November 18, 2015

CP School

Community Park kindergarteners in Sheila Aguilar’s Dual Language Immersion (DLI) class went outdoors last week to discover signs of fall. This is the first year for the DLI program in grades K-1 at Community Park, with a planned expansion of the program to include second grade next year.

(Photo by MS AKR)

(Photo by MS AKR)

Thanks to a $175,000 gift from the Synod of the Northeast, Witherspoon Presbyterian Church now owns outright the Robeson House, the birthplace of actor and civil rights leader Paul Robeson and the parsonage occupied by Mr. Robeson’s father, the Rev. William Drew Robeson, when he was pastor of the historic church.

The announcement of the gift at a banquet last Sunday celebrating the church’s 175th anniversary wasn’t the only good news for the more than 200 people attending the event at The Nassau Inn. The congregation also received a formal apology from the Presbytery of New Brunswick for asking blacks to leave Nassau Presbyterian Church in 1836.

The monetary gift means the church can cover the two mortgages on the Robeson House. “This gift is just wonderful for us,” said Denyce Leslie, a ruling elder who chairs the church’s buildings and grounds committee. “Now we clearly outright own four properties within town — the church, the Paul Robeson House on Witherspoon Street, the church office next door, and the manse on Walnut Street.”

The apology from the Presbytery of New Brunswick for removal of Rev. Robeson from his post in 1900, after 21 years of service, is equally significant, Ms. Leslie said. “We had worked on this for several years starting with David Prince many years ago,” she said, referring to an interim pastor of the church, who died last year. The Rev. Prince and his wife Nancy, who was present at the anniversary celebration, researched the history of the church and learned that Rev. Robeson was forced out when some white people thought he was too outspoken about the rights of black people. more

As of January 5, according to Frontier Airlines, commercial planes from Trenton-Mercer Airport (TTN) will fly to just four destinations, all in Florida. Frontier, the only commercial carrier serving TTN, plans to resume service to six other destinations in the spring.

“The changes are being made based on supply and demand,” stated Frontier Corporate Communications Representative Jim Faulkner. “There’s a greater demand to travel to warm destinations in the winter so that’s where Frontier’s focus is.” more


On October 25, the Princeton Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, members of which are shown here, dedicated a plaque on the grave of Josephine Ward Thomson Swann at Princeton Cemetery. Mrs. Swann founded the chapter in 1893, and was essential in preserving the deteriorating Rockingham, the last wartime headquarters of George Washington, which is in Kingston. By bequeathing her home to the town of Princeton, she enabled it to acquire the property that became its borough hall and senior center. And by leaving Princeton University $325,000 to help found its Graduate School, she helped it to expand as an institution.

Fall Farmers

Lawrenceville Presbyterian Preschool will hold their second annual Thanksgiving Farmers’ Market on Tuesday, November 24 from noon to 6:30 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church of Lawrenceville, 2688 Main Street in downtown Lawrenceville.

Shop for local produce from Cherry Grove Organic Farm, Hlubik Family Farm, Pineland Farms, Z Food Farm, Big Red Farm, and North Slope Farm. Customers can also pre-order pies, cake pops, and other desserts from Happy Wanderer Bakery and The Farmer’s Daughter, which will be made available for pick-up on the day of the event.  more

The Princeton Amateur Wrestling Society (PAWS) invites all local youth (boys and girls in grades 3 through 8) to join the recreation based club for the new season. All practices are conducted in Jadwin Gymnasium on the Princeton University campus. Beginners and advanced wrestlers are welcome. Practice, training, and competition is based on age, weight, and skill level.

PAWS boasts a tradition of outstanding graduates who have found success at major universities and beyond. The program also includes a highly experienced coaching staff. Practices begin on November 17 and occur weekly on Tuesday and Thursday nights from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10 to 11:30 a.m. A PAWS Cubs parent-child program is open to children in grades K-2 (practices occur on Saturdays).  more

Music Trenton

Trenton children beginning music study will have their own instruments to take home for practicing, and neglected instruments will find a whole new life, as Princeton University’s Office of Public Affairs and WWFM The Classical Network host “Instruments of Change,” benefitting the Trenton Community Music School. From November 30 through December 4, the Office of Public Affairs will open its doors for members of the community whose musical instruments are in need of a good home. Families whose children have outgrown their small instruments, shifted their interests away from playing, or developed into the need for a finer instrument, will find grateful recipients for their ½-size violins, novice-level flutes, or instruments that are no longer played. The Office of Public Affairs is located at 22 Chambers Street in Princeton, and will be open for donations from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

D&R Greenway Land Trust has announced that its Princeton campus will become a Conservation Campus. The YWCA Princeton Breast Cancer Resource Center (BCRC) will be its first campus partner by moving into 2 Preservation Place.

“The new strategic alliance between the two nonprofit groups celebrates the healing value that nature brings to our lives,” says D&R Greenway President and CEO Linda Mead. “D&R Greenway Land Trust has been working for more than 25 years to preserve open space and has recognized the important connection between the outdoors and health. The YWCA Princeton BCRC will be able to offer a welcoming and nurturing home setting for women and families, establishing a direct connection between nature and well-being.” more

Book Scott Berg

A. Scott Berg will deliver a lecture on his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, “Lindbergh,” at McCarter Theatre Center on Saturday, November 21 at 4 p.m. The lecture is in support of Morven’s year-long exhibition, “Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age.” Tickets for the lecture are available at, or by calling (609) 258-2787. A 1971 graduate of Princeton University, Mr. Berg is the author of five best-selling books, including “Max Perkins: Editor of Genius,” “Goldwyn: A Biography,” and “Wilson.”

C Carol

McCarter Theatre has produced “A Christmas Carol” every year since 1980, when then Artistic Director Nagle Jackson brought his adaptation to the theater. The current adaptation by David Thompson remains faithful to much of the language and spirit of Dickens’s original story, capturing both the struggles of Victorian life, and the joy and redemption of the holiday season. 2015 performance dates run from December 4 through 27. Seen here (l-r) are Graeme Malcolm, Michele Tauber, Sari Weinerman, Madeline Fox, and Bradley Mott. (Photo Credit: T. Charles Erickson)

Art 1

“HARVEST TIME”: This watercolor by Amy Amico is one of the plein air paintings on display at the Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury from December 6-23. Each painting is inspired by a private property or park in and around the town of Cranbury.

A group show of paintings by artists who participated in the Art in the Park plein air series sponsored by the Cranbury Arts Council will run from December 6 to 23 at the Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury.

There will be an artist reception on Sunday, December 6 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Gallery located in Cranbury Town Hall (Old School Building), 23-A North Main Street. Each month from May to October, a different Cranbury property hosts local artists to capture the scenes offered at their beautiful gardens and historic homes.  more

Hamilton Jewelers has been a showcase — not only for quality — but for a family-owned and operated business since its founding in 1912.

It is a true success story. Guided by former owner the late Irving Siegel, his son Martin Siegel, and now Irving’s grandson Hank Siegel, president and CEO, it continues to thrive. In an age when many establishments no longer stand the test of time, this is a special achievement.

As Martin Siegel has noted, “I started to help my dad in the business when I was 12 years old. I never thought of doing anything else. I came into the business formally in 1955, and now my son Hank is president and CEO. It has meant more than I ever expected to have the family business continue. It’s the dream of a father, passed on to a son and grandson.” more

November 11, 2015


SHE LOVES TO WORK: Princeton native Angeline Cifelli, center, shown with her son Anthony Cifelli and granddaughter Kim Lucas, says work is the key to her longevity. At Valley Road School, Princeton University, and a deli that was located where Hoagie Haven is today, she turned out thousands of lunches for generations of Princeton students and residents. She is celebrating her 100th birthday this weekend with family and friends.

Even as she closes in on 100, Angeline Cifelli can’t sit still. Seated in the solarium at Morris Hall on a recent morning, she used one foot to rock her wheelchair back and forth while reviewing her life, nearly all ten decades of which has been spent in Princeton.

She was born Angeline Pinelli on November 16, 1915. Her mother, who was from the Nini family, had come to Princeton in 1912. The Pinellis had 11 children, and Mrs. Cifelli is the only survivor of all her siblings. Five generations of her family will gather this Sunday to celebrate her centennial at a special brunch/breakfast in the Hilton Garden Inn. On the actual birthday, Mrs. Cifelli will entertain friends with a pizza party at Morris Hall in Lawrenceville, where she has lived for the past three years. more

Where are the Steve Jobs, the Bill Gates and the Mark Zuckerbergs of the next generation? You might want to check out the giant hackathon at Princeton University’s Friend Center this weekend.

More than 600 students from over 80 universities will descend on the Princeton campus this Friday through Sunday to experiment with cutting edge technology and participate in HackPrinceton, a collaborative and competitive software and hardware creation marathon.

“Student hackers are the CTOs, founders, and innovators of tomorrow,” stated Mike Swift, co-founder of Major League Hacking, the official student hackathon league, which supports this event and more than 150 others in North America and Europe every year. “These students are already making amazing projects now. Imagine what they will be doing in a few years.” more

Everything you always wanted to know about animals — and probably a lot of interesting information you didn’t even know you wanted to know — is coming over the air in Pets and Their People on 920AM The Voice.

Broadcast every Friday at 5 p.m. and Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 2 p.m., the show, sponsored by Dogs and Cats Rule pet stores, just celebrated its 100th episode, discussing everything animal-related from puppy mills to therapy dogs to a mountain lion that climbed a telephone pole, a zoo visitor who decided to pet a polar bear, and a dog who suffered predictable consequences when he chose to confront a porcupine (last three incidents did not actually take place in the studio).

Of all the many visitors to the show, Bocker the Labradoodle (combination Labrador and poodle), a celebrity therapy dog, boasted the most impressive resume. Featured in many different TV commercials and movies, he’s listed as the author of a book and a coloring book, and he’s been on the cover of the Tommy Hilfiger Magazine, and appeared in Target Magazine and Animal Planets Dogs 101.  more


Claire Connolly, professor of Modern English and head of the School of English at University College Cork, will present a lecture entitled “The Holyhead Road” on Friday, November 13 at 4:30 p.m. at the Lewis Center for the Arts’ James M. Stewart ’32 Theater, 185 Nassau Street. Part of the 2015-16 Fund for Irish Studies series at Princeton University, the event is free and open to the public.

Ms. Connolly will explore how journeys along the Holyhead Road from London to Dublin and across the Irish Sea, which have been represented by novelists, playwrights, and poets from Jonathan Swift to James Joyce, create a cultural exchange between Ireland and Britain. This is part of her larger research into the ways in which the Irish Sea scales and shapes diverse relationships between infrastructural links and cultural identities.

Ms. Connolly’s research has focused on the cultural history of 18th- and 19th-century Ireland, as well as Scottish and Welsh romanticism. Her books include A Cultural History of the Irish Novel, 1790-1829 (2012); The Cambridge Companion to Modern Irish Culture, edited with Joe Cleary (2005); and Theorizing Ireland (Palgrave, 2002).

Information about Fund for Irish Studies series events can be found at

Post Office Open

The new post office is up and running, and the first customer to send mail is Joseph Telese, shown here with United States Postal Service worker Charles Lovers, whom you may recognize from the old location at Palmer Square. The new, smaller branch is where a laundromat once operated at 259 Nassau Street, behind the building that is being turned into a 7-Eleven. The USPS sold the longtime location on Palmer Square to LCOR Ventures, which will use the space for either a restaurant or a retail business. (Photo by Ryan Stark Lilienthal)

Art 1

“TRENTON MAKES BRIDGE”: Local photographers capture the beauty of winter across the world in “The Quiet Months” exhibit at the Tulpehaking Nature Center in Hamilton. (Photo by Jonathan Michalik)

The Tulpehaking Nature Center will feature an exhibit that is a celebration of winter and water. Through photographs and interactive activities, The Quiet Months: An Exploration of Winter, opening December 4, takes a look at the special properties of water that make winter unique; how plants and animals survive the frigid season; and how we all can enjoy the marvels of nature in winter.

The exhibit will feature the work of regional photographers with images from near and far — from the Abbott Marshlands and Delaware River in Trenton to ice fields in Iceland. The photographs illustrate how water freezes to create varied textures and patterns, and show the beauty found by those who take the time to look. more

Art 2

“BARNES HALL”: This still image from the “Barnes Hall 2012-14” exhibit at the Princeton Day School (PDS) Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery will be on display from November 24 to December 17. The exhibit features the photography and video work of PDS alumna Eleanor Oakes ’03.

A new exhibition is opening at the Princeton Day School (PDS) Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery on November 24 and will run through December 17. The exhibit titled Barnes Hall 2012-2014 features the photography and video work of PDS alumna Eleanor Oakes ‘03. There will be an opening reception on Tuesday, November 14 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the gallery. There will also be an open house with the artist on Friday, November 27 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the gallery. Both events are free and open to the public.

PDS alumna Eleanor Oakes is an artist and photography professor currently living in Detroit. She received a BA in Visual Arts and Art History from Princeton University in 2007 and an MFA in Art Practice from Stanford University in 2014. Her work has received awards, such as a Murphy and Cadogan Contemporary Art Award from the San Francisco Foundation (2013) among others, and has been featured in publications and exhibitions such as 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers and a recent solo exhibition at Tyler Wood Gallery in San Francisco. Her work can be viewed online at more

Princeton Symphony Orchestra continued its journey through “significant voices of our time” with a concert of appealing yet complex music Sunday afternoon in Richardson Auditorium. For this concert, in a season dedicated to women’s creativity, PSO Music Director Rossen Milanov chose to explore the topic through guest solo pianist Joyce Yang, an international superstar who mesmerized Sunday afternoon’s audience with demonically virtuosic playing.

Concerts featuring guest stars often ‘warm up’ the audience with a familiar work before the star attraction. PSO put a great deal of faith in its audience on Sunday afternoon by beginning the concert with a full-length symphony by Princeton composer Edward T. Cone. Cone’s 1953 Symphony showed the musical influence on Cone of the early 20th-century Second Viennese School in its use of small melodic fragments passed around among the players of the orchestra. In the opening Sostenuto random pitches seemed to come from throughout the stage, as conductor Mr. Milanov maintained steady control over the building intensity. The texture continually changed as different instruments came to the forefront during the course of the work.  more

Theater Bollywood

From acclaimed Artistic Director Rahis Bharti, Bollywood Masala invites audiences on a lively musical journey from Radasthan to Mumbai at McCarter Theatre on Monday, November 16 at 7:30 p.m.

For their Princeton debut, a company of 17 musicians and dancers will perform traditional Rajasthani dance, including pot balancing, standing on swords, the Maharaja (spinning dances), and even the spectacle of fire breathing. The dancers will be accompanied by musicians using a variety of instrumentation.  more

Music Flute

Swiss flutist Emmanuel Pahud will perform with guitarist Christian Rivet at Richardson Auditorium on Thursday, November 19 at 8 p.m. The musicians will perform selections from their 2014 award-winning recording titled, Around the World, a collection of music linking four continents across three centuries. The program will include both original works and special arrangements by Astor Piazzolla, Maurice Ohana, Francesco Molino, Ravi Shankar, George Frederic Handel, Elliott Carter, Christian Rivet, and Béla Bartók. There will be a musical preview at 7 p.m. free to ticketholders, featuring the Princeton Pianists Ensemble performing arrangements of Beethoven, Rachmaninov, Chopin, and Ravel for up to eight hands. more

November 4, 2015

New front page image

It’s fitting that a painter helped make Lake Carnegie possible. When Andrew Carnegie was having his portrait painted by Howard Russell Butler, Class of 1876, Butler told him of the Princeton crew’s need for a place to practice and compete. That was in 1902. On December 5, 1906, the dream became a reality — at a final cost of $450,000 or about $9.5 million today. (Photo by Emily Reeves)


HARNESSING THE POWER OF LITERATURE: Last month, a group of select librarians from around the country came together at Princeton Public Library to learn the techniques of People and Stories/Gente y Cuentos, which shares literature with those who might otherwise not have access. Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the participants were led by Pat Andres and Alma Concepcion, fourth and fifth from left, of People and Stories/Gente y Cuentos.

It wasn’t exactly quiet in the Quiet Room at Princeton Public Library. Seated around a table one day last month, nine librarians from around the country were reviewing a short story and how it can be used to get the people they serve excited about literature. While tones were muted — these were librarians, after all — the discussion was animated.

Josie Andrews, from Nevada City, California, counts a large homeless population among her library clients. Cindy Welsh, from Greeley, Colorado, works with refugees and immigrants with low literacy. Aida Quinones, from Athens, Georgia, manages a bilingual library that attracts a lot of migrants. more

You see them blowing in the street or beside the road. You’ll see them if you wander into the woods. You’ll see them in streams, rivers, and the ocean. You probably have a few in your car, maybe a bag full in your garage or under the sink or in the kitchen closet.

Each of us brings home hundreds of plastic bags every year — more than 100 billion total in the United States, according to the United States International Trade Commission. There’s widespread agreement that this is a problem for our environment, and widespread disagreement over the best thing to do about it. Can we break our addiction to plastic bags, which didn’t appear in grocery stores until the late 1970s, and embrace reusable non-plastic bags?  more