February 10, 2016

Stuart Triplets

Triplets Juliet, Natalie, and Pamela McGowen (L to R) of Skillman will graduate from Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in June and enter Princeton University in the fall. All three National Honor Society and AP scholars are on Stuart’s varsity track, volleyball, and tennis teams. After a campus college tour in August they all decided Princeton was their first choice.


NOT JUST ROSES: Presenting a loved one with this lavish arrangement from Viburnum on Nassau Street is one of many ways to demonstrate Valentine’s Day affection (see princetonmagazine.com for an upcoming article on Viburnum and making a case for the anti-romantic). Over the coming weekend, there are multiple opportunities for celebrating the holiday. (Photo by Jeff Tryon)

“If I don’t do something, I’ll never hear the end of it,” a 40-something man was overheard telling a friend while waiting for a sandwich at Gennaro’s Italian Market in Kingston on Tuesday afternoon. “I mean, it’s not just one day this year. Valentine’s Day is on Sunday so it’s all weekend. I made a hotel reservation. But maybe it’ll snow and we won’t have to go.” more

Did you pick the winners in the Iowa primaries? How about New Hampshire?

If not, you’re in good company. The renowned Gallup Poll didn’t either. In fact, according to Gallup Editor-in-Chief Frank Newport in a speech last Thursday at Princeton University’s Dodd’s Auditorium in Robertson Hall, Gallup is backing off from the predicting business — no more “horse-race polling.” more

In response to rising concerns over a drug epidemic throughout New Jersey and the nation, Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance, Princeton Health Department, and Princeton Police Department will be offering a presentation at Princeton High School on March 2, 7-9 p.m., to educate parents, high school students, and community members.

“We want to make sure that we alert the community that heroin is around, and we want people to have the facts,” stated Alliance Coordinator Gary DeBlasio, “so that they know what they’re looking at when they see it.” more

Thoughts of Valentine’s Day bring back a song I knew by heart when I was growing up. No wonder, the way my parents kept playing Nat King Cole’s recording of “Nature Boy.” They were addicted to it; so was everyone; the whole country was enthralled by the “strange enchanted boy who wandered very far, very far over land and sea.” The voice was already a pleasant part of our family’s life because of Cole’s “Christmas Song.” Now the same warm smooth deeply familiar voice that sang of chestnuts and yuletide carols and mistletoe was making me feel things I’d never felt before, exciting my imagination with dreams of distant lands and magic days, with a message about loving and being loved that was more appealing than the lessons I learned in school. more

Feature Image

Celebrate the Year of the Monkey with Red-Colored Gifts!

In traditional Chinese art and culture, red is considered to be a very auspicious color. For example, monetary gifts are often packaged in red envelopes signifying fortune and good luck. In honor of 2016’s Year of the Monkey, Princeton Magazine has chosen to shop red! Simply click on each product image to purchase and bring a little luck into your own life. more

Pure Barre, the popular workout franchise, has signed a lease to open a studio at 31 Hulfish Street on Palmer Square. The studio, which will open in late February, is located above Mediterra restaurant.

Owner Jacqui Arce-Quinton was already a Pure Barre fan when she and her husband decided to move to Princeton and open the studio. “Not only did we choose Palmer Square because it’s in the heart of town, but we decided to live here, too,” she said. “Princeton has been very welcoming and I’m so excited to share my passion for Pure Barre with the local area.” more

Artworks DirectorWhen Lauren Otis was approached about becoming executive director of ARTWORKS, the Trenton visual art center, he was hesitant at first. “I thought long and hard about it,” said Mr. Otis, who served on the organization’s board from 2009 to 2014 and has been active in several of its programs. “I felt I almost knew too much. I knew how big a job it was.”

But ultimately, he couldn’t resist the opportunity to have a leading role in a movement he feels passionate about: furthering the arts in Trenton. Where some see blight and decay on the capital city’s streets, Mr. Otis sees artistic opportunity. “I am a true believer. I’ve given lectures on the subject,” he said. “There is this negative public story. But those of us in the arts see this incredible flowering of creativity. It’s not just street art or mural art. There are also interesting events going on all over the city that are driven by art.”

It was Mr. Otis who founded the popular Art All Day, an ARTWORKS-sponsored event each November where Trenton artists open their studios to the public. It is a cousin of the wildly successful Art All Night weekend, a 10-year-old event that draws thousands to a former Roebling Steel factory in Trenton every June. more

Hun Art

“CANDYLAND”: Hun School student artist Carmel Monkton ’16 received a Gold Key Award from The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards for her painting “Candyland.

Hun School artists Carmel Monckton ’16, Baiyi ‘Rebecca’ Ning ’17, and Siyeh ‘Sophia’ Chung ’17 received prestigious awards for their artwork submissions to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards [SAWA]. SAWA is the nation’s longest-running and most prestigious recognition initiative for creative teens.  more

See below for the February 9, 2016 Princeton Council Meeting.

Town Topics Newspaper will be posting videos of all future municipal meetings.

#33 Goalie

NET GAIN: Princeton University women’s hockey goalie Kimberley Newell makes a save in a game earlier this season. Last weekend, senior Newell starred as Princeton defeated Colgate 4-2 on Friday and then blanked Cornell 5-0 a day later. Newell had 37 saves against Colgate and 30 in the shutout of the Big Red. She was later named the ECAC Hockey Goaltender of the Week for her heroics. The win over Cornell clinched the Ivy League title for Princeton, the program’s first Ivy crown since 2006. Eighth-ranked Princeton, now 19-5-1 overall and 12-5-1 ECAC Hockey, hosts No. 5 Clarkson on February 12 and St. Lawrence on February 13. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

A year ago, the Princeton University women’s hockey came agonizingly close to an Ivy League title, ending up one win behind champion Harvard after dropping a 2-1 heartbreaker to Yale in the regular season finale. more

In recent years, the Princeton Symphony Orchestra has expanded its offerings to include both a Chamber and Pops series, among others. The Pops series has been in place for more than a decade, attracting new audience members and giving the musicians a chance to explore a different genre of repertoire. This past Saturday night, the Princeton Symphony treated the audience at Richardson Auditorium to some of the “greatest hits” from the movies — just in time for Academy Awards month. more

Rider ProfA new documentary on race; written, directed, and produced by Dr. Sheena C. Howard, assistant professor of communication studies at Rider University; will have its premiere screening on February 25 at The Landmark Theatre, Ritz, and the Bourse, in Philadelphia.

Remixing Colorblind examines how the current educational system shapes national understanding of race, and by extension, race relations. These areas of racial misunderstanding are explored through in-depth conversations with faculty, administrators, teachers, guidance counselors, and young people from a variety of Historic Black Colleges/Universities, predominantly white institutions, and inner city high schools.

Remixing Colorblind is Howard’s first film. She is also scheduled to appear on NPR and WBUR Boston’s Here and Now on February 21.

To learn more, visit www.rider.edu.


Snowed in?

Send the one you love something sweet for Valentine’s Day! From the perfect cup of coffee to a festive box of Cadbury chocolates, these gourmet delights and comforting gifts are sure to warm the heart. Simply click on each product image to purchase. more

February 8, 2016


Princeton High girls’ swimmer Abbey Berloco, right, enjoys the moment with Maria Nitti of Notre Dame after winning the 50-meter freestyle final last Saturday in the Mercer County Swimming Championships at WW/P-N. Sophomore Berloco also prevailed in the 400 free and helped PHS win the team title at the meet, its fourth straight county crown. See page 26 for more details on the competition. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

February 3, 2016

Retailers Kate Spade, Aerosoles, Palm Place A Lllly Pulitzer Signature Store, and Design Within Reach have all closed up shop on Palmer Square in recent weeks. But what may look like a mass departure is just a routine part of turnover, according to management. And discussions with new “very exciting tenants” to take their places are underway.

“It doesn’t have to do with money,” said David Newton, vice president of Palmer Square Management. “It happens that their leases were up at the same time. Two of them were doing very healthy sales. It had to do with the internal workings of their companies. I was upset that they were going, but on all of these spaces, we are in various stages of talking closely with a number of tenants.” more

VDay Gifts_3

Valentine’s Day is often associated with flowers, chocolates, and teddy bears; however, this year, Princeton Magazine is offering up a few new options. These gifts are suitable for all ages, male and female, young and old. To purchase, simply click each product image.


Princeton University’s Board of Trustees has adopted a strategic planning framework that includes expanding the student body, building a new residential college, reinstating a transfer admissions program, and attracting more students from low-income families, among other initiatives.

The framework was adopted after two years of deliberations. “We believe the framework provides a clear reaffirmation of Princeton’s mission and its defining characteristics, and a compelling blueprint for building on and enhancing Princeton’s capacity to achieve the highest possible standards of teaching and research,” said Kathryn A. Hall, the chair of the board. “We look forward to working with President Eisgruber and other members of the University community to achieve the goals and priorities that we have articulated.” more

“The evil that men do lives after them;” says Shakespeare’s devious Marc Antony in his famous funeral oration from the play Julius Caesar. “The good is oft interred with their bones. So let it be with Caesar.” And Woodrow Wilson too? Or not?

The Wilson Legacy Review Committee of the Princeton University Board of Trustees, in taking on the responsibility of assessing the record of Mr. Wilson, who was president of the University from 1902 to 1910 and president of the United States from 1913 to 1921, has gathered letters from nine distinguished Wilson scholars, from a wide spectrum of backgrounds and universities, providing dozens of pages of historical information and insight, but nothing likely to make the committee’s job easier.  more

A trio of Princeton University freshmen are in the running for the seventh annual Hult Prize, which could win them $1 million in start-up funding “to change the world,” as the organization’s website says.

Ricardo Diaz, Viktoria Zlatinova, and Evan Trauger are hoping that Ryde, a subscription-based transportation service, will make it through the regional finals of the student competition and start-up platform to advance to the next level. The Princeton students will travel to the regionals in Boston next month to pitch their idea and describe their business model.  more


EXPLORING ISLAMIST EXTREMISM: (left to right) Playwright Emily Mann, scholars Dr. Stuart Gottlieb, and Dr. Hooshang Amirahmadi and moderator Paula Alekson discuss with the audience the issues raised at Sunday’s performance of Ms. Mann’s new play “Hoodwinked.” (Photo Courtesy of McCarter Theatre Center)

“It’s about the 21st century’s responses to Islamist extremism,” Emily Mann explained in describing her documentary drama Hoodwinked, performed as a reading in the McCarter Theatre Center Lab last weekend, “but it’s also very much about asking questions and sharing information.” The drama was a springboard for a lively discussion.  more


SHOWING PRIDE: Kelly Cooke heads up the ice in recent action for the Boston Pride of the National Women’s Hockey League (NWHL). Former Princeton University women’s hockey standout Cooke has enjoyed a solid season for the Pride, tallying three points on one goal and two assists in 14 appearances as the team has produced a 10-3-1 start. (Photo Courtesy of NWHL)

After Kelly Cooke wrapped up her career for the Princeton University women’s hockey team in 2013 with a superb senior season that saw her pile up 27 points on 15 goals and 12 assists, it looked like that might be her last hurrah on the ice. more

Profile in Educ

“POSITIVE ENERGY”: Krysten Yee, assistant teacher at Eden Autism Services, works one-on-one with the Eden students, looking forward to helping them to develop the skills that will lead to increasing independence and self-fulfillment.

Krysten Yee started her career in education just last year as a teaching assistant at Eden Autism Services. The 23-year-old Westchester, New York native graduated from James Madison University in 2014 with a major in psychology, a minor in non-teaching special education, and a certificate in autism spectrum disorders. She joined Eden as a counselor at their Crossroads camp program in the summer of 2014, and signed on with the full-time staff at Eden Institute the following fall.


IllustratorPatrick McDonnell, creator of the “Mutts” comic strip talks about his work Saturday, February 6, at 2 p.m., at Princeton Public Library.

Mr. McDonnell, who recently moved to Princeton, is also the author of children’s books including the 2005 New York Times bestseller The Gift of Nothing and the 2012 Caldecott Honor winner Me … Jane, a biography of the young Jane Goodall.

Mutts appears in hundreds of newspapers in 20 countries and was once described by Peanuts creator Charles Schulz as “one of the best comic strips of all time.”

Mr. McDonnell has received numerous awards for Mutts including the National Cartoonists Society’s highest honor, The Reuben, for Cartoonist of the Year. Mutts has also been recognized for its environmental and animal advocacy with a Sierra Club award and the PETA Humanitarian Award, among others.

Book Rev“A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It had begun to snow again.” That’s James Joyce’s snow, falling outside a Dublin hotel room, the first notes of the sublime last movement of his long story “The Dead.” Snow is also falling on the nameless lovesick wanderer in Franz Schubert’s song cycle Winterreise (Winter Journey).

Though I make a point of listening to Schubert and reading Joyce every year at this time, I’ve never brought them together in the same column — under the same roof of the same imaginary inn, as it were, the short plump bespectacled composer at the piano accompanying the tall, thin, bespectacled Irish tenor whose singing voice was “clarion clear” according to Oliver St. John Gogarty, otherwise known as “stately plump Buck Mulligan” in the opening sentence of Joyce’s Ulysses. Given the preoccupation with songs and singers in Joyce’s life and work, it’s not all that unlikely a pairing, allowing for a little poetic license in the matter of time and space. True, Schubert was born in Vienna on January 31, 1797, Joyce 85 years and 1300 miles away in Dublin on February 2, 1882, but online the distances and years disappear in “that region where dwell the vast hosts of the dead,” their “wayward and flickering existence” sensed but not apprehended by Joyce’s Gabriel Conroy seconds before he turns to the window and sees the snow “falling obliquely against the lamplight.” more