August 18, 2017

See below for the August 16, 2017 Princeton Council Meeting.

Town Topics Newspaper will be posting videos of all future municipal meetings.

August 16, 2017

Peter Gruen

Peter Gruen of Lawrenceville, formerly of Princeton, died peacefully last Thursday, August 3, 2017 at Compassionate Care, the Robert Wood Johnson In-Patient Hospice in Hamilton. He was 74. He had contended with prostate cancer for many years. His family was at his side.

Mr. Gruen was an Adjunct Professor of Classics at The College of New Jersey for 14 years. He graduated cum laude from Rutgers University where he was also a Henry Rutgers Scholar. He received his master’s in Greek literature and his doctorate in philology from Columbia University. In 1971-72 he was a fellow of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. In 1973 he joined the faculty of Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y. There he became a tenured professor and chair of the Classics Department. He taught Latin and Greek and classical literature in translation. He was the author of several published academic papers.

In 1983 he gave up his tenured position to write. He studied playwriting at Carnegie-Mellon in Pittsburgh. While there he wrote the book and the lyrics for the musical, Just Desserts, in 1989. He wrote many other short and full-length plays. His play, For Anne, won the Off-Off Broadway Play Festival in 1991 and was included in an anthology of plays published by Samuel French that year. In 2008, The End of My Tour, was produced at The Passage Theater in Trenton and performed by his son, Swann.

Even while writing, he continued to teach part–time because he loved working with students. His course in Classical Mythology at The College of New Jersey was so popular that it needed two sections every semester. He retired due to his health in 2015.

Peter John Gruen was born in Newark, the son of the late Fred and Helen Gruen. He is survived by his wife of 37 years, Anne Elliott of Lawrenceville and New York; a daughter, Skye Elliott Gruen of New York; a son, Swann Elliott Gruen of Brooklyn; a brother, John F. Gruen of New York; and five nieces and nephews. And the many relatives, friends, and students whose lives he profoundly touched.

There will be a memorial service at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, in Princeton on Friday, September 29th at 2 p.m.

Memorial contributions may be made to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and Compassionate Care Hospice Foundation in Newark, Delaware.

———

Ariel Eden Malberg

Ariel Eden Malberg died at age 27 on August 12, 2017.

Ariel was born in Libertyville, Illinois and was a lifelong resident of Princeton. She attended the Hart School of Music in West Hartford, Connecticut. Ariel enjoyed music, gardening, the culinary arts, and especially cooking and baking for her family and friends. She took pride in volunteering many hours for homeless people. Ariel was a great all- around athlete, excelling in swimming, a talented artist, and loved taking care of her cat “Littlefoot.” She will be sadly missed by all.

Surviving are her parents Alta and Dr. Marc Malberg, seven aunts and uncles, and 16 cousins.

Funeral services were held at noon on Monday at Temple Beth El, 67 Route 206 North, Hillsborough. Arrangements were by Bruce C. VanArsdale Funeral Home, 111 Gaston Ave, Somerville. Interment followed at Temple Sholom Cemetery, Chimney Rock Road, Bridgewater.

Donations can be made to the IHN Fund at Temple Beth El (Caring for the Homeless).

To send condolences to the family, visit www.brucecvanarsdalefuneralhome.com.

To the Editor:

On behalf of the Princeton Recreation Commission, I would like to thank everyone that came out to be part of Princeton’s 11th annual Community Night Out on August 1, 2017. Community Night Out is the result of many months of planning by the Recreation and Police Departments, and this year’s event drew roughly 2,000 visitors to Community Park Pool.

One of the highlights of this free community event is the participation by many municipal agencies and community organizations, including: Corner House, Princeton Fire & Rescue Squad, Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad, Sustainable Princeton, Princeton University Public Safety, Princeton Tennis Program, Princeton Health Department, Princeton Human Services Department, Mercer County Prosecutors Office, Princeton Girl Scouts, Access Princeton, Not In Our Town, Princeton Public Library, Princeton Fitness and Wellness, Womanspace, and Greater Mercer TMA.

The generosity of many sponsors is critical to the success of the Community Night Out. These sponsors include Princeton PBA, McCaffrey’s, Cross Culture, Princeton Pi, Ace Hardware, Let’s Be Heroes, Dacole Photo Booth, and Lily Yu (Zumba).

Community Night Out will be back in 2018 and will remain free, fun, and family-oriented for all to enjoy.

Ben Stentz

Executive Director of Recreation

KEEPING IT CLEAN: At Saint Peter’s University Hospital, environmental services staffer Hilda Guzman of Old Bridge prepares the Xenex LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robot in order to disinfect a patient’s room. (Photo Credit: John O’’Boyle)

Hospitals around the world are looking for new and innovative ways to battle deadly pathogens and kill multidrug resistant organisms that can cause hospital-acquired infections, or HAIs. Saint Peter’s University Hospital has taken a leap into the future with the implementation of a LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robot that emits ultraviolet (UV) light to destroy hard-to-kill infectious organisms in hard-to-clean places. more

United Way of Greater Mercer County (UWGMC), a nonprofit organization that improves the financial stability, self-sufficiency, and health of Mercer County residents, announced recently that Jennifer Woods of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has become the new chair of the board of directors.

Ms. Woods joined the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in 2014 as the staff development officer. In this role, she is tasked with improving organizational effectiveness by working with leadership to understand business challenges/skills gaps, and to determine and then implement strategies to address the learning needs of the organization.  more

Princeton Summer Theater is presenting Appropriate at the Hamilton Murray Theater. Written by Princeton University alumnus Branden Jacobs-Jenkins (who graduated in 2006), this contemporary drama is an apt conclusion to a season that has examined “whether it is better to look to the past for inspiration or to move in the direction of future progress,” as Princeton Summer Theater’s website states.

In Pippin, the title character comes of age and anticipates his future. The affluent heroine of Spider’s Web is a fantasist whose comfortable, orderly world permits her to live for the present. By contrast, The Crucible presents conflict as ever-present, using a brutal historical event as an allegory for more recent injustice.

Set in the present day, Appropriate develops themes explored by all three of these shows, epitomizing the exploration of tension between generations and eras. Princeton Summer Theater has given audiences a season that can be interpreted as a variation on A Christmas Carol in its interplay between past, present, and future.  more

HV YOUTH CHORALE WELCOMES NEW DIRECTORS: Hopewell Valley Youth Chorale welcomes (from left) Managing Director Jennifer Ghannam, Preparatory Choir Director Ingrid Ladendorf, with founding director, Michele Alford.

The Board of Directors of Hopewell Valley Youth Chorale (HVYC) is pleased to announce the appointments of Ingrid Ladendorf as director of the preparatory choir and Jennifer Ghannam as managing director in charge of operations. more

Richard Tang Yuk, Voices Chorale’s new artistic director, is looking for altos, basses, baritones, and tenors for the 2017-18 Season. Auditions will be held in early September. Voices Chorale rehearses Monday evenings at Music Together, 225 Pennington-Hopewell Road in Hopewell. To schedule an audition, email Dr. Susan Evans at drsevans@comcast.net.  more

The Trenton Children’s Chorus, a 28-year-old nonprofit organization that empowers the academic, social, and spiritual lives of children through artistry in music, announced recently that Dr. D.A. Graham (pictured here) has been named president of the board of directors and Dr. Rochelle Ellis has been named music director. 

The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, one of New Jersey’s premier private charitable foundations, has awarded a $52,500 grant to Trenton Community Music School, to support the Trenton Music Makers preschool and orchestra programs.

The Trenton Music Makers preschool program was launched in 2000 to ensure that Trenton’s pre-K students received the academic and social benefits implicit in high-quality early-childhood music and movement instruction. Developed in partnership with the Office of Early Childhood Programs of the Trenton Public Schools and The Center for Music and Young Children, then in Princeton, the program has to date engaged over 3,000 children and their families, and trained 250 classroom teachers to integrate high-quality music activities into their daily routines.  more

August 14, 2017

STRETCHING THE LIMITS: Matthew Michibata of the Princeton Tennis Program has been named to the second USTA Junior Leadership Team. (Photo Credit: Erica M. Cardenas)

Written by Erica M. Cardenas

Matthew Michibata, who trains with Princeton Tennis Program, has been named to the second USTA Junior Leadership Team, which recognizes the finest U.S. junior tennis players who exhibit leadership, sportsmanship, and character on and off the court. more

August 9, 2017

To the Editor:

The Board of Trustees of Housing Initiatives of Princeton (HIP) would like to thank the owners and staff of One53 in Rocky Hill for their “Rose for a Cause” event that kicked off on July 14, Bastille Day. One53 raised $1,000 for HIP by donating the proceeds from every sale of a glass of AIX rose poured from an enormous 15-liter Nebuchadnezzer, and we are truly grateful!

HIP is an all-volunteer, community-based organization that provides transitional housing to working families in the Princeton area. HIP’s members are concerned about homelessness and the unmet need for affordable and low-income housing in Princeton. HIP is a 501(c)(3) organization that started assisting families in 2004.

Rose for a Cause was a wonderful example of local businesses and non-profits collaborating to make a difference in the lives of our neighbors.

Carol Golden

Chair, Housing Initiatives of Princeton, Mercer Street

To the Editor:

Mayor Lempert’s comments, recorded in the August 2 edition of Town Topics [“Mayor Expresses Position On School Board Bid for Westminster Campus”], concerning the acquisition of Westminster Choir College property are completely consistent with the autocratic approach to societal issues inherent in a one-party government. She appears to advocate acquisition of the property over a concerted effort to preserve an internationally recognized cultural gem. And, of course, the cost is no problem since Princeton seems to be able to exercise an unlimited ability to tax, without limit, property and business.

Although she acknowledges the fact that Westminster is a “treasured community asset,” it’s not treasured enough for her to seek a means of preservation. She would rather Princeton join the circle of vultures for its share of the carcass.

Absent is her offer of the prestige and influence of her office with local and area big business and Princeton University, with which she and others in our government have a connection, for a way to preserve this “asset.”

If Princeton prides itself on being aggressive about social issues, why is it willing to participate in the destruction of a cultural treasure?

If we let Westminster Choir College become a high school gym or another AvalonBay project, shame on us.

Marc Malberg

Autumn Hill Road

Joint Efforts Safe Streets organizer John Bailey, left with scarf, and many others gathered on Sunday in the Miller Chapel of the Princeton Theological Seminary at an ecumenical service that celebrated the four black churches of Princeton: First Baptist, Morning Star, Mt. Pisgah AME, and Witherspoon Street Presbyterian. The service also honored the historic Witherspoon-Jackson community and its people. (Photo by Erica M. Cardenas)

Princeton Integral Yoga Community Center (Princeton IYCC) hosted an AcroYoga Workshop on Palmer Square on Saturday, August 5. Blending the wisdom of Thai massage, yoga, and partner acrobatics, the class focused on the fundamentals of flying, basing, and spotting, as well as inversion training, tightness drills, and partner warm-ups. Princeton IYCC will next host a free outdoor soft flow yoga class in the Princeton Shopping Center Courtyard on Saturday, August 12 at noon. The event is free. To learn more, visit www.iyccprinceton.org.

A $2 million donation from Eric and Wendy Schmidt will support the launch of the Program in Theoretical Machine Learning in the Institute for Advanced Study’s School of Mathematics. Eric Schmidt is the executive chairman of Google; Wendy Schmidt is president of The Schmidt Family Foundation and co-founder of the Schmidt Ocean Institute.

The Schmidts have a history of supporting innovation. In 2009, they established the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund at Princeton University. more

Girls on the Run of New Jersey East’s registration for the fall season is now open. Girls on the Run is a physical activity-based, positive youth development program that inspires girls in third through eighth grade to be joyful, healthy, and confident. The volunteer-led program brings together groups of 8-20 girls for a ten-week program that encourages personal development, team building, and connection to the community. Girls on the Run New Jersey East has inspired girls throughout Essex, Morris, Union, Burlington, and Mercer Counties since 2000 and has impacted the lives of more than 10,000 girls. The program fee for the fall season is $199 and financial assistance is available based on a sliding scale. Visit the Girls on the Run of New Jersey East website, girlsontherunnj.org, for more information about the program and fall season registration.

Saint Peter’s University Hospital of New Brunswick has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Hospital Accreditation by demonstrating continuous compliance with its performance standards. The Gold Seal of Approval® is a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to providing safe and effective patient care.  more

Tutors, class leaders, workshop leaders and other volunteers are needed to teach teenagers through the Princeton Learning Cooperative in the coming academic year. PLC provides an alternative to regular school.

Subjects in which volunteers are sought include writing, math, evolution, nature, marine biology, animal behavior, social activism, geography, debate, world religions, American sign language, Brazilian conversation, basic auto mechanics, drama, piano, and many others.  more

The lengthy approval process for the proposed move of Triumph Brewery from its current location on Nassau Street into the former U.S. Post Office branch on Palmer Square continued last week without a final ruling.

On August 3, Princeton’s Planning Board heard more testimony from the preservation architect, traffic consultant, attorneys in favor and opposed to the project, and some members of the public before deciding to continue the discussion at their September 28 meeting. An earlier hearing on July 13 was ended prematurely due to a power outage during a storm. more

Kara Richardson Whitely will be at Labyrinth Books on Wednesday, August 9, at 6 p.m. to discuss her book, Gorge: My Journey Up Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds (Seal Press $17), as part of the Library Live at Labyrinth Series.

Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, says “In Gorge, Kara Richardson Whitely takes us where few have dared to go before: thrillingly up to the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro and profoundly down to the darkest depths of food addiction. Kara is fearlessly honest and powerfully intelligent. I was moved and inspired by every page of this beautiful book.” more

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is presenting a discussion of Marie Winn’s book Red Tails in Love: A Wildlife Drama in Central Park on Saturday, August 19, from 10 a.m. to noon at 1635 River Road, New Hope, Pa.

When a pair of red-tailed hawks builds a nest atop a Fifth Avenue apartment house across the street from the model-boat pond, author Marie Winn and a cadre of fellow naturalists become hawk watchers. Join Naturalist Monica Flint to learn about the natural history of Central Park and beyond through the eyes of Pale Male, a very special hawk indeed. Book discussion will be followed by tour of the meadow.  more

SEW EASY: Alexa Cavalli of Montgomery works on an apron at the Pop In Space at 10 Hulfish Street. Ms. Cavalli is no newcomer to sewing, having even made a headband for her cat, but she was glad to exercise her skills in textiles on Monday.

Maria Evans, artistic director for the Arts Council of Princeton, had long had plans to host a makerspace — a collaborative workshop for all manner of tinkering, building, and fixing, the likes of which have been appearing in ever-increasing numbers across the country for roughly the past decade. Earlier this year, when the Arts Council was offered a large space in the Princeton Shopping Center, her hopes were on the cusp of realization; the large space, less than two miles from downtown Princeton, would be an ideal satellite location. more

“SEASHELLS BY THE SEASHORE”: Scenes such as this inspired the interpretations by Johnson Park School fourth-grade students now displayed on the Olivia Rainbow Gallery walls, along with actual shells brought into the classroom. “Seashells by the Seashore” is on view through September 6.

D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery presents a virtual seaside stroll in “Seashells by the Seashore” by Johnson Park School fourth-grade students, on view through September 6. For this exhibit, the young artists re-created the spirit of beachcombing along the Jersey Shore, while learning the science of shells.  more

PLEIN AIR PAINTING WORKSHOP: Artist Oscar Peterson, right, offers hands-on instruction at a recent Hunterdon Art Museum plein air painting workshop. The Museum will be hosting another workshop on August 20 at 10 a.m. at the Hunterdon Land Trust’s Dvoor Farm.

Create art outdoors on the 40-acre Hunterdon Land Trust’s Dvoor Farm on Sunday, August 20 with the Hunterdon Art Museum’s Plein Air Painting workshop.

Artist Oscar Peterson will teach the techniques to start, establish, and finish a painting en plein air. Fundamental principles of capturing color, light, planes, and structure will all be covered. This workshop, which begins at 10 a.m., is for adults and teens ages 16 and up. more