September 24, 2014
COOKING UP A BENEFIT: The culinary delights of local chefs will share the spotlight with author and guest speaker Gary Shteyngart at the Princeton Public Library’s annual gala fundraiser on November 1. Among the chefs are, from left: Scott Anderson of Elements, Terry Strong of Mediterra, and Ben Nerenhausen of Mistral.(Photo by Yamile Slebi)

COOKING UP A BENEFIT: The culinary delights of local chefs will share the spotlight with author and guest speaker Gary Shteyngart at the Princeton Public Library’s annual gala fundraiser on November 1. Among the chefs are, from left: Scott Anderson of Elements, Terry Strong of Mediterra, and Ben Nerenhausen of Mistral. (Photo by Yamile Slebi)

There was a time when Princeton was not considered a restaurant town. But as any local foodie knows, those days are in the past.

Capitalizing on the popularity of several successful eateries in and around town, the Princeton Public Library decided to ask local chefs to participate in this year’s benefit. The chefs agreed not only to prepare the food for the event on Saturday, November 1, but to donate most of it, for what planners of the party hope will be 425 or more guests.

Before dinner, the featured speaker at “Beyond Words” is Gary Shteyngart, author of novels The Russian Debutante’s Handbook, Absurdistan, and Super Sad True Love Story as well as the memoir Little Failure. Mr. Shteyngart will speak at 6 p.m. at Princeton University’s McCosh Hall.

Following the author’s talk, the party moves to Frick Chemistry Building on the campus. Partygoers can walk to the location or be ferried by shuttle bus. Dinner will be presented at food stations catered by restaurants including Chambers Walk Cafe, Elements, Eno Terra, Main Street, Mistral, Mediterra, Tre Piani, and Witherspoon Grill. The meal follows an array of hors d’oeuvres and drinks from Cherry Grove Farms, Olives, and Olsson’s. Desserts and additional items come from The Bent Spoon, Bon Appetit, Chez Alice, House of Cupcakes, Small World Coffee, and Thomas Sweet.

“After our success at last year’s event with dinner from food trucks, we knew that we wanted to offer a variety of cuisines,” said Yamile Slebi, chair of the benefit. “And we realized that we have that right here in town. We want to build community. After all, the library is known as the community’s living room. So we decided to invite local restauranteurs to work with us. We wanted to be inclusive, instead of hiring a single caterer.”

First to be approached by the library were Scott Anderson, chef at Elements, and Ben Nerenhausen, chef at Mistral. “They immediately responded,” Ms. Slebi said. “because they feel like they are our neighbors. The same thing happened with the Momos (of Mediterra and Eno Terra), Jack Morrison (Witherspoon Grill) and the owners of Main Street and Chambers Walk.”

Princeton University is donating the use of its buildings for the benefit. “We couldn’t have done anything without their support and generosity,” Ms. Slebi said. Additional donations have come from large companies like NRG, and smaller operations such as Suretech, Pinneo Construction, and Hamilton Jewelers. “Even the little companies that participate in the farmers’ market are helping out,” said Ms. Slebi. “One is donating its honey. So it’s a way for us to help promote them, while they support us.”

The evening includes silent and live auctions, as well as an after-party in a tent behind the Frick building. “It’s with a DJ in a clear tent, under the stars, for those who wish to stay longer,” Ms. Slebi said.

Benefit tickets range from $200 to $500 each. The library raised $130,000 from last year’s event. Sales are “going well,” Ms. Slebi said on Monday. “We’re halfway sold. It’s the biggest fundraiser of the year for the library, in terms of events.”

 

Two lectures will be presented at the Princeton Public Library as part of the Princeton Area Six Historic Sites N.J. 350th Celebration this weekend, September 26 and 27.

Historian Tom Fleming kicks off the weekend-long event with “The Quest for Justice in the American Revolution” on Friday at 7 p.m. One of the foremost historians of the American Revolution, Mr. Fleming is the author of Now We Are Enemies, the Story of Bunker Hill, a 50th-anniversary edition of which was published in 2010. His most recent book is The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers.

Closing out the weekend will be a lecture, “Black Soldiers in the American Revolution” given by author Arthur Lefkowitz. Mr. Lefkowitz is the author of award-winning books including The Long Retreat, George Washington’s Indispensable Men, The American Turtle Submarine, The Best Kept Secret of the American Revolution, and others. His latest book is Benedict Arnold in the Company of Heroes. Mr. Lefkowitz is a member of the Board of Governors of the American Revolution Round Table and has lectured extensively for the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the National Park Service and Fraunces Tavern Museum, and has taught American history at Middlesex County College.

Princeton Area Six Historic Sites N.J. 350th Celebration activities will be held throughout the weekend at Princeton Battlefield State Park/Clarke House, Morven, Updike Farm, Drumthwacket, Bainbridge House and Rockingham. For more information, see visit
princeton.org.

The library is at 65 Witherspoon Street. Call (609) 924-9529 or visit www.princetonlibrary.org.

ANGUISH IN ADVANCE OF SCOTS REFERENDUM: With just ten days to go before the Scottish Referendum question “Should Scotland be an independent country,” the British tabloids show fervent appeals to Scottish voters with headlines such as “Don’t Let Me Be Last Queen of Scotland,” “Only Ten Days Left to Save Britain,” “Scotland Heads for Exit,” and “‘No’ Camp Scrambles to Promise Scots New Powers.” One of the best came several days later, when Scotland’s First Minister, Alex Salmond, scenting a win for his “Yes” campaign, taunted U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron in the Scots vernacular. “Your Jaicket’s on a Shoogly Peg,” he said, which might roughly be translated to: “Mr. Cameron, your leadership days are numbered.” Come voting day, Mr. Salmond had to eat his words when a “No” vote kept Scotland part of the United Kingdom.(Photo by L. Arntzenius)

ANGUISH IN ADVANCE OF SCOTS REFERENDUM: With just ten days to go before the Scottish Referendum question “Should Scotland be an independent country,” the British tabloids show fervent appeals to Scottish voters with headlines such as “Don’t Let Me Be Last Queen of Scotland,” “Only Ten Days Left to Save Britain,” “Scotland Heads for Exit,” and “‘No’ Camp Scrambles to Promise Scots New Powers.” One of the best came several days later, when Scotland’s First Minister, Alex Salmond, scenting a win for his “Yes” campaign, taunted U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron in the Scots vernacular. “Your Jaicket’s on a Shoogly Peg,” he said, which might roughly be translated to: “Mr. Cameron, your leadership days are numbered.” Come voting day, Mr. Salmond had to eat his words when a “No” vote kept Scotland part of the United Kingdom. (Photo by L. Arntzenius)

Ties between Princeton and Scotland run as deep as the fight for independence that saw the death of General Hugh Mercer at the Battle of Princeton. Mercer was a medical student at Aberdeen University when he fled his native land for America after the bloody massacre of Highlanders by the Royal troops of George II at Culloden. That battle, the last fought on British soil, put an end to hopes of independence for Scotland in 1746. It’s ironic that Mercer met the cold steel of a British bayonet right here in Princeton in another battle for independence in 1777.

Mercer County bears his name, while other familiar place names hereabouts, such as Witherspoon, Drumthwacket, and Morven, echo their Scottish past.

Even today, many ex-patriot Scots make their home here as Scotland’s First Minister Alex Salmond found last year when he spoke to a crowded auditorium at Princeton University. So it was with some interest, even some anxiety, that many Princeton residents watched last week’s referendum on Scottish independence.

Last Friday morning in Scotland, as the votes were being counted after the referendum on Thursday that would have taken Scotland out of the United Kingdom, I packed my bags following a two week stay in my native land and headed back to Princeton. The previous two weeks had been agonizing emotionally. Everyone I spoke with seemed exhausted after months of discussing the issue. Many seemed to be in denial, wishing the whole debate would somehow go away.

Although I wasn’t able to vote, having lived outside of the country for some three decades, I had to ask myself “how I would vote?” Truth be told, I had a “Yes” sticker on my heart and a “No” sticker on my head. And that went for a lot of the people I spoke to as well.

As the big day neared, excitement and anxiety could be felt in the air in almost equal measure. For a moment the balance of power between Edinburgh and London teetered and then thumped down with a bump on the northern side of the border as Westminster politicians made haste for Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Aberdeen. British Prime Minister David Cameron delivered an impassioned plea for Scots to stay in the union. As a Conservative, or Tory, he dared not go to the traditionally Labor stronghold of Glasgow, for fear of scoring a home goal, it was said, so he spoke in Aberdeen.

There was interest all over the world. And quite rightly so. For if Scotland voted for independence what would there be to stop the Shetland Islands, now part of Scotland but closer geographically and culturally to Norway, from severing ties with Scotland, especially with most of the U.K. oil reserves located just off their shores? And what about the Basques, the Catalans, The Québécois, and the Walloons. Visitors from Spain, Canada, and Belgium could be seen bearing the flags of their own hopes for independence in Edinburgh last week. Hikers from all three countries were interviewed by an intrepid BBC reporter on the top of Ben Nevis, the highest point in the British Isles. They had come to witness the referendum in anticipation of the same, perhaps, for their own lands.

Fear played a part too. I heard it said that leaders of the “Yes” campaign didn’t do such a great job in responding to the concerns of people like the young woman staffer in the Atholl Arms Hotel in Blair Atholl who worried about the security of an independent Scotland. “I don’t trust Alex Salmond or Nicola Sturgeon,” she said “they have not been up front with the costs of funding a Scottish army and what about the economy? Will Scotland end up like Norway where a pint costs nine pounds? Will the National Health Service end up privatized like in America? What will happen then to our old people who can’t afford to turn their heating on now let alone choose between heat and paying for medicine.”

Many Glaswegians looked upon the sudden attention of Westminster Tories as “a bit late.” Memory of injustice runs deep in this city where older voters still express resentment of the Conservative party dating back to the days of U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Often regarded as a hero south of the border, The Iron Lady is more often vilified north of it for policies that sold off Scotland’s council housing stock (the equivalent of a what is called affordable housing here in Princeton) and measures against the trades unions.

In spite of last minute vows for further powers to devolve from the U.K. government in Westminster to the Scottish parliament in Edinburgh, many Scottish voters I spoke to seemed skeptical of change from that quarter. Others were eager to share their optimism for the “Yes” position. “What have we got to lose?” was a frequent response of former Labor voters who had defected to the nationalist position. “It’s time for change,” and “Scotland can do better on its own,” were other common sentiments.

The euphoria of the “Yes” campaign seemed to obliterate concerns about the army, the pound, Trident, and the relations with rUk (the rest of the UK). The Queen, one wondered, might even need a passport to visit her highland estate of Balmoral.

One 75-year-old “No” voter from Inverness, spoke movingly for staying with the Union after 300 years, as he recalled the united spirit that prevailed against Hitler’s Germany during World War II. Originally from the north of England near the Scottish border, he described bomb blasts that had removed the plaster on the interior walls of his tenement home. He remembered a time before there was a National Health Service and pointed out that the oil so many “Yes” campaigners seemed to be relying on to solve all of Scotland’s problems could well be claimed by an independent Shetland. “My grandfather, who came from the Shetlands, would call himself a Shetlander but never a Scotsman,” he said.

There was much rallying on Wednesday, but on Thursday, most people went quietly to the polling stations to cast their ballots. While there was some criticism in the press of rude behavior by “Yes” campaigners in the last few days before the referendum, this reporter observed little of it, and witnessed instead a general recognition that the vote was going to be bittersweet whatever the outcome.

On the whole, people were well-mannered about their differences. All seemed to recognize the gravity of what was at stake. Families as well as regions were divided on the issue. In Edinburgh, the main street, known as the Royal Mile, was filled as usual with tourists. Numerous international media had set up but there were few politicians to talk to. All of the campaigning was over. The media frenzy came later, on Friday, after the ballots had been counted.

At around 5 p.m. Nicola Sturgeon, Deputy First Minister for Scotland, recognized defeat. Mr. Salmond was conspicuously absent. He later announced his resignation from the post of First Minister and as leader of the Scottish National Party, although he will stay on as the MSP for Aberdeenshire East.

Although he had described the referendum as a “once in a lifetime” chance, Mr. Salmond gave some hope for another stab at independence in his resignation speech even as he spoke of handing over to a younger generation. Scotland had not chosen separation from the United Kingdom “at this stage,” he said, clearly leaving the door open for future change.

 

Randy Cohen

Randy Cohen

Randy Cohen will interview  Pulitzer Prize-winning Irish poet Paul Muldoon and his wife novelist Jean Hanff Korelitz for his public radio program Person, Place, Thing on Monday, September 29 at 7 p.m. in the Community Room at the Princeton Public Library. Guests on the program are asked to speak about a person, a place, and a thing they find meaningful, rather than about themselves.

Paul Muldoon is the Howard G.B. Clark ’21 university professor in the Humanities at Princeton and the founding chair of the Lewis Center for the Arts where he is a professor of creative writing. He is also the poetry editor for The New Yorker. His new collection One Thousand Things Worth Knowing: Poems will be published by Farrar Straus and Giroux in January. According to the publisher, “Muldoon can be somber or quick-witted — often within the same poem: The mournful refrain of “Cuthbert and the Otters” is ‘I cannot thole the thought of Seamus Heaney dead,’ but that doesn’t stop Muldoon from quipping that the ancient Danes “are already dyeing everything beige/In anticipation, perhaps, of the carpet and mustard factories.”

Nick Laird’s assessment, in The New York Review of Books, is that Muldoon is “the most formally ambitious and technically innovative of modern poets,” an experimenter and craftsman who “writes poems like no one else.”

Publishers Weekly calls Jean Hanff Korelitz’s new novel You Should Have Known (Grand Central $26) an “excellent literary mystery” that “unfolds with authentic detail in a rarified contemporary Manhattan.” Her 2009 novel, Admission, about a reader in Princeton University’s Office of Admissions, was made into a movie starring Tina Fey in 2013. Her other novels include The White Rose, The Sabbathday River, and A Jury of Her Peers.

Randy Cohen won multiple Emmy awards as a writer for Late Night with David Letterman and for 12 years wrote “The Ethicist” column for The New York Times Magazine.

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CENT'ANNI: Dorothea van Dyke McLane and Guy Richards McLane on their wedding day.

CENT’ANNI: Dorothea van Dyke McLane and Guy Richards McLane on their wedding day.

Dorothea’s House, the Italian-American cultural center in Princeton, celebrates its 100th anniversary on October 5 with entertainment by Coro d’Italia, an Italian American singing and dancing group based in Upper Montclair, and specialties from area restaurants and food purveyors representing regions throughout Italy. The event will be held from 2 to 5 p.m., rain or shine.

Dorothea’s House, located at 120 John Street, was founded as a living memorial to Dorothea van Dyke McLane, a volunteer social worker who assisted Princeton’s newly arrived Italian immigrants in the early 1900s. Similar Italian culture centers exist in metropolitan areas across the United States, but Dorothea’s House is a rare example of an ethnic settlement house that still thrives and serves the public today. It now serves community members, regardless of their background, as an Italian-American cultural institution, providing programs, events, and a link from the Princeton of today to the Italian immigrants who settled in the area over 100 years ago.

Admission to the celebration is free. Visit www.dorotheashouse.org for more information.

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Illustrator Brian Floca is signing a copy of his 2014 Caldecott Award-winning book “Locomotive” at the Princeton Public Library’s Children’s Book Festival on Saturday. Comments from some of the young readers will be found in this week’s Town Talk. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

September 20, 2014

Before a packed house under the lights brought into Harris Field for homecoming, the Princeton High football team defeated Ewing 7-0 on Friday night. PHS scored on a 11-yard touchdown run by junior star Rory Helstrom in the third quarter as it moved to 2-0. Senior linebacker Sam Smallzamn keyed the defensive effort with a fumble recovery and a fourth quarter interception that sealed the win. The Little Tigers, who hadn’t won a game since 2012 before their season opening 28-7 victory against Hamilton on September 13, will look to keep on the winning track when they play at Hightstown on September 27. For more details on the win over Ewing, including quotes from Smallzman and head coach Charlie Gallagher, see the September 24 issue of the Town Topics.

September 19, 2014

Princeton officials have moved the date for starting demolition of the former Princeton Hospital site to Monday, September 22. Originally targeted for today (Friday), the razing will begin with the building closest to the parking garage, according to Princeton’s municipal engineer Bob Kiser.

Workers have been on site for the past several weeks preparing for the demolition. The entire process is expected to take four to six months. Asbestos removal from the main hospital building has been completed, except for the roof flashings, which the Yannuzzi Wrecking and Recycling Corporation is in the process of taking out.

The demolition will begin Monday, weather permitting. For more information, visit www.avalonprinceton.com.

September 18, 2014

Full page fax printYesterday afternoon, Princeton police announced the capture of Wesley A. Gugliuzza, a 28-year-old homeless man charged with the TD Bank robbery that occurred on Monday, September 15, in the bank at 883 State Road.

Police detectives were led to Mr. Gugliuzza, who was apprehended in Old Bridge, after getting a confidential tip. The arrest was a coordinated effort between Princeton and Old Bridge detectives. Mr. Gugliuzza was apprehended without incident.

Mr. Gugliuzza’s photograph was shared by news agencies after he was captured on surveillance video. He is currently incarcerated at the Middlesex County Correctional Center in New Brunswick, and is charged with one count of first-degree robbery, one count of third-degree terroristic threats, and one count of fourth-degree tampering with evidence. Bail has been set at $300,000.

September 17, 2014
MARKING A MILESTONE: Members of the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund celebrated their 10th anniversary Monday with a reception at Mediterra. The fund promotes civil rights and helps provide access to health care and education for low-income Latin American immigrants.

MARKING A MILESTONE: Members of the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund celebrated their 10th anniversary Monday with a reception at Mediterra. The fund promotes civil rights and helps provide access to health care and education for low-income Latin American immigrants.

For a growing number of Latino immigrants in Princeton, Trenton, and other parts of Mercer County, the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund (LALDEF) has provided much-needed assistance in everything from learning English to finding proper health care.

It has been a decade since a group of Princeton citizens calling themselves the Latin American Task Force decided to incorporate as a public charity. But the organization, started by local residents including Anne Reeves, founding director of the Arts Council of Princeton; Ryan Lilienthal, immigration attorney; and representatives from Princeton Friends Meeting, had already been helping the town’s Latino community for years. They reorganized in response to growing alienation faced by Latino residents due to an increased level of immigration enforcement after 9/11.

These days, LALDEF operates out of the Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton and a community center in Trenton’s Chambersburg neighborhood. Through its programs, more than 1,000 children and adults have gotten access to preventive health care and immunizations, Latino students have been mentored as they transition from high school to college, English and computer skills have been taught, and assistance in filing tax returns has been given.

A $25,000 grant from the Princeton Area Community Foundation (PACF) has helped LALDEF with recent initiatives. “As with all of our grants and grantees, we saw important work being done for people in our community, by good and competent people,” said Nancy Kieling, PACF outgoing president, at the reception on Monday. “It’s hard to build a grass roots organization from the ground up. It’s wonderful to see, with this 10 year celebration, that it has worked.”

LALDEF chairman Patricia Fernandez-Kelly said she is most proud of the organization’s Community ID Card program, which has issued identification cards to some 7,000 residents allowing them to access basic services. Speaking to the assembled crowd, executive director Maria Juega recalled the founding of the organization. “Our collective distress about the senseless unfairness of it all” was a motivator. “It was a very personal commitment each one of us had to do,” she said “We were dismayed and wanted to raise our voices.”

Ms. Fernandez-Kelly said that the celebration was held at Mediterra because of a longstanding relationship between LALDEF and the restaurant’s owners, Carlo and Raoul Momo. “They have been so helpful to us,” she said. “This is capitalism that does well by doing good.”

 

U.S. News & World Report has ranked Princeton University number one over all in the Best National Universities category of its “2015 America’s Best Colleges” report. The University was ranked second in the most recent list of the 100 “Best Values in Private Colleges” by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance and fourth in the Forbes ranking of the country’s 650 best undergraduate institutions in “America’s Top Colleges.”

Internationally, the school was ranked sixth in the Shanghai Jiao Tong ranking, which is officially known as the Academic Ranking of World Universities, according to the University’s web site. In addition, Princeton ranked sixth in the latest Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings, and in the top ten among 800 institutions across the world by the QS World University Rankings.

lewis school

NEVER FORGET: During The Lewis School’s Annual 9/11 Memorial Ceremony, Director of Admissions Laura Desai and Founder Marsha Lewis unveiled three 9/11 Memorial Panels from The Garden of Reflection Memorial in Yardley, Pennsylvania. The panels are currently on display on the school’s Bayard Lane campus. They were designed and donated by Ellen Saracini, Bucks County native and widow of United Airlines Flight 175 Captain Victor Saracini, whose plane crashed into the south tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Dozens of panels from the Walls of Remembrance have been displayed in many places throughout the nation including the White House, Congress and the 9/11 Ground Zero Memorial in New York City. Each panel is filled with handwritten personal reflections, messages, thoughts, memories and prayers from the thousands of visitors who have had the opportunity to sign them while on display. Lewis students, staff and faculty added their personal messages at the ceremony last week.

SIGNING: Illustrator Sophie Blackall signing a copy of Annie Barrows’s “Ivy + Bean” at a recent Prince-ton Public Library Children’s Book Festival. This year’s event will take place Saturday, September 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, on Hinds Plaza or in the library’s Community Room.

SIGNING: Illustrator Sophie Blackall signing a copy of Annie Barrows’s “Ivy + Bean” at a recent Prince-ton Public Library Children’s Book Festival. This year’s event will take place Saturday, September 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, on Hinds Plaza or in the library’s Community Room.

The ninth annual Princeton Children’s Book Festival takes place Saturday, Sept. 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event will be held rain or shine on Hinds Plaza or in the library’s Community Room.

More than 80 authors and illustrators in children’s literature will participate in the festival, one of the largest of its kind on the East Coast. During the festival, young readers can interact with the people behind their favorite books who will talk about and sign copies of their works.

Author and illustrator Dan Yaccarino, created the poster announcing this year’s festival and will attend the event. In addition to writing and illustrating more than three dozen children’s books, Mr. Yaccarino is the creator and producer of the Nickelodeon series Oswald and Willa’s Wild Life and is the character designer behind The Backyardigans.

Also participating in this year’s festival will be 2014 Caldecott Medal-winner Brian Floca (Locomotive), 2014 Theodore Geisel Award-winner Greg Pizzoli (The Watermelon Seed); Coretta Scott King Award-winner Bryan Collier (Knock, Knock: My Father’s Dream for Me), Rita Williams Garcia (One Crazy Summer; P.S. Be Eleven), Pseudonymous Bosch (The Name of this Book is Secret), Bruce Coville (Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher), Tad Hills (Rocket the Dog series; Duck and Goose series), David Lubar (Warped and Creepy Tales series), Wendy Mass (Space Taxi series, 11 Birthdays series), Anne Rockwell (Apples and Pumpkins, Hey Charleston!) and Jon Scieszka (Stinky Cheese Man, Battle Bunny).

For a complete list of additional participating authors and illustrators, see bookfestival.princetonlibrary.org.

The Princeton Children’s Book Festival is made possible by a partnership with JaZams of Princeton, Bai5, Terra Momo Restaurant Group, and the Friends of the Princeton Public Library. The library is in the Sands Library Building at 65 Witherspoon Street in Princeton. Convenient parking is available on neighboring streets and in the Spring Street Garage, which is adjacent to the library. For more information about library programs and services, call (609) 924-9529 or visit www.princetonlibrary.org.

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lewis centerTwo writers selected as Princeton University Lewis Center for the Arts’ Fellows will read on Wednesday, September 24 at 4:30 p.m. in the Berlind Theatre at McCarter Theatre Center. Hodder Fellow and poet Roger Reeves and Princeton Arts Fellow and fiction writer Hanna Pylväinen will begin their residencies at the Lewis Center by opening the Program in Creative Writing’s 2014-15 Althea Ward Clark W’21 Reading Series, which is free and open to the public.

Hanna Pylväinen’s debut novel, We Sinners (Henry Holt 2012), which The Los Angeles Times called, “Remarkably funny for a book about a deeply religious family grappling with loss of faith,” tells the story — in alternating chapters from the point of view of the parents and several of the nine children — of the Midwestern Rovaniemi family, members of a Finnish sect of Lutheranism called Laestadianism. Ms. Pylväinen is the recipient of residencies at Djerassi, The MacDowell Colony and Yaddo, and a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Mass. In 2012 she received the Whiting Writers’ Award and in 2013 the Balcones Fiction Prize. Her work has appeared in Harper’s Magazine, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and Chicago Tribune. Originally from suburban Detroit, she graduated from Mount Holyoke College and received her MFA from the University of Michigan, where she was also a postgraduate Zell Fellow. She currently lives in Brooklyn where she is completing her second novel, The End of Drum Time.

Roger Reeves’s first book, King Me, recently published by Copper Canyon Press, was described by The Los Angeles Review of Books as “A book of varied tongues and urgencies. Van Gogh is here, Mike Tyson, Ernest ‘Tiny’ Davis, and in the first and last poems, someone named Roger Reeves appears. It’s a book of inhabitations and transformations; the disembodied multitudes that constitute a single body.”

Mr. Reeves’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in journals such as Poetry, Ploughshares, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, and Tin House. His poem, “Kletic of Walt Whitman,” was selected for the Best New Poets 2009 anthology. He was awarded a 2013 NEA Fellowship, a 2013 Pushcart Prize, a Ruth Lilly Fellowship by the Poetry Foundation in 2008, two Bread Loaf Scholarships, an Alberta H. Walker Scholarship from the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and two Cave Canem Fellowships. He earned his PhD from the University of Texas and is currently an assistant professor of poetry at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

In addition to Mr. Reeves, Hodder Fellows for 2014-15 include choreographer Nora Chipaumire, visual artist Miko Veldkamp, and lewis center 2playwright/screenwriter Gabriel Jason Dean. Ms. Pylväinen begins her two-year appointment as an Arts Fellow along with theater/performance artist Aaron Landsman. They join graphic design artist Danielle Aubert and musician/composer Jason Treuting who are beginning their second year as Arts Fellows.

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AN AWARD FOR AN ARTIST: Pennsylvania painter Robert Beck, whose “Classic Lighting, Fishtown” is shown here, is among three artists to be honored next month at The Philadelphia Sketch Club.

AN AWARD FOR AN ARTIST: Pennsylvania painter Robert Beck, whose “Classic Lighting, Fishtown” is shown here, is among three artists to be honored next month at The Philadelphia Sketch Club.

Artist Robert Beck will be honored, along with Moe Brooker and Elizabeth Osborne, at the 154th Anniversary Gala of The Philadelphia Sketch Club on Saturday, October 18. Bronze medals will be awarded to the artists for their contributions to the arts. Previous honorees include Alex Kanevsky, Jamie Wyeth, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown.

“It was a surprise,” says Beck. “Those are big names. It is an honor to be mentioned in that company.”

Mr. Beck studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and in addition to his many exhibitions and awards has four invitational museum shows to his credit, one of them a solo retrospective. He is also a lecturer and contributing writer to ICON Magazine. Beck maintains a studio at his home in New Hope, Pa, and a gallery in Lambertville.

Beck’s representational images, mostly painted “live,” bring the viewer to a broad range of subjects, often created in high-energy, even difficult, environments. “I have always been fascinated by what makes things happen, and I use painting to investigate the events of our lives. I’m creating a portrait of contemporary culture,” Mr. Beck says. “This is not nostalgia. My images are straightforward depictions of being in the American here and now.”

Mr. Beck has recently been using social media to share sequential photographs of his paintings in progress. “Seeing how the image is built informs the viewer whether painter or lay person,” he says. “It is like discovering a descriptive language. I’ve had good response to it.”

“I’ve always wanted my work to have a purpose,” he adds. “To identify simple truths, or move things forward. That is what is so fulfilling about the Sketch Club award. It is recognition from my colleagues that I am getting it done.”

Beck’s work can be seen at www.robertbeck.net. Visit www.sketchclub.org for tickets and information. The Philadelphia Sketch Club is at 235 South Camac Street in Philadelphia. The gala begins at 7 p.m.

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GROVER’S CORNERS: Mary Barton, shown here with Richard Kondras in the 1995 production of Philip Jerry’s “Our Town” by American Repertory Ballet, coaches current dancers by relaying the late Mr. Jerry’s direction “almost word for word.” “Our Town” is being presented this weekend at Rider University.

GROVER’S CORNERS: Mary Barton, shown here with Richard Kondras in the 1995 production of Philip Jerry’s “Our Town” by American Repertory Ballet, coaches current dancers by relaying the late Mr. Jerry’s direction “almost word for word.” “Our Town” is being presented this weekend at Rider University.

Nineteen years ago, American Repertory Ballet (ARB) debuted the ballet Our Town, based on the play by Thornton Wilder that won the playwright a Pulitzer Prize in 1938. Choreographed by Philip Jerry, who was ballet master of the company while earning his undergraduate degree at Princeton University, the affecting drama was made all the more poignant by Mr. Jerry’s death from AIDS not long after the premiere. He was 41.

The fact that the ballet company has continued to perform Our Town over the ensuing two decades is testament to its dramatic power. This weekend, it is one of four works on a program ARB is presenting at Rider University’s Bart Luedeke Center. Coaching the dancers are artistic director Douglas Martin and the company’s ballet mistress Mary Barton, who starred in “Our Town” at its premiere. The two, who celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary last week, knew Mr. Jerry from when they were all members of The Joffrey Ballet in the 1980s.

“He was very clear about what he wanted,” Ms. Barton said, recalling Mr. Jerry before a rehearsal of Our Town last week. “We only had a week to learn the ballet. But he was so articulate and such a good actor that he got me to fully understand what he wanted. And I relay that today, almost word for word.”

Ms. Barton played Emily Webb, a central character in the story of Grover’s Corners, an average, early 20th century New England town as depicted through the simplicity of everyday life. Emily’s childhood, her romance with George Gibbs (played by Mr. Martin), her death giving birth to her second child, and her wrenching return to Earth for just one day are the crux of the three-act play, which Mr. Jerry condensed into one act.

“Philip had done a first draft of it elsewhere, but not on professional dancers,” Ms. Barton continued. “When he set it on us, a professional company, it felt like it was real to him, I think. This was his first drama. He had done some ballets for Joffrey 2 [the Joffrey Ballet’s second company] that were strictly just movement. But this was what he was really great at, in my opinion. The music, by Aaron Copland, really sweeps you along. Philip arranged it beautifully and set it in such a way that it just flowed from your body.”

Mr. Jerry was first accepted at Princeton University in 1972, but he deferred to pursue a dance career in New York. He was a member of the Joffrey Ballet until 1991, when he left to enroll at the University. He graduated with honors in art history and a certificate in French.

“Philip was very well read and very intelligent,” said Mr. Martin, during a rehearsal break last week. “He understood what artists of the early 20th century did, and he was so smart at understanding character.” As a younger dancer with the Joffrey, Mr. Martin remembers following Mr. Jerry into several roles. “I spent a lot of time with him in the rehearsal hall,” he recalled. “I mean, he had learned the role of the Chinese Conjurer (in the revival of the historic 1917 ballet Parade by Leonide Massine) from Massine himself. He was my role model.”

The local connections with Our Town go back to Mr. Wilder’s day. He taught French at The Lawrenceville School between 1921 and 1928. While there, he earned a master’s degree in French from Princeton University. Mr. Wilder won his first Pulitzer, for the novel The Bridge of San Luis Rey, before resigning from Lawrenceville in 1928. When Our Town premiered a decade later, it was at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre.

The ballet Our Town was also given its first viewing at McCarter. “We performed it with the scrim up, as the play had been done,” said Ms. Barton. “Then we did it again during Douglas’s first year as artistic director.”

Monica Giragosian and Cameron Auble Branigan play Emily and George in the current version of Our Town. Jumping up during rehearsal to demonstrate Emily and George’s loving glances at each other and the baby in Emily’s arms, Ms. Barton and Mr. Martin look completely believable as the young couple. “After I learned the ballet, I felt like I had become Emily,” Ms. Barton said. “It was very powerful.”

It’s all about simplicity, Mr. Martin tells the dancers. “When you do it right, you feel the righteousness of this New England town. It’s about community. It’s almost like a Capra film. It’s a day in the life of everybody, and people are doing so much. If the people in the background aren’t doing their job, it doesn’t work.”

The ballet “is more about the story than the steps,” Ms. Barton said. “The way Philip felt about it — and I’m sure he knew his situation — imbued you with how important a piece it was. You felt entrusted with something very precious.”

American Repertory Ballet performs Our Town, Confetti, Fantasy Baroque, and Dreams Interrupted Friday and Saturday, September 19 and 20, at 7:30 p.m. at Rider University’s Bart Luedeke Center. Tickets are $20; $10 for students and seniors. Call (609) 896-7775.

 

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Palmer Square’s 23rd Annual JazzFeast showcasing area musicians and restaurants drew an overflow crowd to hear Alan Dale and the New Legacy Jazz Band; the Warren Chiasson Quartet’s Tribute to George Shearing; The Fins; Cynthia Sayer & Sparks Fly; and Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

September 10, 2014

A public talk by the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader, will take place October 28 at 9:30 a.m. at Jadwin Gymnasium on the Princeton University campus. Tickets will be available to students starting September 16, to staff September 18, and to the general public September 23. Members of the public can obtain two tickets per person.

The Dalai Lama’s talk, “Develop the Heart,” is sponsored by The Office of Religious Life at Princeton University and The Kalmyk Three Jewels Foundation. “As a scholar and a monk, the Dalai Lama will highlight the importance of developing compassion and kindness, alongside the intellect, in an academic environment,” according to information from the University’s Office of Communications.

At 1:30 p.m., the spiritual leader will engage “a select group of students and faculty in conversation around Princeton’s informal motto, ‘In the Nation’s Service and in the Service of All Nations,’” according to the University’s website. For further information, email hhdl@princeton.edu.

SELLING OFF SILVER: The Silver Shop, the oldest store on Palmer Square, closed its doors a few months ago. But fans of the shop will be able to view and buy the inventory at an auction later this month. The preview is September 22 at the Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart.

SELLING OFF SILVER: The Silver Shop, the oldest store on Palmer Square, closed its doors a few months ago. But fans of the shop will be able to view and buy the inventory at an auction later this month. The preview is September 22 at the Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart.

Customers of The Silver Shop, the oldest store on Palmer Square, were dealt a blow when the store announced its closing a few months ago. But those who counted on the shop for its stock of silver jewelry and antiques will have one more chance to check out the merchandise.

Sal Pitts, the fourth and final owner of the shop, will offer the entire contents at an auction at Philadelphia’s Material Culture over two weekends, September 27 and 28 and October 11 and 12. A preview is being held September 22 at Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart, 1128 Great Road, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., followed by a reception from 5 to 8 p.m.

Taking a break from preparations, Mr. Pitts recalled his discovery of The Silver Shop in 1988, and his subsequent move to Princeton from Philadelphia, where he was in the restaurant business, a decade later. The store was opened during the Great Depression by a couple who had ties to a prominent jewelry store in Philadelphia.

“I was a customer there for ten years, and it evolved that every single one of my gifts came from that store,” Mr. Pitts said. “I never needed to shop anywhere else. I could go to Princeton and get something for anyone, anytime, at that little shop.”

Mr. Pitts moved to Princeton in 1998. It wasn’t long before he heard that the third owner, Arthur Colletti, had died, and the store was going to close. Mr. Pitts became convinced that he had to save the shop. He began a campaign to buy it, finally prevailing after a year.

“I would go with my neighbor, Hope, every Thursday afternoon,” he said. “We would go in and talk to whoever was on duty and leave my name and contact information. But no one ever called. On the last day — this is for real — there was a picture of the store in the paper, with a caption saying it was closing that day. It was a Thursday. We drove over and there was actually a parking space in front of the store, and I don’t have to tell you how serendipitous that was.”

It was only four o’clock, and the store was supposed to close at six, but the woman at the counter was already turning the lights out. Mr. Pitts and his friend talked her into calling the man who was handling the estate. “I told her I’m not leaving until you get whomever you report to talk to me,” he said, laughing. “I embarrassed Hope. But it worked. This very distinguished-looking elderly man in a suit, with a walking stick, came in and said, ‘I heard you wanted to see me.’ So we went across the street to The Nassau Inn and I bought him a drink. I wrote him a check and we became great friends.”

Once he took over, Mr. Pitts gutted and revamped the store. He bought the inventory and the contents of the late owner’s house as well. “We had something for everyone,” he recalled. “The shop was full of one-of-a-kind items. It was pleasurable to share it. I never had an employee who forced a sale. It wasn’t fruit. It wasn’t going to spoil. My passion extended far beyond the revenue. The exchange with the customer was the best thing about it.”

After seven years, Mr. Pitts signed on for five more years. But by the time the lease came up again, he had made up his mind to close the store. “I have other interests, and it tethered me,” he said. “It was time.”

Among the treasures Mr. Pitts is most excited about offering are “a very important Sterling tea and coffee service designed by Donald Colflesh, who was ahead of his time in the late 1950s with the biggest tray ever produced. I found it in the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, and it took more than ten years to acquire it for myself,” he said. Also up for auction: “Two silver trumpets, the largest ceramic pot that the kilns of Lenox in Trenton could fire, a giant tankard with a cherub who has Princeton University’s logo on his sweater, throwing a football, from the nineteenth century, and several thousand pieces of jewelry,” he said. “That tankard was in the shop for decoration, but now it’s for sale.”

The decision to close the shop wasn’t easy, but Mr. Pitts doesn’t seem to have regrets. “I’ll miss the people whose paths I crossed,” he said. “It’s Princeton U.S.A., not just Princeton, New Jersey. Everybody’s a somebody. But I live here, so I’ll still get that.”

 

MONTH-LONG FRENCH THEATER FESTIVAL: The Lewis Center for the Arts, the Department of French and Italian, and L’Avant Scène will present Princeton University’s third annual “Seuls en Scène” French Theater Festival from September 15 through October 11, at venues across the University’s campus. All performances will be in French and are free and open to the public. Pictured here is Adeline Chagneau, Stanley Weber, Audrey Bonnet, and Loic Corbery (left to right) from last year’s “L’ Épreuve” by Marivaux.(Photo by Brigitte Enguerand)

MONTH-LONG FRENCH THEATER FESTIVAL: The Lewis Center for the Arts, the Department of French and Italian, and L’Avant Scène will present Princeton University’s third annual “Seuls en Scène” French Theater Festival from September 15 through October 11, at venues across the University’s campus. All performances will be in French and are free and open to the public. Pictured here is Adeline Chagneau, Stanley Weber, Audrey Bonnet, and Loic Corbery (left to right) from last year’s “L’ Épreuve” by Marivaux. (Photo by Brigitte Enguerand)

The Lewis Center for the Arts, the Department of French and Italian, and L’Avant Scène will present Princeton University’s third annual “Seuls en Scène” French Theater Festival from September 15 through October 11, at venues across the University’s campus. All performances will be in French and are free and open to the public.

The Festival brings celebrated French actors and directors to the University and the local community. This year’s festival includes a hit from the 2013 Avignon Theater Festival, a preview of a new monologue to premiere in France in November, and rarely staged texts by Knut Hamsun, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, and Louis Jouvet. Discussions with the artistic teams will follow a number of the performances. The festival was organized by Florent Masse, senior lecturer in Princeton’s Department of French and Italian.

Nicolas Bouchaud and Judith Henry will perform Projet Luciole (Project Firefly), a highlight of the 2013 Avignon Theater Festival, on September 17 and 18 at 8 p.m. Projet Luciole is created and directed by Nicolas Truong, a journalist and editor at Le Monde. The play features texts by Theodor W. Adorno, Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Walter Benjamin, Guy Debord, Gilles Deleuze, George Orwell, Jacques Rancière, and Jaime Semprun.

The festival will open on September 15 at 4:30 p.m. in East Pyne Hall, Room 010 with a conversation between Truong and Masse on the development of Projet Luciole and Truong’s longtime contribution as a director and moderator of the intellectual debates at the Avignon Theater Festival. The conversation will be in French and is open to the public.

Arthur Nauzyciel, the artistic director of the National Theater Center of Orléans (CDN Orléans/Loiret/Centre) will direct Faim (Hunger) by Knut Hamsun on October 1 and 2 at 8 p.m. At the intersection of reading and performance, the monologue Faim is in part an autobiographical tale of the terrifying descent of a man who wanders the streets. Xavier Gallais, a well-known French actor, makes his Princeton debut portraying the outcast. Gallais has engineered the adaptation of Hamsun’s novel with his longtime artistic collaborator Florient Azoulay. Faim was first presented at the Théâtre de La Madeleine in Paris before being part of the 2013-14 season at the CDN in Orléans. This production will be accompanied by English subtitles.

Benjamin Lazar represents a new generation of directors whose unique aesthetics have begun to receive critical recognition. Lazar, who has developed a reputation as a specialist in baroque theater, will direct and perform L’Autre Monde ou les États et Empires de la Lune (The Other World or the States and Empires of the Moon) on October 4 at 8 p.m. and October 5 at 5 p.m. Lazar created the stage adaptation of this rarely performed story by Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac in which a man strives to go to the moon, convinced that it is a world comparable to our own. Cyrano is best known to American audiences as a character in a play by Edmond Rostand, but Rostand’s Cyrano was based on a real-life 17th century French author. Musicians Florence Bolton and Benjamin Perrot, co-founders of the baroque music ensemble La Rêveuse, will accompany Lazar on stage. L’Autre Monde ou les États et Empires de la Lune was first created in 2008 and has since been widely performed. Lazar returns to Princeton for this production, having visited campus last spring to meet with a group of artists and scholars in Princeton’s Program in Latin American Studies and to teach a master class for L’Avant-Scène students.

The Compagnie des Petits-Champs (whose production L’Épreuve by Marivaux was part of Seuls en Scène 2013) will return to Princeton to present Le Voyage en Uruguay (The Trip to Uruguay) by Clément Hervieu-Léger on October 9 and 10 at 8 p.m., and Répertoires: A Staged Reading based on the Drama Classes of Louis Jouvet at the Conservatoire National Supérieur d’Art Dramatique on October 11 at 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Both shows will be performed at Whitman College Class of 1970 Theater.

In Le Voyage en Uruguay, Hervieu-Léger, a member of the Comédie-Française, revisits the story of an ancestor who brought Norman cattle from across the sea in order to establish a livelihood in a new country. Actor and director Daniel San Pedro, who co-founded the Compagnie des Petits-Champs with Hervieu-Léger, will direct Le Voyage en Uruguay, which is at its core a family history. Guillaume Ravoire, a recent graduate of the Conservatoire National Supérieur d’Art Dramatique, will perform this newly written monologue, which will premiere in Princeton before opening in France in November.

Compagnie des Petits-Champs’ week-long residency will conclude with a staged reading featuring the company’s actors and directors. Comédie-Française member Loïc Corbery, will return to Princeton alongside Audrey Bonnet, a renowned stage performer who won the Best Actress Award in 2013 at les Palmarès du Théâtre, the French equivalent of the Tony Awards. Corbery often collaborates with Hervieu-Léger who recently directed him in the role of Alceste in Le Misanthrope at the Comédie-Française. Bonnet is a member of the Compagnie des Petits-Champs. Last season, she led the company’s production of Yerma by Frederico Garcia Lorca, directed by San Pedro. Répertoires will highlight excerpts from classes by Louis Jouvet, a renowned director, actor, and master teacher at the Conservatoire and one of the premiere artists of the French theater in the years before the Second World War. A selection of classical scenes by Racine, Molière, and Beaumarchais will complement Jouvet’s texts.

During the festival the visiting artists will offer master classes and coaching for Princeton students, as well as participate in theater classes.

Most festival performances will take place in the Marie and Edward Matthews ’53 Acting Studio at 185 Nassau Street. The productions by Compagnie des Petits-Champs will be performed at the Whitman College Class of 1970 Theater.

Further information about L’Avant-Scène can be found at www.princeton.edu/~ftw. For more information on the Princeton French Theater Festival, visit www.visitarts.princeton.edu.

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Whitney B. Ross is the new executive director of Trinity Counseling Service (TCS). Ms. Ross is a graduate of Hamilton College and holds a Masters Degree from Harvard University and a PhD from City University of New York. In addition, she completed training in organizational consultation at IPTAR, the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research in New York.

In addition to her work at TCS, Ms. Ross will continue to serve as a trustee on the Board of Religious Ministries at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro where she also sits on the Biomedical Ethics Committee. She is also a trustee of Center for Supportive Schools in Princeton. Ms. Ross succeeds Rev. Peter Stimpson, who retired after leading the TCS for 25 years.

Trinity Counseling Service was founded in 1968. Its mission is to provide quality, individualized clinical and wellness services in a caring environment to all in the community, regardless of their ability to pay. TCS provides approximately 10,000 clinical sessions a year to hundreds of clients from the greater Princeton area.

Trinity Counseling Service invites members of the community to meet Dr. Ross at the annual TCS Fall Benefit: “The Circle Continues” on Saturday September 13 at the Princeton Academy. The event will include dinner, dancing, and live and silent auctions, including trips to the Bahamas, Bermuda, Florida, Maine, and Nantucket. Tickets are available online at www.trinitycounseling.org/fallbenefit.
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Art historian Emily Mark-Fitzgerald will open the 2014-15 Fund for Irish Studies series at Princeton University with a lecture entitled, “Commemorating the Irish Famine,” on Friday, September 12 at 4:30 p.m. at the Lewis Center for the Arts’ James M. Stewart ‘32 Theater, 185 Nassau Street. The event is free and open to the public.

Ms. Mark-Fitzgerald, of University College, Dublin, is the author of Commemorating the Irish Famine: Memory and the Monument (Liverpool University Press, 2013), a book exploring the history of the 1840s Irish Famine in visual representation, commemoration, and collective memory from the 19th century until the present, explaining why since the 1990s the Famine past has come to matter so much in the present. She has also launched a website that catalogues a sample of photographic records and information related to these commemorative monuments in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Britain, and the United States — www.irishfamine
memorials.com.

Speaking and publishing regularly on the subject of public art, memory and commemoration, museology and the visual culture of migration/diaspora, and contemporary Irish and international art, Ms. Mark-Fitzgerald is the recipient of major fellowships and research funding from the U.S.-Ireland Alliance (Mitchell Scholarship), Mellon Foundation/Social Science Research Council, Humanities Institute of Ireland, Royal Hibernian Academy, Royal Irish Academy, Irish Research Council, and Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

She is a founding editor of Artefact: the Journal of the Irish Association of Art Historians and the Irish Journal of Arts Management and Cultural Policy.

The Fund for Irish Studies, chaired by Princeton professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon, affords all Princeton students, and the community at large, a wider and deeper sense of the languages, literatures, drama, visual arts, history, politics, and economics not only of Ireland but of “Ireland in the world.”

Information on upcoming Fund for Irish Studies series events can be found at fis.princeton.edu.

doris goodwinDoris Kearns Goodwin, world-renowned presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, will speak at Rider University on Tuesday, September 16 at 5 p.m. in the Bart Luedeke Center. The event, which officially marks the kickoff of the university’s 150th anniversary celebration, is free and open to the public.

Ms. Goodwin’s talk will focus on the leadership lessons of Abraham Lincoln and will be followed by a question-and-answer session. Her award-winning book, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, illuminates Lincoln’s political genius and rise to become president.

As a historian, Ms. Goodwin says, “Your hope is that people looking back into the past can see the contours of the present and feel a sense of depth to their own lives and the lives of their countrymen so they don’t feel like they’re confronting problems totally alone.”

Ms. Goodwin was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in history for No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II. She is also the author of the bestsellers Wait Till Next Year, Lyndon Johnson and The American Dream and The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys. She earned a PhD in government from Harvard University, and served as assistant to President Lyndon Johnson in his last year in the White House.

Advance registration to attend the presentation is required. Register online at www.rider.edu/dkg or call (609) 896-5001. It is the first of many events planned to honor Rider’s sesquicentennial. The year-long celebration will begin in September, and will commemorate the past, celebrate the present, and look forward to the future. More information can be found at www.rider.edu/150.

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Mayor Liz Lempert, Princeton Public Library director Leslie Burger, and Princeton Public Schools Superintendent Steve Cochrane were among local notables who read from favorite books at the Library’s Readathon for Adult Literacy on September 4. September is Adult Literary Month in Mercer County, and the event, which lasted from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., was sponsored by Literacy New Jersey/Mercer County Programs. Also taking a turn at the podium were students, tutors, staff members, and volunteers, reading brief selections from their chosen books. (Photo by Kim Dorman)

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Imagine being able to get off or on the Dinky just south of Blair Hall. That would have made catching a New York train a cinch for Scott Fitzgerald in the days when he lived on University Place, where the photo was taken. The station moved a quarter mile south to its now-former location in 1917, the year Fitzgerald left school to join the army. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)