August 3, 2016


Saturday’s flood created the illusion of an upside-down world in the lobby of the library. (Photo Courtesy of the Princeton Public Library) 

The afternoon rain storm that soaked the Princeton area last Saturday paralyzed traffic and closed roads in several areas of town. But by Tuesday, most everything was back to normal.

More than seven inches of hard-driving rain flooded Hinds Plaza and sent water rushing into the Community Room of Princeton Public Library, raised water to unprecedented levels at Princeton Junction train station in West Windsor, and flooded Princeton High School’s boiler room and the orchestra pit in its performing arts center.  more

July 22, 2016

Clara Martha Burton CP Pool Opening 2012

Princeton’s cooling station will be open Friday, July 22 through Monday, July 25 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. to ensure Princeton residents have a safe place to stay cool during the expected high temperatures. Residents, especially senior citizens, are strongly advised to take advantage of these cooling stations if needed. Cooling stations are air conditioned facilities where Princeton residents can find relief from the heat. Free water is accessible at all stations. more

July 21, 2016

Public Service Electric & Gas Company (PSE&G) will be working in Princeton to replace approximately 1 mile of older gas pipes with new, durable plastic and/or coated steel piping – ensuring a continued safe, clean and reliable gas system well into the future.

Linden Lane, Guyot Avenue, Franklin Street, Murray Place, Nassau Street, Prospect Avenue, Russel Road, Winant Road End, Tee-Ar Place, Clearview Avenue, and Franklin Avenue will be affected. more

July 20, 2016

Three police officers were killed and three others wounded last Sunday morning in an ambush in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Ten days earlier, five officers had been shot dead and 12 injured during an otherwise peaceful protest in Dallas, Texas. more

July 13, 2016

Avalon Princeton, on the former site of Princeton Hospital on Witherspoon Street, is looking forward to welcoming its first residents next month, with construction to complete the 280-unit rental community scheduled through next spring.

The new development will include studio apartments starting at $2258 per month, one-bedroom apartments at $2735, two-bedroom apartments from $3135, as well as three-bedroom apartments and two- and three-bedroom townhouses. (There are additional fees for application, amenities, security, parking, pet rent, and storage.)  more

June 22, 2016

Come July, you might find Princeton’s municipal engineer Bob Kiser driving a tractor across the fields of a farm he owns in Hunterdon County. Mr. Kiser is retiring next week after 33 years on the job, and he is looking forward to spending time with his family С especially his six-and-a-half-month-old granddaughter С and cutting the grass with that tractor. more


ON THE JOB: Matt Madalon is all smiles during a lighter moment this spring as he took the helm of the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team as interim head coach in the wake of Chris Bates being dismissed after a sideline incident in a game against Brown. Madalon guided the Tigers to a 3-2 record down the stretch after a 2-6 start, culminating with a dramatic 7-6 win over Cornell in the season finale. Last week, Madalon was elevated to permanent head coach of the Princeton program. (Photo by Robert Goldstein, Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Matt Madalon is all about moving forward.

After being named the interim head coach of the Princeton University men’s lacrosse team in the wake of Chris Bates being dismissed after a sideline incident in a game against Brown, Madalon focused on righting the ship. more

June 17, 2016

On Tuesday, June 21, a series of events will pay tribute to those killed in the Orlando shootings.

“A Multi-Faith Gathering for Orlando and Beyond” begins with a multi-faith service from 7-8 p.m. in the sanctuary of Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street. The Gathering is presented by the Princeton Clergy Association and the Coalition for Peace Action. more

June 15, 2016

The Coalition for Peace Action’s gun violence prevention group, Ceasefire NJ, invites members of the public to its monthly advocacy committee meeting on Thursday, June 16 to discuss a possible vigil or public witness in response to the mass shooting in Orlando, Florida. The meeting, at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, will start at 7:30 p.m. more

June 8, 2016

Incumbent Jenny Crumiller and newcomer Tim Quinn won the most votes in Tuesday’s Democratic primary race for two Princeton Council seats, beating out fellow contenders Leticia Fraga and Anne Neumann. These are unofficial results.

According to the Mercer County Clerk’s Office, Ms. Crumiller earned 2,587 votes, or 31.42 percent of the vote, while Mr. Quinn received 2,168, or 26.33 percent. Following closely behind, Ms. Fraga got 2,124 votes, which is 25.80 percent, and Ms. Neumann earned 1,348, or 16.37 percent. more

1NathansonJeff Nathanson will be stepping down as executive director of the Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) at the end of 2016, the ACP announced yesterday.

The Arts Council on Witherspoon Street has experienced a significant transformation in the 11 years since Mr. Nathanson took the helm in 2005.

“Jeff successfully led the Arts Council through an exciting time of tremendous growth for the organization,” stated Princeton Mayor Liz Lempert. “He’s been an effective and effusive champion for the role of the arts in building community. I’m grateful for the opportunity to have worked with him, and am very sad to see him move on.”

ACP Board of Trustees President Ted Deutsch echoed the mayor’s praise, describing Mr. Nathanson as “an outstanding leader not just for the arts community, but for the Greater Princeton community as a whole. His in-depth experience in arts program development and management helped the organization dramatically expand and improve its arts-related offerings over the past decade. At the same time he has kept the ACP focused on its historic mission to serve the local community through free, accessible and inclusive events and scholarship programs for children and families.” more

May 25, 2016


As Princeton University alumni return for Reunions this weekend, many will remember an institution very different from the Princeton of 2016. It was 1909 when Princeton President Woodrow Wilson wrote to an African American applicant that it would be “altogether inadvisable for a colored man to enter,” but more recently, alumni from 70 years ago will recall a college that would not graduate an African American student until 1948.  more

May 11, 2016

Following a special May 2 workshop on the 2016 municipal budget, Princeton Council voted Monday to adopt the proposed figure of $61.9 million.

The proposal had originally called for an amendment raising taxes in order to increase the town’s surplus by $150,000, but that amendment was tabled in favor of changes recommended by the Citizens Finance Advisory Committee and municipal staff. Those changes include some cuts, as well as putting off the purchase of a police car and delaying a hire for the Sewer Operating Committee, among other measures. more

The Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) has rejected Senator Kip Bateman (R-16) and Assemblyman Reed Gusciora’s (D-15) request to meet with representatives of the IAS Board concerning the Institute’s faculty housing project, “to discuss alternatives and a possible resolution of this controversy.”

Institute director Robbert Dijkgraaf, in his response Friday, stated that the legislators’ letter “seems to be part of a larger publicity effort to discredit the Institute and mischaracterize its project.” more

Images of police in the news media and in the public imagination are often negative С depicting at best enforcement and at worst brutality. Think Baltimore, Chicago, New York, Ferguson С and so many other conflict locations throughout the country.

Princeton Chief of Police Nick Sutter sees vast changes in the nature of police work in the 21st century and the need for new approaches to the job.  more

In a deal announced last week, The Bank of Princeton is being merged into the Short Hills-based Investors Bancorp. The agreement provides a combination of stock and cash with a value of $154 million for Bank of Princeton stockholders. more

May 4, 2016


RECONSIDERING WILSON’S LEGACY: A mural depicting Woodrow Wilson throwing out the first ball at a 1915 Washington Senators baseball game was removed on Saturday from Princeton University’s Wilson College dining hall, in accordance with the decision of Wilson College Head Eduardo Cadava and the recommendation of an undergraduate student committee. (Photos by Donald Gilpin)

A large mural depicting the image of Woodrow Wilson was removed Saturday from the dining hall of Wilson College at Princeton University, at the behest of Wilson College Head Eduardo Cadava.  more

As New Jersey public school students completed the 2016 PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers) exams last week, the Princeton Public Schools (PPS) Board of Education passed a resolution urging the New Jersey Department of Education (DOE) to “withdraw its pending graduation requirement proposals.” more

At a meeting on April 25, Princeton Council voted unanimously to hire a consultant to take a hard look at residential zoning in the town. The priority of The RBA Group’s Neighborhood Character and Zoning Study will be the issue of teardowns, which are taking place in just about every area of the town. more

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CHANGING THE STREETSCAPE: The Avalon Princeton rental community is taking shape along Witherspoon Street, where Princeton’s hospital once stood. The 280-unit complex of apartments and townhouses, the subject of considerable pushback from area residents over the past few years, is planning to welcome its first tenants by late August, with full completion projected for a few months later.

The first units in the AvalonBay rental complex being built on the former site of Princeton Hospital on Witherspoon Street are scheduled to be available in late August. more

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GILL DISEASE: Gizzard shad from Lake Carnegie that were necropsied last week by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection Division of Fish and Wildlife were found to have a gill disease caused by a common protozoan parasite. (Photo Courtesy of Division of Fish & Wildlife)

The spring die-off of hundreds of gizzard shad in Lake Carnegie, noted by many residents over the past couple of weeks, is the result of a gill disease caused by a parasite known as “Ich” (Ichthyophthirius multifiliis), according to a pathology report issued Saturday by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection Division of Fish and Wildlife (F&W). more

May 1, 2016

Edens, the company that has owned Princeton Shopping Center since 2012, is committed to “catering to the community,” the company’s vice president of development David Germakian told Princeton Council at a meeting of the governing body Monday night. Mr. Germakian said that Edens, which owns 120 retail centers along the east coast and in Texas, sees the shopping center as “Princeton’s second downtown.” more

April 27, 2016


CAUSE OF DEATH?: Numerous dead gizzard shad and a few dead carp were seen floating in Lake Carnegie during the past week, prompting an investigation by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. A spring die-off of gizzard shad is not uncommon, but the fish pathologist of the Fish and Wildlife Division of the DEP is evaluating specimens for possible bacterial diseases. (Photo by Donald Gilpin)

Is it an environmental crisis or just an annual rite of spring?  more

April 20, 2016

The Princeton Battlefield Society (PBS), in its ongoing efforts to halt an Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) construction project, last week asked the U.S. District Court for New Jersey to grant a preliminary injunction under the Clean Water Act.

If granted, that injunction would prevent the IAS from continuing work on its 15-unit faculty housing project until the Battlefield Society’s March 10 complaint concerning the destruction of wetlands on the site is resolved. The Institute has until May 2 to respond to the current motion, and on May 16 the court is scheduled to hear the case, according to Battlefield Society attorney Bruce Afran. more