December 27, 2017

By Anne Levin and Donald Gilpin

Much of the news in Princeton in 2017 arose in response to actions and initiatives emanating from Washington. It was a year full of political activity, with rallies and demonstrations taking place in Princeton almost weekly.

Immediately following the inauguration of President Donald Trump on January 20, a number of Princeton residents, including at least three Council members, joined more than 6,000 marching in Trenton for women’s rights, civil rights, and other issues. Many in Princeton also expressed concern for arts and education, with cuts threatened for the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities. more

LIVING LARGE: Princeton University women’s lacrosse player Olivia Hompe, left, looks to unload the ball in game this spring. Senior star Hompe ended her career with a bang, setting the Princeton single-season record for points (with 110) and goals (with 75) as she helped the Tigers reach the NCAA quarterfinals. She graduated as program’s all-time leading scorer and goal-scorer with 285 points on 198 goals and 87 assists. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

A number of memorable and somewhat improbable title runs spiced up the pro sports world in 2017. Sloane Stephens shocked the world of women’s tennis when the unseeded and 83rd ranked American won the U.S. Open to earn her first major title. On the diamond, the Houston Astros outlasted the New York Yankees and the Los Angeles Dodgers on the way to winning the first World Series title in franchise history, bringing joy to a city ravaged by Hurricane Harvey. In college football, the Clemson Tigers avenged a defeat to powerhouse Alabama in 2016 in the national final to win its first national title since the 1981 season. more

By Stuart Mitchner

Some years before Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) became as cherished a Christmas tradition as Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, film-buff friends of mine smirked when I dared to suggest that it was a great movie. Admittedly, it beggared belief that anyone could be as noble as James Stewart’s good banker George Bailey or as evil as Lionel Barrymore’s bad banker Mr. Potter. What really made the cynics sneer was that the whole enterprise depended on a tipsy angel named Clarence (Henry Travers), who offers homilies like “Each man’s life touches so many other lives” as he gives a suicidal George Bailey a tour of Pottersville, the mean-spirited, lawless nightmare his town Bedford Falls would have become had he never existed. more

“PORTRAIT OF MY FATHER”: Henriette Wyeth’s 1937 painting of her father, artist N.C. Wyeth, is featured in “Magical & Real: Henriette Wyeth and Peter Hurd, A Retrospective,” running from January 21 through May 16 at the Michener Museum of Art in Doylestown, Pa. The exhibit also features the work of Henriette’s husband, artist Peter Hurd.

In January, the Michener Art Museum will present “Magical & Real: Henriette Wyeth and Peter Hurd, A Retrospective,” an exhibition that explores the work, marriage, and careers of two remarkable artists who contributed to the canon and dialogue of 20th century American art.  more

Ulysses Grantz Dietz

Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville will host curator and author Ulysses Grantz Dietz on January 18 as he delivers a presentation titled “It Was All Modern: Art, Craft, and the Rhetoric of the Marketplace.”

The presentation looks at a range of modern objects, from the 1890s to the 21st century, and explores different meanings of “modern.” more

By Kam Williams

Twenty years ago, Frances McDormand won an Academy Award for Fargo, a delightful whodunit set in a tiny Minnesota town inhabited by colorful local characters. In that Coen Brothers’ black comedy, McDormand played a dedicated police chief who was tireless in her efforts to solve a murder case, even though she was pregnant.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is a similar dark mystery set in the Midwest, that’s also full of folksy characters. McDormand plays Mildred Hayes, the mother of her teenage daughter (Kathryn Newton) whose beaten and raped corpse was found lying in a ditch along a lonely stretch of road. more

ANSWERING THE BELL: Princeton University men’s basketball player Amir Bell, left, goes up for a lay-up in a game earlier this season. Last week, senior guard Bell contributed 18 points, nine assists, and seven rebounds as Princeton defeated the University of Southern California 103-93 in overtime on December 19. The Tigers were slated to be competing in the Diamond Head Classic from December 22-25 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

After the Princeton University men’s basketball team topped Monmouth 69-58 to snap a three-game losing streak, Mitch Henderson sensed that his squad may have turned a corner.

“We have been playing like crap and it is on me,” said Princeton head coach Henderson after the December 12 contest. “I thought tonight we looked like team.” more

DEVELOPING SITUATION: Princeton High girls’ ice hockey player Victoria Zammit brings the puck up the ice last week against the Pingry School at Baker Rink. Sophomore forward and assistant captain Zammit tallied three goals and an assist in a losing cause as PHS fell 11-6 to Pingry in the December 19 contest. The Little Tigers, who moved to 1-2 with an 11-4 loss at Summit last Wednesday, return to action when they play at Princeton Day School on January 3. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

As Victoria Zammit has hit the ice for her sophomore season with the Princeton High girls’ hockey team, she is showing a maturity as a player and a leader.

The forward has five goals and four assists through three games while shouldering extra responsibility as an assistant captain. more

YOUNG GUN: Princeton Day School boys’ basketball player Freddie Young, left,  jumps around a defender in recent action. Last Sunday, freshman standout Young scored 22 points in a losing cause as PDS fell 76-59 to Friends Central (Pa.) in the Springside Chestnut Hill Academy (Pa.) tournament. The Panthers, now 3-4, are next in action when they compete in the Prime Time Shootout at Trenton Catholic Academy from December 27 and 29. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Even though the Princeton Day School boys’ basketball team went 0-2 at the Springside Chestnut Hill Academy (Pa.) tournament last week, Kerry Foderingham liked what he saw from his players.

“I was very excited and pleased with how we played, especially our last game,” said PDS head coach Foderingham, whose team fell 70-62 to the Solebury School (Pa.) last Friday and then lost 76-59 to Friends Central (Pa.) two days later. more

December 20, 2017

KLEZMER MUSIC IN THE SQUARE: The Odessa Klezmer Band performed festive dance music in Palmer Square on Thursday evening at the annual lighting of the Menorah. The event also featured special guest speakers and refreshments including doughnuts, and latkes with applesauce. (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

By Anne Levin

New Jersey’s State Leasing and Space Utilization Committee Monday approved a controversial state office buildings project in Trenton that has been vigorously opposed by some city residents, business owners, and some members of the local government. The three-member committee voted unanimously to allow the development plan for state office buildings, which would tear down two existing government buildings and relocate them outside of the central downtown area. more

Princeton Day School senior student-athlete Luke Franzoni  enjoys the moment as he signs a National Letter of Intent to attend Xavier University and play for its Division I baseball program. Pictured with Franzoni in the front row are his parents, Paul Franzoni, Sr. and Lauren Franzoni. In the back row, from left to right, are Head of School Paul Stellato, Associate Director of College Counseling Cindy Michalak, and Director of Athletics Tim Williams.

By Donald Gilpin

A recent study, co-authored by Princeton University Economics Professor Janet Currie, reveals significant increases of health risks for infants born to mothers living within two miles of a hydraulic fracturing (fracking) site.

“Given the growing evidence that pollution affects babies in utero, it should not be surprising that fracking, which is a heavy industrial activity, has negative effects on infants,” said Currie, who directs the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. more

By Donald Gilpin

The Princeton-based Coalition for Peace Action (CFPA) held a Candlelight Vigil for Diplomacy, Not War in Palmer Square last Thursday, followed by a Peace Potluck and a Peace Program at the Nassau Presbyterian Church. About 20 people braved the cold weather for the vigil, and more than 50 overall participated in the evening’s events.

CFPA Executive Director the Rev. Bob Moore, who for 40 years has been organizing for peace full-time, expressed mixed feelings of hope and apprehension in the face of recent events. In particular, he emphasized “momentum toward this war with North Korea,” citing experts who claim that the prospects of a nuclear war are “chillingly realistic.” more

READING AND SHARING: People & Stories’ Crossing Borders program at the Bo Robinson facility in Trenton has been as rewarding for participants, including Libby Rainey, far left, and Ted Fetter, far right, as it has for clients.

By Anne Levin

For the past 31 years, People & Stories has been pairing clients of the Rescue Mission of Trenton, the Albert M. “Bo” Robinson Assessment & Treatment Center, and other Trenton facilities, with trained volunteers for reading, discussion, and sharing of literary short stories. Chief among the organization’s initiatives is Crossing Borders With Literature, which aims specifically to bridge gaps between members of the urban and suburban population. more

A VETERAN’S BEST FRIEND: Jeff Mullins, a veteran who has suffered from PTSD and an officer of Rebuilding Warriors, credits his service dog, Zoey, with helping him cope with civilian life.

By Anne Levin

A year and a half ago, the Lawrence Township dog daycare Camp Bow Wow held a small fundraiser for Rebuilding Warriors, a nonprofit that matches service dogs with veterans diagnosed as amputees and those with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injury (TBI). The event raised some money. And it made Louise McKeown, the camp’s owner, think about doing more. more

The FreeB bus will start the New Year with a new schedule on January 2. The enhanced service combines the previous commuter and neighborhood schedules into one expanded route for residents of Princeton and the greater community.

The new schedule will offer additional routes in the morning, making it possible for people who live and work in Princeton to commute by public transportation. It also provides service later in the day, enabling riders who live in communities such as Elm Court, Redding Circle, and Princeton Community Village to have transportation home from work and community events in the evening. Early morning service to the Dinky Station for those who wish to transfer to NJ transit train service will continue.  more

The FreeB bus will start the New Year with a new schedule on January 2. The enhanced service combines the previous commuter and neighborhood schedules into one expanded route for residents of Princeton and the greater community.

The new schedule will offer additional routes in the morning, making it possible for people who live and work in Princeton to commute by public transportation. It also provides service later in the day, enabling riders who live in communities such as Elm Court, Redding Circle, and Princeton Community Village to have transportation home from work and community events in the evening. Early morning service to the Dinky Station for those who wish to transfer to NJ transit train service will continue.  more

SWIMMING INITIATIVE: Emily Becker, left, founder and lead instructor of the Princeton Youth Swimming Initiative, encourages her students, Euphemia and Jordan Tejeda, in the Princeton Fitness & Wellness Center pool.

By Donald Gilpin

Working as a lifeguard and teaching swimming lessons to campers at Community Park (CP) pool in the summer of 2016, Emily Becker, now a Princeton High School (PHS) junior, observed several children in the pool who could not swim. She spoke with the children and learned that typical swim instruction was too expensive for them to participate. more

More than 35 events will take place in Trenton during Patriots Week, the annual commemoration of the city’s crucial involvement in the Revolutionary War. It has been 241 years since the Battle of Trenton saved the cause of the Continental Army and the American Revolution in 1776.

Planned are battle reenactments, planetarium shows, lectures, historic tours, and more. The famous battle will be reenacted on Saturday, December 30 at 11 a.m. A Revolutionary Pub Crawl is led by the Trenton Downtown Association on December 27, with Colonial dress welcome. The Capital Singers of Trenton will perform on December 30, and the New Jersey Capital Philharmonic closes out the week on New Year’s Eve with a concert at the War Memorial auditorium. more

Advancing Opportunities, Inc. has announced a new program that will provide support to students with disabilities attending Mercer County Community College who are interested in pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM). Selected students with STEM-related majors will receive enhanced services to help them pursue their career goals. more

“SAVE THIS I”: This painting by Charles Bryan is part of “Past Looking Forward,” an exhibition featuring the work of Bryan and Diana Weymar at the Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School. The exhibition runs from January 8 through February 1, with an artist’s reception on January 12 from 12:30 to 1 p.m.

The Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School will present “Past Looking Forward,” featuring the work of artists Charles Bryan and Diana Weymar, from January 8 through February 1. There will be an artists’ reception on Friday, January 12 from 12:30 to 1 p.m. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. more

“CLOSE ENCOUNTER”: This watercolor painting by Beatrice Bork is part of “Naturally Inspired,” an exhibit also featuring the work of Bill Jersey, Maxine Shore, and Joe Kazimierczyk. The exhibit will be at Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville from January 4 through February 4, with an opening reception on January 7  from 1-4 p.m.

Fine artists Bill Jersey, Maxine Shore, Beatrice Bork, and Joe Kazimierczyk explore the great outdoors through their unique interpretations in “Naturally Inspired,” an exhibit at Artists’ Gallery in Lambertville running January 4 through February 4. All are invited to attend the opening reception on Sunday, January 7 from 1 to 4 p.m. more

“RED BERRIES:” Linda Gilbert’s acrylic painting will be featured in the Gourgaud Gallery’s ninth annual “Open Call Exhibit,” running January 7 through January 26. A reception with refreshments will be held on Sunday, January 7 from 1 to 3 p.m.

The Gourgaud Gallery will present its ninth annual “Open Call Exhibit” from Sunday, January 7 through Friday, January 26. The theme is trees and plants. An opening reception with refreshments will be held on Sunday, January 7 from 1 to 3 p.m.  more