene Wells of Morrisville, Pennsylvania; Gail O. Everett (Robin) of Princeton, New Jersey; and her brother Elisha White Jr. (Michelle) of Stockbridge, Georgia. She was the proud grandmother of 16 grandchildren. She also leaves to mourn uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and many cousins.

A memorial service was held on April 25, 2015 at 2 p.m. at The Arts Council of Princeton’s Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton.

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Obit Eldred 5-27-15Willard Gibbs Eldred

Willard Gibbs Eldred, 87, of South Brunswick died Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at home surrounded by his loving family.

Bill was born in Camden, raised in Clementon, and was a resident of South Brunswick for 57 years. He was a graduate of The Hill School in Pottstown, Pa. and a graduate of Cornell University and Cornell Law School. Bill was a U.S. Army Veteran. He retired after 38½ years as deputy general counsel with Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. He was a very active member of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in South Brunswick. Bill served on the South Brunswick Planning and Zoning Board. Bill was an Eagle Scout and leader of Troop 90. His father, Arthur Rose Eldred, was the first Eagle Scout of America.

Son of the late Arthur Rose and Mildred (Gibbs) Eldred; brother of the late Arthur Rose Eldred; grandfather of the late James Hitte; and father-in-law of the late Paul Hitte; he is survived by his wife Margaret (Saecker) Eldred; son and daughter-in-law Willard (Bill) and Kandice Eldred; three daughters and two sons-in-law, Nina Hitte, Susan, and Joseph Santangelo, Margaret (Margy) and Charles Malott; sister Patricia Hudson; 13 grandchildren Allyson, Robert, Jenifer, Mark, Kaitlynn, Kyle, Jordan, Spencer, Tyler, Kasey, Jack, Jacob, and Kaitlin; and many nieces and nephews.

The funeral was held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 23, 2015 at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, 142 Sand Hill Road, Monmouth Junction. Burial followed in Franklin Memorial Park, North Brunswick. Calling hours were held from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 22, 2015 at M.J. Murphy Funeral Home, 616 Ridge Road at New Road, Monmouth Junction.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Willard’s name to Fox Chase Cancer Center or Boy Scouts of America.

May 20, 2015

John Irwin Fischer

John Irwin Fischer, 74, eighteenth-century scholar specializing in the works of Jonathan Swift, died at home in Princeton on the morning of May 15, 2015. He suffered from a lung disease, which worsened throughout 2015.

Fischer held a BA from Ohio State and a PhD from the University of Florida. He was a Woodrow Wilson and an NDEA fellow. Upon receiving his doctorate, he accepted a position in the English Department at Louisiana State University (LSU). Later, he chaired that department and served as its graduate director. He won grants and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). He also served as consultant for NEH. He was author of On Swift’s Poetry and co-editor of Swift and His Contexts and Contemporary Studies of Swift’s Poetry. He was a regular contributor to the Munster Symposia on Jonathan Swift.

After remaining at LSU for his entire academic career, Fischer retired in 2001 and moved to Princeton. Here, he pursued his bibliographic work on Swift, editing the only as-yet-unpublished work that Swift wrote.

In Princeton, John Fischer was a member of Community Without Walls, House Five, for which he once served as president. Noted internationally for meticulous historical scholarship, John’s well-known wit fueled his generosity, allowing him to offer helpful insight
and humor in equal measure.

After a marriage of 40 years, he is survived by his wife Panthea Reid. Other survivors are his daughter Hannah Fischer, son-in-law Michael Pinck, step-son Reid Broughton, and step-grandson Reid Broughton Jr.

Memorial services will be held on June 14, 2015 at Princeton University Chapel and the Arts’ Council of Princeton.

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Kathryn Allshouse

Kathryn Guinn Allshouse, 80, left us on May 14, 2015. Born in Princeton, she resided in Princeton her entire life before moving to Hillsborough in 2004. A graduate of St. Paul’s School and Princeton High School, Kathryn retired from the Hun School of Princeton after more than 37 years of service. She was co-owner, along with her husband of the #55 stock car.

Kathryn was an avid reader, New York Yankee and Dallas Cowboy fan. Preceded in death by her parents, Raymond and Kathryn (Oehr) Guinn; husband Philip Allshouse; sister Dorothy Yingling; and sister-in-law, Rosa Guinn. She is survived by her loving children, Tim And Kim Allshouse, Marianne and Keith Spooner, Gretchen and Hans Sidler. Grandchildren, Elizabeth and Gunnar Sidler; brothers, Raymond Guinn and Robert (Anne) Guinn; brother-in-law, Stephen (Mimi) Allshouse; and sister-in-law, Joyce (Bill) Simonetti; along with many nieces, nephews, cousins, friends; and her loyal dog, Sadie.

A funeral service will be held at 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton. Friends may call on Thursday, from 6 p.m. until the time of the service at the Funeral Home.

Burial will be private. Memorial contributions may be made to Deborah Heart & Lung or St. Jude’s Children Foundation.

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Obit Cirullo 5-20-15Catherine Cirullo

Our Mother, Nana, and the matriarch of our family, Catherine “Katie” Lamantia Cirullo, 97, a resident of Princeton for 92 years, joined her husband, son, sisters, and parents in heaven on May 12, 2015. She passed away peacefully at Merwick Center.

Born on December 24, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York, Mom was predeceased by her beloved husband of 58 years, Anthony “Tony” Cirullo; her father, James Lamantia; her mother and step-father, Teresa and Frank Burratti; her son, Michael Anthony; her sisters, Rose Williams and Anna Boccanfuso; and her grandson, Baby Michael Cirullo. She is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Frances and Henry Jones of Lawrenceville, New Jersey; and her son and daughter-in-law, Anthony and Donna Cirullo of Wellington, Florida.

She was the very proud “Nana” of John Vincent Cirullo, Teresa (Thomas) O’Leary, Catherine (Benjamin) Fruscione, Wendy (Mike) Gunderman, Rick (Jen) Jones, Karen (Paul) Truban, Mark (Jennifer) Jones, Rebecca Jones, and her husband Ray Pyontek, Stephen Cirullo, and Breanne Cirullo.

Nana was proud to be the great grandmother of her 14 great grandchildren Peyton, Alex, Kathryn, Charlotte, Caroline, Cate, Aidan, Thomas, Liz, Caitlin, Nate, Samantha, Michaela, and John Robert. Mom is also survived by many nieces, nephews, cousins, friends, neighbors, and her dear friend, Christine Casati.

Totally independent until her recent illness, Mom was a resilient, energetic woman with a strong work ethic whose youthful appearance belied her age. She was employed in retail sales for many years before retiring from Carter Wallace in 1987. She was a devoted and compassionate caregiver to many family members. She was happiest when surrounded by her family and when she was preparing meals and baking “Nana” cookies, a family favorite. Mom loved tending her gardens and sitting on her porch visiting with neighbors and friends.

She was a longtime member of St. Paul’s Catholic Church and a former Catholic Daughter.

Visitation was held on Monday, May 18, 2015 from 6 to 8 p.m. at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue in Princeton and Tuesday, May 19, 2015 from 9 to 10 a.m. at St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Church, 214 Nassau Street in Princeton. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 10 a.m. on Tuesday at St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Church. Burial followed in St. Paul’s Cemetery.

Everyone who knew Mom knew how much she loved flowers. However, they also knew how strongly she felt about helping others. If you wish, memorial contributions may be made to Senior Care Ministry of Princeton, P.O. Box 1517, Princeton, N.J. 08542-1517, whose friendship and service she valued, or St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 08542, where she was a faithful parishioner for 92 years.

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Obit Fasanella 5-20-15Anthony Edward Fasanella

Anthony Edward Fasanella, age 94, a longtime resident of Cincinnati, passed away peacefully on May 10, 2015. He was born in Philadelphia, Pa. on March 8, 1921 and was the youngest son of Sebastian and Alfonsa Fasanella of Princeton. When World War II broke out his patriotism compelled him to leave Princeton University, where he had spent two-years studying electrical engineering, to enlist in the U.S. Coast Guard. He served on active duty for the duration of World War II. While serving on the USS LST #16 (a Navy landing ship designed to carry troops, vehicles, and supplies), he participated in five invasions including the invasion of Normandy on D-Day. After the European operations were completed he served in the Pacific until the end of the war.

After the war, he worked as a stone mason for large commercial contractors in the construction of major buildings all over the East Coast from New Jersey to Florida. He left his mark in stone at beautiful Wake Forest University, Duke University, University of Dayton, Princeton University, and Indiana University. In addition, Anthony used his acquired masonry talents locally in Cincinnati to help build Oak Hills High School and McAuley High School (where his daughter Melissa graduated). Later in life, he obtained a teaching certificate from the University of Cincinnati and taught vocational high school masonry courses at Scarlet Oaks until the program was closed. Anthony spent the remainder of his masonry career (until age 85) as the bricklayer on staff serving the Williamsburg of Cincinnati apartment complex and contracting private job requests.

Anthony was predeceased by his devoted wife, LaVerne Fasanella of Cincinnati, who passed away in late
February of 2015; by his ex-wife, Dolores Church Fasanella; his parents; his brothers, Anthony Sebastian, Carmen, Joe, and Victor Fasanella; his sister, Helen Fasanella of Princeton; and by his great grandson Benjamin Vidlak. He is survived by his 5 sons, Dr. Edwin Fasanella (Poquoson, Va.); Retired Col. Glenn Fasanella (Tacoma, Wash.); Mark and Michael Fasanella (Cincinnati, Ohio); Todd Fasanella (New York, N.Y.); and by his daughter, Melissa Fasanella (Wilmington, Ohio). In addition, he is survived by eight grandchildren Annette Vidlak (Williamsburg, Va.); Carolyn Moskowitz (McLean, Va.); Kenneth Fasanella, MD, (Pittsburgh, Pa.); Raymond Fasanella (Wash.); Angela Garcia (Va.); Sabrina Fasanella (N.Y.); Flora and Hayden Franek (Ohio); and by 10 great-grandchildren.

A visitation was held at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, located at 7345 Hamilton Avenue, Mt. Healthy on Monday, May 18th from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., with a Blessing Service at 2 p.m. at the funeral home. A military honors service immediately followed at Arlington Memorial Gardens, located at 2145 Compton Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45231.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations be made to the AMVETS (American Veterans) or Puppies Behind Bars, in memory of Anthony Fasanella, an honorable military World War II veteran and dedicated educator and pet lover. Condolences may be sent online to www.paulyoungfuneralhome.com.

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Obit Wright 5-20-15Vernon Gerald Wright

Vernon Gerald Wright, a resident of Princeton, New Jersey since 1972, died peacefully at home surrounded by family on May 3, 2015, at the age of 90.

Wright, who was born in Port Neches, Texas, lived in Beaumont, Texas; Port Credit (now Mississauga), Canada; and Winchester and Lincoln, Massachusetts before moving to Princeton.

He was a graduate and registered civil engineer, educated at Rice University and the University of Texas. He later completed the Advanced Management Program of the Harvard Business School.

He served as a Civil Engineer Corps officer attached to a Seabee Combat Pontoon Battalion in the South Pacific during World War II hostilities, and then
participated in the first postwar atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll. He was awarded the Navy Commendation Award for his contribution to those tests.

His professional career was spent in the engineering and construction industry. He was employed for many years by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation, Boston, where he ended as a vice president responsible for projects. After a short vice presidency with Research Cottrell in Bound Brook, New Jersey, he joined Catalytic, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and retired as its president in 1986. From 1984 until his retirement, he was also president of Stearns-Roger, Inc. of Denver, Colorado. He assumed a prominent international role in the engineering and construction business, serving as chairman of the National Constructors Association in 1979. Subsequent to his formal retirement, he acted as a consultant for several major companies related to the engineering and construction industry.

Wright was a trustee of the Williamson School, Media, Pennsylvania, for over 30 years, and served on the Construction Advisory Board of Princeton Township and on the Board of Trustees of the Friends of the Princeton Public Library. He was a member of the Harvard Club of Boston, Union League of Philadelphia, the Nassau Club, Springdale Golf Club and the Old Guard of Princeton. He was also a member of Nassau Presbyterian Church and a 32nd degree Mason.

Wright was born on July 5, 1924, the son of Edward Vernon Wright and Vergie Payton Wright. He was married in Houston, Texas on December 23, 1946, to the former Huberta Read Nunn, who predeceased him in 2007, after a happy marriage of more than 60 years. He is survived by their three children, Robert Payton Wright and his wife Sallie, of Houston, Texas; David Cummings Wright, of Concord, Massachusetts; and Sally Ann Wright, of Princeton, New Jersey; two grandchildren, Payton Cullen Wright and his wife, Ashley; and Elizabeth Risher Wright Rappaport and her husband, David; a great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Peterson Wright, all of Houston, Texas; and his brother, Harry Payton Wright, of Port Neches, Texas.

A memorial service will be held on June 20, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church.

Contributions in lieu of flowers may be sent to the Williamson School, 106 South New Middletown Road, Media, Pennsylvania 19063, Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542, Friends of the Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542, or to a charity of choice.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Obit Avery 5-20-15John Edwin Avery Jr.

John Edwin Avery Jr., of Palm Beach, Florida, and formerly of Princeton, died on March 15, 2015, in West Palm Beach. He was 86. Born and raised in Connecticut, he was the son of John E. Avery Sr. and Vera Gallagher Avery. After serving in the Army, he earned his bachelor’s degree at Yale University in 1952. He married Antonia Ariani and they raised four children during 32 years of marriage. In 1984 he married Caron Girard Cox, who predeceased him in 2012.

A resident of Princeton for over 30 years, Mr. Avery will be remembered by his family and many friends for his love of life, integrity, and unfailing generosity.

He spent his career in international business. In São Paolo, Brazil, he was employed with J.T. Baker Chemical Company. He joined Johnson & Johnson (J&J) in 1962 as CEO of the J&J subsidiary in Manila, Philippines. While there he expanded the company’s global footprint by opening new Southeast Asian markets. As a senior executive with J&J, he rose to Company Group Chairman of all operations in Latin America and the Caribbean. He also acted as a special international
advisor to the chairman.

Upon retiring from J&J, Mr. Avery served as chairman of the Americas Society/Council of the Americas in New York City from 1993-96. Both organizations were instrumental in promoting the North American Free Trade Agreement during his leadership. He also served on the board of several biotechnology companies.

He is survived by his four children John E. Avery III, Alicia M. Avery, Paul B. Avery, and Andrea Avery Renault; as well as his step-daughter Jenner Girard Beck; he had four grandchildren; he is also survived by his brother George A. Avery and sister Patricia A. Avery.

A memorial for Mr. Avery will take place at noon on Sunday, June 14, at the Madison Beach Club in Madison, Connecticut.

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Rose Johnson

Rose O. Johnson (Mrs. Edgar J. Johnson), 100 years old, died peacefully at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro, on April 16, 2015. A lifetime resident of Princeton, she was the daughter of Agnes and Andrew Kurkjian.

Rose was devoted to her family and her passion was the game of golf. She had been a member of Springdale Golf Club since the 1960’s, and had been the Springdale Ladies Champion on several occasions. She was also an active member of the Princeton community, and had been a volunteer at the Princeton hospital and at the annual Princeton Hospital Fete until 2007. Rose was also a member of the Present Day Club and currently a member of The Princeton Historical Society and the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Rose was the wife of the late Humphrey S. O’Brien of Princeton, and also the late Edgar J. Johnson, of Waltham, Mass.

She is survived by her daughter, Dianne O’Brien Unangst, and her partner Dr. John F. Piro, Maryland, of Norwalk, Connecticut; her two grandsons, Mark Unangst, and his partner Ms. Kerry Gorrasi, of Weston, Connecticut and H. Blake Unangst, and his wife Marion, of Redding, Connecticut; her four great-grandchildren, Jaclynn Unangst, Ryan Unangst, Max Unangst, and Sam Unangst; her sister Araxy Foster (Mrs. Walter B. Foster) of Princeton; and several nieces and nephews.

A private memorial service and celebration of her life will be held in June, and will be under the direction of Kimble Funeral Home in Princeton. Interment will be at the Princeton Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions or donations may be made to The Princeton Historical Society.

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John Ashby Valentine Jr.

John Ashby Valentine Jr., age 96, died Friday, May 15, 2015 at Croasdaile Village in Durham, North Carolina. He was born on July 26, 1918 to Mollie and John Valentine. John was preceded in death by his loving wife Nellie Lauth Valentine, and his sister, Elizabeth Valentine Day. He is survived by his son John Valentine and Ann Bushyhead, of Hillsborough, North Carolina; daughter Susan Valentine of Durham, North Carolina; son Timothy Valentine and Dena Knight Valentine of Santa Fe, New Mexico; daughter Megan Valentine and Ivy Hoffman of Pittsboro, North Carolina; and three grandchildren, Charlie Annich, Charlotte Valentine and Dan Gearin, and Georgia Valentine.

Born in Staten Island, New York, John attended Curtis High School, graduated from Princeton University with high honors, Phi Beta Kappa, received a Master’s degree and then a PhD in Social Psychology from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He was a professor of psychology and Chairman of the Psychology and Education Department at Middlebury College; he worked at Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) where he was instrumental in establishing academic committees and served as executive secretary in the groundbreaking Commission on Non-traditional Study. He spent a year, with his family, in England while he consulted with the University of London on multiple choice examinations. He wrote a book, The College Board and the School Curriculum. John was a Lt. Colonel in the United States Air Force and an Air Force reservist. He retired from the College Board in 1987. He and Nellie moved from Princeton, New Jersey to Durham, North Carolina in 1999.

In Princeton, John was an active member and Elder of Trinity Church and All Saints Church; a teacher at the Princeton Adult School; a member and president of the Old Guard of Princeton; a volunteer member and president of the Soup Kitchen in Trenton; and an active member of the Princeton University Class of 1940. He and Nellie enjoyed his membership at the Princeton Club in New York and the Nassau Club in Princeton.

In his later years, in Durham, North Carolina, John was an active member of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church and at Croasdaile Village. An avid banjo player, John continued to play his banjo into his 90s and was even a member of a musical group called “Three Peas in a Pod” that performed at Croasdaile. John loved to sing, had a beautiful voice, and an uncanny memory for the words to songs. He was a happy and loving man, a good father, and a devoted grandfather.

A family service was held on May 16. Donations can be made to a charity of your choice.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.howertonbryan.com.

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Leonard Punia

Leonard P. Punia, 88, passed away at his home on May 18, 2015. Born and raised in Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn, New York, Leonard married Renee Denmark in 1950 and moved to Trenton, New Jersey in 1953.

Leonard served in the Army during World War II. After returning from the war, Leonard oversaw the construction of several developments of single-family homes, apartment buildings, and shopping centers in Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and Long Island. In 1950, he started building single-family homes in Mercer County. Thereafter, Leonard together with his brother Herbert, built numerous residential and commercial properties throughout the tri-state area. Leonard was a licensed real estate broker in New Jersey and New York. He was involved in many professional organizations and received several awards for his work in real estate. Leonard was especially proud of his involvement with the Sunnybrae Little League, which was created on land carved out of one of his developments.

During his lifetime, Leonard generously donated to many charities including Greenwood House, The American Cancer Society, The Jewish Federation, The Israel Tennis Centers, Israel Bonds, and other worthwhile charities. Upon the death of his wife Renee, Leonard made several significant donations to the Princeton HealthCare System Foundation, The Hun School of Princeton, Abrahamson Family Cancer Center at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Mass General Hospital (MGH) Fund in his wife’s memory. In addition, Leonard donated to the Greenwood House Hospice which was renamed the Renee Denmark Punia Community Hospice.

Leonard was predeceased by his wife Renee. He is survived by his daughter Leslie Punia Schwebel and son and daughter-in-law Joseph and Sheryl Punia; grandchildren Elyse and Andrew Rosenfield, Charles Punia, Mathew and Dale Schwebel, Michael Schwebel and Mallory Schwebel; brothers Herbert Punia and Jerome Punia; and many nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will take place on Wednesday, May 20 at 11 a.m. at The Jewish Center, located at 435 Nassau Street in Princeton. Burial will follow at Floral Park Cemetery in Deans, New Jersey.

The period of mourning will be observed Wednesday

and Thursday at the Punia Residence, located at 170 Gallup Road in Princeton.

The family requests in lieu of flowers or fruit baskets that memorial contributions should be made to Greenwood House.

Funeral arrangements are under the care of Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road in Ewing.

May 13, 2015

Obit Fasanella 5-20-15Anthony Edward Fasanella

Anthony Edward Fasanella, age 94, a longtime resident of Cincinnati, passed away peacefully on May 10, 2015. He was born in Philadelphia, PA on March 8, 1921 and was the youngest son of Sebastian and Alfonsa Fasanella of Princeton, NJ. When WWII broke out his patriotism compelled him to leave Princeton University, where he had spent two-years studying Electrical Engineering, to enlist in the U.S. Coast Guard. He served on active duty for the duration of World War II. While serving on the USS LST #16 (a Navy landing ship designed to carry troops, vehicles, and supplies), he participated in five invasions including the invasion of Normandy on D-Day. After the European operations were completed he served in the Pacific until the end of the war.

After WWII, he worked as a stone mason for large commercial contractors in the construction of major buildings all over the East Coast from New Jersey to Florida. He left his mark in stone at beautiful Wake Forrest University, Duke University, University of Dayton, Princeton University and Indiana University. In addition, Anthony used his acquired masonry talents locally in Cincinnati to help build Oak Hills High School and McAuley High School (where his daughter Melissa graduated). Later in life, he obtained a teaching certificate from the University of Cincinnati and taught vocational high school masonry courses at Scarlet Oaks until the program was closed. Anthony spent the remainder of his masonry career (until age 85) as the bricklayer on staff serving the Williamsburg of Cincinnati apartment complex and contracting private job requests.

Anthony was predeceased by his devoted wife, LaVerne Fasanella of Cincinnati, who passed away in late February of 2015; by his ex-wife, Dolores Church Fasanella; his parents; his brothers, Anthony Sebastian, Carmen, Joe, and Victor Fasanella; his sister, Helen Fasanella of Princeton, NJ; and by his great grandson Benjamin Vidlak. He is survived by his 5 sons, Dr. Edwin Fasanella (Poquoson, VA), Retired Col. Glenn Fasanella (Tacoma, WA), Mark and Michael Fasanella (Cincinnati, OH), Todd Fasanella (New York, NY); and by his daughter, Melissa Fasanella (Wilmington, OH). In addition, he is survived by eight grandchildren, Annette Vidlak (Williamsburg, VA), Carolyn Moskowitz (McLean, VA), Kenneth Fasanella, MD (Pittsburgh, PA), Raymond Fasanella (WA), Angela Garcia (VA), Sabrina Fasanella (NY) and Flora and Hayden Franek (OH); and by 10 great-grandchildren.

A visitation will be held at Paul R. Young Funeral Home, located at 7345 Hamilton Avenue, Mt. Healthy on Monday, May 18th from 12 PM to 2 PM, with a Blessing Service at 2 PM at the funeral home. A military honors service will immediately follow at Arlington Memorial Gardens, located at 2145 Compton Road, Cincinnati, OH 45231.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations be made to the AMVETS (American Veterans) or Puppies Behind Bars, in memory of Anthony Fasanella, an honorable military WWII veteran and dedicated educator and pet lover. Condolences may be sent online to www.paulyoungfuneralhome.com.

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Elizabeth D. Somers

Elizabeth D. Somers, 94, a longtime Princeton resident, died of natural causes on Sunday, May 10, 2015 at the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in Hamilton, New Jersey.

Born in New York City, Elizabeth came to Princeton in 1921 with her parents Giovanni and Raffelina (DeAngelis) DiMeglio, both born in Ischia, Italy.

Upon arrival here, her father began the Rialto Barber Shop on Witherspoon Street. From the age of five Elizabeth started helping her father in the barber shop. At the age of 12 she and her mother worked for the National Recovery Administration. Elizabeth graduated from Princeton High School and Rider College and was employed as a secretary by both Dr. John F. Sly at Princeton University and subsequently Dr. Paul Chesebro at The Hun School until she retired. After retirement, she went to work at her son’s law office on Harrison Street where she was well liked by all of the office clientele.

Elizabeth wed George B. Somers in 1948. Their son, George B. Somers, Jr. was born on Connecticut Avenue in Washington, D.C. while his father was attending law school. Years later, the family moved back to Princeton where George, Jr. opened his practice.

Mrs. Somers was predeceased by her parents, two sisters; Vincenza “Nancy” (DiMeglio) Guanieri and Mary (DiMeglio) Hodges; niece Susan DiMeglio; and two nephews John DiMeglio and Robert Guanieri. She is survived by her son, George B. Somers, Jr of Princeton; three grandchildren Melissa Somers of Lawrenceville, John Somers of Brooklyn, New York and Jeb Somers, at home; a brother, Antonio DiMeglio of Tucson, Arizona; five nieces; Sandi Guanieri, Debora DiMeglio, and Judy DiMeglio all of Tucson, Arizona; Lucia Hodges and Carol Hodges, both of Little Rock, Arkansas; and two nephews, Joseph DiMeglio of Tucson, Arizona and Raymond Hodges, of Little Rock, Arkansas.

A Memorial Mass will be celebrated on Friday, May 15, 2015 at 9:30 a.m. in St. Paul Catholic Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey followed by a committal service and interment in Princeton Cemetery.

Arrangements are entrusted to Kimble Funeral Home, Princeton, New Jersey. Extend condolences and remembrances at www.TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Margaret Considine

Long-time Princeton resident Margaret Mary Burlee Considine died peacefully on Saturday, May 9, 2015 following a three-month struggle with cancer. She was 94 years old.

Marge (as she was known to Princetonians) was born and raised on the historic Tree Hill Farm in Richmond, Virginia. After graduating from Trinity College in Washington, D.C. in 1941 with a degree in English, she enlisted in the Navy on July 31, 1942, the very first day that women were eligible for service. Following Officer Candidate School at Smith College, she worked in the Code Room at the Naval Operating Base in Norfolk, Virginia, where she was promoted to Lieutenant and supervising officer of the Code Room and Radio Room. Marge participated in the robust social life of the Base’s Officer’s Club, where she met her future husband Lt. Norbert Aloysius Considine. After VE Day, she worked in the same capacity at Terminal Island in Long Beach, California, where she and Norbert were engaged and later married in Richmond upon returning to civilian life on the East Coast.

After brief stints in both New York City and Philadelphia, Marge and Norb settled in Princeton in 1947. Their first home here was in the Stanworth apartments, where they made many enduring friendships that they passed on to their four children: Norbert, Brian, Kevin, and Mardi. Her husband, son Norbert, and daughter Mardi pre-deceased her.

In addition to caring for her family, Marge worked at a number of schools and non-profit organizations in Princeton, including Princeton Hospital and Princeton Country Day School; with her husband she was a co-founder of Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart where she worked in various capacities. Her longest and most passionate engagement was as a Docent at the Princeton University Art Museum, where she led tours and organized study trips for members from 1980 until recently.

A devotee of art, family, and friends, Marge upheld the intrepid spirit of her war years with extensive travel to Europe, Myanmar, South Africa, Istanbul, and the North Sea, and never shied away from a social engagement on the home front.

She is survived by her son Brian and his wife Pam, their two sons, Liam and Caleb; her son Kevin and his partner Sonny Dumas; her daughter-in-law Eileen; her son, William and step-son Peter; her step-daughter Wylie; and five great grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to HomeFront, 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08648.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, May 13, 2015, at St. Charles Borromeo Church, 47 Skillman Road, Skillman, New Jersey. Burial will be private.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton.

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William D. Baird Jr.

William D. Baird Jr., known as Denny, of New Vernon, New Jersey, died peacefully on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 at the age of 70. He was the son of William D. Baird and Dorothy Wodehouse Baird. Born in Washington, D.C., the son of a Naval aviator, Denny was raised in various parts of the country including McLean, Virginia, where he graduated high school. At Brown University, Denny was a member of the Delta Phi fraternity and he graduated in 1968 with a degree in political science.

Denny’s 43 year career in commercial and investment banking included 27 years at Chemical Bank where he served as president of Chemical Bank-Delaware and managing director of the Global Securities and Foreign Exchange Group. In the early 1990s, he was named CEO of Princeton Bank and Trust Company. He also served as CEO of the Glenmede Trust Company of New Jersey and CEO of Beacon Trust Company before retiring in 2011. He was a member of numerous community boards including service as Chairman of the Board of the Foundation for Morristown Medical Center, trustee of McCarter Theatre and the Executive Council of the New Jersey Network Foundation.

Denny was a longtime member of the Morris County Golf Club, the Morristown Club, and Saint John on the Mountain Episcopal Church. He enjoyed playing golf, gardening, collecting art, his golden retrievers, and spending time with family in Duck, North Carolina.

Denny is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joy; sons, Chip and his wife Tressa of Bernardsville, New Jersey; David and his wife Jill of Arlington, Virginia; and Andrew and his wife Sarah of Kent, Connecticut; and eight grandchildren. He is also survived by his three siblings, Lyn, Richard, and Laura and their families.

Family and friends were invited to visit on Sunday, May 10, 2015 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Gallaway and Crane Funeral Home, 101 South Finley Avenue, Basking Ridge, New Jersey. A funeral service was held on Monday May 11, 2015, at 10 a.m. at The Episcopal Church of Saint John on the Mountain, 379 Mt. Harmony Road, Bernardsville, New Jersey. Burial was at the St. Bernards Cemetery, Washington Ave, Bernardsville, New Jersey. For further information, please contact the funeral home at (908) 766-0250, or to light an online condolence candle please visit www.gcfuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, please consider memorial donations to Campaign 360, c/o Foundation for Morristown Medical Center, 475 South Street, Morristown, New Jersey 07960.

May 6, 2015

Stephen Alan Lawrence

On May 2, 2015, Stephen Alan Lawrence passed away at his home in Princeton, New Jersey, at the age of 77.

Born on March 12, 1938 to Rudolph Leventhal and Jean Skolnick Leventhal, he grew up in the Bronx. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Hunter College and a Master of Arts from New York University; he did his doctoral studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

An English teacher for most of his professional life, he taught at Carnegie Mellon University, Temple University, and the Princeton Day School, where he was chairman of the English Department for 25 years. For three years he also served as an acquisitions editor for the Temple University Press.

He is survived by his wife, Rita Signorelli Pappas of Princeton; his brother, Donald Lawrence of Boynton Beach, Florida; his two sons, Timothy Lawrence of Brooklyn, New York, and Daniel Lawrence of Jupiter, Florida; his stepson, James Pappas of Oak Ridge, North Carolina; his stepdaughter, Sarah Pappas of Woodside, New York; his daughters-in-law Lauren Page Burner-Lawrence, Liana Ball Lawrence, and Marin Stanfield; his grandson, James John Pappas; and his cousins Betsy Pinover Schiff and Jim Lawrence of New York City.

There is no funeral planned. A private memorial gathering will be held at his home in Princeton. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

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Obit Pollack 5-6-15Rose G. Pollack

Rose G. Pollack, 101 years old, of Princeton/Plainsboro died Tuesday, April 28, 2015 at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center. Born in New York City, she resided most of her life in South Salem, New York and Aventura, Florida, before moving to Princeton in 1992 after her husband passed away.

She attended Cooper Union College, New York. Rose retired after many years of service as a decorator with the Lehigh Furniture Company, Yonkers, New York. She was an artist, receiving a medal for her artwork, a singer, and enjoyed doing home decorating. Rose travelled a lot with her husband Alex.

Daughter of the late Henry and Irene (Takas) Greenfield, wife of the late Alexander Pollack, she is survived by a daughter Lana Glasberg; two grandsons Jeffrey Glasberg, Glenn Glasberg, and his wife Audrey; and four great-grandchildren Hollie, Toby, Lauren, and Matthew.

The funeral service was held on Friday, May 1, 2015 at the Star of David Memorial Chapel of Princeton. Burial was at Beth El Cemetery in Paramus, New Jersey.

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Americo A. Arcamone

Americo A. Arcamone, 89, of Princeton died peacefully in his sleep on Thursday, April 30, 2015, at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro, after a brief illness.

Born December 28, 1925 in Princeton to Antonio and Giovanna Marcoline Arcamone, Americo, fondly known as “Gooch,” went to Nassau Street School and attended Princeton High School. He entered the Navy in 1943 and served as a Pharmacist’s Mate on the Hospital Ship, U.S.S. Haven. Following his discharge in 1945, Gooch worked for the Princeton Post Office, and co-owned Veteran’s Taxi Service of Princeton. He retired after 25 years at McGraw-Hill Publishing Company in Hightstown, and ended his part-time employment with Princeton University’s Athletic Department just prior to his death.

Husband of the late Antoinette (née Mazziotti) Arcamone, Gooch is survived by his two daughters, Karen Cinkay (Tom Gray) of Pennington and Adele Hagadorn of Skillman; his son, Frank Arcamone of Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania; his granddaughter, Kaylen Hagadorn and her partner, Laura Enstad of New York City; and grandson, Enzo Arcamone of Edmond, Oklahoma. Gooch is also survived by his brother, Dante and wife, June, of Lawrenceville, as well as by many nieces and nephews. He is predeceased by his sisters Angie Pinelli and Maryann Procaccino, as well as his brothers Frank, Carlo, and Mose.

The funeral will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, May 8, 2015, at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Ave., Princeton.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. on Friday at St. Paul’s Church, 214 Nassau Street in Princeton. Calling hours will be held on Thursday, May 7 from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. at the funeral home.

Many of Gooch’s memories and stories from his childhood featured his two favorite places, Princeton Summer Camp and The Dorothea House; memorial contributions in his name may be made to: Princeton-Blairstown Center, Administrative Office, 13 Roszel Road, Suite C204A, Princeton, NJ 08540 and/or Dorothea’s House, Dorothea VanDyke McLane Association, 120 John Street, Princeton, NJ 08542.

April 29, 2015

Obit Borgerhoff 4-29-15Jane Cuyler Borgerhoff

Jane Cuyler Borgerhoff died on April 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, her home for over 30 years. She was diagnosed with Central Nervous System Lymphoma in 2010. She was in hospice care at the time of her death, with her children by her side.

Jennie was born in Princeton, New Jersey on July 27, 1949, the eldest daughter of Professor and Mrs. E.B.O. Borgerhoff. She attended Rose Cottage Nursery School, Nassau Street School, John Witherspoon School, and Miss Fine’s School. She graduated from Princeton Day School in 1967.

Jennie began her college education at the University of Michigan. She was accepted into the Residential College, a new and experimental facet of the university, and graduated with a BA in history in 1971.

One of the most important experiences in Jennie’s life occurred in 1963, when she went with her mother to the March on Washington and heard Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. She continued to be politically active in college and to develop a sense of community and social responsibility, with a special interest in education. After graduating from college, Jennie began work on a Master’s in Education at Antioch Graduate School, during which time she taught second grade for a year in Norwich, Vermont.

Jennie’s interest in history, especially medieval, never faltered, and took her back to Princeton, where she entered the history department at Princeton University as a graduate student. She loved the research and writing required, but decided against a life in academia.

Jennie moved to Philadelphia, and after training and working as a legal assistant, found an opportunity through her Quaker Meeting to create a victim advocacy group. In 1989 she established Center City Crime Victim Services, the first such service in Center City, Philadelphia. The agency received an award from the mayor of Philadelphia.

Jennie remained a devoted Quaker all her life, serving as clerk of the Worship and Ministry Committee and as a children’s teacher at the Friends Meeting’s First Day School. Jennie was brilliant; she had a passion for books, for the arts, for learning of every sort. She was an adventurer and a traveller. She had a marvelous curiosity, a wonderful sense of humor, and a deep and abiding love for animals.

Jennie is survived by her children, Arthur Christopher Newlin Borgerhoff and Cornelia Grace Newlin Borgerhoff; her sister and brother-in-law Elisabeth Borgerhoff-Pomerleau and Dwayne Ricky Pomerleau; her sister Ledlie Newlin Borgerhoff; and beloved pets Dolce, Moe, and Spitfire.

There will be a memorial service in Philadelphia on Sunday, May 3, 2015 at 3 p.m. at Friends Center, 1515 Cherry Street. A private gathering will be held in Princeton in June.

Donations in Jennie’s memory may be made to the charity of one’s choice.

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Obit Spencer 4-29-15Marie Elizabeth Spencer

Marie Elizabeth Spencer passed peacefully on April 22, 2015 at Acorn Glen in Princeton, New Jersey at the age of 101.

Marie was born January 17, 1914 to Elizabeth and William Tecumseh Sherman Bean in Philadelphia. She was the youngest of eight children John, Charles, Marcy, Katherine, Margaret, Bill, and Dorothy.

During the Depression, Marie worked in a cake baking factory in north Philadelphia among tough women, with tough hands. After hours, Marie enjoyed dancing. With a sweet and witty disposition she once caught the eye of the local ice delivery man, who, out of admiration, named his horse after her. But it was a sister Margaret who introduced Marie to her future husband, Earl Spencer, from Doylestown. Marie and Earl were married on June 6, 1941.

During World War II, Marie worked at the Frankford Arsenal and the family grew; four children, Earl, Judy, Barry, and Roger arrived both during and after the war. In 1949 the family moved from Philadelphia to a charming house on the Neshaminy Creek in Bensalem, Pennsylvania. It was in this home that Marie and Earl raised their children and welcomed four grandchildren into their lives: Eric, Kate, Stephanie, and Kristina.

Never one to let grass grow under her feet, Marie worked at Sears in the Neshaminy Mall in the 1970s and 1980s to help keep her candy bowl full. With a keen sense of humor, she took ten years off her age when she applied for the job, but being such a spritely spirit, no one ever knew. Marie remained in Bensalem until moving to Princeton with her daughter, Judy in 2013.

Marie became a member of the Acorn Glen community in October 2013. There, Marie enjoyed an active social life befriending staff and residents alike. With her two special friends Samantha and Melissa, who organize activities at the Glen, Marie thoroughly enjoyed trips to the horse track, the theater, and wine tasting events, as well as everyday activities like cooking classes, musical events, and birthday parties.

Marie is survived by her two children Earl and Judy, four grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren Sofia and Sylvia. She will be remembered fondly for her warm sense of humor, her ready smile, and her uncommon kindness. In her 101 years of life, Marie lived through an incredible swath of history, and like many of her generation, experienced tough times, yet she met every challenge with supreme grace, humor, and charm. She stands as an example to us all. Proud of her heritage, we salute Marie with one of her favorite toasts — “To the Irish.”

Extend condolences and remembrances to the Hoffman Funeral Home in Bensalem Pennsylvania: www.hoffmannfuneralhome.com/contact.

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Obit Rashada 4-29-15Mahasin Rashada

Mahasin Rashada (formerly Patricia Ann White-Flenoid) died suddenly on October 27, 2014. She was born on June 26, 1951 to the late Olivia Magnum-White and Elisha White Sr. She was preceded in death by her sister Beverly Ann White.

Mahasin was born and raised in Princeton where she graduated from Princeton High School. She then moved to California and married Harlen Flenoid Sr.

She loved live concerts and plays, sewing, vintage stores, and flea markets. Upon being hired by United Airlines, she realized her dream of travel would become a reality. Her children were now adults and off she went! She visited many parts of the world. Later in life, her struggle with multiple sclerosis slowed her down. She maintained a wonderful attitude as she was determined to live life to the fullest. She joined the Senior Citizens Club which was just minutes from her apartment. She found fulfillment in assuming the duties of “Promotions Coordinator” and the members truly appreciated her skills and energy. She will be sorely missed in California and New Jersey.

Mahasin’s memory will be cherished by her children, sons Lance Sr. (Trekina); Harlen Jr. (Destiny); Muhammed (Kiera); and daughter Atiya of California. She is also survived by her sisters, Cynthia Fisher (Gilbert) of Princeton, New Jersey; Shirlene Wells of Morrisville, Pennsylvania; Gale O. Everett (Robin) of Princeton, New Jersey; and her brother Elisha White Jr. (Michelle) of Stockbridge, Georgia. She was the proud grandmother of 16 grandchildren. She also leaves to mourn uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and many cousins.

A memorial service was held on April 25, 2015 at 2 p.m. at The Arts Council of Princeton’s Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton.

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Obit Vehslage 4-29-15Ramsay Watson Vehslage

Ramsay Watson Vehslage, 77, of Skillman, New Jersey, died peacefully and suddenly on Friday, April 17, at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. He is survived by his beloved and loving wife, Ann; his much-loved children, Ramsay Watson Vehslage, Jr, of Madison, New Jersey; his daughter Murray Vehslage Isgrig of Denver, Colorado, her husband, Trent and their three children, Wyatt, Milly, and Hazel. He was predeceased by his brother, Stephen, in 2002. He was born in New York City on November 4, 1937, and moved at age 10 with his family to Haverford, Pennsylvania. He graduated from The Haverford School and with the class of 1959 from Princeton University. Prior to his retirement in 2010, Ramsay was president of the Bonney-Vehslage Tool Company of Newark, New Jersey, a manufacturing business founded by his grandfather in 1906. The company is now located in Springfield, New Jersey. Ramsay was a nationally-ranked squash player in his teens and twenties, an avid fly-fisherman, talented photographer, determined golfer, enthusiastic gardener, and a man deeply and quietly devoted to his family. His signature style was one of affection, humor, and integrity. Ramsay will be forever missed. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, June 12, at the Princeton University Chapel in Princeton. In honor of his lifelong interest in squash, donations may be made to The Pingry School for the Pingry Squash Courts, and sent to The Pingry School, Office of Institutional Advancement, 131 Martinsville Road, Basking Ridge, New Jersey 07920, or made via their website at www.blueprint.pingry.org.

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Anne Carolyn Reed

Anne Carolyn Reed, a Kingston resident for 27 years, died on April 3 in Charlotte, North Carolina. She was 93 years old. She died peacefully of old age in Harris Hospice of the Presbyterian Medical Center of Charlotte. Anne was a devoted wife, mother, and sister.

She was born on May 29, 1921 in Plainfield, New Jersey. She met her husband, S. Chadwick Reed, in junior high school; they were married in 1941. Later, she became the first married freshman to attend Connecticut College for Women. After his service in World War II, Chad attended Yale Law School and the couple lived in a Quonset hut near the Yale Bowl.

In 1947, the Reeds returned to New Jersey. Chad practiced law and later worked in the securities industry. The couple lived in Short Hills and in Summit and had two children, Ted and Elizabeth. After her husband died in 1982, Anne was employed by the Kemper Corporation in Summit for several years. She moved to Kingston in 1987 and to Charlotte in November 2014.

Anne remained active and physically fit into her 90s. She had an active mind. She enjoyed reading, following the news, pursuing various cultural activites, and playing scrabble and bridge with friends. She travelled frequently to Europe, first with her husband and later with friends. Until she was 92, she frequently traveled unescorted to Charlotte and Boston to visit her children.

She volunteered for the American Red Cross for many years. She was deeply involved with the Unitarian Church of Princeton, and she particularly enjoyed their Women’s Alliance.

Throughout her life, Anne remained close to her family. She was predeceased by her sister Nancy Lee Pierson, and by her brother Louis Rothberg. She is survived by her children, Ted Reed of Charlotte, and Elizabeth Reed of Boston; by her brothers, Dr. Harvey Rothberg of Princeton and John Charles Rothberg of Madison, Virginia; by her grandchildren Teresa Reed of Palo Alto, California, Gabriela Reed of Stamford, Connecticut, and Chad Reed of Minneapolis; and by her daughter-in-law Alexandra Jenkins of Charlotte; and her son-in-law Professor Jan Wampler of Boston.

A memorial service will be held at the Unitarian Church of Princeton at 10 a.m. on Thursday, May 21. Contributions in her memory may be made to that church or to the American Red Cross.

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Christine D. St. John

Christine D. St. John, 87, of Skillman, New Jersey died Monday, April 20, 2015 at Stonebridge at Montgomery.

Christine was born in Clacton-on-Sea, England, on September 11, 1927 where she spent her early childhood. In 1941, she and her parents moved from outside London to Honolulu, where she attended the Punahou School. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, she attended Maui High School and then the Castilleja School in Palo Alto, California. She later attended the University of Hawaii where she met her husband, Charles E. St. John. After their marriage, they moved to Philadelphia and then settled in Princeton. Christine was office manager of a local architectural firm for many years. Both Christine and Charles were active in Princeton Borough politics and she served as Princeton Borough Tax Collector from 1968 to 1972. Christine later went on to become director, New Jersey Division of Elections from 1982 to 1990, during the Tom Kane administration.

Christine was pre-deceased by her father Harry M. Dove, her mother Sheila P. Brady, and her husband Charles E. St. John. She is survived by her daughter Elizabeth S. Sykes and her husband Greg P. Sykes of West Grove, Pennsylvania; three grandchildren, Rachel S. Meyers and her husband Jonathan of Denville, New Jersey; Rebecca D. Sykes of Boston, Massachucetts; and Sarah E. Sykes of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is also survived by two great-grandchildren Ashley G. Meyers and Abigail S. Meyers. In addition, she is survived by her step-mother Lorraine Dove of Honolulu, Hawaii.

Funeral services will be private.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton.

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Christopher Mark Hagadorn

Christopher Mark Hagadorn, 63, of Skillman, New Jersey died peacefully at home surrounded by his loving family and dear friends on Friday, April 24, 2015. Throughout his very short, yet courageous battle with cancer, Chris maintained his ever-present sense of humor, and his concern was always and only for others.

Born on March 31, 1952, Chris graduated Princeton High School in 1970, attended Missouri Valley College, and worked in the printing industry for over 35 years. Chris was a sports enthusiast; throughout his lifetime, his loyalties lay with the New York Giants, Rangers, and Yankees. Chris’ real passion was golf. He was fortunate enough to play his favorite game with foursomes comprised of childhood friends as well as many new friends.

Chris is survived by his loving wife of 32 years, Adele Arcamone Hagadorn and his beloved daughter, Kaylen and her partner; Laura Enstad of New York City. Chris is also survived by his sister, Suzan Sanders of Redmond, Oregon; brothers, Randall of Titusville, New Jersey; Jeffrey of Hopewell, New Jersey; Thomas of Seaside Park, New Jersey; and several nieces and nephews. He is predeceased by his brother Richard (Ricky) and his parents James Randall and Florence Swinnerton Hagadorn.

Chris’ legacy of humor, kindness, and love for family and friends will be celebrated at the Mercer Oaks Golf Course Clubhouse at 725 Village Road West in West Windsor, New Jersey. Visitation hours followed by a brief service will be held from noon to 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 30, 2015.

Memorial contributions may be made in Chris’ name to Princeton Hospice, 88 Princeton-Hightstown Road, Princeton Junction, New Jersey 08558, ATTN: Mary Winters or The American Cancer Society. The family wishes to extend their gratitude to Princeton Hospice and Merwick Rehabilitation Center for their immeasurable support during Chris’ illness.

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April 22, 2015

Obit Moore 4-22-15Béatrice Moore

On the evening of Tuesday, April 14, 2015, Béatrice Marcelle Marguerite Chaumont Moore passed away peacefully at her home in Blawenburg, New Jersey at the age of 64. The straightforward kindness and quiet compassion with which she lived her life surrounded her in her final days, aspired to in her closest friends and son, Alexander John Moore, who survives her.

Bea, as she was known, was born in Paris, France on February 9, 1951. She immigrated to America in 1970 and settled in New York City. She was a natural caregiver and worked first as an au pair, sharing her grace with a Manhattan family, with whom she stayed in touch until her passing. She transitioned to a wonderful career at the American Ballet Theater, where she met her husband of 22 years, Frederick Moore, with whom she raised her son. She moved to Princeton in 1987 and began managing the office of a popular boutique, Merrick’s. She remained in the Princeton area for the rest of her life and shared over 25 years with Merrick’s, which became the nexus of a wonderful community that carries on her memory to this day.

A memorial service will be held at Bea’s home, on April 26, 2015, where her loved ones will celebrate her tenderness and warmth, the elegant sense of style for which she was deeply admired, and her great love of nature and animals. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, 900 Herronton Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 www.save-animals.org.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton.

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Obit Rashada 4-22-15Mahasin Rashada

Mahasin Rashada (formerly Patricia Ann White-Flenoid) died suddenly on October 27, 2014. She was born on June 26, 1951 to the late Olivia Magnum-White and Elisha White Sr. She was preceded in death by her sister Beverly Ann White.

Mahasin was born and raised in Princeton where she graduated from Princeton High School. She then moved to California and married Harlen Flenoid Sr.

She loved live concerts and plays, sewing, vintage stores, and flea markets. Upon being hired by United Airlines, she realized her dream of travel would become a reality. Her children were now adults and off she went! She visited many parts of the world. Later in life, her struggle with multiple sclerosis slowed her down. She maintained a wonderful attitude as she was determined to live life to the fullest. She joined the Senior Citizens Club which was just minutes from her apartment. She found fulfillment in assuming the duties of “Promotions Coordinator” and the members truly appreciated her skills and energy. She will be sorely missed in California and New Jersey.

Mahasin’s memory will be cherished by her children, sons Lance Sr. (Trekina), Harlen Jr. (Destiny), Muhammed (Kiera), and daughter Atiya of California. She is also survived by her sisters, Cynthia Fisher (Gilbert) of Princeton, New Jersey; Shirlene Wells of Morrisville, Pennsylvania; Gale O. Everett (Robin) of Princeton, New Jersey; and her brother Elisha White Jr. (Michelle) of Stockbridge, Georgia. She was the proud grandmother of 16 grandchildren. She also leaves to mourn uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and many cousins.

A memorial service will be held on April 25, 2015 at 2 p.m. at The Arts Council of Princeton’s Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton.

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Obit Houghton 4-22-15Marion Stover Houghton

Marion Stover Houghton, a longtime resident of Princeton, passed away peacefully on April 13, 2015 at The Arbors in Bedford, New Hampshire, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer’s. She was 88 years old.

Born on April 11, 1927 in Trenton, New Jersey to John K. Stover and Marion Elizabeth Stover, she lived in New Jersey for most of her life. She attended Edgewood Park Junior College. She married the love of her life, Oliver Houghton, on September 24, 1949. They had two children, Doug and Jill, and resided in Princeton.

Marion was very active in the Princeton community. She was a volunteer with the Welcome Wagon at Princeton Hospital, a member of the Present Day Club, Springdale Golf Club, and attended Trinity Church. She loved music, was a beautiful piano player, an animal lover, golfer, and played tennis regularly. She loved to travel with her husband, Ollie, and their friends. Most of all, she loved spending time with her family and their yearly trips to the Jersey Shore.

She is survived by her son Doug and his wife Kathy; their daughter Karly Houghton of Kingston, New Hampshire; her daughter Jill and her children Elizabeth and Samuel Mudge of Nashua, New Hampshire; and her nephew Donald Stover and his wife Sue of Sarasota, Florida. She was predeceased by her parents John and Marion Stover; her brothers John and Donald Stover; and her husband Oliver Houghton. She will be greatly missed.

In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Marion’s Memory to SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, 900 Herrontown Road, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540 or to the Alzheimer’s Association, 400 Morris Avenue, Suite 251, Denville, New Jersey, 07834.

A graveside service will be held on April 25, 2015 at 11 a.m. at The Princeton Cemetery, located at 29 Greenview Avenue in Princeton. Friends of Marion Houghton and the Houghton family are invited to attend.

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Michael Stefanchik III

Surrounded by, and immersed in the abundant love of his wife, Martha, and all of their children, Michael Stefanchik III went into the hands of our Eternal Father on Friday, April 17, 2015. He was a servant of God, of his family, his community, and the nation. He was a loving husband, proud father of five children, and grandfather of three.

A man of great faith, he was an active parishioner of Saint Paul’s Roman Catholic Church in Princeton, where his daughter, Christa, teaches the Fourth Grade in Saint Paul’s School. Over the years he served on the Parish Council, the Diocesan Pastoral Council, and was a member of the Saint Vincent de Paul Society, the Knights of Columbus, and several community focused organizations. He was an avid golfer and student of the game, a love he shared with his son, Peter, the Head PGA Professional at Elmwood Country Club in White Plains, New York. He had an expressive talent he sparingly displayed in sketches and paintings, but that he shared prolifically with his son, Joseph, an award winning professional photographer with Chrisman Studios. He shared both his love of golf and artistic expression with his son, John, a musician with D’Angelico Guitar Company of America in New York City and at Due Process Stable Country Club in Colts Neck, New Jersey. A veteran, retired with the rank of Captain, he served as an Infantry Lieutenant in South Vietnam, earning the Bronze Star for Valor and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, a distinction shared by his son, Michael, a Lieutenant Colonel in the Army Special Forces at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Following his wartime service, he worked for 31 years as an Out-of-State Auditor for the State of Indiana Department of Revenue, retiring in 2001. The absence of his great gift of being able to easily engage almost anyone, even complete strangers, in conversation together with his wry sense of humor, which he readily shared, will be dearly missed.

He is preceded in death by his father, Michael Stefanchik Jr., and mother, Theresa. He is survived by his sister Cynthia (Jon) Readnour of North Clarendon, Vermont.

The Kimble Funeral Home, at 1 Hamilton Avenue in Princeton, will host a Visitation/Life Celebration on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 from 4 to 9 p.m. Funeral services will begin on Thursday, April 23 at 11 a.m. at the funeral home with a Christian Mass of Resurrection celebrated at Saint Paul’s Roman Catholic Church, 214 Nassau Street in Princeton at 11:30 a.m. A graveside ceremony with military honors at Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Pennsylvania will follow.

The family requests continued prayers for Mike. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Saint Vincent de Paul Society of Saint Paul’s Church, 214 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

Extend condolences and remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

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Obit Reed 4-22-15David Charles Reed

David Charles Reed, known as ‘Dave’ to friends and family, passed away on April 1, 2015 at the age of 64.

Born January 13, 1951 to Thomas H. and Marguerite B. Reed, David resided in Shaler Township, a suburb of Pittsburgh, until he attended Lehigh University, earning a degree with honors in business in 1973. After graduation, he worked as an auditor with Arthur Young where he became a CPA.

David moved to Commodities Corporation in 1979, where he took the position of vice president and controller. In 1989, he helped to establish and manage a Japanese — United States joint venture for Commodities Corporation in futures trading with offices in Tokyo and Singapore. During this time, he and his family lived in Tokyo for 3 years.

In 1998, David left Commodities Corporation and became co-founder and CEO of Mapleton Nurseries in Kingston, New Jersey. Mapleton is a wholesale nursery specializing in container grown native and ornamental trees and shrubs.

At the time of his death (and for more than 10 years prior thereto) David served on the Board of Directors at 1st Constitution Bank, where he chaired the Audit Committee. Additionally, he served as director of both Arden-Sage Multi-Strategy TEI Fund and Arden-Sage Multi-Strategy Fund. More recently, he became a trustee of two alternative mutual funds sponsored by Arden Asset Management, LLC in New York.

Some of David’s fondest memories involved his years in the Boy Scouts of America, where he earned the rank of Eagle Scout. All three of his sons, Thomas, Michael, and Mark were Boy Scouts in Troop 43, Princeton, where he stayed active in scouting as a member of the Troop Committee, as well as offering the use of his personal workshop and his expertise in woodworking to help many scouts with their own Eagle Scout projects.

David is survived by his wife Dolores Elder Reed; his sons Thomas, Michael, and Mark; and his mother Marguerite Bettegar Reed. Also surviving are his brothers, Robert and his wife Mary; Arthur and his wife Joellen; a niece Katie and her husband Dustin Schron. His wife’s twin sister Marianne and her husband Dr. Richard Altenbaugh; nephews Ian and Colin; a sister-in-law Ruth Woodside and her three sons, Danny, David, and Benjamin Elder.

Memorial gifts in lieu of flowers can be sent to: BSA Troop 43, Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton or Lehigh University’s Thomas H. Reed Endowed Scholarship Fund c/o Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. A celebration of David’s life will be announced in the near future.

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Obit Jacobs 4-22-15Annette Jacobs

Annette Jacobs, born November 3, 1924, passed away April 11, 2015 following a lifetime of inspiring others.

Daughter, wife, mother, grandmother, teacher, leader, friend — these are some of the words that describe the long time Princeton resident, Annette Jacobs. Annette moved to Princeton in 2000 after 75 years spent in the Midwest (Lansing and East Lansing, Michigan) paving the way for women to expand their possibilities by being an exemplary role model. She was a devoted mother, raising her two daughters, while pursuing a career as an educator, starting the speech department at Lansing Community College (LCC), where she taught for 23 years. Annette was also a mainstay on the local theatre circuit, actively participating as a director and actor for Riverwalk Theatre.

Setting herself apart early in life, Annette attended two of the big ten universities, Michigan State University and the University of Michigan, before graduating with honors from the University of Wisconsin where she had the distinction of being the first female student director to ever stage a university production.

After graduation, Annette pursued a professional theatre career in New York City before marrying Bernard Jacobs, a Julliard graduate and professional violinist. A trailblazer himself, he encouraged his wife to get her advanced degree and upon completing her MA, he supported her joining the faculty as the only full time female instructor at LCC. They lived as a pioneering two career couple for 38 years before his death in 1986.

Subsequently, Mrs. Jacobs traveled the world, exploring the Middle East, Europe, South America, the Caribbean, as well as most of Asia Pacific and visiting her daughter in Beijing, China several times before settling in Princeton to be close to her other daughter, a Library Place resident.

For the past 15 years, Annette embodied her mantra, “bloom where you are planted;” joining CWW (Community Without Walls), becoming an associate board member of McCarter Theatre, serving as an early and active volunteer for Opera New Jersey, fully participating in Windrows Adult Community events, being an engaged member of “Currents,” an informal political topics discussion group and perhaps most satisfying and enjoyable was her status as a sought after competitive bridge player.

Annette’s friends and admirers spanned generations and occupations. She was universally admired for her energy, originality, and zest for living. The last year of her life was marked by a courageous battle against Crohn’s disease, which was initially undiagnosed by the medical team in Princeton but was aggressively treated by a wonderful group of doctors at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. They worked tirelessly to give this amazing woman another year of life and by so doing gave a wide circle of her friends and family more time to be inspired and uplifted by this unique woman whose indomitable spirit and generous heart will live on.

A private service for family and friends was held at Evergreen cemetery in Lansing, Michigan. Annette was predeceased by her parents, Belle and Maxwell Suravits, of East Lansing, Michigan, founding members of Congregation Shaarey Zedek. She is survived by her two daughters, Saryl Rodney Bueschlen-Jacobs, of Beijing, China; Tamara Jacobs Epstein, of Princeton, New Jersey; her sons-in-law, Eric Bueschlen and David Epstein; her grandchildren, Kyle Bueschlen, Haley Bueschlen, and Averienne Epstein; and her faithful Pekingese, Chi Chi.

A memorial gathering and celebration of her remarkable life will be held at Windrows, 2000 Windrow Drive, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 3 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, 900 Herrontown Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

April 16, 2015

Obit Bakoulis 4-15-15Marion Bergen Bakoulis

Marion Bergen Bakoulis, a native and longtime resident of Princeton, died peacefully at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro on April 3, 2015, at the age of 81.

Marion was born in Princeton in 1933 to Stanley Silvers Bergen and Leah Johnson Bergen. She attended Princeton public schools and graduated in 1951 from the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pa. She graduated from Vassar College in 1955 with a BA in child studies and received a masters in teaching from Columbia Teachers College in 1957.

She and Demos Constantine Bakoulis were married at the Princeton University Chapel on August 24, 1957. Their loving union lasted 45 years, until his death in 2002.

Marion taught at the Plainsboro School from 1957 until 1960. While raising her family, she was the director of the Princeton Cooperative Nursery School and a tutor at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. In 1974, she returned to full-time teaching in the West-Windsor Plainsboro School district, teaching at the Wyckoff School and the Dutch Neck School. She retired in 1998.

Marion was a deeply loved member of All Saints’ Church of Princeton, where she served faithfully on the altar guild.

She was active in Princeton community organizations, in recent years volunteering with GrandPals and taking many courses at the Princeton Senior Resource Center.

Marion had a deep love of the visual and performing arts, regularly attending concerts and visiting museums locally and in Philadelphia and New York City. She traveled widely, even as her health declined, and cherished memories of visits to England, France, Spain, Italy, Greece, Cuba, Maui, and elsewhere.

Marion is survived by her brother, Stanley Silvers Bergen Jr. of Stonington, Maine; her daughters Gordon Bakoulis of New York City (and husband Alan Ruben); Anne Bakoulis of Haiku, Hawaii (and partner Lesley Evans); and Julie Bakoulis of Princeton (and husband Kurt Kammerer); her grandchildren Joseph, Samuel, Daniel, Leah, Camille, and Wyatt; and a large and loving extended family.

A memorial service will be held at All Saints’ Church on Saturday, April 18, 2015 at 11 a.m. Burial will be private.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be made to the Nature Conservancy, Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, the Princeton Senior Resource Center, or a charity of your choice.

Arrangements are by The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home Princeton.

April 9, 2015

Ida Toto

Ida Toto, 96, passed away peacefully at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro on Friday April 3, 2015. Born in Mozzagrogne, province CH, Italy, in 1918 and raised in Raritan, New Jersey, Ida married and moved to Princeton where she resided for more than 75 years. In 1954, she joined her husband’s family business, Toto’s Market of Princeton, and worked alongside her husband, Albert for over 35 years.

A parishioner of St. Paul’s Church, she was a member of The Catholic Daughters, The Altar Rosary Society, The Golden Agers, and the Woman’s Auxiliary of The Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad. For many years, Ida actively volunteered for the Princeton Hospital Fete and the Princeton Hospital Rummage Sale.

Daughter of the late Madelena and Antonio DiGiuseppantonio, she was predeceased by her beloved husband, Albert S. Toto Sr. and sister Frances Watkinson. Ida is survived by her daughter, Lucille Rosendorf, her husband, David of Skillman; her son, Albert S. Toto Jr. of Belle Mead; a granddaughter, Melissa Calvert, her husband Charles of Washington Crossing; a grandson, Albert S. Toto III, his wife, Kathleen of Cape Elizabeth, Maine; and five precious great grandchildren: Madeline and Pierce Calvert and Albert IV, Ava and Andrew Toto.

Ida will be remembered, with love, by her family and friends for her bountiful spirit of generosity, her friendliness to everyone she met, her many kindnesses throughout her life and for her delicious and plentiful Italian cooking.

A funeral will be held at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 9, 2015, at The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue in Princeton.

A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday at St. Paul’s Church, 214 Nassau Street in Princeton.

Calling hours will be held on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, from 4 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Senior Care Ministry of Princeton, P.O. Box 1517, Princeton, New Jersey 08542-1517 or to Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, P.O Box 529, Princeton, New Jersey 08542.

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Obit Flory 4-8-15Robert Earl Flory

Robert E. Flory, 82, died peacefully on March 16, 2015. He was born to Leslie and Helen (Kezeler) Flory of Oaklyn, New Jersey. The family later moved to Princeton where he graduated from Princeton High School. Mr. Flory (“Bob”) went on to receive degrees in electrical engineering from Cornell University and the University of Pennsylvania. He lived and worked in the Princeton area for most of his adult life, but was enjoying retirement with his beloved wife Marjorie in Oro Valley, Arizona.

In his four-decade career at RCA’s David Sarnoff Research Center, Mr. Flory focused primarily on television disk and tape recording technology. He was also part of the development team for a broadcast camera that was used by NBC studios for more than a decade and which earned RCA an Emmy award in 1981. In the latter part of his career, he helped to develop some of the earliest standards and technologies for High Definition TV.

He was an accomplished, albeit amateur astro-photographer who particularly enjoyed eclipse chasing. He and Marjorie took a number of jaunts to remote locations to observe and photograph such celestial events. He also directed his photographic interests toward the abundant wildlife in his adopted home state of Arizona.

Bob always enjoyed symphonic music and in the last decade he and Marjorie derived much pleasure from their subscription to the local orchestral series. He also appreciated good food and word play — from crossword puzzles to puns. He was an extraordinary engineer, a loyal friend, and a devoted family man.

He was predeceased by his first wife and the mother of his children, Eleanor (Collins) and his sister, June Ann Flory. He is survived by his wife of nearly 23 years, Marjorie Jelinek Flory (previously of Pennington, New Jersey); two children, Robert G Flory (Pamela) of Hopewell, New Jersey and Janice E Flory (Eric Stabb) of Athens, Georgia; three step-daughters, Monica Housen (Tom), Marie Berrien, and Marsha Mimnaugh (Todd); five nieces, Linda, Chris, Ellen, Cynthia and Sarah; and nine grandchildren, Martin, Madeline, Katherine, Hayden, Riley, Ella, Connor, Rogan and Bryson.

A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. on May 30, 2015 at Gravity Hill Farm (67 Pleasant Valley Road in Titusville, New Jersey). Those wishing to honor his memory might consider a contribution to The Sarnoff Collection at The College of New Jersey or to the Tucson Symphony Orchestra.

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Frances Rossmassler

Frances Branch Scott Rossmassler, 77, of Newtown, Pennsylvania and Grindstone Island in Clayton, New York, died peacefully in Newtown on March 18, 2015. She was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1937 and was the daughter of Thomas Branch Scott Jr. and Carrie Taliaferro Scott. She attended St. Catherine’s School in Richmond and graduated from St. Timothy’s School in Stevenson, Maryland, Briarcliffe Junior College in Briarcliff Manor, New York, and Richmond Business School in Richmond, Virginia.

She married Peter Radford Rossmassler in 1962. Peter and Frances moved from New York City to Princeton in 1965. In 2009, they moved to Pennswood Village in Newtown, Pennsylvania. She and her family spent their summers on Grindstone Island on the St. Lawrence River in the Thousand  Islands where her husband’s family has been going since 1895.

Frances worked as a secretary in New York City for Reynolds Metals Co. and for Travel Bureau Inc. She did a lot of volunteer work at Princeton Day School for the Parents Association and served on the Board of Camp Kieve for Boys in Damariscotta, Maine for 12 years. She also served on the Board of Grindstone Island Research and Heritage Center raising funds for programs and scholarships for island children. She was a member of the Garden Club of Princeton and Trinity Church of Princeton.

She is survived by her husband, Peter, of over 50 years, three sons, William R. Rossmassler III and his wife Wendy of Middlesex, Vermont; Thomas B. S. Rossmassler and his wife Sarah of Hatfield, Massachusetts; Richard R. Rossmassler of Williamsburg, Brooklyn; and five grandchildren, Colby, Louisa, Branch, Tae and Eva; her sister, Caroline S. Decazes of Lausanne, Switzerland; and six nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by her twin sister, Ellen, who died at birth, her sister, Dorothea S. Adamson, two brothers-in-law, Richard and William R. Rossmassler Jr. and his wife, Sue.

A brief visitation period will begin at 10:30 a.m. with memorial services beginning at 11:15 a.m. on Saturday, April 11, 2015 at Bringhurst Funeral Home, 225 Belmont Avenue, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, 900 Herrontown Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 or to the Pennswood Village Fellowship Fund, 1382 Newtown-Langhorne Road, Newtown, Pennsylvania 18940.

Arrangements are by Bringhurst Funeral Home at West Laurel Hill Cemetery.

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Obit Smith 4-8-15Berit Smith 

Berit Blomqvist Smith, a longtime resident of Princeton, died peacefully at home on March 26, 2015. She was 77 years old.

Born in Munkfors, Sweden, she moved to Princeton in 1960 to experience the States for a few years before returning home to Sweden. Her plans changed, however, when she met Craig Gary Smith, then a graduate student at Princeton University. The two married in 1962 and she never moved back to Sweden. She became a United States citizen in 1994.

After residing for a time in California and New York, the two moved back to Princeton in 1976, where they very much enjoyed living, made a great many friends, raised two sons, and were avid supporters of the arts, attending performances and volunteering on boards.

Among her many activities in support of the arts, she served as a trustee of the Princeton Chamber Symphony (forerunner to the Princeton Symphony Orchestra) and was a subscription holder since 1980; associate director of the McCarter Theatre Center; committee member for Princeton Summer Concerts; and member of the Princeton Friends of Opera and the Princeton Festival Guild. In addition, she volunteered at the Princeton Library and was a founding member of Hands On Helpers, now VolunteerConnect.

For most of her professional career, she was employed by the former Scanticon Hotel, where she was hired in 1980 by the soon to be opened Danish-based hotel as its first U.S. employee, eventually rising to sales manager. This experience served her well when — at her husband’s behest — she assumed responsibilities for planning the Princeton University Class of 1958 Reunion Dinners. She continued to attend reunions and travel with members of her husband’s class well after his death in 2000.

She is survived by sons Erik Michael Smith and his wife, Karen Sundberg, of Georgetown, South Carolina; and Kevin Andrew Smith and his wife, Elizabeth McDowell Smith, of Charlotte, North Carolina. Also, two grandchildren, Andrew McDowell Smith and Lillian Alexandra Smith of Charlotte, North Carolina; and a sister, Gunvor Blomqvist Engdahl and her husband, Carl-Axel Engdahl, of Karlstad, Sweden; as well as a niece, a nephew and three grand-nieces, all residing in Sweden.

The Smith family invites you to the memorial service to be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 11, 2015 at the Nassau Inn, Ten Palmer Square East in Princeton. A luncheon reception will follow.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her name may be made to the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, P.O. Box 250, Princeton, NJ 08542. Please write “In Memory of Berit Smith” on the memo line.

Arrangements are under the supervision of the Kimble Funeral Home of Princeton.

Extend condolences and share remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.

April 2, 2015

Obit ColbyPaul N. Colby

Paul N. Colby, affectionately known as “Nick,” was a resident of Princeton for many years. Nick died on March 7, 2015 in California at the age of 86. Nick was born to Jesse Van Horne and Paul N. Colby in Trenton, New Jersey on August 16, 1928.

Nick was an all-state football player for The Pennington School. At Princeton, he played football and was a member of the Elm Club. Nick graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from Princeton University in 1950, and subsequently served in the Navy during the Korean War on the USS Rendova from 1950 to 1952.

Nick worked in the plastics industry for 60 years, designing and manufacturing feed screw systems for injection molding machinery. He and his wife, Illene, started their own company, Spirex Corporation, in 1978. Nick patented seven of his inventions in injection molding, machine screw and barrel technology. He served as president of the Plastic Pioneers and was inducted into the Plastics Hall of Fame in 2009. Nick was also a skilled pilot and regularly used his multi-engine, instrument license.

Nick’s sister, Marylou Sharrett, died in 2005. He is survived by his wife, Illene Colby; his daughter, Gale Colby Mirzayanov, of Princeton, New Jersey; his son, Paul T. Colby, of Incline Village, California; his daughter, Sarah Colby ’90, of Oakland, California; his grandchildren, Ted Colby, Steve Schauer, Sarah Schauer, Matthew Colby, Nicholas Colby, and Lucas Massa; and his great grandchildren, Camilla Colby and Angelo Pasquerella.

A memorial service will be held on April 27, 2015 in Bodega Bay, California. Memorial gifts can be made to the UCSF Memory Clinic or to a charity of your choice.

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Obit GenungNancy Nalle Genung

Nancy Nalle (Lea) Genung passed away in peace on March 7, 2015 after a long and full life. She was 100 years old.

Nancy Porter Nalle was born to Dr. and Mrs. Brodie Crump Nalle of Charlotte, North Carolina on August 27, 1914. The Nalle family was well known in the Charlotte community. Brodie Nalle, MD was a prominent physician, who with other associates, founded the Nalle Clinic in 1921. The Clinic was very patient based, and flourished for nearly 80 years before it finally closed its doors, succumbing to a rapidly changing healthcare industry. As an aside, Nancy’s mother, Sadie Mayer Nalle, was reportedly the first woman to drive a car in Charlotte.

Nancy attended Charlotte public schools. She graduated magna cum laude from Sweet Briar College in 1937, majoring in history. After marrying Gilbert Lea in 1938 the couple moved to Princeton, New Jersey and she lived an active life there for most of her life.

During the Second World War the young family was stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma from 1942 to 1944. When Gil was transferred to the European theater, Nancy and their two children went to Charlotte to stay with her parents, until they returned to Princeton in the fall of 1945.

Nancy was a communicant of Trinity Church beginning in 1938. She was a member of its Altar Guild for decades. She was an avid gardener, always maintaining several flower beds, and was active in the Stony Brook Garden Club for years. She was a longtime member of the Pretty Brook Tennis Club beginning in 1940 and became an honorary member in her later years.

For a number of decades she held a real estate sales license into her 90s with what is now Henderson Calloway.

She lived at Princeton Windrows for over 10 years. The family would like to thank the staff of Windrows for making her life more comfortable. In particular, the family wishes to extend their love and regard for her personal caregiver, Comfort, who was unrelenting in her care and loyalty. Nancy moved to The Clare Estate in 2011, where she was wonderfully cared for during the remainder of her years. The family would also like to express its appreciation to Hospice of New Jersey for the palliative care and attention they provided her.

Given her advanced age Nancy was predeceased by many relatives and friends. In her immediate family she was predeceased by her brother Brodie Crump Nalle, Jr.; her first husband, Gilbert Lea and second husband, Alfred Genung, both ending in divorce; and her late son John (Biff) Lea. She is survived by her daughter Ann Lea Fries of Savannah, Georgia and her two daughters, Lea Erdman Marshall of Skillman, New Jersey and Lynne Erdman O’Donnell, of Portland, Oregon; and by her son John’s 4 children Molly Lea and Robin Scott Lea, both of Portland, Maine, and Tim Lea of Greensboro, North Carolina, and Kate Lea Luckett of Easley, South Carolina; and by her son Thomas Nalle Lea, of Cumberland Foreside, Maine, and his daughter Allison Porter Lea of Middletown, Maryland and son Halsey van Rensselaer Lea of Washington, D.C.; and by her great nephew, Brodie Crump Nalle, III, of Shreveport, Louisiana; and by five great grandchildren.

She will be interred in a family plot in Charlotte, North Carolina, next to her deceased parents, Brodie and Sadie Nalle. There will be a private family interment at her final resting place.

As of this writing a memorial service in Princeton has not yet been organized.

Arrangements are under the care of and have been entrusted to Huber-Moore Funeral Home, Bordentown, New Jersey.

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Obit GodfreyLeonard Godfrey

Dr. Leonard E.A. Godfrey (“Len”), born January 30, 1928 in Essex, England, passed away on Friday, March 20, 2015 in Princeton at the age of 87 from health complications.

Len is survived by his wife of 60 years, Gillian Wendy Godfrey of Princeton; son Nicholas Godfrey, his wife Allison Godfrey and their children Slater and Alta Godfrey of Charlestown, Massachusetts; his daughter Dr. Phoebe Godfrey, her wife Tina Shirshac, and son Dylan Fedora of Willimantic, Connecticut. Len is also survived by his younger sister Pat Clark-Sutton of Worcester, England and nieces and nephews in both England and Australia.

Len earned a first class honor degree in organic chemistry from London University in 1953. Len and Gillian “Wendy” met and were married in 1955 in London, England. They departed for Trinidad shortly thereafter where Len worked until 1957. From there, his career moved them to Santa Barbara, California then back to London in 1960 where Len received his PhD at London University in 1961. Son, Nicolas was born in 1962 in London. The family then moved to Princeton where daughter Phoebe was born in 1964. Len then worked for the FMC Corporation in Princeton, as a research chemist and had a number of inventions patented. He stayed in the New Jersey branch until 1970 when his career allowed them another move to Geneva, Switzerland. From there, the next stop was Belgium where they stayed from 1972 to 1977. Returning to New Jersey, and staying with FMC until 1982. Len then began working at SUNY Albany and the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New York until his retirement in 1997.

Len had been an active Democratic member of the Princeton Township Committee beginning in 1989. He served his first term until 1991, and during his second term in 1997, suffered a stroke. It has been since this physical setback that he has dealt with health complications. His third term on the Township Committee ran through 2003, where he continued to attend and make effective strides for the Township of Princeton.

Len was a resident of Merwick Rehabilitation Center for the last two years where he received excellent care. He continued to be an avid reader of history, nature, and just about any book he could find. He would share his repertoire of limericks, jokes, and stories with anyone that enjoyed a good tale or laugh. His wit and intelligence will be missed!

Before his first stroke, Len was very active and always enjoyed playing tennis, skiing, bicycle riding, hiking, camping, and travelling all done with family and friends. He was very social and was never happier than when he was enjoying food and drink with loved ones.

A memorial gathering will be held on Saturday, June 27, 2015 in the home and garden of Wendy and Len’s house at 560 Lake Drive in Princeton. Everyone is welcome. Please respond to Phoebe Godfrey at phoebe.c.godfrey@gmail.com if you wish to attend or to get in touch with Wendy as the date moves closer.

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John V. Rossi

John V. (Chauncey) Rossi, passed away on Friday, March 27, 2015 at Merwick Care and Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro, New Jersey at the age of 96. He was born on Humbert Street in Princeton on April 5, 1918 and was a lifelong Princeton resident.

After graduating Princeton High School in 1938, he served in the Military Police component of the U.S. Army in South America during World War II. After the war, he worked for F.A. Baman and Sons in Princeton from 1946 to 1964 then worked at Princeton University’s Caldwell Field House from 1964 until his retirement in 2004 at the age of 86. John was a well-respected member of the Athletic Department and thoroughly enjoyed working among the many athletes he came in contact with over the years.

John was known as a superior three-sport athlete at Princeton High School where he co-captained the 1937 football and baseball teams. He was a member of the ’37-’38 basketball teams that won the New Jersey State Championship and the ’37 football team that won the State Championship. John’s baseball career included receiving a tryout invitation from the New York Yankees and he was an All-Star softball player in the Princeton Community Leagues.

John was predeceased by his parents Giovanni and Tomasina (Nini) Rossi, both from Pettoranello, Italy, sister Angelina Rossi Marcoline, brother Louis Rossi, and niece Emma Marcoline Embley. Surviving are nieces Mari Rossi Daetwyler; Barbara Embley Brooks; his special niece, Julia Marcoline; nephews Louis Rossi, Jr.; John Rossi; and Richard J. Embley, Jr.; and 10 grand nieces and nephews.

John was a humble, quiet, and generous man who was much loved by his family and will be deeply missed by relatives and friends.

Funeral services will begin on Friday, April 3, 2015 at 11 a.m. in the Kimble Funeral Home, located at 1 Hamilton Avenue in Princeton, followed by burial at Princeton Cemetery.

Visiting hours at the funeral home are Thursday, April 2 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Friday, April 3 from 10 a.m. until the time of the service.

Memorial contributions may be made to Princeton-Pettoranello Sister City Foundation, 120 John Street, Suite 3, Princeton, NJ 08542; SAVE Animal Rescue, 900 Herrontown Rd, Princeton, NJ 08540; or Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, 237 N Harrison Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

Extend condolences and share remembrances at TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.
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Obit FloryRobert E. Flory

Robert E. Flory, 82, died peacefully on March 16, 2015. He was born to Leslie and Helen (Kezeler) Flory of Oaklyn, NJ. The family later moved to Princeton where he graduated from Princeton High School. Mr Flory (“Bob”) went on to receive degrees in electrical engineering from Cornell University and the University of Pennsylvania. He lived and worked in the Princeton area most of his adult life, but was enjoying retirement with his beloved wife Marjorie in Oro Valley, AZ.

In his four-decade career at RCA’s David Sarnoff Research Center, Mr. Flory focused primarily o`n television disk and tape recording technology. He also was part of the development team for a broadcast camera that was used by NBC studios for more than a decade and which earned RCA an Emmy award in 1981. In the latter part of his career, he helped to develop some of the earliest standards and technologies for High Definition TV.

He was an accomplished, albeit amateur astro-photographer who particularly enjoyed eclipse chasing. He and Marjorie took a number of jaunts to remote locations to observe and photograph such celestial events. He also directed his photographic interests toward the abundant wildlife in his adopted home state of Arizona.

Bob always enjoyed symphonic music and in the last decade he and Marjorie derived much pleasure from their subscription to the local orchestral series. He also appreciated good food and word play – from crossword puzzles to puns. He was an extraordinary engineer, a loyal friend, and a devoted family man.

He was predeceased by his first wife and the mother of his children, Eleanor (Collins) and his sister, June Ann Flory. He is survived by his wife of nearly 23 years, Marjorie Jelinek Flory (previously of Pennington NJ); two children, Robert G Flory (Pamela) of Hopewell NJ and Janice E Flory (Eric Stabb) of Athens GA; three step-daughters, Monica Housen (Tom), Marie Berrien, and Marsha Mimnaugh (Todd); five nieces, Linda, Chris, Ellen, Cynthia and Sarah; and nine grandchildren, Martin, Madeline, Katherine, Hayden, Riley, Ella, Connor, Rogan and Bryson.

A memorial service will be held 10 a.m., May 30, 2015 at Gravity Hill Farm (67 Pleasant Valley Rd, Titusville, NJ). Those wishing to honor his memory might consider a contribution to The Sarnoff Collection at the College of New Jersey or the Tucson Symphony Orchestra.

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Robert W. Ayling

Robert W. Ayling, 89, died on Sunday, March 22, 2015. He was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York and had lived in the Princeton area since 1970. He graduated from Fordham University Class of 1947. Robert worked as a sales executive in the office equipment industry, and worked for Friden Inc., for over 26 years. He was a communicant of St. Charles Borromeo Church in Skillman. While at Brooklyn Prep High School, he was a member of the National Champion 1 mile relay team. In his free time, he enjoyed playing bridge, reading, traveling, and rooting for the New York Yankees and Giants.

Surviving are his wife of 65 years, Margaret; his son Bob and his wife Ann of Bayonne, New Jersey; his daughter Patti Gilmour and her husband Tom of Asbury Park, New Jersey; his 3 grandchildren Tom, Linnea, and Daniel; his great grandchild Clara Louise; and a family friend, April. A Mass of Christian Burial was held on Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 11 a.m. in St. Charles Borromeo Church. Visiting for family and friends was one hour prior to mass from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Charles Borromeo Church in his memory. Arrangements are under the direction of the Hillsborough Funeral Home.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMartha Coate Challener

Martha Coate Challener died peacefully at Stonebridge on Friday, March 27, 2015. She was 90 years young. Her love of reading, of painting, of appreciating the natural world, and of befriending everyone she met, will live on in her children, her grandchildren, her friends, and the generations of children that she taught.

Martha Coate was born in Dayton, Ohio and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She earned her BA from Chatham College. In 1947, she married the love of her life, Richard Challener. The two of them raised three children, Cathy, Elisbeth, and Dan, and lived happily together for 55 years. They shared many passions, including teaching, reading, hiking, gardening, caring for dogs, visiting art museums, and spending time at their cabin in New Hampshire.

Martha began her teaching career in Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania and continued it in Tenafly, New Jersey. She left teaching to raise her children, but returned in 1969 to teach kindergarten at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. She stayed at Stuart for 25 years and often claimed she loved every minute of it. She especially loved to teach children how to read, something she did over and over and over again. She also taught art appreciation, developing a series of talks and contests for elementary school children. She helped create the StuARTS summer program, served as a children’s docent at the University Art Museum, and taught water color to children and adults in her home for many years.

In 2004, two years after her husband died, Martha moved to Stonebridge and, with her dachshund Birdie, made many new friends. She continued to enjoy painting and also took up memoir writing. She wrote a series of vignettes about the many blessings in her life and gave copies to her family on Christmas Day, 2012. She and her family celebrated her 90th birthday in New Hampshire this past summer, and she continued to travel to see her children and grandchildren into this year.

Family members who will continue to hold Martha dear to their heart include her three children; Cathy Challener; Elisbeth Challener and her husband Brett Bachman; and Dan Challener and his wife Melinda and their three children, Brandon, Skye, and Dakota; as well as Martha’s brother David Coate, and his four children, Lisa, Andrew, Amy, and Dan.

Martha Coate Challener loved life. She often said, “Every day is a gift from God. Live it to the fullest, and enjoy every minute.” Her life is proof that we can do that.

A celebration of her life will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, April 2, 2015 at Stonebridge at Montgomery, 100 Hollinshead Spring Road in Skillman, New Jersey.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Princeton or the Stonebridge Employee Appreciation Fund.

March 25, 2015

Obit Campbell 3-25-15Mildred Campbell

Mildred Lucille Corum Campbell, a child of Warfield, Brunswick County, Virginia, died peacefully on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 while a patient at University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, New Jersey. She is survived by her husband of 42 years, H. Stuart Campbell and a sister, Virginia D. Corum of Maryland; four step-children, Constance C. Rinaldi and her husband, Alexander, of New Jersey; Eleanor S. Vulopas and her husband Samuel, of North Carolina; H. Stuart Campbell, Jr., and his wife Alice, of Delaware; and Elizabeth C. Rodriguez and her husband, William, of Maryland; eight step-grandchildren and four step-great grandchildren. Mildred’s other sister, Ruby Corum Garrison, died in 2007. The three girls were the children of Oliver and Hazel Corum, long-time residents of Brunswick County.

Mildred’s childhood was one with a close knit, hard-working family raising tobacco and enjoying Sunday fish fries hosting their many neighbors. She attended Warfield Grade School and graduated second in her class from Alberta High School, Alberta, Virginia. She went to Mary Washington College in Fredericksburg, Virginia from 1951 to 1953 (at that time this college was the girl’s division of the University of Virginia). She then went on to UVA at Charlottesville and graduated in 1956 with a BS degree in nursing. She immediately passed the Virginia State Board of Nursing Examinations and was ultimately registered in Virginia, South Carolina, Texas, California, Arizona, and New Jersey.

Following graduation, Mildred worked in the operating rooms at the University of Virginia Hospital until 1961. During this time she was Head Nurse in plastic surgery for 14 months and Head Nurse in cardiovascular for 2 years. Unfortunately in late 1958 she developed pericarditis (her heart covering calcified and constricted her heart function). She underwent heart surgery to remove the heart covering, was hospitalized for four months and spent a year and a half in recovery at home. When she returned to gradually resume a work schedule, she ironically operated a heart-lung machine that had not yet been developed for her surgery. We speculate her life ultimately would have been far different and less debilitating in her final years had the heart lung machine come along two years earlier.

Nevertheless, this lady was strong of character and dedicated to bringing her skills and experience to the welfare of countless patients throughout her exemplary career in nursing. She was recommended to the operating room staff at the Heart Institute in the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland and served there in 1961 and 1962.

She was hired by the medical university of South Carolina in Charleston as supervisor of the operating and recovery Rooms where she “ran the show” until an exciting opportunity was presented in 1964. Mildred went to Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center in Houston with the chance to “scrub” for two of the world’s most famous heart surgeons at that time: Doctor Michael DeBakey and Doctor Denton Cooley. During her four years in Houston she completed training as a cardiovascular specialist in operating room nursing (one of the first three nurses in the United States to be so trained). She also was one of two civilians allowed to take a course in operating room management at the United States Army Medical Service School in San Antonio, Texas. Her extraordinary experience and reputation now brought her to Cedars of Lebanon Hospital in Los Angeles, California as supervisor of the operating and recovery rooms and supervisory support to the cardiac assist program.

In 1968, Mildred was hired by Ethicon, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson company, as a Nurse Consultant. Ethicon, Inc., the world’s largest suture and wound closure products company, benefited from Mildred’s background with her input on product development and packaging. She was also invaluable in providing marketing support with her many contacts among the operating supervisors around the country. She also developed training programs for the national sales force. After less than a year Mildred was moved to become the first full time nurse consultant to the Johnson & Johnson Hospital Products Company.

In August, 1970, Doctor E. B. (Ted) Diethrich, a protégé of Michael DeBakey, MD, recognized Mildred’s unique background and convinced her to join him in building the Arizona Heart Institute. This was a “once in a lifetime” opportunity for a nurse to undertake such an assignment. Mildred’s years of experience and diversity in operating room nursing, O.R. management and special training in cardiovascular let her confidently accept the offer of this brilliant cardiovascular surgeon to coordinate design, construct, and start-up operations of the new multimillion dollar Arizona Heart Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. She started with drawings, oversaw the construction, developed a budget, ordered all materials and supplies, hired all non-doctor personnel, started operations of diagnostic lab, operating rooms, intensive care units, office space, and all support systems for the Institute. The project was completed in one year and fifteen days.

Mildred resigned in 1972. She and Stuart were married in the Lawrenceville, Virginia, United Methodist Church on December 2, 1972, and took up residence in New Jersey. For ten years then, Mildred became wife, gourmet chef, housekeeper, gardener, house decorator, and step-mother to Stuart’s four children from his first marriage. In 1982 Stuart retired from Johnson & Johnson and he and Mildred bought a little packaging business together. From three employees and three packaging machines at the start, they grew the company over the next 19 years to 126 employees and 30+ machines. Mildred was president of the company and ran operations while her husband took care of finances and marketing. They sold the business and retired in June of 2002. Mildred was an incredible motivator of people and “mothered” many of the more than 1000 employees who passed through the business to a better life.

In April, 1995 a benign tumor (the size of a newborn) was discovered in Mildred’s chest, having grown following her surgery in 1959. She returned to Houston for open heart surgery but they could only remove very little of the mass. It continued to grow slowly, pressing on her heart and lung leading to gradual deterioration of her breathing.

In retirement from their business she enjoyed travel. Having travelled the rest of the world with her husband as he pursued his worldwide responsibilities, now in retirement they concentrated on travelling in America and Canada. They just “wandered” up to six weeks at a time with Mildred’s sister, Virginia, and a cousin’s widow along — they would play bridge most evenings. Those travels took them to most of the lower 48 states, to 31 state capitols, 11 of the 13 presidential libraries and many beautiful national parks.

Mildred became fascinated with the beauty and engineering variety of the countless bridges encountered in her travels and used her photography hobby to capture those features.

Other hobbies or personal pursuits included the Princeton University Art Museum, the Pennsylvania Ballet, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, cross-stitching, interior decorating and a voracious appetite for everything in sports.

She was a member of the Association of Operating Room Nurses from 1956 to 1984; a member of the Plainfield, New Jersey Muhlenberg Hospital Auxiliary; the New Jersey Association of Manufacturers; Who’s Who of American Women; and Who’s Who of America.

This lovely lady was loved, admired, and respected by all whom she encountered in life. She guided and taught and positively influenced so many in an exemplary life. It is understandable that all of her immediate and extended family are so proud of her story.

The family received friends on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at Williams Funeral Home, 410 Windsor Avenue, Lawrenceville, Virginia. The memorial service was conducted at the funeral home on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. followed by a private burial for family members at Oakwood Cemetery, in Lawrenceville, Virginia. Memorial contributions may be made to Antioch United Methodist Church, 15328 Christanna Hwy, Lawrenceville, Va. 23868. Online condolences may be made at www.wmsfhva.com.
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Robert W. Ayling

Robert W. Ayling, 89, died on Sunday, March 22, 2015. He was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York and had resided in the Princeton area since 1970. He graduated from Fordham University Class of 1947. Robert worked as a sales executive in the office equipment industry, and had a 26-year career with Friden Inc. He was a communicant of St. Charles Borromeo Church in Skillman, New Jersey. While at Brooklyn Prep High School, he was a member of the National Champion 1-mile relay team. In his free time, he enjoyed playing bridge, reading, traveling, and rooting for the New York Yankees and Giants. Surviving him are his wife of 65 years, Margaret, his son Bob, and his wife Ann of Bayonne, New Jersey; his daughter Patti Gilmour and her husband Tom of Asbury Park, New Jersey; his 3 grandchildren Tom, Linnea, and Daniel; and his great grandchild Clara Louise.

A Mass of Christian Burial will take place on Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 11 a.m. in St. Charles Borromeo Church in Skillman. Visiting time for family and friends will be one hour prior to mass from 10 to 11 a.m. in the church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Charles Borromeo Church in his memory. Arrangements are under the direction of the Hillsborough Funeral Home.

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Obit Parker 3-25-15John O. Parker, Jr. 

John O. Parker, Jr. died on Wednesday, March 18, 2015, at his home in Skillman, New Jersey. He was 70 years old.

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Mr. Parker earned his undergraduate degree from Bowdoin College in 1966. He served as a submarine officer in the U.S. Navy aboard the U.S.S. Greenfish before earning his Master of Business Administration degree from Harvard University in 1972.

After starting his career at Corning Glass Works, Mr. Parker went on to serve as chief information officer of Baxter Healthcare, Squibb Corp., Sea-land Corp. and SmithKline Beecham. Upon his retirement from the pharmaceutical industry, he co-founded Care Capital LLC, a venture capital investment firm, and later joined Rho Ventures as a venture partner. Over the years, he served as a member of the board of directors of several companies, including Express Scripts, PHT Corp., Medical Present Value, Inc., and Solicore, Inc.

An avid sailor, Mr. Parker’s voyages included a trans-Atlantic passage and trips to South Georgia Island and Antarctica, as well as numerous crossings from the Chesapeake Bay to Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, and Canada. He held a 100-Ton Master’s License from the U.S. Coast Guard. Not limited to the water, Mr. Parker was also a Federal Aviation Administration-licensed aviator with private, instrument, high performance, and seaplane ratings.

While his passions for his career and his travels were great, nothing paralleled Mr. Parker’s love for his wife of 43 years, Beverly, and their family. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his son, Todd, and his daughter, Hilary; his grandsons, Andrew and Kevin; his brother, Jim; his son’s fiancée, Vanessa Alegria; and many in-laws, nieces, and nephews.

A celebration-of-life ceremony will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 11, 2015 at Prospect House on the Princeton University campus. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society in memory of John O. Parker, Jr.

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Obit Fiero 3-25-15Charles E. Fiero, Jr. 

Charles Eldredge Fiero, Jr., a resident of Princeton and Nantucket Island, died on January 24, 2015 at Stonebridge at Montgomery due to complications from pneumonia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Chuck, as he was known to friends and family, was a brilliant man of great integrity and was an enthusiastic mentor to many.

Chuck was born on December 26, 1926 in Bronxville, N.Y. during a violent snowstorm causing his mother to be taken to the hospital by sled. He was the second of five children.

Raised in Bronxville, Chuck spent summers on Connecticut’s Long Island Sound and became a life long lover of the sea. On Nantucket Island, he shared his love with his children and grandchildren.

Chuck graduated from Admiral Farragut Naval Academy as valedictorian and joined the Navy, serving in World War II as a radar technician. His ship was about to leave San Diego for the Pacific when peace with Japan was declared. He then entered Connecticut’s Wesleyan University in 1946 and married Dorothy (Dolly) Hagenbuckle in 1948. Graduating in 1950 with distinction in Economics and as a member of Phi Beta Kapa, he joined Chase Bank’s training program.

During his 25 years at Chase he was made vice president in 1958 and was put in charge of the credit department, Chase’s vast training program. Later, he joined the international department and was asked to open Chase’s first branch in Geneva, Switzerland, and also to restructure and improve Chase’s European network. In 1965, the family moved to London where Chuck became a Board member of what was then the Standard Bank with branches in sub-Sahara Africa.

In 1968, Chuck was asked to become the Under Secretary of Commerce in the Lyndon Johnson administration to check and control the amount of U.S. funds being moved to Europe. He spent a year in Washington and then returned to Chase as director of long range planning and corporate development. Under David Rockefeller, he traveled extensively in the Middle East to assess the impact of OPEC’s wealth on the world’s monetary system. He then became an executive vice president.

In 1976, he left Chase to join the Hay Group, an international consulting group based in Philadelphia, as partner and chief financial officer. During that time, he ran biannual sessions at Northwestern University’s business school emphasizing mergers and acquisitions.

When Hay was sold to Saatchi and Saatchi of London, Chuck and two other partners formed MLR Holdings, a venture capital firm which also included publishing suburban Philadelphia newspapers and magazines. He retired at 78 due to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Chuck was a trustee of Wesleyan University, chairman of Mount Holyoke College Parent Fund, and a member of the Board of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Dolly Fiero, a son Dr. David E. Fiero (and Kathleen) of Princeton, a daughter Diane Claffey (and Don) of Indiana, a daughter Wendy Morgan (and Hugh) of Rhode Island, a sister Margaret Stone in Florida, a sister Jeanette Joynes in Virginia, a brother John W. Fiero of Louisiana, six grandchildren, and one great-grandson.

A memorial service will be held this summer on Nantucket. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, New Jersey Chapter, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, D.C. 20090-6011.

March 18, 2015

Obit Graves 3-18-15Michael Graves

Long-time Princeton resident Michael Graves passed away peacefully at home on Thursday, March 12, 2015. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1934, Graves came to Princeton University to teach in 1962 and opened his architectural firm two years later. 2014 marked the 50th Anniversary of his practice (through April 5, Grounds For Sculpture is exhibiting “Michael Graves: Past as Prologue” in their Museum and Domestic Arts Building). He remained on the faculty at Princeton University until his retirement in 2001 and retained the title of the Robert Schirmer Professor of Architecture, Emeritus following his retirement.

Michael Graves was a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, (FAIA), and is credited with broadening the role of the architect in society and raising public interest in good design as essential to the quality of everyday life. Graves is the president and founding principal of Michael Graves Architecture & Design (MGA&D), which provides architecture, interior design, and master planning services, as well as product design, graphic design, and branding services. MGA&D’s offices are located in Princeton and New York City.

Graves has directly influenced the transformation of urban architecture from abstract modernism toward more contextual responses. Critic Paul Goldberger, writing in The New York Times, called Graves, “truly the most original voice in American architecture.” Graves’s architectural practice has designed over 350 buildings worldwide encompassing most building types.

The product design practice has designed and brought to market over 2,000
products with Target Stores and JCPenney, and manufacturers such as Alessi, Stryker, Kimberly-Clark, Steuben, and Disney.

Graves has received prestigious awards including the AIA Gold Medal, the National Medal of Arts from President Clinton, and the Topaz Medallion from the AIA/ACSA. Graves is the 2012 Richard H. Driehaus Prize Laureate. Graves has become internationally recognized as a healthcare design advocate, with the Center for Health Design naming him one of the Top 25 Most Influential People in Healthcare Design. In 2013, President Obama appointed Graves to the United States Access Board.

Graves received his architectural training at the University of Cincinnati and Harvard University. In 1960, he won the Rome Prize and studied for two years at the American Academy in Rome, of which he is now a Trustee. Graves has received 14 honorary doctorates and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, as well as a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

Graves is survived by his daughter, Sarah Graves Stelfox, her husband Brad Stelfox; three grandchildren: William, Katherine, and Nathaniel Stelfox; two sons, Adam Graves, and Michael Sebastian Min Graves, and his companion, Minxia Lin.

A memorial service is being planned at Princeton University on Sunday, April 12, 2015. Please check the firm’s website at www.mi
chaelgraves.com for details as they develop.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. One of the projects that Michael was most passionate about, he believed in Madonna’s mission and vision to rebuild lives using world-class technology, translational research, and family-like culture. The memorials for Michael Graves will all be used to help build the rehabilitation hospital that he designed and to honor him with a permanent naming opportunity. Checks can be made out to Madonna Foundation-Omaha Campus and sent to: Madonna Foundation, 5401 South Street, Lincoln, NE 68506.

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Merna Goldberg

Merna (Bunny) Goldberg passed peacefully on March 10, 2015 at her home in Princeton surrounded by her family. She was born in Newark, New Jersey on August 8, 1936, daughter of Herman and Bobbi Davis. She leaves behind her devoted husband of 57 years, Marvin Goldberg. She was predeceased by her son, David Goldberg. She is survived by her son Robert Goldberg and wife Sara; her daughter Amy Benjamin, and husband, Alan; and daughter in law, Betina Goldberg Rappoport. She leaves behind seven loving grandchildren: Margaret, Jacob, Emanuel, Daniel, Hannah and Lili Goldberg, and Jesse Benjamin.

Bunny attended Mount Sinai School of Nursing in New York City where she was the recipient of the Guggenheim Award for Nursing. Bunny was a founder and co-director of Hi Hills Day Camp in Somerset County for 36 years. She was a volunteer at the University Medical Center at Princeton and at McCarter Theater, where she was also a member of the Associate Board. She established the annual David Goldberg Lecture in Architecture in conjunction with the Arts Council of Princeton. She also served as a Community Fellow at Princeton University.

Bunny loved nature and enjoyed being by the ocean and in the woods. She loved farms and animals and once worked as a guide at Terhune Orchards in Princeton. She especially valued time spent with her devoted family and her wonderful friends.

Funeral services were held at the Star of David Memorial Chapel, 40 Vandeventer Avenue in Princeton on Friday, March 13, 2015 at 10 a.m. Shiva was observed at their home on 8 Greenholm Street on Saturday, March 14, 2015.

Memorial contributions may be sent to the Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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Obit Merrill 3-18-15Margaret Merrill

Margaret Kirkwood Menzies Merrill died early on March 9, 2015 at her home in Skillman, New Jersey, where she had lived for four years. She had previously resided in Princeton Junction from 1965 to 2010. Margaret was born in Richmond, Virginia and lived in that area throughout her childhood with the exception of a year in Scotland with her parents’ families during the Depression.

She attended Mary Washington College, graduating in 1951 with a degree in Spanish. The Alumnae Placement office encouraged her to accept a primary school teaching job, starting a career that spanned over 40 years, taking off only a few years to start a family before being lured back to the profession that was her calling. While teaching in Martinsville, Virginia, she met her future husband, David Dayton Merrill, a DuPont employee. They married in 1955 and moved to Wilmington, Delaware, and then Charlotte, North Carolina, before finally settling permanently in Princeton Junction.

She was best known for her gifted teaching, and she wove her love of art, music, literature, science, and the humanities into the classroom where many hundreds of children were infected with the joy of learning.

Her husband died in 1985, and she continued teaching until her retirement in 1995. She then filled her days with church activities, grandchildren, and a determination to gather all the good books she came across and give them a home.

She is survived by her sister, Jean Menzies Pleasants of Ashland, Virginia and her husband Joseph; her younger brother John Menzies and his wife Shirley of Mechanicsville, Virginia; and her sister-in-law, Janet Menzies, the widow of Margaret’s youngest brother, Walter Menzies, Jr., of Mechanicsville, Virginia. Also surviving are two daughters: Margaret Elisabeth Walls and her husband John, of Salisbury, North Carolina; and Lynn Ann Cornell and her husband David, of Princeton, and their two children, Marjorie Kirkwood Cornell of North Brunswick, New Jersey and James Ellerson Cornell of Atlanta, Georgia; and a rich circle of extended family and friends.

A memorial service in celebration of her life and in witness to the resurrection will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 21, 2015 at her church home, Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street in Princeton. Contributions may be made to Nassau Presbyterian Church, the Trenton Children’s Chorus, Crisis Ministries of Princeton and Trenton, or Centurion Ministries.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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March 11, 2015

Edward L. Gibson, Sr., MDEdward Lewis Gibson

On Tuesday, January 6, 2015, Edward Lewis Gibson, Sr., M.D. passed away at the age of 82. He was surrounded by family and had recently been in touch with many colleagues and friends.

Born June 6, 1932, Dr. Gibson grew up in Chicago, Ill. He was the son of Mildred M. and Harry H. C. Gibson, an insurance executive, attorney and member of the Chicago Bar Association. He was also the grandson of Truman K. “TK” Gibson, Sr., who was a graduate of Harvard Business School, founder of the Supreme Life Insurance Company of America, mentor to John Johnson of Johnson Publishing, and an early investor in Johnson Products and Ebony/Jet publications. TK maintained a close friendship with W.E.B. DuBois as part of a well-established, but at that time thinly publicized population of well-educated, accomplished African-American leaders dubbed the “Talented Tenth” by Dr. DuBois.

Dr. Gibson studied chemistry at the University of Illinois, earning a Bachelor’s of Science in 1953. He went on to Howard Medical School, graduating in 1957. Following medical school, Dr. Gibson served in the United States Air Force as a Captain and Flight Surgeon. Upon fulfilling his service requirements and receiving an honorable discharge, Dr. Gibson was selected to join Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons as associate professor of anesthesiology. At Columbia and in collaboration with several colleagues, Dr. Gibson conducted research on blood-gas chemistry and anesthetics helping to improve the efficacy of anesthetic compounds.

From Columbia, Dr. Gibson was selected to join the department of anesthesiology at The Medical Center of Princeton moving there with his family in 1967. Within a year he was elevated to department chairman. He was the first African American physician to join the Medical Center’s staff. Starting with a team of nurse anesthetists and one anesthesiologist, Dr. Gibson built the department into a full-fledged state-of-the-art anesthesiology facility, including selection and recruitment of numerous physicians. Additionally, Dr. Gibson was instrumental in establishing and developing The Medical Center’s surgery center.

Along the way, Dr. Gibson mentored several junior physicians, staff, and colleagues, many of whom continue to speak favorably about their early career experiences under his leadership. He also earned the respect not only of his physician colleagues by continuing to share equally in emergency call rotation throughout his career, but he was widely respected as a friendly and accessible physician to members of the broader hospital staff and medical community. In Princeton and neighboring communities, too, Dr. Gibson developed a reputation and rapport with Princeton-area first responders, frequently personally seeing to and monitoring their medical care. Upon his retirement in November 2002, Dr. Gibson continued to remain involved with the Medical Center, attending its Board meetings and advising the next generation of anesthesiology department leadership.

Among the signature accomplishments of Dr. Gibson’s career, perhaps the most notable is his professional legacy. Dr. Gibson created a first-rate department of anesthesiology at a regional medical center in a community that was initially not always that welcoming to its hospital’s first African American physician. Through competence, hard work, commitment, and integrity, he demonstrated not only that it could be done, but that it could be done well, with distinction. In doing so, Dr. Gibson bore out the dream and claim of his grandfather, T.K., Dr. Dubois, and his parents that talent of any color, race, creed or hue could assume its rightful place of leadership in American life, and so set a standard for others to follow.

In his private life, Dr. Gibson cultivated a variety of interests. Among them he studied the German language, enjoyed traveling and took numerous trips, both domestic and abroad with his wife, Nannette. A lifelong animal lover and outdoorsmen, Dr. Gibson was known to maintain a wide variety of pet animals, and to enjoy camping, hiking, and deep-sea fishing. He also loved music from various genres including jazz, opera, classical, and pop. And, he liked to cook. A self-described “foodie,” any and all fortunate enough to sample Dr. Gibson’s cooking will know that his special insights into chemistry informed his talent for cooking. From scrambled eggs to seafood paella to gumbo to turkey soup to beef tenderloin, many can recall the subtlety, uniqueness of flavors, and wonderful combinations with which he infused each creation.

It may be no surprise to know that, subsequent to medical school, Dr. Gibson enrolled in cooking school. In contrast, it may surprise many who knew him to learn that Dr. Gibson, ever curious about and engaged in the world around him, earned a lay ministry degree through correspondence with the University of the South.

In retirement, Dr. Gibson volunteered with Master Gardeners of New Jersey, offering advice and expertise to others who shared his passion for cultivating a variety of decorative and edible plants. He also literally lent his voice to Recording for the Blind by helping to create audiobooks for the visually impaired. Additionally, he was a member of Sigma Pi Phi, Mu Boulé Chapter.

Dr. Gibson is survived by his wife of 58 years, Nannette, his three children, a son-in-law, and three grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made in his memory to The Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 529, Princeton, NJ 08542-0529 and The Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., 40 Rector Street, 5th floor, New York, NY 10006.

A memorial service in honor of Dr. Gibson will be held on March 28, 2015 at 2 p.m. EDT at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, phone (609) 924-2277. Friends, family, colleagues and other well-wishers can send condolences, request further information or RSVP to ELGsrMemorial@gmail.com.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton.

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Obit Sebor 3-11-15Marta Sebor

Marta Sebor passed away peacefully at home on February 28, 2015 at the age of 93. Born in Budapest, Hungary in 1921, she lived in Princeton for over 25 years, the last 15 of which she spent happily at The Windrows retirement community.

Her early years before World War II were filled with happiness, surrounded by a large extended family. During the war she worked for Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat, typing false passports in order to help save the lives of thousands of Hungarian Jews. Marta and her immediate family spent the last two years of the war in hiding, managing to avoid being caught and sent to concentration camps, unlike so many family members and friends she knew. During the war she also met her husband Jan Sebor, a film and stage actor from Czechoslovakia.

Following the war, Marta and her family settled in Israel for seven years, where she opened a cosmetics studio, before coming to the United States. Marta enjoyed her later years in Princeton, where she had many wonderful friendships at the Windrows, and spent considerable time with her beloved grandchildren. Her daughter Ann Mantell, son-in-law Michael Mantell, and her grandchildren Becky Mantell and Matt Mantell, survive her. Donations in Marta’s name may be made to the U.S. Holocaust Museum or JNF-Israel.

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Cyril Maurice Franks

Cyril Maurice Franks, 91, of Bloomington, Indiana died Monday, February 23, 2015 in Bloomington Hospital. Dr. Franks was born in Neath, Wales, United Kingdom. Prior to his arrival in Bloomington, Dr. Franks lived for 52 years in Princeton. In addition to being a distinguished faculty member in the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, Rutgers University, until 1991, he spent his professional career promoting Behavior Therapy. He was a founding member and first president of the American Association of Behavioral Therapy and founding editor of the journal Behavior Therapy, as well as editor of Child and Family Behavior Therapy until 2013. Dr. Franks was the author of several hundred articles, book chapters, and professional texts. For many years he served as program chairperson of the NJ Psychological Association and of the Pavlovian Society of North America. His interests included the MMPI, executive selection and psychological evaluation in general, and the conceptual/philosophical foundations of behavior therapy. He served many professional associations including the New Jersey Psychological Association and the British Psychological Association. Dr. Franks was a licensed practicing psychologist in New Jersey and consulted with patients at Carrier Clinic.

He was predeceased by his father and mother Harry and Celia Franks, and a brother Ronald.

Cyril met the love of his life, Violet, at a Hillel dinner in Minnesota in 1953. They met and married in the span of weeks. He whisked away his American bride to London, where they began their careers and their family. They travelled the world visiting and revisiting family and friends and professional colleagues. In addition to Violet, he is survived by one son, Steven Franks, his wife Karen and their children; Julia of Coral Gables, Florida; Elisabeth of Edinburgh, Scotland; and David Franks of Bloomington, Indiana; as well as one daughter, Sharrin Franks Vernall and her two children, Brendon Liam Miles and Emily Sage Vernall of Auckland, New Zealand.

A brief service was held at Beth Shalom, Bloomington, Indiana on Thursday, February 26, 2015 followed by interment. A memorial service will be held at the Princeton Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street at 1 p.m. on Sunday, March 15, 2015.

Donations may be made in his memory to the American Psychological Foundation, 750 First Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 or online at www.apa.org/APF, Cyril and Violet Franks research fund for stigma in mental illness.

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Theodore G. Kane

Ted Kane passed away on February 23, 2015, at Exeter Hospital in Exeter, New Hampshire, with his family by his side. He was 90 years old.

Ted was the son of J. Sperry Kane and Regina A. Kane of Greenwich, Connecticut and East Dorset, Vermont. He is survived by his children, Theodore Gibbs Kane, Jr., Richard Kane, and Katherine Blaxter, eight grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren. Carroll O’Brien Kane, his beloved spouse of 67 years, died in 2013.

Ted attended Groton School, Harvard College (pre-war), Princeton University (post-war), and Stonier Graduate School of Business. During World War II, he served aboard an LST in the Allied invasion of Normandy. He rowed on the Ivy Champion 1948 Princeton Lightweight Crew.

Ted and Carroll lived in Princeton, New Jersey, Sewickley Pennsylvania, and Exeter, New Hampshire, and spent happy summers on Chappaquiddick Island, Massachusetts, surrounded by family and friends. Ted was a member of Beden’s Brook, Allegheny, Edgartown and Farm Neck golf clubs.

His 50-year career in trust banking included the Chase Manhattan Bank, Stuyvesant Asset Management, and Pittsburgh National Bank, and he served as treasurer to many organizations, including Colonial Club and Trinity Counseling Service.

Ted and Carroll enjoyed travel with family, friends, and classmates, and Ted was at his happiest when planning the next trip.

A memorial service will be held on Chappaquiddick Island this summer.

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Obit Coyner 3-11-15Mildred Coyner

Mildred Emile Coyner passed away on March 6, 2015, at her home in Princeton, New Jersey, surrounded by her loving family. She was 92 years old. She was known and loved for her contributions to her communities, her faithfulness to her church, her loyalty to her friends, and most significantly for her love of her family. Daughter of Jacob and Matilda Grzenda, she was born in Trenton, New Jersey, one of five sisters. For 38 years she was the beloved wife of Harold Frederick Coyner, who predeceased her in 1978.

Mildred made an early mark with her dramatic skills at Trenton High School. She met her soulmate Harold at a church social, and they married in 1940. As a housewife and mother in Yardley, Pennsylvania, Mildred was an endlessly creative member of the New Hope Craft Guild, always experimenting with interesting new genres. She was a designer and creator of clothing for her 4 daughters. Flower arranging was a special passion, and for many years she worked as a wedding and floral consultant.

In 1979, she moved to New Smyrna Beach, Florida, where she became deeply involved in the new Atlantic Center for the Arts as a founder and first chairman of the volunteers, a member of the board, and a tireless fundraiser. She was recognized there with a walkway and the children’s art program named in her honor. She was a loyal volunteer at Fish Memorial Hospital in New Smyrna Beach, receiving several awards for her work. Mildred was endlessly enthusiastic about life, and about the arts in particular, always eager to see what new thing was being created by talented people, no matter how unconventional. Mildred’s great love of adventure extended to her many trips with friends to Europe and the Far East. Moving back to Princeton in 1999, she became involved in local activities, especially at McCarter Theater, where she and her son Robert served as volunteers.

With Harold, she was a founding member of Resurrection Lutheran Church in Yardley. In Princeton, she became a member of the spiritual community of Lutheran Church of the Messiah, where she most recently was an active knitter in Messiah’s Mantles, who create prayer shawls for people in need. Her deep faith was her lodestar, and was her comfort and her hope through the challenges of life.

She leaves her five children, Diana Charnok of Lyme, Connecticut; Cheryl Evans of Princeton; Barbara Marshall of Pawley’s Island, South Carolina; Alison Howard of Lambertville; and Robert Coyner of Princeton; 6 grandchildren; and 9 great-grandchildren.

A celebration of Mildred’s life was held at Lutheran Church of the Messiah in Princeton on Monday, March 9, 2015. Memorial contributions may be made to the Mildred Coyner Scholarship for the Children’s Art Program at the Atlantic Center of the Arts, New Smyrna Beach, Florida (www.atlantic
centerforthearts.org); the National Alliance of Mental Illness (www.nami.org); or the Lutheran Church of the Messiah in Princeton.

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Obit Woolston 3-11-15Lorraine Potent Woolston

Lorraine Potent Woolston, 78, of Princeton, died peacefully from the final stage of Alzheimer’s on March 3, 2015 at Arden Courts of Yardley, Pa. Born in Trenton, Lorraine had been a Princeton resident since 1960.

She was a loving wife (57 years), mother, sister, grandmother, and friend to all who knew her. Among her many passions, she was an avid gardener, splendid cook, music enthusiast, and lover of the outdoors, particularly on Moosehead Lake, Maine where she spent her summers for the last twenty plus years and always enjoyed the sounds of the loons on the lake. She taught her grandchildren how to make the sound of the loon. She enjoyed helping others through her work at the Princeton Public Library in charge of Interlibrary Loans, and as a volunteer leader with the Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts. She especially enjoyed reading to her grandchildren.

The daughter of the late Elmer E. Potent and the late Wilhelmina P. Potent, she was pre-deceased by her son Jonathan R. Woolston. She is survived by her husband J. Rogers Woolston of Princeton; her son Japhet P. Woolston and his wife Zoe of Heinsberg, Germany; her daughter Cynthia W. Maltenfort and her husband Andrew of Burke, Va.; her daughter-in-law Amy S. Woolston of Madison, S.Dak.; and her daughter Gail W. Wilkinson and her husband Bruce of Williamsburg, Va. She is also survived by her brother Victor Jay Potent and his wife Margaret of Middletown, Del. and by her sisters-in-law Eleanor Potent and Charlotte Potent of Hamilton and Columbus respectively.

In addition she is survived by her nine grandchildren: Emma, Nicholas, and Julia Woolston; Alex and Martin Maltenfort; Timothy J. Woolston and Kaitlin Kahn; and Natalie and Alyson Wilkinson, plus several nieces and nephews. She will be missed by her loving beagle Sadie.

Burial in the Ewing Church Cemetery will be private. A memorial service for family and friends will be held at The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, Route 206 and Cherry Hill Road, Princeton on Saturday, April 18, 2015 at 11 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 196 Princeton Hightstown Road #11, Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 — (alzfdn.org.) or to Heartland Hospice Memorial Fund, 333 North Summit Street, Toledo, Ohio 43604 (hospicefund@hcrgives.org).

Arrangements are under the supervision of Kimble Funeral Home in Princeton.

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Obit Mernagh 3-11-15Harry C. Mernagh

Harry C. Mernagh, 92, of Princeton died Friday, February 27, 2015 at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro.

Born in Akron, Ohio, in 1922, Harry had resided in Princeton since 1948. He received his BM degree from Westminster Choir College in Princeton. He sang for two years with the Westminster traveling choir under Dr. John Finley Williamson and he sang with Pro Musica for several years and was a member of Princeton Lodge #38 F&AM. Harry retired from Educational Testing Service (ETS) in 1987. Harry was a veteran of World War II, serving first with 83rd Infantry Division and then with 15th Air Force in Italy.

Son of the late Harry and Beryl (Kirkland) Mernagh, brother of the late Marian Dement and Ralph Smith, he is survived by his wife Myra (they were married in 1945); his daughters Janet Bancroft and husband Robert, Nancy Mertz and husband Gary, and Joanne O’Brien and husband Bob; four grandchildren Heidi Loforese and husband Martino, Shannon Gilkey and husband Brian, Brian Mertz and wife Genesis, Neva Orlando and husband Bill; and seven great-grandchildren Michael, Kayla, Tyler, Jordin, Jameson, Mara, and Domenica.

Harry and Myra shared a wonderful life with family and friends and just being together.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 14, 2015 at All Saints Church, 16 All Saints Road in Princeton.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to All Saints Church or The Salvation Army.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home of Princeton.

A family burial will be in the Princeton Cemetery.

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