September 18, 2019

The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Creative Writing kicks off a year-long celebration of its 80th anniversary Wednesday, September 25, with a reading by National Book Award-winning writer Maxine Hong Kingston, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa, and Ojibwe novelist and non-fiction writer David Treuer, a Princeton alumnus, Class of 1992. The reading, which will be introduced by poet and faculty member Paul Muldoon, opens the 2019-20 Althea Ward Clark W’21 Reading Series and begins at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus. Free and open to the public, the reading will be followed by a book sale and signing with the writers.

Maxine Hong Kingston is the  author of, among others, China Men, Tripmaster Monkey, and I Love a Broad Margin to My Life. In 1997 she was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Clinton, and the National Medal of Arts by President Obama in 2013. She is emerita senior lecturer for Creative Writing at the University of California, Berkeley. more

June 12, 2019

Author Diane Ciccone will discuss her new book, Into the Light: The Early African American Men of Colgate University Who Transformed a Nation, 1840-1930 on Thursday, June 20 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the West Windsor Arts Council in the Florence B. Hiller Studio, 952 Alexander Road.

On the eve of the bicentennial of Colgate University, Into the Light details years of research into the lives of the early African American men who attended Colgate when it was an all-male school. The book examines the lives of more than 50 African American Colgate men, including, Jonas Holland Townsend, a friend and confidante of Frederick Douglass and the first African American to attend Colgate; Samuel Archer, president of Morehouse; and Adam Clayton Powell, the Harlem Congressman.

A member of the first class of women at Colgate as well as a former councilwoman and the former director of the West Windsor Arts Council, Ciccone will be on hand to sign copies of her book. She now works as a practicing attorney and arbitrator in New York City, and was the producer of the award-winning documentary, Acts of Faith, which documents the first integrated planned housing development in New Jersey.

June 5, 2019

SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS: Thanks to the Women’s College Club of Princeton, these young women will have help paying for their college educations. From left are Zoe Jackson, Oona DiMatteo, Ayva O’Kane, Fable Young-Shor, Salma Hashem, Jada Jones, Adrienne Wang, and Katherine Chuei. Not pictured are Richayla Smith, Marilena Cordon-Maryland, and Shreya Kota.

The Women’s College Club of Princeton held its annual Scholarship Awards Tea last month, continuing its tradition of helping outstanding young women obtain higher education. Now in its 103rd year, the club this year awarded $30,000 in scholarships.

 more

November 28, 2018

“NOCTURNE III”: The paintings of Princeton artist Lucy Graves McVicker are now on display in “Reflections of Light,” The exhibit runs through March 1 at the Art for Healing Gallery at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center.

The Art for Healing Gallery at Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center (PMC) is now featuring “Reflections of Light,” an exhibit of paintings by award-winning Princeton artist Lucy Graves McVicker. It runs through March 1.

A signature member of the American Watercolor Society, McVicker also works in oil, acrylic, and mixed media. Her work has been shown in more than 80 statewide, national, and international exhibitions, including 38 juried competitions.  more

By Kam Williams

ALL TOGETHER NOW: From left, Pete (Mark Wahlberg) and Ellie (Rose Byrne) Wagner form an Instant Family when they adopt siblings Lizzy (Isabela Moner), Lita (Julianna Gamiz), and Juan (Gustavo Quiroz). (Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

Pete (Mark Wahlberg) and Ellie (Rose Byrne) Wagner are speculators who make a living flipping real estate in their hometown of Atlanta. The couple’s latest acquisition is a fixer-upper with five bedrooms that they hope to sell to Ellie’s sister Kim (Allyn Rachel) and brother-in-law Russ (Tom Segura).

However, Kim and Russ aren’t in the market for a house that needs so much work. Furthermore, they’re childless with no plans to start a family. So, they simply have no use for a place that large. 

Pete and Ellie don’t have kids either, but they have been seriously considering adoption. In fact, they’ve even been checking out photos of available children online.  more

PAINFUL ENDING: Princeton University men’s water polo player Matt Payne fires the ball in recent action. Last Saturday senior star Payne tallied four goals and two assists but it wasn’t enough as 12th-ranked Princeton fell 14-13 in overtime to No. 16 George Washington in the opening round of the NCAA tournament. The defeat left the Tigers with a final record of 19-11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Justin Feil

Matt Payne will have surgery on one shoulder on December 15 and surgery six weeks later to fix the other one.

Torn labrums caused the Princeton University men’s water polo senior star’s shoulders to repeatedly come out of socket. They ached plenty over the final weeks of the team’s 2018 campaign, but he wasn’t about to miss his last year.

“For me, it was my last season of a 17-year playing career,” said Payne, a 6’2 native of Laguna Beach, Calif.

“I just grew so close to these guys over the last couple years, and the freshmen this year have been the closest I’ve been to a first-year class the whole time I’ve been here, so it really inspired me.” more

CAN DO: Princeton University men’s basketball player Devin Cannady dribbles upcourt in a game last season. On Saturday, senior guard Cannady scored 21 points to help Princeton overcome a 12-point second half deficit to edge Monmouth 60-57. Cannady, who scored the last eight points of the game for the Tigers, was later named the Ivy League Player of the Week. Princeton, now 2-2, plays at Maine on November 28 before hosting George Washington on December 1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

After being sidelined for the first two games of the season due to a hamstring injury, Devin Cannady didn’t miss a beat as he took the court for the Princeton University men’s basketball team last Wednesday against visiting Fairleigh Dickinson.

“I always do a pretty good job of staying in shape, so it was good to just get back out there and let my legs be free,” said senior guard Cannady. more

GETTING A LEG UP: Princeton Day School boys’ soccer player Wesley Leggett flies up to boot the ball in game this fall. Senior striker and UConn-bound Leggett led the area with 22 goals, helping PDS advance to the state Prep B final as it went 8-7-3. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski).

Charlotte Bednar was an unknown quantity as she toed the starting line for the Hun School cross country team at the Mercer County girls’ varsity meet in mid-October.

The petite blonde freshman had won some races in smaller prep meets for Hun but hadn’t competed against the runners from the county’s public school programs.

It didn’t take long for the runners from the bigger schools to notice Bednar as she shot to the front of the pack in the first half mile of the race at Washington Crossing Park. more

BLUE CHIPPER: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey player Chip Hamlett handles the puck last season. Senior defenseman Hamlett will be spearheading the PDS defensive unit this winter. The Panthers get their 2018-19 campaign underway this week by hosting St. Joe’s Prep on November 27, Gloucester Catholic on November 29, and Morristown-Beard on December 3. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

While the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team boasts some high-quality players, it is a little thin in numbers compared to past years.

“There is plenty of returning, experienced talent; I expect results, I expect us to play well and to do a lot of things we have done well over the years,” said PDS head coach Scott Bertoli, who guided the Panthers to a 17-8 record last year and a spot in the Mid-Atlantic Hockey League (MAHL) final. more

BIG MAC: Princeton High boys’ hockey player Ryan McCormick, left, goes after the puck in a game last season. Junior forward McCormick figures to be a key producer for PHS this winter. The Little Tigers begin their 2018-19 season this week with games against Hopewell Valley on November 27, Nottingham on November 28, and Robbinsville on November 30, with all three contests to be played at the Mercer County Park rink. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

After making two straight runs to the state semifinals, the Princeton High boys’ hockey team is bringing high hopes into the winter.

“The team is excited; there are a lot of expectations,” said PHS head coach Tim Chase, who guided the Little Tigers to an 18-9-2 record and a spot in the Public B state semis last winter in his debut season at the helm of the program. “We are not going to fly under the radar.” more

FAST EDDIE: Hun School boys’ hockey player Ed Evaldi controls the puck in a game last winter. Junior defenseman Evaldi gives Hun skill and speed from the blue line. The Raiders open their 2018-19 season by hosting Bishop Eustace on November 28 and St. Joe’s (Metuchen) on November 30 before playing at Bergen Catholic on December 3. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Welcoming back a battle-tested squad, Ian McNally is feeling a comfort level with his Hun School boys’ hockey team as it prepares for the 2018-19 season.

“We are skilled and we have an older group than we have ever been,” said Hun head coach McNally, who led the Raiders to a 13-8-1 record last as the program won its fifth straight Mercer County Tournament title. more

FULL SPEED AHEAD: Hun School basketball player Jada Jones races upcourt in action last winter. Senior guard Jones provides production and leadership for Hun. The Raiders were schedule to start their 2018-19 campaign by hosting Germantown Friends (Pa.) on November 27 and Stuart Country Day on December 4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Over the last three seasons, the Villanova men’s basketball team has utilized deadly outside shooting and defensive intensity to help undersized Wildcat squads win two NCAA crowns.

As the Hun School girls’ basketball team heads into the 2018-19 season, Hun head coach Bill Holup views that formula as the blueprint of success for his program. more

IN CHARGE: Stuart Country Day School basketball player Nia Melvin heads to the hoop in a game last winter. Sophomore star Melvin will be counted on to the trigger the Stuart offense this winter. The Tartans were slated to tip off their 2018-19 season by hosting Springside Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on November 27 and then competing in the Peddie School Invitational from November 30-December 1 and playing at Hun on December 4. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Understandably, there is a positive vibe around the Stuart Country Day School basketball team as it prepares to start the 2018-19 campaign.

Coming off a memorable winter which saw Stuart roll to its first state Prep B title and with most of its starters returning and the arrival of some talented newcomers, the Tartans are in a very good place. more

November 21, 2018

By Bill Alden

After taking its lumps early in the fall, the Princeton Day School boys’ cross country team saved its best for last.

Building on a positive performance at the Mercer County championship meet in mid-October that saw several runners post personal bests, PDS ended the season by placing a solid fifth in the team standings at the state Prep B meet at the Blair Academy on October 24 won by Newark Academy.

“That was a terrific way to end to season; we were looking at that kind of performance and hoping for that all year,” said PDS head coach John Woodside, whose team was led at the meet by sophomore Gunnar Clingman, the seventh place finisher in a time of 17:46 over the 5,000-meter course with junior Kevin Dougherty coming in 14th at 18:41. “There is no question that there were a lot of struggles early on.” more

JORDAN RULES: Hun School field hockey player Jordan DelOrefice, right, goes after the ball in a game this fall. Senior DelOrefice scored five goals this season to help Hun go 6-11 as it bounced back from a 2-9 start. It marked the last season at the helm of the program for longtime head coach Kathy Quirk. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Struggling to a 2-9 record by mid-October, the Hun School field hockey team could have thrown in the towel over the last few weeks of the season.

Instead, Hun kept pushing, winning four of its last six games to end the fall with a 6-11 record.

“We made tremendous improvement, both myself and my assistant coach (Christine Caberle) were very happy with the way that we had improved,” said Hun head coach Kathy Quirk, noting that one of the ream’s finest efforts down the stretch came when they battled hard in a 3-0 loss to Blair in the state Prep A semis game. “We just grew as a team, a lot of individuals grew.” more

November 14, 2018

EXPLORING HISTORY: “I enjoy the opportunity to talk with people about history, and see them get excited about it. I also love seeing them get involved with an exhibit or event that we have put together.” Izzy Kasdin, executive director of the Historical Society of Princeton, is enthusiastic about introducing people to history’s unique insight and relevance to today’s world.

It’s not just facts and figures and dates. It’s ideas and events and explorations. And, especially, it is stories. Stories about people and places and not only major historical figures whose names we all know — but about those we don’t know. It’s about what they did, what they thought, how they lived, how they worked. more

ANCIENT ART OF PAPER-CUTTING: Contemporary artist Dan Landau will present a free class on paper-cutting on Monday, November 26 at 6:15 p.m. at Labyrinth Books, 122 Nassau Street, Princeton. The event is free and open to all community members aged 16 and over, but space is limited and registration is required (register at Eventbrite: http://bit.ly/PapercuttingEventbrite).

Have you ever made a snowflake with folded paper and scissors in school? If so, you’ve engaged in the ancient art of paper-cutting. This art form has been around in one form or another since the Chinese invented paper, and has been infinitely adapted over time by different artists and cultures. more

Chris Hedges

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges will be reading from his new book America: The Farewell Tour (Simon & Schuster $27) at Labyrinth Books on Tuesday, November 27 at 6 p.m.

Ralph Nader says, “Chris Hedges wants us to face realities. Our society is unraveling, institutionally and structurally, and is being replaced by the corporate state of merging big business and government. Commercialism overwhelms civic values, impoverishes its subjects, and reaches into childhoods bypassing parental authority. Poverty, addiction, gambling, and hopelessness spread like epidemics. Only we the people can reverse the disintegration of democracy by plutocracy. In America: The Farewell Tour, Chris Hedges depicts the horrifying truths on the ground from which resistance rises to jolt us into an active, realizable culture of reconstruction.”  more

TITLE RUN: Princeton University football player Collin Eaddy heads upfield in recent action. Last Saturday, sophomore running back Eaddy gained a career-high 266 yards to help Princeton defeat Yale 59-43 and clinch at least a share of the Ivy League title. The 9th-ranked Tigers, now 9-0 overall and 6-0 Ivy, will look to end the fall undefeated as they host Penn (6-3 overall, 3-3 Ivy) on November 17 in their season finale. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Bob Surace sensed that there could be some offensive fireworks as the Princeton University football team played at Yale last Saturday afternoon.

“On a tough surface, it does favor the offenses in a lot of ways because you know where you are going with the ball with the change of direction,” said Surace, in assessing the muddy surface at the Yale Bowl. more

November 7, 2018

ON THE MOVE: “I wanted to leave a legacy for Dad and my family, and this was the right time to make the move. We have the construction project going on at our Spring Street building, and we found this great Alexander Road location.” Robbie Nelson (center), owner of Nelson Glass & Aluminum and daughter of its founder, the late Bob Nelson, is shown with officer manager Joanne McGettigan (left) and longtime former office manager Alice Kent (right).

Your son just threw a baseball through the window; the wind blew the patio table over, and broke the glass top; the king-size mirror fell off the wall — who to call?

Nelson Glass, of course! Since 1949, this has been the place to go, whether for an emergency, a quick fix, or a long-range project.

Nelson Glass & Aluminum is unique in Princeton today. An independent, family-owned and operated business that continues to provide Princeton and the area with knowledgeable, friendly service and quality products. It has a proud history.

In 1949, Bob Nelson returned to his Princeton hometown with an engineering degree from Cornell and a goal of establishing his own business. It didn’t take long to discover that Princeton lacked a glass company, and he set out to fill that need.

Full-Service
After learning the ropes of the glass industry, he set up shop at a Nassau Street location. And, the rest, as they say, is history!

“In those days, the bulk of the business was cutting flat automobile glass,” explains Robbie Nelson, Bob Nelson’s daughter, and the firm’s current owner. “The store evolved into repair — especially broken windows. Dad saw a need, and he was always concerned with being a full-service glass company.”

After 10 years on Nassau Street, the firm moved to 45 Spring Street, where it has remained ever since. It continued to grow and evolve, beginning to provide aluminum storm doors and windows, then mirror work, shower doors, insulated glass, sliding patio doors, and table tops. Work began to be divided between commercial and residential projects.

Nelson Glass has always been known for its attention to detail and painstaking care for each project. As always, the company still does things by hand. The expert staff will custom-cut all mirrors, and make perfectly-fitting glass table tops. They also replace defective (foggy) double-paned insulated glass.

“The big thing now is doubled-paned insulated glass,” says Robbie Nelson. “It can get moisture between the panes though, and then needs to be replaced. Probably our most common job is replacing defective insulated glass.”

That is just one of the many services the company provides. Glass for picture frames, Plexiglas and safety glass, repair of leaded windows, application of solar film to windows to help prevent fading of interior items — the list goes on and on. Fixing rotted wood window frames is another service.

Showroom Display
“People often come in and bring a broken storm window,” points out Nelson, “and then they’ll see the showroom display and find something else they want. Maybe they need a new storm door, for example, or a new glass table top.

“When they come in, they can meet the staff. And we do the work here. We create the new storm door for you or make the repairs right here. Then, if there is ever a problem later, the customer can come back and see us. We will be here. We always stand by our work. Our reputation means everything. We always take pride in doing a good job.”

Now, Nelson Glass is embarking on a new adventure. After nearly 60 years on Spring Street, the firm has moved to a new location at 741 Alexander Road, Suite 7/8.

Changing times bring changing needs, and Nelson Glass has always adapted to new markets and directions.

“We started when Princeton was a village,” remarks Nelson, “Spring Street was a good location in the heart of town. But as times have changed, and Princeton has grown, we need more space and more parking.

“The Alexander Road location is just right. We needed a level loading dock, and it offers more space. We’ll go from 3,500 square to 5,000 square feet. It’s still a Princeton address, and there is lots of free parking.

Excellent Staff
“We’re looking forward to having more room in the shop and in the showroom. I’m also happy to have a bigger office. We will also be adding more staff. Finding the right staff has always been very important to us, and we have always been fortunate to have an excellent staff at Nelson.

“We have a new office manager, Joanne McGettigan, who has 15 years’ experience in the glass industry. She has the same talent for customer service that our longtime office manager Alice Kent has. Customers will be pleased to know that although Alice is semi-retired, she will be on hand at least three days a week in our new location.”

The timing of the move coincides with a building project at the Spring Street location. In the works for two years, the plan includes the addition of six stacked terraced apartments atop the original building. These rental units will include one single-bedroom, three two-bedroom, and two three-bedroom apartments. One affordable unit will be available.

Designed by Princeton architect Joshua Zinder of JZA+D, the project allows for 2,000 square feet of commercial space on the existing first level. The apartments will feature outdoor glass balcony railings, and after completion, the structure will be known as the Nelson Glass House.
“We need more housing in downtown Princeton,” says Nelson, who also owns the house next door at 47 Spring Street, currently divided into two apartments. “With the new addition and the house next door, we feel we are keeping the area as a neighborhood.

“I wanted to do something my dad would be proud of,” she continues. “I wanted to leave a legacy for him and the family. It’s all about family.”

Loyal Customers
Nelson Glass has had many loyal customers over the past decades, and continues to add new clients from all over the area.

“We want them all to come and see us at the new location, where we will continue to service all their glass needs,” says Nelson. “They can count on us for the cutting and installation. We are a true service operation. We do it all, and we will also help to guide those who want to do it themselves. But for the things that are too big, such as long mirrors or big pieces of glass, they can rely on us.

“Every day is different, with different challenges. We have a wealth of knowledge and experience. We can handle any project — from little jobs to big jobs, whatever the customer needs.”

While looking forward to this new adventure in the annals of Nelson Glass history, Robbie Nelson admits to mixed feelings about leaving Spring Street.

“The move is bittersweet. I will certainly miss coming here. It’s been a big part of my life. I love Princeton, and I’ll miss the downtown very much. But we will not be far away at all. It’s still a Princeton address, and we can’t wait to welcome all our customers to our new home.”
Nelson Glass & Aluminum hours are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (609) 924-2880. Website: www.nelsonglassprinceton.com.

“THREE OVER NINETY”: This painting by Ros Dayan is part of an exhibition opening November 8 at the Princeton Senior Resource Center. The show, also featuring works by Martha Kingslety and Naomi Reich, runs through November 30. A reception is Thursday, November 8 from 4 to 5:30 p.m.  more

DINNER IS SERVED: “I want people to come and experience classic/modern French cuisine; the French way of cooking.” Assi Li Ponte, chef/owner of Bonne Assiette in Pennington, is shown with a sampling of his culinary creations: Filet Mignon, served with potato dauphinois, sauteed asparagus, and béarnaise sauce; Salmon with orange glaze, baby carrots, Nicoise olives, heirloom tomatoes, saba wine reduction, and pistou oil; Diver Scallops, served on a faro and corn confit, topped with orange beurre blanc and micro greens; and Mustard Chicken served with new potato fondant, baby carrots, and haricot verts with brandy mustard sauce.

By Jean Stratton

Dining out at Bonne Assiette in Pennington is not only a pleasure for the palate, it is a splendid experience on many levels. The welcoming atmosphere, attractive decor with French motif, and attentive service all combine to create a lunch or dinner to remember.

As chef/owner Assi Li Ponte says, “I want the people who come here to have a really good time. A great gastronomic experience! This is the hospitality business. You have to be hospitable. And everyone who comes here is treated like a guest.” more

IN THE CLEAR: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Lauren Rougas clears the ball up the field in recent action. Junior defender Rougas starred as PHS advanced to the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional quarterfinals where the eighth-seeded Little Tigers lost 4-0 at top-seeded Hunterdon Central last Friday. PHS finished the fall with a 9-7-2 record.  (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Lauren Rougas and her fellow defenders on the Princeton High girls’ soccer team knew they faced a challenge when they played at high-powered Hunterdon Central in the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional quarterfinals last Friday.

“Our defensive game plan was to just play as a unit and pass the ball around and keep possession on the offense,” said Rougas.”We wanted to keep our defensive stance and play as hard as we could.” more

October 24, 2018

MAXING OUT: Princeton University men’s hockey player Max Veronneau heads up the ice in game last winter. Senior forward Veronneau, who scored 55 points on 17 goals and 38 assists last winter to help Princeton win the ECAC Hockey tournament, will be looking for a big final campaign this winter. No. 13 Princeton opens its 2018-19 campaign by playing at No. 10 Penn State (4-0-0) on October 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

While the Princeton University men’s hockey team achieved some dramatic victories over Top 20 teams on the way to winning the ECAC Hockey tournament last winter, it is a loss that is driving the squad coming into the 2018-19 campaign.

“We have always started each year looking back on our last game and we try to build from there,” said Princeton head coach Ron Fogarty, who guided the Tigers to a 19-13-4 record last winter. more

October 17, 2018

“MOUNT ADAMS, WASHINGTON, 1875”: This oil on canvas painting by Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) is featured in “Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment,” an exhibition encompassing three centuries of American art. It is at the Princeton University Art Museum through January 6, 2019. Admission is free.

The story of our changing relationship with the natural world is comprehensively told through this exhibition encompassing three centuries of American art. “Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment” presents more than 120 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, photographs, videos,  and works of decorative art, from the colonial period to the present, exploring for the first time how American artists of different traditions and backgrounds have both reflected and shaped environmental understanding while contributing to the development of a modern ecological consciousness. more