June 27, 2017

See below for the June 26, 2017 Princeton Council Meeting.

Town Topics Newspaper will be posting videos of all future municipal meetings.

June 26, 2017

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Hitting a golf ball with distance and accuracy is hard enough when you’re in good health, let alone when you’re in pain or recovering from an injury or surgery.

To help golfers reclaim their best game, University Medical Center of Princeton (UMCP) Outpatient Rehabilitation Network is now offering golf rehabilitation. The program helps golfers regain their strength, range of motion and correct swing mechanics to improve their game and prevent further injury, says Barbara Kutch, PT, DPT, CSCS, a Physical Therapist with the Outpatient Rehabilitation Network. more

June 21, 2017

To the Editor:

I would like to thank all the voters of Princeton who took the time to turn out and cast a ballot last Tuesday, exercising one of our most important rights and responsibilities in a democracy. I and my co-candidate Leticia are proud to be part of a strong Democratic Party ticket headed into the fall, and many of the races in November will be hotly contested, providing an opportunity for voters throughout Princeton, Mercer County, Legislative District 16, and all of New Jersey to express their commitment to each other and to the cause of responsible, caring, effective government for our community.

We will not take your support for granted, and intend to be active throughout the summer and fall, getting to know as many voters as we can, and making ourselves available to hear what issues are of greatest concern to the people of Princeton. We will continue to regularly show up at Bon Appetit on Wednesday mornings from 8-9 a.m., and McCaffrey’s on Monday afternoons from 5-6 p.m. in the upstairs seating area. Please do stop by and introduce yourselves, and/or share your views. Also look for us at the farmers market in Hinds Plaza on Thursday afternoons, and keep your ears open about house parties coming to your neighborhood, where we hope to engage with neighbors in every voting district in town.

To learn more about my priorities as a candidate, and to learn about upcoming house parties, please visit my Facebook page: www.facebook.com/DECPrinceton. Princeton faces many challenges in the coming years, planning for change and preserving the wonderful character of our community, as we experience constant pressure for growth and development. We are blessed to reside in a highly desirable place to live, but in the wise words of the Jewish folk hero Nasrudin, “sometimes what seems like a blessing may be a curse, and what seems like a curse may be a blessing.” Let’s all pitch in together to make sure our blessings stay blessings.

David E. Cohen, AIA

Democratic Candidate for Princeton Council, 

Terhune Road

To the Editor:

The June 7 community conversation on race and equity was a much-needed step toward improving race relations in Princeton Public Schools. Thanks are owed to the event organizers as well as to the panelists who shared their time and points of view. And to the Princeton High School students who spoke: your comments deeply affected us. Thank you for your courage and for speaking truth to power; and please know that there are many parents and community members who want to work together to make Princeton Public Schools more equitable and just for all.

Jennifer Jang

Russell Road

To the Editor:

Every day, the United States alone uses or imports about 42 million pounds of synthetic chemicals. There are more than 84,000 compounds approved for commercial use in the U.S., most of which have never been tested for toxicity. A 2011 Policy Statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics acknowledges that the large quantities of chemicals that enter commerce could be harmful to children’s health and development. The contribution of many of these chemicals to human illnesses, such as cancer and asthma, as well as in breast cancer, obesity, and hormone disruption, is now being studied in the scientific community with great interest and concern. Many studies now show increasing levels of common household chemicals in blood samples (bio-monitoring) collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as in breast milk and other bodily fluids. According to umbilical cord blood samples tested, nearly all babies in the U.S. are born with synthetic chemicals already in their blood streams.

Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are an intensely studied area in the scientific community. Some have been strongly linked to effects on hormone signaling and adverse developmental outcomes in children. Many of these endocrine-disrupting chemicals surround us every day in the air we breathe, food we eat, and cosmetics we apply to our skin. Pre-teen and teenagers are among the largest groups of consumers of cosmetics and personal care products in the U.S. This raises concern due to rapid development during puberty and risk for future health issues. Cell phone and radiation exposure is also an area of growing concern for young people. Education in the area of environmental health is a needed tool in the ongoing efforts to grow healthy children in the U.S.

Over the past six weeks, I have had the pleasure of speaking with hundreds of students at Princeton High School about the potential health effects of various environmental exposures, and sharing with them vetted, practical, and highly relevant information and resources to reduce environmental exposures. These students were bright, inquisitive, and self-aware, and I have no doubt that they will make us all very proud as they mature into healthy young adults.

I would like to thank Ed Cohen EdD (no relation!), Supervisor of Science preK-12 for Princeton Public Schools, for his ongoing support of this program, and Whole Earth Center for their generous financial backing. Community support is essential for making positive changes, and I am grateful to the Princeton community for embracing this important work. Knowledge is power!

Aly Cohen, MD, FACR, FABoIM

Applegarth Road, Monroe Township

George Luchak

Dr. George Luchak, who introduced the academic study of operations research at the Princeton University School of Engineering in 1966, died peacefully at his home in Princeton in early June 2017, surrounded by Elizabeth, his wife of 68 years, and his family.

Dr. Luchak was born in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada to Eli and “gennie” Luchak, and was the eldest of 10 children. He earned his undergraduate degree in mathematics and physics at the University of Toronto in 1942, which he obtained a year early in order to enlist in the Canadian Army during World War II. He rose to the rank of Captain and was stationed in London, and thereafter participated in the invasion of Europe, landing at Normandy Beach. After the German defeat, he taught mathematics at the Joint Services Staff College of the United Kingdom and then returned to the University of Toronto in 1946, where he earned his PhD in physics. His PhD dissertation, Theory of the Earth’s Magnetic Field, was published in 1953 and was referenced in 2010 to explain the magnetic fields of neutron stars. While in graduate school, he met Elizabeth Szilagyi, the love of his life, at Hart House, where she did graduate work after receiving her undergraduate degree from the University of Alberta. In 1949, they were married in Calgary, Alberta. They lived in Ralston, Alberta, and began to raise a family.

Dr. Luchak worked at the Canadian Defense and Research Board as a research scientist from 1949 to 1956 in Suffield, Alberta, where he published papers in the diverse fields of environmental physics, colloid sciences, mathematics, and queuing theory. In 1954, he was the Canadian representative (and one of the first Canadians) to observe an atmospheric atomic bomb test in the Nevada desert. He also was the first Canadian to publish an article on the nascent discipline of operations research.

In 1956, Dr. Luchak and his family emigrated to the United States, soon settling in Bucks County, Pa. He helped develop the new field of systems engineering at General Electric (GE) Missile and Space Vehicle Division in Philadelphia, and taught courses at Drexel University and La Salle University. From 1963 through 1966, while a senior scientist at Radio Corporation of America (RCA), Dr. Luchak designed the development program for the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) sitting atop the Saturn rocket that would take man to the moon, publicly known as the Apollo Program. On July 20, 1969, the Apollo 11 LEM enabled man to first land and set foot on the moon, an event still considered by many to be NASA’s crowning achievement.

In 1966 he joined the faculty of Princeton University as a tenured full professor in the School of Engineering. For the remainder of his professional career, Dr. Luchak taught and conducted research at the School of Engineering where he taught game theory, queuing theory, and graduate courses in Modern Developments in the Management of Industrial Design. While he was teaching at Princeton, Dr. Luchak was asked to investigate the New Jersey Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G) application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for permission to build a floating nuclear power plant off the coast of Ocean County in the mid-70s. His testimony before the NRC was instrumental in the decision of the NRC to recommend against granting PSE&G a permit to build the reactor. In recognition of his scientific and academic achievements, Dr. Luchak was appointed by Governor Kean to the Science Advisory Committee for the State of New Jersey, where he served as a member and then as chairman from 1982 through 1984.

Dr. Luchak continued to be prominent in the Princeton community after retiring in 1986. A true Renaissance man, he actively was engaged in his research as well as other intellectual and cultural pursuits for the next 31 years. In his spare time he continued to develop and expand his proficiency at poker. His love of the game was shared weekly with the Poker Group, which met at the Nassau Club of Princeton. Dr. Luchak was an active charter member of the Poker Group for almost 50 years. The select membership consisted of such well-known figures as Fletcher Knebel, Peter Benchley, Arnold Roth, U.S. District Judge Joe Irenas, as well as academics, businessmen, politicians, ambassadors — and others from all walks of life. Dr. Luchak is best remembered for introducing his own variant of “Texas Hold ‘em” to the Poker Group, as well as his razor wit and personal warmth, which created strong bonds of friendship and loyalty with his poker brethren over the years. He was particularly appreciative of his friend John Tucker, who drove him to and from the weekly game in recent months, even just five days before his death.

Dr. Luchak was an exemplary family man, devoted to his children and grandchildren. He was a mentor, and took a keen interest in their education and careers until the last day of his life. He is survived by his loving wife, Elizabeth; his children and their spouses and partners: Frank Luchak (Nadya Z. Day), Elaine Small (W. Thomas Small, Jr.), Jolanne Stanton (James L. Stanton), and Heather Kunkel (Gerard K. Kunkel); 10 grandchildren: Matthew, James, George, Wills, Brittany, Alicia, Sasha, Alec, Dane, and Eli; his sisters Irene Harason and Patricia Kettle; more than 25 nieces and nephews; and hundreds of former students, who were touched by his dedication and sharing of his wisdom.

Please visit www.GeorgeLuchak.org for Guest Book and photos.

———

Carolyn Quay Wilson

Carolyn Quay Wilson, 88, of Princeton, died peacefully at home surrounded by family on Sunday June 18, 2017.

Born on May 2, 1929, originally from Wayzata, Minn., she was the third daughter of Arthur H. Quay, president of the First National Bank of Minneapolis, and Marion S. Quay. She attended Carlton College and graduated from the University of Minnesota, where she met and married George E. Wilson. She raised her two children, Brett and Ward, in Lawrenceville, where she was a Girl Scout leader and active in local politics.

After moving to Princeton in 1969, she volunteered for decades at Recording for the Blind, and the Women’s Professional Roster (a volunteer organization dedicated to finding jobs for women.) She was hired as a grant writer by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation in 1970. Within several years she was Director of Teacher Education and she created a nationally recognized program to foster excellence in teaching for high school teachers. Over the following decade the program expanded, eventually bringing $1.2 million dollars of funding to the foundation annually.

Upon retiring, she co-founded The Evergreen Forum, a popular life-long learning program in Princeton.

She loved reading, travel, theater, and anything to do with the water. She bought herself a windsurfer when she was 62. She will be deeply missed.

She is survived by her husband, George; her children, Brett and Ward; two granddaughters, Emily and Kori; and her sister Nancy.

Funeral services will be held Friday, June 23, 2017. Please visit the Kimble Funeral Home website at www.TheKimbleFuneralHome.com for details. Attendees are encouraged to wear a little something red (her favorite color).

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to two of her favorite causes: Planned Parenthood or the Nature Conservancy.

———

Robert Frederick Brodegaard

Robert Frederick Brodegaard, known to his friends as “Bob,” passed away at his home in Hopewell, on June 13, 2017. He was born in 1949 to Jeannette Verron Brodegaard and Robert F. Brodegaard of Forest Hills Gardens, and Ancram, N.Y. A 1971 graduate of Colgate University and 1975 graduate of Cornell Law School, he started his career at Weil Gotshal and Manges LLP where he was named partner in 1983. He later moved to Thacher Proffitt and Wood LLP as a partner in litigation.

An esteemed and respected attorney, he specialized in international arbitration, representing foreign governments and corporate entities in complex litigation. He authored several articles and a book on these topics.

He was the loving father of Ingrid Brodegaard Pascali and Kristin Jaffe Brodegaard and grandfather to Catherine and Victoria Pascali. He also leaves behind his beloved companion Ekaterina Schoenefeld.

———

Robert Bentley Fleming

Family and friends will gather to celebrate the life of Robert B. Fleming: husband, father, grandfather, friend, and caring community member. The gathering will be on Saturday, August 5th, at 2 p.m., in the Stony Brook Meeting House of the Princeton Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (the Quakers). For further information or to RSVP, please write Douglas Fleming at niandikie@gmail.com.

Bob died peacefully on the 1st of October, 2016, under the care of Princeton Hospice. Born on Sunday, the 3rd of March, 1929, in Shelbyville, Indiana, Bob was the son of Wray E. Fleming and Phoebe J. Fleming (née Bentley). He grew up in Indianapolis with his sister Nancy and brother Bill, and graduated from Purdue University in engineering in 1951, where he played clarinet and saxophone in jazz bands.

He served in the United States Army in Frederick, Maryland from 1953 to 1955. His dear friend Richard “Bonar” Stillinger helped him survive Army life through a constant supply of puns. Bob always said that serving in the military was the best thing that ever happened to him, because he met his beloved Betty. He won her heart during the “Battle of Magnolia Avenue.” Bob and Betty were married in 1955.

While a PhD student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bob built refrigerators that achieved temperatures so low that atoms themselves slowed down and fell asleep, and leftovers could be stored for millions of years. In 1962, Bob and Betty moved to Schenectady, New York, where Bob took a job at General Electric.

Bob was a wonderful father. With his two young sons, Bob gamely went sailing and canoeing and hiking and camping, even though his idea of an ideal outdoor experience was a dinner at a French restaurant with the window open. He once stunned one of his sons — who had not suspected that his mild-mannered father had been a jazz musician — by pulling down a clarinet from a top shelf of a closet, dusting it off, and launching into George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue.

In the mid-1970s, he blazed new trails in computer technology while assisting with Betty’s accounting for her new children’s bookstore, the Open Door. This was a time when few people had computers, and even fewer men supported their wives to follow their dreams.

Bob found his life’s work in 1976, when he joined Princeton University’s Plasma Physics Laboratory. Bob also held leadership roles in Princeton’s Amnesty International for more than 30 years, and worked in many different community organizations. In 2014, he was honored for his work by the Princeton Democratic Committee for his many years of service to the committee and the Princeton Community.

He is survived by his wife of almost 60 years, Betty, and by his sister Nancy Hope, sons Douglas and Stuart and their families, and many other loving family members.

———

Edward Logan

Edward “Tom” Logan, 66, passed away peacefully at his home in Princeton Junction on June 14, 2017.

Funeral arrangements are under the care and direction of Ruby Memorial of Hightstown. Family and friends may offer condolences and share memories at www.rubymemorialhome.com.

He was born January 28, 1951, in Bridgeport, Conn., to Edward Thomas Logan and Helen Coley Logan.

Tom spent most of his childhood years in Beavercreek, Ohio. He moved to Doylestown, Pa. to attend Delaware Valley College where, in 1973, he received a Bachelor of Science in ornamental horticulture. He continued his education at Rutgers University, receiving a Master of Science in 1975.

Tom worked in the horticulture industry for 20 years before he and his wife established Logan Associates in 1995. Together they ran the business until 2016, when his illness forced him to retire. Tom was highly respected in the industry for his strong work ethic, integrity, and cheery disposition.

He was an active communicant of Queenship of Mary Church in Plainsboro and a member of Knights of Columbus. Through church he became involved in Habitat for Humanity, where he volunteered to help build a number of houses in nearby communities.

Additionally, he volunteered his time at the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen. Tom was a founding member of the Board of Directors of The Molly Bear Foundation, a non-profit started in memory of his beloved granddaughter, Molly Brown.

Tom enjoyed many happy hours with his family at the beach. In his free time he was almost always outdoors; playing golf, tending his yard, washing his truck, or helping a neighbor.

Tom married the love of his life, Regina Murphy on August 11, 1973. During their 43 years of marriage they were all about family. Together they raised four daughters, and the blessings of sons-in-law and grandchildren made their lives even better.

Tom is remembered with love by his wife Regina Murphy Logan; his daughter Erin Brown and her husband Sean of Washington, Conn.; Colleen Wilberts and her husband Steven of Houston, Tex.; Cara Capadona and her husband Bradley of West Caldwell, N.J.; and Monica Logan and her boyfriend Timothy Villanueva of Houston, Tex.; his grandchildren, Gavin and Bridget Brown; Ethan, Thea, and Callum Wilberts; Sophia, Audrey, and Max Capadona; his sisters, Roberta Norman (Richard); Betsy Keyes (Michael); Ann Mundy; and brother Coley Logan (Martha); his brothers-in-law, Paul McCarthy (Nancy); Daniel Murphy (Helena); Peter Murphy (Kathy); sisters-in-law, Maura LaBarre (Ron); Deirdre Ely (Chris); former sister-in-law, Linda Murphy. Tom was predeceased by his granddaughter Molly Brown and nephew Jason Mundy. He will be greatly missed by his many nieces and nephews.

The family extends their gratitude for the compassionate care given to Tom from Victor Iturbides, MD, the neuro-oncology team at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and the hospice team at Princeton Homecare Services.

A Memorial Mass was offered at Queenship of Mary Roman Catholic Church in Plainsboro on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 at 10 a.m. Family received friends at the church from 9:30 a.m. — 10 a.m.

Interment followed at Holy Cross Burial Park in East Brunswick.

Donations in Tom’s honor may be made to The Molly Bear Foundation, PO Box 1258, Hightstown, NJ 08520 or www.mollybear.org.

Sgt. Lagomarsino, shown here with Taco, and other members of the Princeton Police Department’s 4th Squad community policing project teamed up on Sunday with SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, to help find homes for some sweet pups. This is the second year that one of the PPD patrol squads partnered with SAVE for this event. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

Mercer will offer a First-Time Homebuyer Program workshop on Wednesday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. at the Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence.

“Mercer County is again offering assistance to potential homeowners through our First-Time Homebuyer Program, and I invite you to sit in on this workshop to learn more about the lending process,” said Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes. more

The 2017 Eighth Annual New Hope Film Festival will take place from July 21 through 30. The judges selected 136 Official Selections, a number that includes 104 films from 16 countries and 32 scripts. Many of the films are U.S. and world premieres. The Festival will screen films from the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Philippines, Malawi, and Iceland.

All films will be screened at the New Hope Arts Center, 2 Stockton Avenue in New Hope. Filmmakers and screenwriters from around the country and abroad will attend the screenings. more

Princeton Arborist Lorraine Konopka and Bartlett Tree Experts Local Manager Scott Tapp are leaders in the battle to combat the emerald ash borer and preserve Princeton’s ash trees. (Photo Courtesy of Patricia Frawley and Alexandra Radbil)

Board members of the 101:Fund, which provides Princeton High School graduates with financial assistance for college, awarded $125,000 in need-based scholarships in 2017. The organization has awarded more than $1 million to PHS seniors over the last four decades. 

Saturday, June 24 is wheat harvest day at Howell Living History Farm in Hopewell Township. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., farmers will “cut and shock” this year’s crop. Wheat harvested that day will be threshed on Saturday, July 29, the first day of the annual 4-H Fair. A reaper-binder will be used to cut and bundle the wheat. The farm is at 79 Woodens Lane. Admission is free. Visit www.howellfarm.org.

With forecasters predicting a busy 2017 hurricane and tropical storm season, Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes is urging County residents to prepare and plan for potential storms this summer and fall. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, forecasters predict a 45 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 35 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 20 percent chance of a below-normal season.

Although it’s impossible to predict how the season might affect Mercer County residents, the county executive advises residents that it’s better to be over prepared. Mr. Hughes suggests taking the following readiness steps in preparation for hurricane season: more

ROCK BROOK CONNECTIONS: The Rock Brook School in Skillman recently held its Third Annual Family Night/Community Open House. Shown at the event, from left, are Lauren, Rock Brook student; Mary Caterson, executive director, Rock Brook School; Mark Caliguire, Somerset County freeholder and former mayor of Montgomery; and Henry, a RBS staff member’s son. The group is holding a chain link Connections Project, which the students worked on to celebrate the conclusion of Special Education Week. (Photo Courtesy of Rock Brook School)

On May 19, the Rock Brook School (RBS) in Skillman hosted its Third Annual Family Night/Community Open House. This event offered an opportunity for the community to visit the school and meet the students, staff, and families who make Rock Brook such a special place.  more

Rutgers University–New Brunswick faculty member Azzan Yadin-Israel will speak about his book The Grace of God and the Grace of Man: The Theologies of Bruce Springsteen (Lingua Press, 2016) from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 29, at Alexander Library, 169 College Avenue, New Brunswick. The event is free and open to the public.

The Grace of God and the Grace of Man is divided into three parts. The first section traces the evolution of theological ideas in Springsteen’s early albums with a focus on critiques of traditional religious institutions and the possibility of redemption on the open road, a notion that Springsteen ultimately rejects in Darkness on the Edge of Town. The second section looks at records after Darkness and Springsteen’s refashioning of three common religious concepts: sin, grace, and the struggle within. The book’s final section — named “Springsteen’s Midrash” after the ancient commentaries on Hebrew scriptures — looks at songs with explicitly biblical source material, such as “Adam Raised a Cain” and “Jesus Was an Only Son,” to examine how Springsteen recasts traditional biblical stories to grapple with his own uncertain faith. more

It’s only fitting that signed editions of several of Princeton native John McPhee’s acclaimed works — part of what the New York Times called “a grand pointillist mural of our time and place” — are among the items of special interest at the upcoming Friends of the Princeton Public Library Book Sale. During a library ceremony honoring him some years ago, McPhee confessed that when he was a boy he’d borrowed a book and failed to return it (“Well I lost it”). In donating signed editions of all his works to the library’s Princeton Collection on that occasion he was in effect repaying his debt. He then gave the idea of repayment another turn by claiming that he’d written all those books to make up for the one he’d lost.  more

AWARD WINNER: Recent TCNJ graduate Piper Torsilieri is the winner of Princeton Area Community Foundation’s 2017 Thomas George Artist Fund Award. Graduating art majors from Mercer County colleges and universities are eligible to apply for the annual award of $5,000. (Photo courtesy of Princeton Area Community Foundation)

The Princeton Area Community Foundation has named Piper Torsilieri as the winner of the 2017 Thomas George Artist Fund Award.

Ms. Torsilieri, 23, who grew up in Flemington, graduated from The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) in May. more

“THE SON AND THE HOUSE”: This glitch art painting by Phillip McConnell is part of the “Digital Alchemy” exhibit at The Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury from July 9-28. A reception will be held at the gallery on July 9 from 1-4 p.m

The Gourgaud Gallery in Cranbury presents “Digital Alchemy” by Trenton artist Phillip McConnell from July 9-28. A free reception will be held at the gallery on July 9 from 1-4 p.m.

Mr. McConnell describes himself as a glitch artist with a focus on abstract, surrealist digital art.

“‘Digital Alchemy’ is a project where I blend different aspects of photography (landscape, portrait, urban, nature and macro) with different concepts of glitch art (VHS, aesthetic, vapor wave) to create something new out of something broken,” said Mr. McConnell. “With almost everything in photography being digital, it leads the mind to wonder what can really be done when pushed a step further. more

SHAKESPEARE ’70 TAKES ON BIG MORAL QUESTIONS IN DARK COMEDY: Shakespeare ’70’s “Measure for Measure” will run at MCCC’s Kelsey Theatre, June 23 to July 2. In rehearsal for “Measure for Measure” are, from left, Timothy Kirk of Delran as Pompey, Russ Walsh of Morrisville, Pa., as Elbow/Abhorson, and Ernie Albanesius of Chesterfield as Froth/Barnardine. Tickets are available at www.kelseytheatre.net or by calling (609) 570-3333.

“Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall,” proclaims Shakespeare in “Measure for Measure,” coming to Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC’s) Kelsey Theatre. Dates and show times for this dark comedy are: Friday, June 23 and 30, at 8 p.m.; Saturday, June 24 and July 1 at 8 p.m., and Sunday, June 25 and July 2 at 2 p.m.  more

Reverend Johan Johnson

The parishioners at Trinity Episcopal Church on Crescent Avenue in Rocky Hill have just welcomed a new vicar. The Reverend Johan Johnson divides his time between Rocky Hill and Hightstown where he serves as chaplain at the Peddie School. He lives in Hightstown with his wife and their two children, ages 5 and 7 years old.

Father Johnson’s hope is that his ministry at Trinity will include outreach that improves the life of the community. For 16 years, he served a parish with a large, aging church building in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. “In that neighborhood at the 125th Street subway station there is a long staircase and an escalator. But the escalator had been out of service for years. We got together as a group of churches to lobby the MTA to get that escalator fixed. That’s the faith community getting together and using our spirituality to make the community where we live a better place.”  more

June 19, 2017

Every year, in observance of Independence Day, Morven Museum and Garden at 55 Stockton Street in Princeton hosts a FREE event celebrating America’s heritage at the home-turned-museum of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

The festivities take place on Tuesday, July 4, from noon to 3 p.m. No registration is necessary. more

June 16, 2017

See below for the June 15, 2017 Princeton Planning Board Meeting.

 Town Topics Newspaper will be posting videos of all future municipal meetings.

June 15, 2017

Lots of people took advantage of the beautiful weather on Sunday and enjoyed the day outdoors at Terhune Orchards in Princeton. Fresh strawberries are now featured, and guests can pick their own daily in the field at the farm. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

June 14, 2017

To the Editor:

“Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white: that the union be thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing the new constellation.” —The Second Continental Congress, on the passage of the Flag Act, June 14, 1777.

With this resolution, the Congress not only authorized a new flag, but engrained in our collective mindset an unshakable truth — that we are one nation, united and free. And just five months before our American flag was formally created, General George Washington stood on the fields of Princeton, New Jersey, and made this vision a reality.

In the latter half of 1776, just months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, our liberty was far from assured. Washington’s novice army endured a series of brutal defeats in New York, which led to the British capture of New York City. In the words of Thomas Paine that winter, “These are the times that try men’s souls … tyranny, like, hell, is not easily conquered.”

Washington realized that only he and his dwindling fighting force could revive the flickering flame of American independence. Embarking on an audacious campaign easily decried as foolish, Washington secured surprising victories at both Trenton and Assunpink Creek, New Jersey. Eager to capitalize on the momentum begun by his improbable Christmas night crossing of the Delaware River, Washington then dared to confront seasoned British soldiers at nearby Princeton.

In the frigid morning hours of January 3, 1777, citizen soldiers faced trained British regulars and engaged in furious fighting. Many American patriots fell. But, it was at that moment that “a tall man on a white horse could be seen galloping towards the scene of battle.” George Washington had arrived. Rallying his troops, Washington ordered the advance, driving the British from the field and securing a greatly-needed victory.

The valor witnessed at Princeton is a testament to the symbolism of the flag colors themselves: white for purity and innocence, red for hardiness and valor, and blue for vigilance, perseverance, and justice.

Today, we have an opportunity to save the land where Washington secured this victory at Princeton and honor the resolute American flag. In 2016, the Civil War Trust, through its Campaign 1776 initiative to preserve Revolutionary War and War of 1812 battlefields, signed a landmark agreement with the Institute for Advanced Study to preserve 15 acres where Washington’s storied counterattack occurred.

This agreement allows the State of New Jersey and the Trust to transform this property into an outdoor classroom that can inspire all Americans to learn more about Washington and the purity, valor and vigilance of the American flag. Saving the Princeton battlefield – what better way to commemorate Flag Day?

ROGER WILLIAMS

Secretary of the board for the Princeton Battlefield 

Society, Committee member of TenCrucialDays.org and The Spirit of Princeton

To the Editor:

I am writing in response to Anne Levin’s excellent article entitled “Quieting Noisy Leaf Blowers” in your June 7th issue. The increased cost of using rakes rather than leaf blowers is the reason residents are reluctant to change to “quiet landscaping,” say the two area landscapers interviewed. This has not been my experience but I am not looking to remove every single leaf. My landscaper worked with me to eliminate leaf blowing last fall by mowing over light leaf accumulations and directing them onto the beds. In heavier areas he simply used the mower to direct leaves into a pile, rake onto a tarp and haul to the curb. No more mulch blown away and no cost increase!

Quiet Princeton, of which I am a member, is dedicated to improving our quality of life by removing and controlling sources of noise. We hope that reducing or eliminating the use of noisy polluting leaf blowers will gain momentum.

Carol Rothberg

Winant Road