July 26, 2016

See below for the July 25, 2016 Princeton Council Meeting.

Town Topics Newspaper will be posting videos of all future municipal meetings.

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It’s time to roar! Be the leader of the pack in these leo-inspired fashions.

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July 22, 2016

Clara Martha Burton CP Pool Opening 2012

Princeton’s cooling station will be open Friday, July 22 through Monday, July 25 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. to ensure Princeton residents have a safe place to stay cool during the expected high temperatures. Residents, especially senior citizens, are strongly advised to take advantage of these cooling stations if needed. Cooling stations are air conditioned facilities where Princeton residents can find relief from the heat. Free water is accessible at all stations. more

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Photo Credit: @birchbox

By Sarah Emily Gilbert

From Barkboxes to Broboxes, there seems to be a subscription box for just about anything or anyone. While we appreciate the thrill of receiving any package with our name on it, the staff at Urban Agenda Magazine has a proclivity for our Birchboxes. Not only do they give us the chance to try new products, but they also make it feel like it’s our birthday every. single. month. Whether or not you’re ready to gift yourself with this monthly indulgence, Birchbox offers full-sized versions of all their samples online. Here, we outline some of our favorite products from Birchbox. more

July 21, 2016

Public Service Electric & Gas Company (PSE&G) will be working in Princeton to replace approximately 1 mile of older gas pipes with new, durable plastic and/or coated steel piping – ensuring a continued safe, clean and reliable gas system well into the future.

Linden Lane, Guyot Avenue, Franklin Street, Murray Place, Nassau Street, Prospect Avenue, Russel Road, Winant Road End, Tee-Ar Place, Clearview Avenue, and Franklin Avenue will be affected. more

July 20, 2016

Obit Miller 7-20-16Julia Miller

Julia “Judy” Kugelman Miller, a resident of Princeton, New Jersey since 1963, passed away in her home on Friday, July 15 at the age of 91. Born on May 20, 1925 in Cleveland, Ohio, Judy was the daughter of the late John Emerson Kugelman and Helen Voit.

Judy was raised in Chicago, Illinois and went on to graduate from the University of Chicago. She was predeceased by her husband, William Miller, whom she married on May 20, 1950.

Judy was a longtime employee of Princeton University. She worked for many years at the Woodrow Wilson School and concluded her career at the Princeton University Art Museum. At 91 years of age, Judy was an avid reader and was always intellectually engaged. Over the years she enjoyed continuing her education, as well as playing the recorder, playing bridge, sewing, and quilting. Most recently, she was a member of a local Princeton writers’ group and was taking painting classes.

Judy is survived by her two sons, Steven Roderick Miller and Daniel Emerson Miller; their wives, Susie Levin-Miller, and Karen Lust; and three grandchildren, William Miller, Owen Miller, and James Miller.

Judy will be remembered with great fondness for her kind heart, her sharp wit, her wisdom, and intelligence.

A memorial service will be held at the Princeton University Chapel on Sunday, July 24, 2016 at 1 p.m.

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David G. Christie

David G. Christie, 86, of Yardley, Pa. passed away peacefully on Saturday, July 16, 2016 at Sunrise of Lower Makefield. Born on June 25, 1930 in Glen Ridge, N.J., David resided most of his life in New Jersey, primarily Mountain Lakes and Princeton.

David graduated from College High in Montclair, N.J. and attended Rutgers University. At College High, he met his sweetheart, Diane Grace Wettyen and they were married in 1950. Dave and Diane were happily married for 53 years before her passing in 2003.

A dignified and classy gentleman of the old school generation, David was a perfect example of a loving husband, father, grandfather, and a loyal and dedicated employee to the reinsurance industry when a handshake and your word carried the weight over any written contract. His career as a reinsurance executive extended over 50 years, and included employment at American Re-insurance Company and Towers, Perrin, Foster & Crosby, Inc., among others. Most recently, Dave was founder and President of Reinsurance Consultants of Princeton, Inc.

A veteran of the U.S. Army, David was stationed in Alaska during the Korean War and served in the Army reserves for many years. He was an active member of the Nassau Club and served on the Board of the Visiting Nurse Association.

David enjoyed gardening, puttering in his yard, playing Scrabble, and travel with his wife. The beaches of Long Beach Island, Stone Harbor and, in later years, St. Kitts, were his favorite destination points to work on his tan, read a book and frolic with family. A gracious man to the very end, while battling the effects of Alzheimer’s and a stroke, he will be fondly remembered as one who exemplified “gentle” in the word gentleman.

David was predeceased by his parents, Francis and Catherine (Somes) Christie; his wife, Diane G. Christie; and his brother, Malcom Christie. He is survived by his son, Mark Christie; his two daughters and sons-in-law, Lindsey Fraser (B. Grant) and Meredith Koplinka (Raymond, Jr.); five grandchildren, Gordon Fraser (Sauman Choy), Sarah Fraser, Emily Kaster (Paul), Raymond (Trey) Koplinka, III, and Christina Koplinka; and one great-grandchild, Liam Fraser.

Services are private and under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton. The family respectfully requests contributions be made in David’s memory to the Alzheimer’s Association, 225 N Michigan Ave, Fl 17, Chicago, IL 60601 or online at www.alz.org.

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Arthur J. Manuel

Arthur J. Manuel, 94, a resident of West Windsor, passed away May 30, 2016 at Atrium Senior Living in Plainsboro. He was predeceased by his wife of 65 years, Julie B. Manuel. He is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, Beatrice and Stephen Francis of West Windsor; son and daughter-in-law, John and Janice Manuel of Tennessee; son William of West Windsor; granddaughter and grandson-in-law, Julia and Matthew Thomas of West Windsor; grandson and partner, John Francis and Timothy Stackhouse of Cherry Hill; and great grandsons Benjamin and Zachary Thomas.

Arthur began his career as a research and development chemist with Hayden Chemical in Brooklyn, N.Y., then moving to the Princeton plant in Penns Neck where he worked on antibiotics among other projects. It was here that he met and married Julia Morris. Hayden became part of American Cyanamid and Arthur remained with them for 40 years until his retirement in 1986.

Besides work, Arthur was an active member of Princeton Friends Meeting where he served as clerk and treasurer for many years. His time of service in the Army during World War II led him to the Friends who spoke to his condition. In 1972, he helped found the Twin “W” Rescue Squad and was saddened by their recent closure. After his retirement, his garden, classical music, grandchildren, and daily five mile walks kept him entertained.

A memorial service will be held July 23, 2016, at 2 p.m. at Princeton Friends Meeting House, 470 Quaker Road, Princeton, NJ. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Mercer Street Friends Center, 151 Mercer Street, Trenton, NJ 08611 or to Princeton Friends Meeting, 470 Quaker Road, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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Elaine Joel Schuman

Elaine Joel Schuman died July 12, 2016 at the Stonebridge Montgomery skilled nursing facility in Skillman, New Jersey after a long illness. A few days earlier she had celebrated her 90th birthday with close friends.

Mrs. Schuman was born on July 9, 1926 to Adeline and Ralph Joel in Rutherford, New Jersey. She received a bachelors degree in sociology from Rutgers Union College and attended the New School for Social Research and Spencer Business College. She served as director of consumer affairs for Mercer County (1974-1980) and later as executive legislative assistant to the Secretary of Transportation State of New Jersey. She married Dr. Seymour “Cy” Schuman in 1950 and the couple settled in Princeton where they raised an adopted daughter. Mrs. Schuman remained in Princeton after her husband’s death in 1971.

Mrs. Schuman was heavily involved in community affairs and in local and national politics. She served as chair of the Princeton Township Democratic Party and was New Jersey State Coordinator for Edmund Muskie’s presidential campaign in 1972. She was also a founding member of the Princeton based Community Without Walls. Elaine will be remembered for her ardent social conscience, warm outgoing manner and zest for art, literature, writing, and cuisine. In later years she was a devoted grandmother to Cy’s two granddaughters, Lauren and Alison.

Mrs. Schuman is survived by her daughter Elizabeth of Stockton, California and by many good friends at Stonebridge and in Princeton. A memorial service will be held at a later time. Donations in her memory should be directed to the Democratic National Committee or the Alzheimers Foundation of America.

To the Editor:

On behalf of our 1.3 million members in New Jersey, AARP supports proposals to increase the personal income tax pension and retirement income exclusion fivefold over three years. An income tax cut for retirees will help those who have lived and raised their families in New Jersey stay in New Jersey in their retirement years by allowing our middle class retirees to keep more of their hard-earned and hard-saved money to spend on goods and services throughout our state, supporting economic growth. Those 50 years and older play a critical role in New Jersey’s economy, according to a recent Longevity Economy report prepared for AARP. New Jerseyans over 50 create an economic impact much greater than their proportion of the population, outspending the average consumer across most categories and affecting all sectors of the economy.

AARP New Jersey believes it is important to have policies in place that support this important economic engine in our state. We urge lawmakers to ensure that any middle class tax relief include modest, targeted tax relief for New Jersey’s middle class retirees.

 Jeff Abramo

Interim Manager of Communications and Community Outreach, AARP New Jersey, Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village

To the Editor:

Streets are the great connectors of any community. They don’t just take us from one place to another in our cars, they bring us together on bike rides, jogs, and walks. At least, that’s what they’re supposed to do. But the opposite is true in many New Jersey neighborhoods: streets are unsafe for people who walk, bike, or run because there are so few bike lanes, sidewalks, or crosswalks. This not only limits our choices for how to travel, but also discourages exercise.

According to the American Heart Association, physical inactivity is a leading risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases. And in today’s world, it can be difficult to lead an active lifestyle. Sedentary jobs have increased 83 percent since 1950 while physically active jobs now make up less than 20 percent of our workforce. Nearly 70 percent of American adults and one in three children are considered overweight or obese. That’s why we must work together to make it easy and safe to go out and get active.

Complete Streets policies ensure that future road construction build an environment meant to be shared by all travelers — whether it’s bikers, walkers, or drivers. Unfortunately for the Garden State, only seven out of 21 counties and 130 out of more than 500 municipalities have Complete Streets policies.

The American Heart Association is seeking individuals, community groups, and organizations who are interested in serving on a volunteer committee to raise awareness and urge action around this issue.

Please contact courtney.nelson@heart.org or at (609) 223-3734 if you are interested in making New Jersey a healthier and safer place to live.

Courtney Nelson

Senior Director of Community Health, 

American Heart Association 

American Stroke Association, Robbinsville

To the Editor:

Both presidential candidates will take the stage in the next two weeks to try to sell us on the idea they can lead our nation. One way to demonstrate they have what it takes to be president is to tell voters how they’ll keep Social Security strong for our kids and grandkids.

Millions of Garden State residents are paying into Social Security, but the program is out of date. If our nation’s leaders don’t act, future retirees could lose up to $10,000 a year in benefits.

With a volatile stock market and fewer jobs offering pensions, today’s workers and future generations will likely have an even greater need for Social Security.

Before we decide who to vote for, we deserve to know if the presidential candidates will commit to taking action to update Social Security for us, our kids and grandkids.

Douglas Johnston

Manager of Governmental Affairs & Advocacy, 

AARP State Office, New Jersey

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Where else but in Princeton can you beat the heat in the spray from James Fitzgerald’s Fountain of Freedom with Ai Weiwei’s Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads looking on, and Minoru Yamasaki’s Robertson Hall in the background? (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

“Some of the ideas may boggle the mind,” warns Evergreen Forum instructor Stuart Kurtz as he describes his upcoming course, “What is Time? An Overview.”

“Time” is among the 24 courses being offered this fall by Evergreen Forum, a peer-led continuing education program of daytime courses for interested adults. Most courses, which begin at the end of September, meet once a week for two hours for six to eight weeks. more

Princeton resident Paul Josephson, a partner in the Cherry Hill office of Duane Morris LLP, has been appointed New Jersey Committee co-chair and to the board of directors of the Regional Plan Association (RPA). more

Harry Potter

A release party is being held Saturday, July 30, starting at 9 p.m., at Princeton Public Library to celebrate Harry Potter’s birthday and the midnight release of the official script for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, a new play based on an original story by J.K. Rowling. The play is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first to be presented on stage. more

Art HAM Terrace 7-20-16

THE TOSHIKO TAKAEZU TERRACE: The Hunterdon Art Museum’s (HAM) terrace was named in honor of artist Toshiko Takaezu, one of the 20th century’s most influential ceramists. Ms. Takaezu moved to Clinton because she loved the waterfall that separates HAM from the Red Mill. She donated much of her time to the museum, and taught at Princeton University for many years.

When renowned ceramic artist Toshiko Takaezu first gazed upon the charming waterfall beside the Hunterdon Art Museum (HAM) in the summer of 1964, she knew she had found just what she was looking for: a home and a peaceful place where she could focus on her work. more

Art Homefront 7-20-16

“ICY TAIWAN MOUNTAINS”: This painting by Lynn Varga will be included in the “Celebration” exhibit hosted by the Creative Collective and HomeFront’s Artspace. The work on display brings awareness to homelessness and the transformative power of art.

The Gourgaud Gallery will host an art exhibition titled, “Celebration” that features members of the Creative Collective and showcasing the artists of HomeFront’s ArtSpace. The exhibit celebrates the work of local artists and highlights the artists of ArtSpace, and aims to build self-confidence through therapeutic art.  more

Art Birds of a Feather 7-20-16

“BLUE JAY” BY MICHAEL YANG: Johnson Park Elementary School artists created scratch-art images of local birds for the “Birds of a Feather” exhibit that are on display at the D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery until July 29.

Through July 29, D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery exhibits Birds of a Feather, scratch-art images of local birds by Johnson Park Elementary School fourth graders. Art teacher Linda Gates inspired this celebration of predominantly New Jersey natives.  more

Music Martiba 7-20-16

THIS ONE’S FOR THE GIRLS: See 14-time Grammy nominated country star Martina McBride perform at the State Theatre of NJ in New Brunswick on Thursday, August 25 at 8 p.m. McBride is well-known for her soprano singing range and country pop materials. Her greatest hits include “Independence Day,” “A Broken Wing,” “Wild Angels,” and “This One’s for the Girls.”

The city of Trenton and The Trenton Downtown Association (TDA) host The Levitt AMP Music Series on Capital Green, July 23 through September 24. Trenton was selected to receive a grant of $25,000 to hold 10 free, family-friendly concerts each beginning at 7:30 p.m. Trenton based NJM Insurance Group is also a presenting sponsor.  more

July 19, 2016

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Photo Credit: @anna_brstyle

Modern rings for a modern woman. 

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July 15, 2016

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These iPhone cases have attitude and sass. 

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July 13, 2016

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Look stylish while biking around your neighborhood this summer. 

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Obit Warren 7-13-16Joyce Stives Warren

Joyce Stives Warren, 92, passed away peacefully in Allentown, Pa. on July 8, 2016. Joyce was a life-long resident of Princeton, having moved to Allentown just a few years ago. Born in Princeton, Joyce was the daughter of the late Harry Stives and Elizabeth Geddes Carlton, and stepfather, George Carlton. She was also predeceased by her brother, William Stives, and her former husband, Russell Warren.

After graduating from Princeton High School in 1942, Joyce worked at the high school as executive secretary to 15 principals over her 53-year career. At her retirement in 1995, she received a commendation from the Princeton Regional Board of Education for her many years of devoted service to the benefit of the students, her colleagues, the school district, and to the Princeton community. Everyone knew and loved “Joycie”.

Joyce was a fiercely independent woman. She had a great sense of style, and was known for her sense of humor and quick wit. She loved to make people laugh. Joyce was adventurous, and enjoyed traveling to such places as Europe, Africa, and Japan. She was very kind hearted and loved animals, especially her dachshunds. She loved music — anything from opera to Willie Nelson. During her retirement years, she enjoyed lazy days at home, watching the neighborhood happenings, reading mystery novels, feeding the birds, and doting on her dachshunds.

Joyce is survived by her three sisters-in-law, many cousins, nieces and nephews, great nieces and nephews, and friends. She was also very fond of her Arden Courts of Allentown Pa. family, who truly loved and cared for her during her final few years.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton, N.J. Memories and condolences may be shared at the Mather-Hodge website (www.matherhodge.com). Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to any animal rescue organization of your choice, or to the Trinity Church Memorial Fund at 33 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540.

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Obit Cline 7-13-16Hugh F. Cline

Hugh F. “Tony” Cline passed away peacefully on July 4, 2016 surrounded by family. Tony was born on March 6, 1935 in Yeadon, Pa. to Jane Hunter Cline and Hugh “Bud” Cline. He was enrolled in Philadelphia’s Girard College in 1943 by his widowed mother where he excelled academically and athletically. He was awarded an athletic scholarship in gymnastics to Pennsylvania State University in 1952 and became captain of the team, winning the National Championship in 1955. He later earned a master’s degree in sociology at the University of Lund in Sweden and a PhD from Harvard University.

Tony served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force from 1956 to 1959. During this time, he married his college sweetheart Patricia Dickinson, who died in 1991. Together, they raised a family as they moved from Sweden to Boston, then to Santa Barbara Calif. before settling in Princeton in the late 1960s. His yellow Jeep became an iconic fixture at Princeton High School in the 1970’s, and his ski trips were the winter highlight for his kids and many of their friends.

Education and family were two constant passions and dedications in Tony’s life. His educational career started as a professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara before joining Russell Sage Foundation in New York City on staff and then as president. He continued his career at Educational Testing Services (ETS) as executive director, division of applied measurement research, retiring in 1997.

In his retirement he returned to education as an adjunct professor at Teacher’s College, Columbia University and wrote Information Communication Technology and Social Transformation, a book exploring the transformation computers and information technology had on culture, a topic that had been so much a part of his research at ETS. Outside of work, he loved how education, as both a learner and an educator, kept life vibrant. He had a particular passion for improving educational programs in underprivileged communities. This was reflected by his involvement on the Board of Academic Affairs at Girard College and his work with the Trenton Literacy Program. People who knew him found him to be a caring listener with a genuine and inspiring interest in their lives, while always being ready to share what he had learned.

In 1996, Tony married long-time friend Hilary Hays. They shared a full and enriching life. They enjoyed time with family and close friends. Whether in Princeton, Cape Cod, or traveling (often to Europe and most recently, Myanmar), he left his mark on people with his interest, curiosity, and enthusiasm. He regularly engaged in activities that varied from spinning classes and multi-day charity bike rides with people generations younger than he, to involvement with groups such as Community Without Walls. Regardless of the nature of the gathering or setting, Tony was known as a person of profound integrity, warmth, compassion, and a great sense of humor.

In addition to his wife, Tony is survived by his children, Lynn Cline and husband Kyle Langan of Santa Fe and Hugh Cline of Los Angeles; his brother Peter Capolino and wife, Fran Deitrich of Philadelphia; his stepchildren, Bob Ogilvie of Princeton, Bill Ogilvie and partner Alice Johnson of Austin, Tex.; Brad Ogilvie and partner Walter Cortes of Washington, D.C.; Beth Ogilvie Freda and husband Mark Freda of Princeton; and his step-grandchildren Rebecca Freda and Alex Freda of Princeton.

Contributions may be made in his name to the Girard College Foundation at 2101 S. College Avenue (Office of Advancement), Philadelphia, PA 19121, or to an educational program that promotes academic advancement for underprivileged children in your community.

A memorial service will be held October 29, 2016 at 11 a.m. at the Princeton University Chapel followed by a reception.

Topics_Pontoon

Looking for a lazy afternoon activity? Hop aboard the Mercer County Park Commission’s pontoon boat for a fun and informative nature tour of Mercer Lake. These family-friendly tours will be held on Thursday, July 21 and 28, August 4, 11, and 25, and September 1. There are two tours each day, noon to 1:30 p.m. and 2 to 3:30 p.m., weather permitting. Tour tickets are sold at the Mercer County Marina on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 11:30 a.m. on the day of the tour. Children must be at least 6 years old. Tour rates for in-county residents are $10 per person for adults and $8 per person for children and seniors. Out-of-county rates are $12 per person for adults and $10 per person for children and seniors. For more information, please call (609) 448-4004.

The Early Childhood (EC) Music Program at Westminster Conservatory is hosting an information meeting on Wednesday, July 20 at 7:30 p.m. This Parent-Only information session will be led by Jennifer Garr, EC department head. She will focus on Westminster’s early childhood music program and preview the new recordings and materials created by the faculty.  more

Terhune Peaches

Summer at Terhune Orchards means peaches! The farm grows over 28 varieties and will celebrate “everything peachy” on the last weekend in July.

Activities include tractor-drawn wagon rides through the orchards, pony rides, face painting, and more. Also, Live country music will have the whole family dancing along every day from noon to 4 p.m.  more