April 28, 2016

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The Arts Council of Princeton’s signature art and wine spring fundraiser, Pinot to Picasso, will take place at the Technology Center of Princeton on Friday, April 29 from 6 to 10 p.m. Guests will peruse the Tombola Gallery with 90 works of art and participate in art-making throughout the event. There will also be gourmet tastings provided by local restaurants, along with world-class wines and brews. Tickets are available at www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. For more information, call (609) 924-8777. 

April 27, 2016

To the Editor:

Princeton’s Council needs the skilled, experienced, and fiscally responsible leadership of Tim Quinn. As former members of the Princeton Board of Education, we saw first-hand his consensus building, and genuine respect for our town. His leadership on the Board helped save Princeton’s pre-K program and improved its focus on vulnerable and under-represented students. He helped Princeton buck the state trend of charging for sports participation or reducing arts and music in schools. Instead of taking the easy way out, he steered the Board toward thoughtful and fiscally responsible solutions to budget pressures.

Tim is a civic-minded and collaborative leader. We urge Princeton residents to support Tim Quinn for Princeton Council.

Anne Burns

Baldwin Lane

To the Editor:

It was a heartening moment on Wednesday night when a majority of the Princeton Planning Board refused to be coerced into supporting an ill-conceived subdivision of a narrow lot fronting onto Jefferson Road. Despite badgering from the applicant’s attorney, Planning Board members led by Jenny Crumiller, Liz Lempert, and Timothy Quinn courageously argued that “as of right” was never meant to sanction the drawing of zig-zag lot lines that violate very clearly stated guidelines. Instead of setting a dangerous precedent for the carving up of neighborhoods to maximize developers’ profits, the Planning Board fulfilled its mission of being a true steward for the community it serves.

Martin Kahn

Jefferson Road

To the Editor:

We are supporting Jenny Crumiller in the upcoming Democratic primary election. Jenny has a strong record of promoting progressive values, from her decades-long support and involvement with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Princeton Committee, her anti-war activities, her opposition to the use of torture, and her support for progressive Democratic candidates, to her current work on the Council.

Jenny brought forth Princeton’s resolution supporting the Anti-Corruption Act, which is federal campaign finance reform legislation. Princeton became the first town in New Jersey to pass this resolution, which now has growing support across the country. She also introduced an anti-fracking ordinance and a resolution opposing the pipeline on the Ridge and calling for additional safety measures. She has supported anti-wage theft measures as well as policies limiting local police involvement in immigration enforcement. She is pro-environment and supported the composting program as well as preserving open space on the Ridge.

As the newly consolidated town was forming its new police department, she brought the ACLU-NJ in to consult with the council and promote recommended police practices for the department. She compelled the police to include race and gender statistics for police stops in their monthly police reports. She promoted a police ride-along program so that Council members as well as members of the public could ride along on a police shift to promote transparency in policing.

Jenny is currently a strong supporter of the earned sick leave ordinance, brought to Princeton by the Working Families Alliance, which would require Princeton employers to provide paid time off when employees are sick or need to care for a sick family member, a fair and humane measure that in our view is required by human decency.

We agree with these positions and that’s why Jenny has earned our enduring respect and our strongest support in this election. We encourage fellow Democrats to vote for Jenny on June 7.

Beth and Jim Healey

Moore Street

To the Editor:

When I hear that someone is running for Princeton Council, the skeptic in me naturally wonders: Why? It’s an often-thankless job that probably pays about $3 an hour.

I didn’t have any questions when I heard Leticia Fraga was running. I’ve known Leticia for more than 10 years, and her life’s work has been about helping others — bringing together people to make her community a better place. Her reward is simply the inherent satisfaction that comes from solving problems.

If that all sounds a little too sentimental for your political tastes, please understand that Leticia also has the experience and is willing to do the hard work to get things done. Her career includes serving as a professional civil rights enforcement investigator and facilitator, resolving cases that saved taxpayers hundred of thousands of dollars. As a volunteer in Princeton, she has helped launch programs that have provided meals to underprivileged children and ID cards to underrepresented adults.

In short, Leticia combines a “can do” attitude with a natural knack for relating to people from all backgrounds. If you want a Council member who is interested in accountability, affordability, and social justice, vote for Leticia Fraga in the Democratic Primary on June 7.

Chris Johnson

Benjamin Rush Lane

To the Editor:

I will choose Anne Waldron Neumann for Council in the Princeton Democratic primaries on June 7. A long time Princeton resident, Anne has produced tangible results in affordable housing, zoning, lowering taxes, and so forth.

I have great respect for her generosity, her fierce intelligence, her indefatigable determination to attain success in progressive causes that are dear to her heart. Anne does her homework. She has an encyclopedic knowledge of all sorts of topics relatable to the important issues of this town. Like all of us, she welcomes changes that benefit the town and its people.

Anne understands how important town-gown relations are; however, she will fight for what is only fair, no strings attached. And this is why Anne Waldron Neumann has my vote, hands down.

I encourage you to check her impressive resume and progressive goals at her website anneneumannforcouncil.weebly.com

Sandra Jordan Bierman

Grover Avenue

To the Editor:

We read avidly Stephen Hiltner’s letter in the April 13 issue of Town Topics [“By Taking Our Local Nature’s Problems Seriously, We Also Build Community”]. Our garden yard and woods are filled with the “little yellow flower,” definitely an invasion.

However, the solutions suggested by Mr. Hiltner are not good ideas. Checking further with You Bet Your Garden, I learned: Roundup’s active ingredient glyphosate, is not toxic, but the surfactants and other so-called ‘inert’ ingredients can wipe out frogs, toads, and other amphibians. So while attempting to eliminate one invasive plant we could be inadvertently killing fragile species that are being threatened already. In addition, Roundup may not even be effective against lesser celandine: a few years ago I tried it on a small patch and the plants barely blinked and then continued to thrive.

I agree that it would be helpful for everyone who sees first signs of lesser celandine to dig them up and throw them in the trash, not the compost pile. That seems to be the only effective approach not harmful to wetland species.

Rev. Carol S. Haag

Ridgeview Circle

See below for the April 25, 2016 Princeton Council Meeting.

 Town Topics Newspaper will be posting videos of all future municipal meetings.

obit L Joan Goodman_MedL. Joan Goodman

L. Joan Goodman (nee Mehltretter) of Lawrenceville, died peacefully at home on Tuesday, April 19, 2016, three weeks shy of her 80th birthday.

Born in New York City, she was raised on Staten Island by her foster parents, Vincent and Minnie Ernst and their daughter Anna. She graduated first in her class from both St. Sylvester’s school (in 1950) and New Dorp High School (in 1954). She received a scholarship to the College of New Rochelle and graduated cum magna in 1958. After two years as an Ursuline novitiate, she decided to return to secular life and earned her master’s of arts from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. on a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.

Joan first taught high school English at Northwestern Senior High School in Prince George’s County, Md., but spent the last 26 years of her career at Princeton High School in Princeton. She became a well-loved and respected institution known as “JG” there. Students did not take her courses to get an easy “A”, but to learn how to write well. She also advised the award-winning student newspaper, The Tower, for ten years, staunchly defending its freedom of press when necessary.

After retiring in 1999, Joan, always a social activist, kept incredibly busy with extensive volunteer, church, and charity work. She also began to travel, ultimately visiting more than 70 countries. When her grandchildren arrived she made regular trips to see them in between their visits to her. She was an avid reader, and never drove anywhere without a “Books On Tape” playing. She loved to be outdoors, walking and bicycling year-round, and cross-country skiing whenever possible.

Joan is survived by her two beloved sons, John V. Goodman and his wife Dorota Bulik of Malden, Mass.; and Christopher J. Goodman and his wife Kim of Round Rock, Tex.; her three grandchildren, Nicolas, Maya, and Theo; her brother Albert Holtje and his wife Anita of Staten Island, N.Y.; her sisters Irene Lamprecht of San Antonio, Tex. and Jennie Coins of Harlingen, Tex.; her ex-husband James A. Goodman of Princeton; many nieces and nephews; other family, dear friends, and former students; and her cherished cats Kami and Zeke.

Joan’s funeral mass was at the Church of St. Ann in Lawrenceville on Tuesday, April 26, and she was interred at Lawrenceville Cemetery.

Contributions in her memory may be made to Doctors Without Borders or the Church of St. Ann, 1253 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648.

———

Timothy C. Hull

Timothy C. Hull, 64 years young, passed away on Monday, April 18, 2016.

Born in Chagrin Falls, Ohio, Tim lived the last 40 years in Princeton. Once a master carpenter, Tim moved to Princeton to be with his wife, Martha and daughter, Valerie in 1979. He retired in 2012 from the Township of Montgomery where he was employed for almost 30 years.

Tim loved to travel the U.S.A., loved history, was an avid fisherman, a wonderful carpenter, had an excellent sense of humor, and enjoyed a clever crossword puzzle.

Tim is survived by his wife, Martha F. Stockton; daughter Valerie Stockton Petredis; 2 grandchildren, Dorian Nikzad (5) and Lillie Nikzad (3); his brother Michael Hull and wife Mary, brother Tod Hull, and a step-mother Linda Hull.

A quiet family service will be held over the summer. In lieu of flowers please think about Tim when you make a contribution to your favorite charity. He loved Trout Unlimited or Ducks Unlimited but any nature-oriented charity would please him.

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GETTING READY: This year’s co-chairs of “Morven in May: A Celebration of Art, Craft and Garden,” from left: Austin and Ann Starkey, and Lisa and Peter Ham, are busy putting the finishing touches on this annual Princeton rite of spring. The festivities kick off Friday evening, May 6, with a preview party which includes a first look at the fine craft work of this year’s 36 visiting artists and heirloom plant sale. Morven in May then opens to the public Saturday and Sunday, May 7 & 8. For more information call (609) 924-8144 x 113 or visit www.morven.org

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Princeton High School’s Odyssey of the Mind Team #1 successfully met the challenge of designing a vehicle powered by a human propulsion system other than pedaling to place first at the State Finals in Ewing, winning a bid to the World Final Championship at Iowa State University May 25-28. (L to R) Diane Li, Ines Aitsahal, Amy Wang, Margaret Evered, Thomas Brinckman, Elliot Wailoo, Sarah Golobish.

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In honor of Earth Day 2016, Mike Phares of Woodwinds Associates helps to preserve local habitats by applying Woodwinds Worm Tea, a type of organic plant food, to Meredith’s Garden at the D&R Greenway Preserve. Woodwinds has built a reputation of extensive experience and personal interest in caring for New Jersey’s trees and shrubs as part of a commitment to the environment.

For inquiries, call (609) 924-3500 or visit www.woodwindsassociates.com

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On Saturday, May 7 at 1 p.m., historian George Luck will lead a walking tour of Kingston’s churches. The tour will start at Kingston cemetery where Luck will point out some of the graves of Kingston’s most storied residents. This event is sponsored by the Kingston Historical Society in conjunction with Kingston Methodist Church and Kingston Presbyterian Church. For more information, call (609) 924-1362. (Photo Courtesy of Kingston Historical Society)

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Eddie S. Glaude Jr. will discuss and sign copies of his book “Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul” on Tuesday, May 3, at 7 p.m. at Princeton Public Library. Mr. Glaude is the chair of the Center for African-American Studies and the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Princeton University. This program is presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Anthony Acciavatti will be at Labyrinth Books on Thursday, April 28, at 6 p.m. for a discussion of his new book, Ganges Water Machine: Designing New India’s Ancient River, which was awarded the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize for 2016. more

Art PDS Alumni Exhibi 4-27-16.

PDS ALUMNI EXHIBITON: The Princeton Day School’s “50th Anniversary Alumni Art Exhibition” is on view until May 14. The exhibit includes a wide variety of media by 37 talented alumni including founding partner of Studio Hillier, J. Robert Hillier PCD ’52, FAIA. His River Road House model, pictured above, will be among the works exhibited.

In continuation of Princeton Day School’s 50th Anniversary celebration, the Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery proudly presents the 50th Anniversary Alumni Art Exhibition, on view from now through May 14.  more

Art Gen Next 4-27-16

“TICK TOCK, DRIP DROP”: This lithography with chine collé and hand coloring by Eileen Foti is included in the West Windsor Arts Council’s “Generation Next” exhibit. From May 2 until June 9, the gallery will feature six established artists who selected one emerging artist to exhibit with them.

West Windsor Arts Council (WWAC) presents its annual “Generation Next” exhibit featuring original artwork by up-and-coming artists with a twist. This year WWAC invited six “established” artists to exhibit their work and choose one “up-and-coming” artist to exhibit with them. The works are on display May 2 – July 9, 2016 with an opening reception May 15, 4-6 p.m. more

Theater Tharp 4-27-16

Twyla Tharp

McCarter Theatre Center is pleased to announce its full schedule of 2016-17 dance, music, and signature presented series. An eclectic mix of the world’s greatest musicians, dance companies, and performing artists are on tap, including several returning favorites and McCarter debuts.  more

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Photo Credit: Willy Somma

On Sunday, May 15 at 4 p.m., the Princeton Symphony Orchestra (PSO) presents its Passion and Affection concert performed in honor of Arnold H. Snider, III and featuring Sarah Kirkland Snider’s Hiraeth, a multi-media work co-commissioned by the PSO with the North Carolina Symphony. more

April 26, 2016

Cat Flowers_Feature

Take inspiration from Coachella with these music festival fashions from Rebecca Minkoff.

 more

April 22, 2016

Gala

On Saturday, April 9, over 200 guests at the Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s (PSO) sold-out gala Gershwin in Paris were treated to the sights and sounds of jazz-age Paris. Held at the grand venue Jasna Polana, patrons sipped cocktails and ate canapés prior to being called to dinner by an impressive brass fanfare by PSO musicians. Music Director Rossen Milanov welcomed everyone and conducted George Gershwin’s “I Got Rhythm” as flappers from the American Repertory Ballet performed a jazz challenge dance choreographed by Mary Pat Robertson. Pictured: Gala Co-Chairs Nora Decker and Beth Beers with spouses Keil Decker of BlackRock and David Beers of Goldman Sachs (Photo Credit: T. Kevin Birch)

April 20, 2016

To the Editor:

The Jewish Federation of Princeton Mercer Bucks and the Board of Rabbis of Princeton Mercer Bucks condemn the beer pong game of “Jews vs. Nazis” that took place in Princeton. This activity demonstrates that there is still a great deal of work to do in educating people about the horrors of the Holocaust.

At the same time, we recognize Jamaica Ponder for her courage in speaking up and alerting our community to this disturbing incident. We have watched for too long as people have remained silent when such actions occur. We are grateful to all those who are working to ensure that these type of episodes do not occur in the future. We are happy to assist in any way that we can.

Jewish Federation 

Princeton Mercer Bucks,

Board of Rabbis 

of Princeton Mercer Bucks

To the Editor:

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I am writing to inform you that after 16 years, seven as executive director, Clare Smith is retiring this spring from Morven Museum and Garden.

With her commitment to historic preservation, her ability to attract the highest quality staff, her boundless dedication and gentleness of character, Clare has led Morven from a young to a maturing museum. The significant milestones achieved during her directorship include:

• Morven’s audience has increased significantly to an annual visitation of 15,000. Recent annual growth of 32 percent has been the product of increased programming, marketing, and collaborations.

• Recent exhibitions have been “game-changing” and underscore the Museum’s ongoing commitment to excellence. The Pine Barrens: A Legacy of Preservation, Coastal Impressions: Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940 and the current Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age have helped transform the museum and raise awareness of this important statewide resource.

• Morven annually offers over 100 public programs including the exceedingly popular recent lectures associated with the Lindbergh exhibit and extending to the July 4th Jubilee, Morven in May, a monthly book group, horticultural classes, and a wonderful collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton that incorporates special access to Morven’s unique history and site.

• Lastly, under Clare’s direction Morven has fostered collaborations with local non-profit groups whose missions focus on underserved populations and includes Isles, Crisis Ministry of Princeton and Trenton, and TASK. She has been a determined advocate for them and others, as well.

These are just a few examples of how Clare Smith’s commitment to excellence has contributed to the strong trajectory of success Morven is experiencing.

I know you join the Board in extending our grateful thanks to Clare and every good wish for her well deserved retirement. We will miss her.

Georgia T. Schley

Morven Board President

To the Editor:

This April 22 is the 46th Earth Day! It all began in 1970 when millions of people called for environmental reforms resulting in the introduction of recycling, keeping plastics, glass, and paper from our landfills for reuse and recycling.

Where is Princeton almost 50 years later?

As the first town in New Jersey to offer curbside food waste pick up, we have moved beyond traditional recycling and created a model program that other towns are copying and adopting. In its first five years, the Municipality’s Curbside Organics Program diverted more than 500 tons of organic matter from the landfill, turning it into beautiful soil.

Princeton residents and retailers have also recycled almost 5 million plastic bags since last year through the ABC’s Recycling Campaign, diverting some 7 tons of plastics from the landfill. The ABC’s is a joint effort between Sustainable Princeton, the Princeton Merchants Association, The Municipality of Princeton, and McCaffrey’s grocery store.

Thanks to the advent of recycling and programs like those mentioned above, we estimate that Princeton now either composts or recycles approximately half of what we would have sent to the landfill on the first Earth Day in 1970.

Where do we go from here? To answer that question, Sustainable Princeton has formed The Zero Waste Working Group comprised of local restaurant owners, retailers, entrepreneurs, and community leaders.

With your help, the working group looks forward to making measurable change between now and Earth Day 2017. We’ll begin by offering six ideas to get us all started toward a Zero Waste Princeton.

1. Commit to a zero waste mindset — Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Compost.

2. Let it Go by hosting a Yard Sale on April 30th as part of the town wide Let It Go event. Sign up on the Princeton Public Library website.

3. Just say no to sending food waste to the landfill. Food scraps are a commodity to be turned back into soil. Residents can join the Curbside Organics Program by calling (609) 688-2566. Retailers can contact a number of compost facilities to pick up their food waste. And, those of us who compost in the back yard, should keep doing exactly what we are already doing!

4. Be Careful with Compostable Tableware — If you are in the Municipal Curbside Organics program, our current compost facility is unable to take compostable tableware such as cups and utensils. Keep putting food and uncoated paper waste in your organics bin — but please, while we’re working out details, direct anything else to recycling or trash. Be watching for more curbside composting information coming soon!

5. Watch for a How to Recycle Brochure to be published soon to help answer your questions about what goes in which recycle bin and where residents can take those hard to recycle items for recycling.

6. Stay tuned for updates about food waste compost options for Mercer County including AgriArk, a locally owned clean compost facility in Hopewell which is already turning food waste into fertilizer. Also, watch for a potential BioGas Facility in Trenton.

We look forward to working with you to reduce, reuse, and recycle to move our town closer to zero waste!

Diane Landis 

Executive Director, Sustainable Princeton

To the Editor:

I am voting for Tim Quinn for Princeton Council in the June 7 election and urge that all eligible voters do the same. Tim has demonstrated through his leadership roles on Princeton’s Board of Education and Planning Board that he has the character and skills to be an excellent addition to our council.

In our community, Tim demonstrated his leadership in tough circumstances. When he was president of the school board in 2011, Governor Christie cut the state aid contribution to Princeton schools by two-thirds — 5 percent of the budget — after appropriating most of the budget surplus in 2010. The school board had to take timely and critical spending actions that would impact students, teachers, and taxpayers. In this crisis situation Board members made the difficult decisions after thoroughly considering all perspectives. They communicated those decisions to constituents in a way that citizens understood their reasoning and that left everyone feeling that their individual concerns were heard and considered. This is the type of leadership that we need on Princeton Council.

I have been concerned that the intense passion with which our current Council considers and legislates some of the issues they face can diminish the decisions made, interfere in their pursuit of a longer-term agenda, and obscure opportunities and risks that are appearing in the distance. I think that Tim’s thoughtful and collected approach will be invaluable to the overall performance of Council and thus benefit the long-term well being of our town.

Tim has lived in Princeton for 25 years and works at the Princeton Public Library on its executive team. He is an avid cyclist. He believes in proactively planning and managing growth, expanding affordable housing, building strong neighborhoods, balancing affordability with quality municipal services, and building community consensus around positive changes.

Princeton is fortunate to have so many citizens dedicating their efforts to the well being of our town. We’re fortunate that Tim Quinn wants to be on Council and I urge Princeton voters to give him that opportunity.

Scott Sillars

Patton Avenue