August 26, 2016

@jackrogersusa

Show your school spirit with Jack Rogers’ new Spirit Sandals collection! Perfect for cheering on your favorite school team or club, each pair features their iconic whipstitching and rondelles.

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August 24, 2016

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Shop for fall during the final days of summer!

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To the Editor:

Evergreen Forum (EF), a program of the Princeton Senior Resource Center (PSRC), is thriving. Course offerings just get more interesting (and numerous), and participant numbers keep rising. Well into its second decade, the Forum provides stimulating daytime study and discussion programs for adults living in the greater Princeton area. It encourages active participation for those who enjoy learning for its own sake. Course leaders are drawn from teachers and other professionals devoted to their subject and wishing to share their enthusiasm.

“Some of the ideas in this class may boggle the mind,” warns Evergreen Forum instructor Stuart Kurtz as he describes his upcoming course, What is Time? An Overview. “Time” is among the 24 courses being offered this fall by EF. Most courses, which begin at the end of September, meet once a week for two hours for six to eight weeks. Many classes are held at EF’s home base, the Princeton Senior Resource Center at the Suzanne Patterson Building, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton; others will take place at convenient nearby locations.

Course descriptions and registration details may be found online at www.theevergreenforum.org, as well as in print brochures available at PSRC and area libraries and churches.

Ellen Gilbert

Stuart Road East

To the Editor:

I’d like to offer some corrections to an August 10 front page article about proposed revisions to Princeton’s tree ordinance [“More Discussion Due On Tree Ordinance at Next Council Meeting”]. I write as a botanist and former member of the Shade Tree Commission (STC) that generated the proposal. At the council meeting, ash trees were not characterized as invasive, and the arborist referred to one that might be attacked by the notorious Emerald Ash Borer in 10 years, not 30.

The proposed changes would make it much more expensive for homeowners to remove healthy, mature trees. The primary aim is to discourage, or at least compensate for, the clearcutting associated with Princeton’s epidemic of teardowns. Replacing a house on a small lot typically means removing all trees, since even trees beyond the new building’s (larger) footprint will be damaged by construction activity. The increased fees — $400 for roughly every 9” of girth, up to $1600 per tree — would provide funds for new plantings to compensate for the lost trees.

There’s clear public benefit here, but the new fees or replacement obligations will also fall on homeowners who may have valid reasons to remove a tree. The proposed changes penalize removal of our two most common invasive trees: Norway Maples, which compete with native species, and the Ailanthus (Tree of Heaven) whose allelopathic root exudates interfere with gardening. The ordinance also penalizes homeowners who wish to install solar panels, grow a vegetable garden or plant wildflowers to feed pollinators. Shade is a wonderful thing, but creating an opening for beneficial plants not blessed with xylem should not be penalized.

Inflexibility is further evident in the decision to levy the fees on homeowners wishing to proactively remove ash trees. Trying to defend the STC’s proposal, the arborist claimed that a healthy ash tree “might” succumb to Emerald Ash Borer in 10 years. There’s no “might” about it. Barring a miracle, every untreated mature ash will succumb. In fact, penalizing proactive removal ignores the warnings of STC’s own Community Forestry Management Plan, which states: “An underlying concern is that municipal employees and private contractors may not be able to keep up with the demand for removal of dead and dying hazardous ash trees.”

Council was scared away from suggested improvements to the proposal by imaginary worst-case scenarios, misleading “slippery slope” arguments, and unnecessary appeals to emotion, as when native plant advocates were characterized as fanatics ready to “wipe out” people’s perennial beds.

The rigidity of the proposed changes, their focus on penalties rather than incentives, and their dependence on expensive nursery trees rather than selectively nurturing the “free forest” of volunteer trees that sprout in people’s yards, deprives the arborist of adequate enforcement flexibility. Large trees provide shade, cooling, habitat, but they also interfere with other social and ecological goods: solar panels, orchards, gardens. Surprisingly, Princeton’s Historic Preservation and Environmental commissions were not asked to comment on the proposed changes. The STC’s important defense of trees needs to be tempered by awareness of other sustainability goals.

(Public comment continues at council’s September 12 meeting.)

Stephen Hiltner

North Harrison Street

To the Editor:

As parents, few things are scarier than finding out something is wrong with your baby, but that’s the news we received six years ago before our daughter, Evalyn, was born. It was then that we found out Evalyn had a congenital heart defect.

Many people believe heart disease only affects the elderly. Yet by age two, Evalyn had undergone two open heart surgeries, three cardiac catheterizations, a stent placement and countless other tests and procedures. While the journey is sometimes difficult, Evalyn is doing well thanks to breakthrough research funded by organizations, such as the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

But the need for more research is unquestionable. In the U.S., nearly 40,000 children are born with a heart defect each year. Many congenital heart defects are diagnosed in infancy and some, like Evalyn’s, can be detected prenatally. After diagnosis, there are medical treatments available to help the heart perform its best.

This year, Evalyn and our family will share our journey at the Central New Jersey Heart Walk. For the past four years, we have walked with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association to raise funds and awareness for the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers, heart disease and stroke. It is our hope that one day no family will need to learn their child has a heart condition.

Join us on Friday, September 30 at the 2016 Central New Jersey Heart Walk at Arm & Hammer Park, home of the Trenton Thunder. For more information, visit www.CentralNJHeartWalk.org.

Fred and Mia Carella

Volunteers, American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, Yardley, Pa.

To the Editor:

Today someone removed the “Bernie for President” sign from my lawn. I would like to think it was an impoverished Bernie supporter who couldn’t resist a souvenir. I prefer that to the idea that it was a supporter of one of the other candidates. I believe in tolerance of others’ political choices, although I enjoy discussions of why those choices were made.

Let’s have some respect for differing opinions.

Eileen Bird

Moran Avenue

Obit Kaine 8-24-16Curtis Andrew Caine 

Curtis Andrew Kaine, devoted husband of Karen Kaine and loving father of Trevor Kaine and Kendra Kaine Saechao, passed on Thursday morning, August 4, 2016. Having worked at Tenacre Foundation in several capacities for almost 30 years, Curtis’s friendly smile and exuberant greeting could be seen and heard at many Princeton establishments. His well-known “Helloooo” will continue to echo in the hearts of his family, friends and acquaintances.

Curtis’s love of theater, both on and off the stage, characterized his love of life. As a thespian, he played roles off Broadway in New York and in both regional and local community theater. He could often be seen at Off-Broadstreet Theatre in Hopewell which became his theatrical family and home. For several years, he was also a professional Santa. With his jolly personality and incredible sense of humor, he was a natural.

Spirituality played a key role in Curtis’s life and his membership in and service to 1st Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton was very important to him. Curtis was also an avid supporter of local politics and civic activities. His infectious smile and his understanding of God have been a blessing to many.

In addition to his wife and two children, Curtis is survived by two brothers, Stephen and Peter Kaine, and two stepdaughters Megan Aubrey and Jackie Rogers.

In lieu of flowers, Curtis’s legacy of caring about others may be honored by donations to any of the following organizations: First Church of Christ, Scientist, Princeton; Off-Broadstreet Theatre in Hopewell, NJ; Tenacre Foundation.

A private family Celebration of Life will be held in California.

———

James Dawson Moyer

James Dawson (JD) Moyer, 39, died August 3, 2016. JD was born in Princeton on May 31, 1977. He was the son of Nina Moyer and Lee Moyer, who predeceased his son.

JD graduated from Hopewell Valley High School and the University of Vermont where he played lacrosse. After his graduation in 2000 he moved to San Diego, Calif. and joined a group of college lacrosse players who helped develop youth lacrosse on the west coast. As a coach, JD had an ability to inspire, motivate, and bring out the best in each player. He was more than a coach, he was a teacher, mentor, and friend to all.

He is survived by his beloved wife, Lauren Moyer, his children Will and Molly, his mother Nina Moyer and brothers Andy (Anne) and Mike (Shaina), his nephews Eli and Charlie, and many very special cousins, aunts, and uncles.

JD was First Vice President at Alliant Insurance Services. An education fund for the children is being set up by his employer. Donations in JD’s memory will be collected for two months and may be made out to Alliant, Alliant Insurance Services, c/o Mariane Holmes, 1301 Dove Street, Suite 200, Newport Beach CA 92660. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, August 27th at 10 a.m. at St. Therese of Carmel Catholic Church in San Diego, CA.

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Obit Gillespie 8-24-16Sara Davies Gillespie

Sara Davies Gillespie, 89, a resident of Princeton for 60 years, died at the Compassionate Care Hospice in Hamilton on August 5, 2016, nine days after a fall at her home. She was born in Savannah, Georgia in 1927, where her grandfather had been mayor three times, and her father was an alderman, but moved with her family to Detroit soon after her birth as her father helped launch the Universal Credit Corp., the new financing arm of the Ford Motor Company.

Her mother was so unhappy with the proposed move north that she secured a promise that they would spend most vacation time home, so they rented, bought, and eventually built a home at the new Sea Island resort, on the Georgia coast. She graduated from St. Catherine’s School in Richmond, Virginia in 1945 and then followed her aunt Inez, two sisters and various cousins to Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, graduating in 1949.

After college, she married the affable and popular, newly-minted Yale PhD John Davies ’41 and he accepted teaching positions at the University of Minnesota and Smith. In 1955, the family moved to Princeton and her husband would edit the Princeton Alumni Weekly for the next 15 years. They built one of the first houses way out on Heather Lane, well before the construction of PDS or the straightening of the Great Road, where they raised the world’s worst behaved boxers and threw pretty good dinner parties. As a young married woman, she volunteered at Princeton hospital, the N.J. Neuro-Psychiatric Institute in Skillman, and tirelessly at Planned Parenthood in Princeton and Trenton, where she eventually became president and a national board member.

After her divorce in 1971, she used her major in art history to become a curator and framing specialist at Gallery 100 on Nassau Street. Later, she became a managing director for William Sword’s Foundation Managers on Chambers Street. In 1988, she married Gene Gillespie and they enjoyed winters in Delray Beach, Florida and at her family house at Mill Reef, Antigua.

She is survived by her two delightful children, Carsten, known as Tena, and Horace Andrew, known as “The Atomic Gasser”, both of Manhattan; a granddog Roxy; her older sister Mary T. Hoagland of Denver; 3 stepchildren; and ten nieces and nephews.

She followed the example set by her first husband and beloved aunt Dua Helmer by prerranging a “Whole Body Donation” with the RWJ/ Rutgers Medical School in Piscataway, saving her family a lot of costly and difficult decisions. In lieu of flowers, the family requests you make a contribution to Pastor Luc Deratus’s Haiti Mission or a charity of your choice, and enjoy a Dove mini ice cream bar and/or a Lindt dark chocolate truffle. She was a pistol.

———

Colin P. Simonelli

Colin P. Simonelli, 24, of Princeton died Saturday, August 20, 2016. Born in Princeton, he was a lifelong resident, except for 3 years when he lived in Pittsburgh. Colin was a student at UMass, Boston. Colin was a lovable and loving son, grandson, brother, cousin, and friend; whose heart, laughter, compassion, and courage will be sorely missed by everyone who knew him.

Grandson of the late James R. Beale, he is survived by his parents Tony and Susan (Beale) Simonelli; two brothers, Mario Simonelli and Xavier Simonelli; maternal grandmother Ellen Beale; paternal grandparents Chris and Linda Simonelli; and many aunts, uncles, and cousins.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, St. Paul’s Church 214 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Friends were invited to call on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations can be directed to Mercer County Community College Foundation to help establish a memorial scholarship in Colin’s memory. Please make your donation online at www.mccc.edu/give (please be sure to indicate in comments: In memory of Colin Simonelli; or mail it to MCCC Foundation, PO Box 17202, Trenton NJ 08690).

At UMASS Boston, gifts in memory of Colin can be made in the following ways:

 By check: Checks should be made out to “UMass Boston” and write “In memory of Colin Simonelli” in the memo line. Checks should be mailed to: University Advancement, Attention: Anne Kelly-Contini, UMass Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd, Boston MA 02125.

Online: Gifts can be made online at www.umb.edu/giving by clicking on the “Give” button. Fill in the form as instructed, including the section that says “My Gift is in Honor or Memory.”

———

Robert Moment Cortelyou

Robert Moment Cortelyou, 80, of Hopewell Borough, died Thursday morning August 11, 2016, at the home of his youngest son, Jack and daughter-in-law Diane after a brief battle with cancer.

Robert (Bob) was born in Princeton on September 15, 1935, and grew up living on “The Farm” on Old Georgetown Road. He graduated from Princeton High School and went on to earn an associates degree from the State University of New York at Delhi in 1955 and a Bachelor of Science from Rider University in 1967. He served as a court martial reporter in the U.S. Army from 1955-1957. Robert retired in 1999 from Delaval Co, in Trenton, where he helped manage manufacturing facilities in Canada and China.

Robert was the son of the late Clifford Stryker Cortelyou and Ruth Louise Moment Cortelyou. He was predeceased by his wife Nancy Powers Cortelyou, a son David who died soon after birth, and a brother Garrie Cortelyou. He is survived by three sons and daughters-in-law Garrie and Debbie of Ringoes, NJ; Larry and Toni of Skillman; and Jack and Diane of Hopewell; four grandchildren, John, Bob, Jacob and Lily; three siblings, Peter of Herndon, Pa.; Kip of McLean, Va.; and Jane Casey of Princeton, and many close friends.

Bob was an avid outdoorsman, farmer, and an iconic family man. He was known around town by many as “Pop”. He had a larger than life personality, always had a funny story, a kind word, and helping hand for all.

A memorial service will be held at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, August 27, 2016 at Six Mile Run Reformed Church in Franklin Park. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Hopewell Memorial Home and Cremation, 71 E. Prospect Street, Hopewell, NJ. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the 4H Association of Somerset County, 310 Milltown Rd, Bridgewater, NJ 08007 or to the Future Farmers of America, P.O. Box 68960, Indianapolis, IN 46268-0960.

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While people are anxious to make use of the “reimagined second floor” at the Princeton Public Library, they are finding plenty of back-up resources, including the wide selection at the Friends of the Library Book Store. See this week’s Town Talk for how some library users are dealing with the situation. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

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A PASSION FOR GEMOLOGY: Hope Mouko, service coordinator at Hamilton Jewelers, has won a scholarship to the Gemological Institute of America (GIA). She is pictured with, at left, Hank Siegel, Hamilton president; and his father Martin Siegel, right, the company’s chairman. Ms. Mouko will study at the GIA while continuing her work at the Nassau Street store.

After living in New York, modeling for Donna Karan and other high-end designers, Princeton native Hope Mouko was ready to move back home and try something new. She had always been interested in jewelry and design. So when she noticed an ad last year for an opening at Hamilton Jewelers on Nassau Street, she decided to apply for the position. more

The Trent House Museum, New Jersey’s oldest national landmark, will celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service with Camp Trent on Saturday, August 27 from 1-3 p.m. The museum is at 15 Market Street in Trenton. more

In recognition of National Wilderness Month, Princeton Public Library is providing two opportunities in September to spend time walking through local green spaces while discussing two engaging readings about nature, wildness, and wilderness.  more

On Sunday, September 25, Send Hunger Packing Princeton (SHUPP) will hold its annual fundraiser at Hinds Plaza to raise awareness and money to help feed children in the Princeton School System.

Celebrity chef Brian Duffy, who shared cooking tips and skills to students at Community Park School two years ago, will host the “Fill the Bowls” event. Local restaurants will provide meals to participants. The event takes place from 1 to 3 p.m. more

The Princeton Regional Chamber’s Sixth Annual Healthcare Symposium will focus on giving guests a glimpse at “The Business of Health,” on Tuesday, September 20, 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Bart Luedeke Center at Rider University in Lawrenceville. more

At a reception in honor of her 100th birthday, the first copy of the book Reminiscences: My 100 Years will be presented to Dorothy Louise Gadberry Irwin Hemphill. The reception will be held at 3 p.m. on August 26 at Princeton Windrows. more

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ADAMS TO WESTON EXHIBIT: Ansel Adams, American, 1902–1984, “Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico,” 1941, printed 1943. Gelatin silver print. Gift of David H. McAlpin, Class of 1920. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

When David McAlpin, Princeton Class of 1920, donated more than 500 fine-art photographs to the Princeton University Art Museum (PUAM) in 1971 — in an age when photography was still considered a reproductive medium — it became one of the earliest museums to commit to photography as an art form. In addition to these gifts of art, McAlpin endowed an acquisitions fund at the museum as well as a professorship in the history of photography at Princeton — the first in the nation.  more

Music_LaShir

Dr. Elyane Robinson Grossman, music director at Sharim v’Sharot, is now holding auditions for all voice parts for the upcoming 2016-17 season. Weekly rehearsals are on Tuesday evenings from September through June in Ewing. The choir will perform at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia this November. The theme for the year-end concert in May 2017 is “Songs to Inspire Peace: Shalom, Saalam.” Sharim v’Sharot performs Jewish music of many era and styles at synagogues, concert halls, museums, and community centers throughout the year. Learn more at www.sharimvsharot.org and call (609) 222-4647 to schedule an audition. 

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Violinist Daniel Rowland

On Thursday, September 15 at 8 p.m., the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) presents The Seasons, Antonio Vivaldi’s popular The Four Seasons interwoven with Astor Piazzolla’s The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires, arranged by Leonid Desyatnikov. The concert at Richardson Auditorium features Daniel Rowland as violinist and conductor, leading the PSO through Vivaldi’s vividly depicted scenery and Piazzolla’s soulful homage infused with passionate melodies and tango rhythms. more

From the Beacon Theatre in Manhattan to the Top of the Standard in Los Angeles to Lola’s Trailer Park in Fort Worth, Tex., musicians are banding together for The Concert Across America to End Gun Violence on Sunday, September 25th. At Trinity United Methodist Church in Ewing there will be a full day of music, food, speakers, art, and peace, as part of this national effort.  more

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So Percussion will offer the first of two free performances in Princeton as part of their Edward T. Cone Residency at Princeton University. On Friday, September 16, 2016 at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall, the community has the opportunity to engage in a striking range of music — from John Cage’s Living Room Music transforming household items into instruments, to the world premiere of Emeritus Professor Paul Lansky’s Springs.  more

Michael Kenwood, the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad member who lost his life while conducting a swiftwater rescue during Hurricane Irene, is being remembered this month by his fellow squad members. The loss of the 39-year-old volunteer on August 28, 2011 was a tragedy for his wife and family as well as for the members of the first aid squad, the EMS community, and the residents of Princeton. more

August 19, 2016

sports12

#OrangeOut in Princeton University gear. 

Don’t forget – the famous Princeton vs. Harvard football game will take place at Princeton Stadium on Saturday, October 22. 

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August 17, 2016

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Photo Credit: Sur la Table

What kitchen gift do you get the couple with impeccable taste? Try one of these.

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To the Editor:

The fast response from observant neighbors, Princeton’s Police and Fire Departments, truly demonstrate that it takes a town to preserve a house.

Last week during the July 30 rain storm, the Barracks, thought to be Princeton’s oldest home, was inundated with water that (most probably) sparked the electrical system and caused a fire. The town’s swift response was able to contain the fire to the garage. The cottage is badly damaged but it will be restored and remediated to ensure its continued preservation.

Mayor Liz Lempert has made a commitment to look at the on-going storm water issues in the town. While I am fortunate to be the custodian of this wonderful and historical house, I am truly blessed to be living in an extraordinary neighborhood, in a great town with committed leadership. My deep appreciation to everyone who helped and opened their doors, sofas, and hearts.

Laura R. Jacobus

Edgehill Street

To the Editor:

I thought your readers would like to know a bit about the financial losses caused by the Carter Road Bridge Construction Project and the additional losses coming this fall because of Governor Christie’s work stoppage order of several weeks ago that has delayed the completion of the bridge for months.

I can tell you that all the farming/nursery endeavors that make our community here in Lawrenceville so special have been negatively impacted this summer. Cherry Grove Farm has lost thousands in revenue so far this year because of the bridge that cuts our farm in half severing our lifeline between the fields along Carter and Carson Roads and our main farmstead on Route 206. Our store revenue is down and by the looks of it the fall season will only be worse. Shoppers just cannot get there due to our bridge closing and other stoppages in the Princeton area. My neighbors running small vital businesses producing locally grown foods so important to our shoppers have told me that sales are way off compared to 2015.

Also as troubling are the potential health hazards resulting from the stagnant water pooling up at the bridge construction project. I do know that West Nile Virus mosquitoes incubate in standing water like the festering pool below the bridge. Mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus also breed in similar environments.

These hazards are in addition to all the accidents I have witnessed this summer along the narrow back roads caused by cars driving too fast on roads that do not have shoulders and should not be used as detours.

Maybe, Brian Hughes, our county executive, can save the day and get the job done. I’m not holding my breath.

Oliver Hamill

Cherry Grove Farm, General Manager/owner

To the Editor:

Here’s my story.

For those of us who love fresh fruit and vegetables, summer is Nirvana: peaches, melons, tomatoes, corn, eggplants, and more, all sold at area supermarkets. But if you want food delivered directly from the farm to you, then visit the West Windsor Farmers’ Market, where 16 local farmers bring their produce every Saturday as it ripens throughout the growing season.

Thanks to Chris Cirkus and her volunteers, market day has become a family and community event. Tents are erected for the farmers and vendors, while shoppers mix and mingle as music and entertainment play in the background.

But, this isn’t the end of the story.

Not everyone can afford the price of fresh produce. Thanks to the generous donations from shoppers at the West Windsor market, Yes We CAN! Food Drives is able to purchase large quantities of fresh fruit and vegetables from the farmers and turn it over for FREE distribution at the food pantries of The Crisis Ministry in Princeton and Trenton. Over one thousand children and families each month know they can depend on the pantries for their spring, summer, and fall supply of fresh produce, and not just the soggy beans in a can of preservatives.

This generosity, however, doesn’t stop with the shoppers. The farmers themselves not only give Yes We CAN! a discount, but at the end of the market day, they often donate to us unsold cartons of their bounty. What a wonderful system — a win/win situation! Last year, our volunteers collected 13,500 pounds of fresh produce for the clients of The Crisis Ministry. This year alone, in five market days, we have collected enough donations to give the Ministry 4,200 pounds of fruits and vegetables, some of that from home and church gardeners. Thank you all, farmers, shoppers, gardeners, and volunteers.

With more and more families facing daily food challenges, we urge you to visit the West Windsor Farmers’ Market, located at Vaughn Drive, off Alexander Road near the train station. The market is open every Saturday from 9 to 1, with free parking. Yes We CAN! Food Drives collects produce every other Saturday. Our next drive is scheduled for August 27.

Come, enjoy, and donate. Your neighbors need your help.

Fran Engler

West Windsor Yes We CAN! Food Drives, 

Publicity Chair, yeswecanfooddrives.org