April 13, 2016


Communiversity has become a rite of spring for Princeton. On the Princeton University campus and throughout the downtown, this celebration of local arts and culture is an annual event that draws more than 40,000 to town, and this year’s event on April 17, 1-6 p.m. will be no exception. more


Named for the kingdom in “The Phantom Tollbooth,” the Cotsen Children’s Library’s Digitopolis is shown in full swing at the Frick Chemistry Building Saturday. Kids describe their favorite things in this week’s Town Talk. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

home improve 4-13-16

GLORIOUS GARDENS : “We plant containers that our customers bring in or purchase so that they have exactly what they want without having to do all the work at home.” Lisa Miccolis, owner of Bountiful Gardens in Hillsborough, is shown working on a special container garden.

How does your garden grow? It’s probably not in full-fledged bloom yet, but it is definitely time to get started. As so often in life, preparation is key. Preparing the soil, adding compost and mulch, planning for color and texture, sun and shade are all very important considerations. more

It was an historic moment. On Monday evening after more than three hours of public hearings and significant controversy and debate among Council members, the Princeton Council passed, by a 5-0 vote, an ordinance to create the Witherspoon-Jackson Historic Preservation District.

Though acknowledging pros and cons of the ordinance and the uncertainties of its impact on the community, councilman Bernie Miller strongly urged the creation of this “unique historic district.” “If not now, when?” he questioned. more

As the town and the high school confront difficult questions about underage drinking, anti-semitism, and the effects of social media, the Princeton Police Department (PPD) continues to investigate last week’s “Nazis v Jews” beer pong incident, which involved a number of Princeton High School students.

“We are investigating who provided alcohol to the minors,” stated Lieutenant Jon Bucchere of the PPD. It is not a criminal violation for minors to possess and consume alcohol on private property, he added, so “many times these cases are hard to prove.”  more

Democracy Demands_page 7

DEMOCRACY DEMANDS DIALOGUE: Scholars discuss Woodrow Wilson’s legacy in a forum at Princeton University’s Wilson School of Public and International Affairs last Friday — (L to R) Chad Williams, associate professor and chair of African and Afro-American Studies at Brandeis; Eric Yellin, associate professor of history and American studies at University of Richmond; Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders, history PhD candidate at Rutgers; and A. Scott Berg, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer.

A panel discussion at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs last Friday brought together four distinguished scholars to “provide an educational and panoramic view of the many aspects of Woodrow Wilson’s life and career.” more


CELEBRATING A MILESTONE: Princeton University’s Center of Jewish Life has been a gathering place of Jewish students on campus for more than two decades. The long history of the faith on campus is the theme of a special, four-day conference.

It has been a century since Jewish students at Princeton University first gathered to celebrate the Sabbath, or Shabbat. It would have been unthinkable, in 1915, to imagine a four-day conference of lectures, panel discussions, religious services, and meals celebrating the University’s role in Jewish life. more


Saturday and Sunday, April 30 and May 1, are Kite Days at Terhune Orchards on Cold Soil Road in Lawrenceville. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., kids can make and decorate their own or use pre-made kites to fly in the 10-acre pasture, with the farm animals looking on. Music, games, sheep-shearing, pony and wagon rides, and lots of food are also on the schedule, along with wine-tasting and more. Admission is $5 for ages three and up. For more information, visit www.terhuneorchards.com.

Between April 28 and May 1, 2016, hundreds of thousands of people across the United States are expected to take a “stand” against racism and do their part to help advance the YWCA’s mission to eliminate racism and increase the collective impact in promoting racial justice and civil rights in the United States. Founded by the YWCA Trenton and YWCA Princeton in 2007, Stand Against Racism™ has been a successful campaign at YWCAs across the country and is now a signature campaign of YWCA USA. more

book rev

Musical protest helps the Japanese “to voice what they cannot ordinarily express in words” according to Princeton resident Noriko Manabe’s The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima (Oxford $27.95). It’s a formidable work: 433 pages, 35 pages of notes, a nearly 15-page-long bibliography, with web icons interspersed throughout the text highlighting links to pronuclear public relations videos, press conferences, music videos, extensive footage from anti-nuclear demonstrations and rallies, plus color photos on a companion website. more

Art Rev_1

MORVEN IN MAY JURIED EXHIBIT/SALE: These hand-spun wool tapestries were created by master tribal weaver Wence Matrinez, in collaboration with his wife, biomorphic painter, Sandra Martinez. The artists of Martinez Studio, based out of Door County Wisconsin, are just two of the 36 fine craft artists from around the country exhibiting at this year’s Morven in May craft show on May 7-8. (Photo From www.martinezstudio.com)

Morven in May, one of New Jersey’s most anticipated spring rituals, is a juried exhibition and sale of contemporary, American-made fine craft. The museum brings together 36 professional fine craft artists from around the U.S., all working at the highest levels in their respective medium, including decorative and wearable textiles, jewelry, furniture, ceramics, glass, metal, and more. more

April 6, 2016


Referring to the library’s upcoming second-floor renovation in this week’s Town Talk, Executive Director Brett Bonfield mentions the “classic view of what a library is.” Other Town Talkers speak highly of the fireplaces, the “fantastic staff,” the Friends bookstore, and “a new director who seems to understand that libraries have to live in the 21st century.” (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)   


Princeton University will not remove Woodrow Wilson’s name from two campus buildings despite a recent outcry over his views on race. A trustee committee charged with examining the Wilson legacy announced Monday that there is a need for “an expanded and more vigorous commitment to diversity and inclusion at Princeton,” but the Woodrow Wilson School of International Affairs and Wilson College will retain his name. more



Give your bookshelf a face lift with these gorgeous editions of your favorite literary classics.


A group of residents from Princeton’s Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood has joined a lawsuit challenging tax exemptions for some buildings on the Princeton University campus. Originally brought by four Princeton residents, the suit now has 24 people listed as plaintiffs. more

Controversy locally and across the country continues to pursue the PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers) Test as Princeton Public Schools (PPS) prepare to administer the 2016 PARCC, starting next Monday. Testing over the next three weeks may result in a more stringent assessment of the PARCC itself than of the student test-takers and their schools.  more


BRINGING IN THE LIGHT: Architect Steven Holl’s concept of integrating the surrounding landscape into the building, with plenty of natural light, was a major factor in the selection of his firm to design the new Rubinstein Commons at the Institute for Advanced Study. (Graphic courtesy of the Institute for Advanced Study)

Every ten years, The Institute for Advanced Study assesses the state of the campus and considers its most pressing issues. At the last review, the most outstanding need was identified: a new, 21st-century gathering space for the kind of social engagement and academic collaboration that makes this 86-year-old research community unique. more

Mohannad Darawshe, a Muslim Palestinian citizen of the State of Israel, will present the 28th Annual Amy Adina Schulman Memorial Lecture, “Inside Israel: Jewish Arab Relations Within a Regional Context” on Tuesday, April 12 at 7:30 pm at The Jewish Center of Princeton.  more

all in a days

“GET A LEG UP ON LIFE”: Kristin Friberg, librarian at Princeton Public Library, loves her job and recommends a visit to the library to take advantage of its collection and its many other valuable resources. (Photo by Donald Gilpin)

“To Listen, to Engage, to Grow” — Kristin Friberg, Readers’ Services Librarian

Kristin Friberg has been a librarian at Princeton Public Library (PPL) for the past 11 years. According to Brett Bonfield, executive director of the library, “Kristin is an extraordinary librarian, a wonderful colleague, and terrific asset to our community. She clearly loves her work, takes pride in her ability to help people enjoy this great library and its outstanding collection, and brings other significant talents to our workplace as well. She’s a skilled, funny, and poetic writer and editor who helps the library tell its story through its blog and via Instagram, and, though she rarely needs to make use of this talent, at least during her desk shifts, she has a marvelous singing voice. The more I get to know Kristin, the more grateful I am for the work she does in our community’s behalf.” more

Princeton University has offered admission to 1,894 students, or 6.46 percent of the 29,303 applicants for the class of 2020. This was the University’s most selective admission process to date and the largest applicant pool in its history. more

Transgender, gender non-conforming, gender questioning — a large contingent of trans youth, along with their allies and an assortment of educators, will gather at Princeton Day School this Saturday, April 9 for the 2nd Annual New Jersey Trans Youth Forum (TYF), sponsored by HiTops and GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network).  more


Riding with HEART (Hunterdon Assisted Recreation and Therapy) is seeking donations for new and gently used horse tack, equestrian clothing, and barn supplies and equipment for its Saturday, April 9 Spring Tack Sale at its Pittstown farm at 639 County Road 513 in Hunterdon County. more


Sponsored by the Cotsen Children’s Library, in collaboration with Bedtime Math, Digitopolis, the mathematical kingdom from “The Phantom Tollbooth,” will be open for visitors in the Frick Chemistry Building on the Princeton University campus from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 9. Full of hands-on exploration, demonstrations, games, challenges, and unexpected connections, Digitopolis is for both the mathphilic and the mathphobic. Recommended for children ages 4-10. For further information, contact Dana Sheridan: danas@princeton.edu.

AM Slaughter

Anne-Marie Slaughter will be speaking about her new book, “Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family” on April 12 from 5 to 7:30 at Greenacres Country Club, 2170 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville. The talk is presented by The Women In Business Alliance. A ticket ($50 members, $65 future members) includes wine, light hors d’oeuvres, and a copy of the book. For more information, contact Lorraine@Princetonchamber.org.

Topics Arbor 4-6-16

On Saturday, April 30 from 2 to 4 p.m., Bob Wells of Wells Tree & Landscape will lead an hour long walk beginning in the heart of Mapleton Preserve. He will offer basic ID techniques and explore the importance of trees to the environment and to our well-being, as well as the threats posed by climate change. Attendees should meet at Mapleton Preserve/D&R Canal State Headquarters, 145 Mapleton Road, Kingston.