July 22, 2015

NJSOIf orchestras nationwide are struggling financially, those who create for these orchestras are surely further behind. Just as musicians are compelled to play, composers must write, and often opportunities to present the fruits of their labor are few and far between. New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO) provided such an opportunity last week with a Composition Institute held at Princeton University that culminated in a concert Thursday night at Richardson Auditorium.

The four composers who participated in the 2015 NJSO Edward T. Cone Composition Institute not only were mentored through the process of creating a work for the orchestra, but were also counseled on the business side of classical music. Institute Director Steven Mackey programmed the concert at Richardson Auditorium with four works from these very diverse composers. more

RAM TOUGH: James Bunn follows through on a swing in action this spring during his junior campaign with the Virginia Commonwealth University baseball team. Speedy outfielder Bunn, a Princeton resident who starred in soccer, hockey, and baseball for the Pennington School, helped the VCU advance to the NCAA tournament Super Regionals this spring, a first in Rams’ program history.(Photo Courtesy of VCU’s Office of Athletic Communications)

RAM TOUGH: James Bunn follows through on a swing in action this spring during his junior campaign with the Virginia Commonwealth University baseball team. Speedy outfielder Bunn, a Princeton resident who starred in soccer, hockey, and baseball for the Pennington School, helped the VCU advance to the NCAA tournament Super Regionals this spring, a first in Rams’ program history. (Photo Courtesy of VCU’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Months before the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) baseball team started its 2015 season, James Bunn sensed it was going to be a big spring.

“In the fall, me and my roommates said this team is special, there is something going on,” said VCU outfielder Bunn, a Princeton resident who starred in soccer, hockey, and baseball for the Pennington School. “We had a core of seniors who didn’t want to be denied.” more

NTU ArleesThe reviews are in, and they are good! In keeping with the growing trend of juice bars springing up across the country, customers are lining up to sample — and re-sample — the range of choices at Arlee’s Raw Blends.

Opened in April at 246 Nassau Street, the new juice bar is owned by the brother and sister team of Brian Moore and Paula Taylor. Their establishment, with its emphasis on cold-pressed juice and natural and organic ingredients, is special, they maintain.

Their background includes spending summers at their grandparents farm (owned by the family for three generations) in Georgia, and a familiarity and love of fresh produce and healthy eating.

“I’ve always been on the road to health and wellness, and my journey led me here,” explains Ms. Taylor. “The business evolved, and we grew into this. There is a movement toward healthy eating today, and we see that more and more people want to eat healthy.” more

July 21, 2015

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The Delaware & Raritan Canal Watch will hold the next in a series free walking tours of the D&R Canal on Sunday, July 26.

The walk will explore the part of the canal park between Carnegie Road in Lawrence Township and Alexander Road in Princeton, a distance of 5.6 miles. A shorter walk of 2.9 miles to Port Mercer is an option. more

shutterstock_57954124Today, July 21 until 5 p.m., Princeton’s cooling station at Witherspoon Hall’s Community Room will be open for those seeking a safe place to stay cool during the heat wave. Residents, especially senior citizens, are strongly advised to take advantage of these cooling stations if needed. Free water is accessible at the station, which is at 400 Witherspoon Street.

To stay safe and cool during heat advisories and warnings, follow these tips:

Stay indoors in air-conditioned spaces as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.

Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. more

July 15, 2015
NEW BUILD ON VALLEY ROAD: Situated on Valley Road, this new home comprises a main residential building (left) plus a garage with what looks to be a roomy apartment or studio space above. It sits on a lot flanked by more modest dwellings.(Photo by Linda Arntzenius)

NEW BUILD ON VALLEY ROAD: Situated on Valley Road, this new home comprises a main residential building (left) plus a garage with what looks to be a roomy apartment or studio space above. It sits on a lot flanked by more modest dwellings. (Photo by Linda Arntzenius)

To many Princeton residents it seems that no matter where you turn, an old house is being torn down to make way for a new – and usually much larger – residential structure. more

ALL HANDS ON DECK: Members of the Princeton University men’s heavyweight crew program celebrate after Princeton won the Rowe Cup team points title at the Eastern Sprints in early May. Earlier this month, all three men’s heavyweight crews competed at the Henley Royal Regatta in England. While none of the boats earned titles, they acquitted themselves well at the famed competition. The men’s first varsity and second varsity 8s were each in the final eight of the Ladies Challenge Cup while the third varsity eight made the quarterfinals of the Temple Challenge Cup.(Photo by Aleka Gürel)

ALL HANDS ON DECK: Members of the Princeton University men’s heavyweight crew program celebrate after Princeton won the Rowe Cup team points title at the Eastern Sprints in early May. Earlier this month, all three men’s heavyweight crews competed at the Henley Royal Regatta in England. While none of the boats earned titles, they acquitted themselves well at the famed competition. The men’s first varsity and second varsity 8s were each in the final eight of the Ladies Challenge Cup while the third varsity eight made the quarterfinals of the Temple Challenge Cup. (Photo by Aleka Gürel)

As three Princeton University men’s heavyweight crews prepared to compete in the Henley Royal Regatta in England, training went well on both sides of the Atlantic.

Prior to heading across the pond, Princeton got in some intense work on Lake Carnegie for two weeks in mid-June. more

Once Princeton University’s spring term ended last month, the annual exodus of students left the dormitories, dining halls, and classroom buildings empty – but not for long. Starting in early June, a different crop of pupils began arriving for a slew of summer programs that have kept the campus humming with activity. more

Reports on plans to renovate part of the Princeton Public Library and monitor tour buses on Nassau Street were the focus of a meeting of Princeton Council Monday night. The governing body also heard from Princeton Police Chief Nicholas Sutter and a member of the consulting firm The Rodgers Group about a recently completed strategic plan that will serve as “a roadmap for us to the future,” Mr. Sutter told Council. more

Is climate change funny? According to Joshua Halpern, it can be. Finding humor in our environmental crisis is perfectly acceptable, the Princeton native believes, especially if it helps people process the magnitude of the situation and take action for positive change. more

WARS OF WORDS: Eliza Doolittle (Bits Sola) has successfully discarded her lower class background and learned from Henry Higgins (Jake Robertson) how to speak and behave like a duchess, but where does that leave their relationship and her future? Princeton Summer Theater’s production of George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” (1913) runs through July 19 at the Hamilton Murray Theater on the Princeton University campus.

WARS OF WORDS: Eliza Doolittle (Bits Sola) has successfully discarded her lower class background and learned from Henry Higgins (Jake Robertson) how to speak and behave like a duchess, but where does that leave their relationship and her future? Princeton Summer Theater’s production of George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” (1913) runs through July 19 at the Hamilton Murray Theater on the Princeton University campus.

There are reasons why Pygmalion has been the most popular and most famous of George Bernard Shaw’s plays. More than 100 years after its 1914 London premiere those reasons ring out loudly and clearly in Princeton Summer Theater’s (PST) striking production.

Shaw’s fiery, intelligent language, his rich sense of comedy and his irreverent and searing social commentary all sparkle in this play, and the top-flight PST ensemble of eight with a polished professional production crew under the direction of R.N. Sandberg make the most of this brilliant text.  more

HIGH TECH: Aaron Shavel unloads the ball in action for the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) men’s lacrosse team. Shavel, a former Princeton Day School standout, wrapped up his RPI career this spring by tallying 12 goals and three assists to help the Engineers go 10-5.(Photo Courtesy of RPI Athletic Communications)

HIGH TECH: Aaron Shavel unloads the ball in action for the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) men’s lacrosse team. Shavel, a former Princeton Day School standout, wrapped up his RPI career this spring by tallying 12 goals and three assists to help the Engineers go 10-5. (Photo Courtesy of RPI Athletic Communications)

During his first two seasons with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute men’s lacrosse team, Aaron Shavel struggled to find a rhythm at the college level.

“The game is a lot faster and the players are a lot bigger,” said Shavel, a former Princeton Day School star attacker.

“I had to be a lot quicker and more decisive, the big thing was the speed of everything. You have to refine your game. It took a while for me to grow into it; I was making a lot of turnovers.”

A coaching decision early in Shavel’s junior year changed the game for him.

“At the end of fall ball, the coach (Jim Townsend) talked to me; he said I wasn’t getting a lot of playing time but thought I could still be an asset to the team,” said Shavel.

“He said he wanted to move me to midfield. I hadn’t played that since middle school but I said anything to help the team and get on the field.”

Adjusting well to his new role, Shavel helped trigger the team’s offense in 2014, scoring 24 points on 17 goals and seven assists.

“I went from a second or third line attacker to first line midfield,” said Shavel.

“It was better for my skill set; I was able to get my hands free. I also got to play on the man-up unit. When you are on attack, you are on the field the whole time. As a midfielder, you are on for 30 seconds and then off for two minutes. Being on the man-up got me one or two more runs. I was on low left; I had a comfort level there and it helped me get a rhythm.” more

ART THAT HEALS: Images such as this painting, titled “Indian Summer Bouquet,” will be among the works by local artist Joanne Augustine on view and for sale (with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting the hospital) at University Medical Center of Princeton through November 8. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 31, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to www.princetonhcs.org/art by Friday, July 24. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

ART THAT HEALS: Images such as this painting, titled “Indian Summer Bouquet,” will be among the works by local artist Joanne Augustine on view and for sale (with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting the hospital) at University Medical Center of Princeton through November 8. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 31, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to www.princetonhcs.org/art by Friday, July 24. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

The University Medical Center of Princeton (UMCP) will host a wine-and-cheese reception on Friday, July 31, to mark the opening of an exhibition featuring work by local artist Joanne Augustine.  more

The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce will hold the annual Mid-Summer Marketing Showcase on Tuesday, July 21, from 4-7 p.m. on the green at Palmer Square. The showcase is free and open to the public, with the rain date set for the following day. more

CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT: Members of the the Princeton Little League (PLL) squad  celebrate last Thursday after they edged Ocean Township 5-4 at Farmview Fields to win the Section 3 50/70 Intermediate tournament. It is the first-ever sectional crown won by the PLL program. The team will now go for a state title and faces West Deptford in the first round of the states on July 15 in the four-team competition being held at Winslow Township.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT: Members of the the Princeton Little League (PLL) squad celebrate last Thursday after they edged Ocean Township 5-4 at Farmview Fields to win the Section 3 50/70 Intermediate tournament. It is the first-ever sectional crown won by the PLL program. The team will now go for a state title and faces West Deptford in the first round of the states on July 15 in the four-team competition being held at Winslow Township. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Having gone undefeated in tournament play this summer, the Princeton Little League (PLL) 50/70 Intermediate squad found itself trailing Ocean Township 4-2 in the fifth inning of the final round of the Section 3 tourney last Thursday.

But PLL star infielder Ben Petrone wasn’t overly concerned about the deficit. more

On July 7, at 2:04 p.m., a 28-year-old male from Hillsborough was charged with one count of theft by deception after an investigation revealed that as an employee of the Princeton University Store, he stole cash from the store register at various times during a 16 month period, totaling $26,000. Bail was set at $5,000.

 

book revThe peace of the heart is positive and invincible, demanding no conditions, requiring no protection. It just is.

—Henry Miller, from The Colossus of Maroussi

If nothing else, Greece’s last-ditch stand against austerity has led me to the poetry of George Seferis, given me a reason to reread Henry Miller’s Colossus of Maroussi (1941), and reminded me of three “it just is” evenings of peace on the Acropolis, each on the same day in the first week of August, all in the space of six years.

Miller writes of arriving in Greece on the eve of World War II: “I had entered a new realm as a free man … for the first time in my life I was happy with the full consciousness of being happy,” because “to understand that you’re happy and to know why and how … and still be happy … in the being and knowing, well that is beyond happiness, that is bliss, and if you have any sense you ought to kill yourself on the spot and be done with it.”

That’s vintage Henry Miller — never go halfway, take it to the rhetorical limit, damn the torpedoes! full speed ahead! If there’s any writer anywhere who embodies the antithesis of austerity it’s Henry Miller. And in Miller’s Colossus, Greece is “the antithesis of America”: “Economically it may seem unimportant [those were the days], but spiritually Greece is still the mother of nations, the fountain-head of wisdom and inspiration.” At the moment mother Athens is under siege. While the front page of Monday’s online edition of the New York Times says the European moneylenders have reached an agreement on the Greek debt crisis, the story comes with a photo worth a thousand words showing a street person holding an empty glass, crumpled as if dead on the pavement in front of an Alpha Bank ATM where people are waiting in line. more

CREATIVITY AT REST: Landscape artist and ideas man Peter Soderman (left) and wood and metal artist Greg Napolitan take time out to enjoy Princeton’s first Parklet in front of Small World Coffee on Witherspoon Street. Mr. Napolitan carved the two huge wooden benches in the parklet after being contacted by Mr. Soderman to participate in the tiny park that takes up two parking spots in front of the coffee shop. The project was a the result of a joint effort by the municipality, the Arts Council of Princeton, and several members of Princeton’s creative community.(Photo by L. Arntzenius)

CREATIVITY AT REST: Landscape artist and ideas man Peter Soderman (left) and wood and metal artist Greg Napolitan take time out to enjoy Princeton’s first Parklet in front of Small World Coffee on Witherspoon Street. Mr. Napolitan carved the two huge wooden benches in the parklet after being contacted by Mr. Soderman to participate in the tiny park that takes up two parking spots in front of the coffee shop. The project was a the result of a joint effort by the municipality, the Arts Council of Princeton, and several members of Princeton’s creative community. (Photo by L. Arntzenius)

Visitors to Princeton’s first “Parklet” located across two parking spots in front of Small World Coffee on Witherspoon Street are not only delighted by the concept and design of the space. They are intrigued by the hand behind two enormous wood benches, each of which has been carved from a single block of wood.  more

New Hope

The 2015 Sixth Annual New Hope Film Festival will take place from July 24 through August 2. The Festival is proud to be honoring Susan Seidelman with a Lifetime Achievement Award on Sunday, August 2 for her outstanding contributions to film. Seidelman is a writer, producer, director, and actor. Her best-known film is “Desperately Seeking Susan,” starring Madonna, which Seidelman directed. For more information, visit www.newhopefilmfestival.com.

Waiters Race

DON’T SPILL IT! The walkways at Princeton Shopping Center transformed into a race course last Thursday for the fifth annual Waiters’ Race, sponsored by the Princeton Merchants Association. After Mayor Liz Lempert kicked off the event, 70 men and women from 15 local restaurants balanced glasses of water and BAI beverage bottles minus their caps on trays as they raced around the courtyard.  more

Art 1This year is the 174th Anniversary of the John A. Roebling’s Sons company, once the largest employer in Trenton and a world leader in the construction of suspension bridges. To mark the occasion, The Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie will present an exhibition centered on the business that was owned by four generations of the Roebling family over 112 years.

The exhibition, which opens with a reception Friday, July 17, from 6 to 8 p.m., will be on view through December 6.

Clifford W. Zink, author of The Roebling Legacy, will speak and conduct a tour of the remaining buildings of the Roebling complex in Trenton at dates and times yet to be announced. For details, check the museum’s website, http://ellarslie.org.

John A, Roebling started making wire rope in 1841 in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, and moved his factory to Trenton in 1848. His sons built the steel and wire mill and town of Roebling, in 1905. In 1953, the family sold the Trenton and Roebling plants to the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company (CF&I). CF&I closed the Trenton plants in 1973 and the Roebling plant in 1974.

Mr. Roebling was the world’s foremost builder of suspension bridges in the 19th century and his bridges spanned major rivers when people said it couldn’t be done. His son Washington A. Roebling completed the most famous Roebling bridge, the Brooklyn Bridge, in 1883, and today it is an iconic national landmark. more

July 14, 2015

Floral TT

D&R Greenway presents a spring-inspired poetry reading at the Johnson Education Center in Princeton on Wednesday, July 15 at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for a light reception. Carolyn Foote Edelmann, Vida Chu, Sharon Olson, Betty Lies, and Linda Arntzenius will read poetry featured in the April 2015 edition of Princeton MagazineThe readings will be accompanied by a slideshow of floral arrangements styled by Diana Moore and photographed by Andrew Wilkinson.

The reading will also include a special introduction by Princeton Magazine Publisher and Architect Robert Hillier.

All of the evening’s poets are members of the U.S. 1 Poets Cooperative and appear in U.S . 1 Worksheets. This literary journal showcases writers from across the globe.

For more information, visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ballet

Attention, ballet fans: On Saturday, July 18 at 3 p.m., Intensio, a group of stellar dancers from American Ballet Theatre, will hold an invitation-only working rehearsal at McCarter Theatre. Intensio is the project of Daniil Simkin, a soloist with ABT.

He describes it as “an art project and series of performances created and curated by me and my family. Our intention is to merge the highest level of ballet and choreography with the new possibilities of media in order to create a unique and special experience for the audience.”

The troupe is using McCarter to rehearse for an upcoming appearance at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Lee, Massachusetts July 22-26. Members of the company along with Mr. Simkin include ABT’s Isabella Boylston, Alexandre Hammoudi, Blaine Hoven, Calvin Royal III, Hee Seo, Cassandra Trenary, and James Whiteside, as well as Céline Cassone, a special guest artist from Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal.

They will perform new works by choreographers Alexander Ekman, Gregory Dolbashian, Jorma Elo, and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa.

The rehearsal will be held in the Matthews Theatre at McCarter, which is located at 91 University Place.

July 13, 2015

The pool at Mary Moss Park, in the Witherspoon/Jackson neighborhood, was reopened Monday after a brief shutdown due to cracks in its plaster bottom.

The town closed it for repairs last Wednesday after a municipal employee cut her foot while walking in the pool. Its very old, dating back at least to the fifties,said Ben Stentz, Princetons Recreation Director. Why it started to peel more rapidly in the last few weeks, we dont know. But it brought to our attention the fact that the deterioration was getting worse.

Temporary repairs have been made to the pool to keep it safe through the summer. The small, shallow pool is used regularly by children from Princeton Nursery School and others from the neighborhood. Its concrete, so it has been replastered and repainted many times,Mr. Stentz said. It shows its age, but still serves a nice function.

The future of the Mary Moss Park, and the pool, is being reevaluated by the town and will be the subject of feedback from the neighborhood and the community. Its up in the air. Were not sure right now what the renovation will look like,said Mr. Stentz. Well see what 2016 brings.

July 8, 2015

Breaking News TT

Shoppers at Quaker Bridge Mall are now able to recharge their electric cars, in 30 minutes or less, at new charging stations. At an opening ceremony Tuesday morning, David Crane, the CEO of NRG, charged his personal electric vehicle (EV). Also in attendance were congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin.

The sites, known as Freedom Stations, are equipped with DC Fast Chargers, which can deliver 40 miles of range in as little as 15 minutes, allowing EV drivers to quickly charge their vehicles. The station also has a Level 2 charger that can charge all EVs.

Simon (owner of the mall) is committed to providing sustainable amenities for our customers and the opening of an EV charging station in a market where there is a lot of interest in electric vehicles is a great example of that,said Mona Benisi, Senior Director of Sustainability for Simon. The locations of our shopping centers across the U.S. mean that Simon is ideally positioned to contribute to the development of a a national infrastructure for electric vehicle charging stations, and also advances the companys sustainability efforts.

The charging stations will occupy two parking spots located on the Grovers Mill side of the property, near the lower level mall entrance between Sears and Lord & Taylor.

For additional information, visit www.quakerbridgemall.com.