December 2, 2015

AM Slaughter

WOMEN MEN WORK FAMILY: Anne-Marie Slaughter, speaking at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, looks for revolutionary changes in the workplace and in society to bring about equality and fulfillment for men and women in the next phase of the women’s movement. (Photo by Sameer Khan)

Anne-Marie Slaughter, former director of policy planning for the State Department under Hillary Clinton, called for a “new social contract,” to complete “the second half of the women’s movement” in a speech Monday at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, where she had served as dean from 2002 to 2009.

“We’ve made enormous progress, but we still have a long way to go,” she told the crowd of about 200 (female-male ratio about 4:1) mostly Princeton University students and faculty with a small contingent from the larger community.

Advocating a focus on care, men, public policy, and collective action, Ms. Slaughter explained how her thinking on the subject of gender equity, work, and family has changed since her 2012 Atlantic Monthly piece “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All” became one of the most widely read and hotly debated articles in the magazine’s history.  more

Hillary Chute and Richard Dienst will be at Labyrinth Books on Wednesday, December 15 at 6 p.m. to discuss Ms. Chute’s new book Disaster Drawn, about the ways in which graphic narratives document the disasters of war.

Investigating how hand-drawn comics have come of age as a serious medium for engaging history, Disaster Drawn explores the ways in which graphic narratives by diverse artists, including Jacques Callot, Francisco Goya, Keiji Nakazawa, Art Spiegelman, and Joe Sacco, document war. Ms. Chute demonstrates why, even in the era of photography and film, people understand hand-drawn images to be among the most powerful forms of historical witness of war. more

Mobile

CLOSING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE: Participants in the district’s new Mobile Access Program get tips from teacher Daniel Scibienski at a training session held at John Witherspoon School in October. More sessions will take place as the program expands to a total of about 200 eligible students across the district.

The Princeton Public Schools Mobile Access Program (MAP) will be providing all eligible students with free internet access and laptops, with the goal of giving every student in the district, regardless of means, with access to online educational resources to build their academic skills, to enhance communication between home and school, and to increase general knowledge.

So far 20 students in the district at John Witherspoon Middle School have received laptops and a Wi-Fi hotspot through the Sprint network, including three gigabytes of internet data each month at no cost.

The Princeton Education Foundation provided funding for this initiative, which will eventually extend to about 200 eligible students across the district. The ultimate goal of MAP is to ensure that every student can complete computer-based assignments and conduct academic research at home. A training session has taken place for the first group of participating families and more sessions will be scheduled as the program expands. more

Pr Academy

Alfred F. (Rik) Dugan III (left) was officially installed as the second headmaster at Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart in a ceremony last month presided over by Abbot Brian H. Clarke (right), O.S.B. of St. Mary’s Abbey Delbarton School.  Mr. Dugan, who assumed his duties on July 1, 2015, praised “the palpable can-do spirit” at Princeton Academy, an independent school for boys in junior kindergarten through eighth grade. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton Academy)

Art Zink

ZINK’S “MERCER MAGIC” TALK: Clifford Zink will talk about his new book, “Mercer Magic: Roeblings, Kusers, The Mercer Automobile Company and America’s First Sports Car,” on Sunday, December 13, at 2 p.m. at Ellarslie, the Trenton City Museum. The cost is $5 for members of the Trenton Museum Society and $10 for non-members. Pictured above is a photograph of New Mercers lined up at the factory for road testing in 1912.

Clifford W. Zink, the foremost expert on the Roebling family and the John A. Roebling’s Sons Company, talks about his new book, Mercer Magic: Roeblings, Kusers, The Mercer Automobile Company and America’s First Sports Car, on Sunday, December 13, at 2 p.m. at Ellarslie, the Trenton City Museum, in Cadwalader Park, Trenton. The cost is $5 for members of the Trenton Museum Society and $10 for non-members.

Mercer Magic is a story of Trenton’s entrepreneurship, innovation, and national achievement in the exciting first decades of the 20th century when the new technology of automobiles was sweeping the country.

Members of the Roebling and Kuser families started the Mercer Automobile Company in 1909 to build automobiles “in a class by itself,” and that’s what they did. Mercer Automobile Company produced fine touring and sporting cars, most notably the two-seater Raceabout, which an amateur sportsman could drive around town during the week and take to the local track to race on weekends.  more

Art Provincetown

“DRIZZLY PROVINCETOWN DAY”: This 18×24 acrylic and collage on canvas is an example of local artist SiriOm Singh’s artwork. There will be an exhibition at the Blawenburg Café in Skillman displaying Singh’s “’scapes,” which include landscapes, seascapes, and inner scapes. The artist sees all images as portraits to create structures that have a personality and become living things that serve as a testament to how we care for our world. Singh’s exhibition will be on display until Friday, January 8.

Local artist SiriOm Singh will be displaying his art in Skillman’s Blawenburg Café located at 391 County Road 518 in Blawenburg until Friday, January 8. The work can be viewed weekdays from 7 a.m.–4 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m.–3 p.m. There will be an artist reception on Friday, December 5 from 6-8 p.m.

Singh sees himself as an abstract expressionist. He uses acrylic and collage applying layering techniques, primarily with a pallet knife, to create images that are intended to help the viewer experience inner peace, love, and unity.

The show displays recent images of landscapes and seascapes, some painted on location, and some recreated in the studio, from memory, or from the artist’s imagination. Singh sees all images as portraits – representations of our humanity and our need to plant ourselves solidly in the world. more

Carol

AJ Cedeño and Graeme Malcolm as seen in a recent production of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” at McCarter Theatre in Princeton. Tickets start at just $25 and are available by calling the box office at (609) 258-2787 or online at www.mccarter.org. Special discounts are available for groups of six or more. Purchase a McCarter Theatre membership and automatically receive one free ticket. (Photo Credit: T. Charles Erickson)

The American Boychoir’s annual “Home for the Holidays” performance will take place at Richardson Auditorium on Sunday, December 20 at 4 p.m. To purchase tickets, call (609) 258-9220.

Artistic Director Fernando Malvar-Ruiz states, “This year’s holiday program was created as an homage to our many supporters and fans. It stemmed from this fundamental question: if people could pick one song for the American Boychoir to sing for them during the holidays, what would it be? The answers to that question put together an ‘all-star’ collection of favorites, as well as what I hope to be a most enjoyable concert experience.”

Earlier this year, there was some doubt that the American Boychoir School would even be open for the holidays, because the school filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in April and the fate of the school was unknown. However, the American Boychoir School leadership, students, parents, and community came together in an unprecedented effort to not only keep the doors open, but to position the school and its revered choir for the future. The holiday season offers the perfect opportunity for the American Boychoir to celebrate and thank its many friends and supporters who are working so hard to keep the school open. more

Join the Princeton Singers for their traditional holiday favorite, A Child’s Christmas in Wales on Saturday, December 12 at 6 p.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton.

Narrated by author Paul Watkins, holiday carols will be accompanied by a reading of Dylan Thomas’s classic story. This local favorite will be, as always, replete with snowballs, Christmas pranks, and a heart-warming ending.

The program is recommended for children ages 10 and older. For more information, and to purchase tickets, please visit www.princetonsingers.org.

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NTU Camillo 12-2-15

DINING ITALIANO: “We’re keeping the Camillo’s tradition with the same authentic Italian cuisine. At the same time, we are continuing to offer many of the Avanti specialties.” Camillo Tortola, chef/owner of the new Camillo’s Avanti in Pennington, is happy to offer his signature Italian cuisine to both former and new customers.

Good news! Camillo is back. After a hiatus of two years during which time he had closed Camillo’s Cafe in the Princeton Shopping Center, Camillo Tortola has opened Camillo’s Avanti.

He recently purchased Avanti Restaurant at 23 West Delaware Street in Pennington, and is now ready to offer customers his traditional classic Italian cuisine in Camillo’s signature relaxing and enjoyable atmosphere.

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well,” says Chef Tortola, quoting Virginia Woolf.

As a chef, he has been devoted to creating delicious authentic Italian dishes. It is what he has been doing his adult life, and what fascinated him when he was a boy. Born in Italy, and brought up by his grandmother in the small village of Miranda, Camillo was intrigued by his grandmother’s cooking. more

November 25, 2015

Theater PBS

NEW ORIGINAL PBS SERIES: The Lewis Center for the Arts presents a screening of the new PBS Civil War drama, “Mercy Street” on Monday, December 7 at 7 p.m. followed by a panel discussion moderated by Christina Lazaridi. Both events are free and open to the public, but advance reservations are strongly recommended. Tickets can be reserved at arts.princeton.edu/mercystreet. (Photo Courtesy of Antony Platt/PBS)

The Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University will present a special preview screening of the new PBS Civil War era drama series Mercy Street on Monday, December 7 at 7 p.m. in the James M. Stewart ’32 Theater at 185 Nassau Street. The screening, preceded by a reception beginning at 6:15 p.m., is free and open to the public, however advance reservations are encouraged.

Set in Virginia in the spring of 1862, Mercy Street follows the lives of two volunteer nurses on opposite sides of the conflict; Mary Phinney (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), a staunch New England abolitionist, and Emma Green (Hannah James), a naive young Confederate belle. The two collide at Mansion House, the Green family’s luxury hotel that has been taken over and transformed into a Union Army Hospital in Alexandria, a border town between North and South and the longest-occupied Confederate city of the war. Ruled under martial law, Alexandria is now the melting pot of the region, filled with soldiers, civilians, female volunteers, doctors, wounded fighting men from both sides, runaway slaves, prostitutes, speculators, and spies. more

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A HOME FOR BUDDING ENTREPRENEURS: At a recent ribbon-cutting, Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert, left, and Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber, right, officially opened the University’s Entrepreneurial Hub. Flanking them on the portico were Provost David Lee, left, and Mung Chiang, right, who directs the University’s Keller Center and chairs its Princeton Entrepreneurial Center. (Photo by Denise Applewhite, Office of Communications)

Like most contemporary educational institutions, Princeton University considers entrepreneurship a priority — so much so that it has dedicated a 10,000-square-foot building in downtown Princeton for just that purpose. The Entrepreneurial Hub officially opened with a ribbon-cutting on November 11, confirming the school’s commitment to innovation among its students and partnerships with the local community.

The red brick building at 34 Chambers Street has served throughout its history as offices for the telephone company, the Gallup company, William Sword & Company, and Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty. The University is renting it from owner Kinsale Properties, of which Jud and Matt Henderson are principal partners. more

Saint Peter’s University Hospital has been recognized for the fourth consecutive year as a national “Top Performer on Key Quality Measures” by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of healthcare organizations in the United States.

Saint Peter’s was the only hospital in its geographic portion of central New Jersey — defined as Middlesex, Somerset, Hunterdon, and Mercer counties — to be cited on Tuesday for excellence in all six of the categories measured by The Joint Commission: heart failure, heart attack, surgical care, pneumonia, childhood asthma, and perinatal care.

Among those categories, Saint Peter’s was one of only two hospitals in New Jersey cited for excellence in the care of childhood asthma. In addition, Saint Peter’s was one of only 17 of the 71 hospitals in New Jersey that submitted data to receive the Top Performer award for 2014. On a broader scale, Saint Peter’s is among only six percent of Joint Commission-accredited hospitals in the United States to earn Top Performer status for clinical quality for four consecutive years.  more

Cherry Hill

Pre-schoolers from Cherry Hill Nursery School in Princeton gathered items for the Crisis Ministry food pantry of Mercer County in preparation for Thanksgiving distributions.

Six new police officers, sworn in two weeks ago, are preparing to take on the ever-increasing challenges of police work in Princeton 2016.

From a pool of more than 800 applicants, the officers passed a written exam, a physical exam, two panel reviews, an intensive background investigation, and two additional interviews.

Princeton Police Chief Nicholas Sutter described the search for “a diverse pool of candidates who possess intelligence, integrity, empathy, strong communication skills, and physical fitness.”

The number of officers in the Princeton Police Department (PPD) will remain at 52, with the new recruits taking the place of retirees over the past few years.  more

DSC_0333

Princeton Day School junior Ruchita Zaparde has been named a 2015 Nickelodeon HALO (Help and Lead Others) Honoree for her work with the non-profit organization Sew a Future, which provides sewing machines to widows with young children in rural India.  The HALO awards show will air on Nickelodeon on Sunday, November 29 at 7 p.m.  Ruchita’s fundraising efforts have helped more than 213 widows acquire sewing machines.

SlaughterAnn-Marie Slaughter, president and CEO of New America and former director of policy planning for the U.S. State Department under Hillary Clinton, will discuss her new book, Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family (Random House, 2015), at 4:30 p.m., Monday, November 30, 2015, in Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall on the Princeton University campus. A book sale and signing will follow the discussion. This is a ticketed event.

Ms. Slaughter is the Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and former dean of the University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, which is sponsoring the discussion.

After leaving her position at the U.S. State Department for family reasons, Ms. Slaughter wrote an article for The Atlantic, “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” which generated much media attention and sparked a national debate.

For information, contact brhuber@princeton.edu.

Chess Champs

Princeton Day School fifth grade chess champions — (left to right) Winston Ni (Princeton), Arjun Kumar (Moorestown), Jai Kasera (Princeton) — hold their team’s trophy.  The PDS teams were first in the first, fifth, and seventh grade New Jersey Grade Championship last Sunday in Lincroft, New Jersey.  

SchiffPulitzer Prize-winning author Stacy Schiff discusses and signs copies of her new book, The Witches: Salem, 1692, Tuesday, December 1 at 7 p.m. at Princeton Public Library.

Stacy Schiff is known for her biographies, many of them about notable women throughout history. In her latest project, she looks to one of the few historic events to center around women, the Salem Witch Trials. The book is set during the mysterious year of hysteria and injustice that resulted in the execution of 19 alleged witches and wizards and reveals the religious, social, and political context in which it took place.

According to Megan Marshall, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Margaret Fuller, “Stacy Schiff’s The Witches is an indelibly etched morality fable, the best recounting of the Salem hysteria in modern times. Clear-eyed and sympathetic, Schiff makes the complex seem simple, crafting a taut narrative that takes in religion, politics, folklore, and the intricate texture of daily life in Massachusetts Bay, with particular attention to those ‘wonder-working’ women and girls who chose this moment to blow apart the Puritan utopia they’d helped to found. It’s all here in one devilish, oracular book.”

Stacy Schiff won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Biography and Autobiography for Vera (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov): Portrait of a Marriage. She is also the author of Cleopatra: A Life and A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America. Her essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times and The New Yorker.

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The Parkinson Alliance has announced that the 2015 Carnegie Center 5K and Fun Run, held last September 26 in Princeton, raised over $95,000 and net proceeds will go to Parkinson’s disease research. In addition to raising money for much needed research, the race brought together runners and supporters to help find a cure for the disease.

The 2015 race was supported by 51 sponsors, including Boston Properties who served as the host. On the day of the race, The Parkinson Alliance presented the Bucks County Roadrunners Club (BCRR) with the King Award for their longstanding support of the event. In addition to their passion for running, BCRR participates in this race as a way of supporting several members of their club who are living with Parkinson’s disease and yet, continue to run.  more

Theater Cabaret

A longtime fixture of the New York cabaret scene, two-time Tony Award winner Christine Ebersole will perform her new show, Big Noise from Winnetka, at McCarter Theatre on December 12 at 8 p.m. Ebersole created the production with her longtime music director Bette Sussman. Song selections in Big Noise from Winnetka include “Alfie,” “Woodstock,” “Landslide,” and “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” To purchase tickets, visit www.mccarter.org or call (609) 258-2787. 

November 18, 2015

CP School

Community Park kindergarteners in Sheila Aguilar’s Dual Language Immersion (DLI) class went outdoors last week to discover signs of fall. This is the first year for the DLI program in grades K-1 at Community Park, with a planned expansion of the program to include second grade next year.

(Photo by MS AKR)

(Photo by MS AKR)

Thanks to a $175,000 gift from the Synod of the Northeast, Witherspoon Presbyterian Church now owns outright the Robeson House, the birthplace of actor and civil rights leader Paul Robeson and the parsonage occupied by Mr. Robeson’s father, the Rev. William Drew Robeson, when he was pastor of the historic church.

The announcement of the gift at a banquet last Sunday celebrating the church’s 175th anniversary wasn’t the only good news for the more than 200 people attending the event at The Nassau Inn. The congregation also received a formal apology from the Presbytery of New Brunswick for asking blacks to leave Nassau Presbyterian Church in 1836.

The monetary gift means the church can cover the two mortgages on the Robeson House. “This gift is just wonderful for us,” said Denyce Leslie, a ruling elder who chairs the church’s buildings and grounds committee. “Now we clearly outright own four properties within town — the church, the Paul Robeson House on Witherspoon Street, the church office next door, and the manse on Walnut Street.”

The apology from the Presbytery of New Brunswick for removal of Rev. Robeson from his post in 1900, after 21 years of service, is equally significant, Ms. Leslie said. “We had worked on this for several years starting with David Prince many years ago,” she said, referring to an interim pastor of the church, who died last year. The Rev. Prince and his wife Nancy, who was present at the anniversary celebration, researched the history of the church and learned that Rev. Robeson was forced out when some white people thought he was too outspoken about the rights of black people. more

As of January 5, according to Frontier Airlines, commercial planes from Trenton-Mercer Airport (TTN) will fly to just four destinations, all in Florida. Frontier, the only commercial carrier serving TTN, plans to resume service to six other destinations in the spring.

“The changes are being made based on supply and demand,” stated Frontier Corporate Communications Representative Jim Faulkner. “There’s a greater demand to travel to warm destinations in the winter so that’s where Frontier’s focus is.” more

DAR

On October 25, the Princeton Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, members of which are shown here, dedicated a plaque on the grave of Josephine Ward Thomson Swann at Princeton Cemetery. Mrs. Swann founded the chapter in 1893, and was essential in preserving the deteriorating Rockingham, the last wartime headquarters of George Washington, which is in Kingston. By bequeathing her home to the town of Princeton, she enabled it to acquire the property that became its borough hall and senior center. And by leaving Princeton University $325,000 to help found its Graduate School, she helped it to expand as an institution.