June 24, 2015
ON THE FLY: Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball second baseman Matt Lambert gathers in a fly in recent action. Last Monday, Lambert, a Princeton High standout, contributed two hits and three RBIs in a losing cause as Post 218 fell 10-5 to Hamilton Post 31 to drop to 2-12. In upcoming action, Post 218 faces Hightstown Post 148 on June 27 at Mercer County Park, hosts Ewing Post 314 on June 29, and plays at Hopewell Post 339 on June 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

ON THE FLY: Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball second baseman Matt Lambert gathers in a fly in recent action. Last Monday, Lambert, a Princeton High standout, contributed two hits and three RBIs in a losing cause as Post 218 fell 10-5 to Hamilton Post 31 to drop to 2-12. In upcoming action, Post 218 faces Hightstown Post 148 on June 27 at Mercer County Park, hosts Ewing Post 314 on June 29, and plays at Hopewell Post 339 on June 30. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Over the final four and a half innings last Monday evening, the Princeton Post 218 American Legion baseball team battled powerful Hamilton Post 31 to a 5-5 standstill.

But having dug an early 5-0 hole, Princeton’s late heroics went for naught as visiting Hamilton left Smoyer Park with a 10-5 victory.

While Princeton manager Tommy Parker liked the spirit his team displayed, he acknowledged that it can’t afford lapses.

“That’s what I just told them out there, once we settled down, we did battle back,” said Parker, who got two hits and three RBIs from second baseman Matt Lambert in the defeat with catcher Steve Majeski and left fielder Ben Danis knocking in one run apiece.

“It has got to be that effort all the way. It is a game of inches, they hit it anywhere we weren’t and we hit it where they was. That’s really what it was.”

With his club having lost 10 of its last 11 games in moving to 2-12, Parker said it has been plagued by uneven play this summer.

“The issues are not hitting, that has been it more than anything,” said Parker. “We can’t make mistakes defensively, those little things, like throwing to the  wrong base, because even if you get away with it, it sets a tone. You have to think the game all the time and that has been my message, think the game and give 100 percent.”

Despite the rough stretch, Parker is seeing some good individual efforts. “It has been game to game, different guys have stepped up in different games, like Joe Studholme tonight,” said Parker.

“He has proven when he is available, that he has been hard to hi, that has been a bright spot. Tommy Pecora had an excellent game pitching against Trenton the other night and he has been getting his bat on the ball. This Paul Cooke is going to be remarkable. Chris Sumners has been playing first base and designated hitter and we discovered this kid can pitch. He had them baffled the other day in Trenton.”

With 10 games left in regular season play, Parker is looking for his players to bear down over the homestretch.

“The future is bright, I am always optimistic,” said Parker, whose team faces Hightstown Post 148 on June 27 at Mercer County Park, hosts Ewing Post 314 on June 29, and plays at Hopewell Post 339 on June 30.

“I just want to see us put our noses to the grindstone, give 100 percent and give our best effort. Let’s not give any games away. They need to stay focused, keep their heads in the game, and play baseball like they know they can.”

Parker, for his part, hopes that kind of effort will yield results that are more indicative of the team’s talent level.

“I feel for these guys, they are better than they appear,” maintained Parker.

“The fan that is not here will look at the score and say wow, these guys are bad. There are good ballplayers here, the numbers don’t necessarily say anything about the ability of this team. They are good enough to compete. They are playing against the best of the best. If you make a mistake they are going to take advantage of it, all the way up and down the line.”

INSIDE JOB: Mark Aziz of Ivy Inn handles the ball down low in recent action in the Princeton Recreation Department Summer Men’s Basketball League. Aziz’s powerful inside game at both ends of the court has helped Ivy Inn get off to a 4-0 start this season. Ivy Inn and SAT Smart/Princeton Soup and Sandwich (3-0) are the only teams remaining undefeated so far this summer. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

INSIDE JOB: Mark Aziz of Ivy Inn handles the ball down low in recent action in the Princeton Recreation Department Summer Men’s Basketball League. Aziz’s powerful inside game at both ends of the court has helped Ivy Inn get off to a 4-0 start this season. Ivy Inn and SAT Smart/Princeton Soup and Sandwich (3-0) are the only teams remaining undefeated so far this summer. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

For Mark Aziz, last year turned out to be a lost season as he looked to help Ivy Inn go for a second straight title in the Princeton Recreation Department Summer Men’s Basketball League.

Aziz suffered a fractured jaw in the fourth game of the 2014 season and was sidelined the rest of the summer. “It was tough sitting on the sidelines and watching us lose,” said Aziz, reflecting on a season that saw Ivy Inn knocked out of the playoffs in the quarterfinals.

Returning to action this season, Aziz, a former standout for The College of New Jersey men’s hoops program,  has been providing his customary tough play inside for Ivy Inn.

Last Friday, Aziz scored eight points and did yeomen’s work in the paint, getting key rebounds and making some blocked shots as Ivy Inn defeated Aria Health 40-27.

In reflecting on the win, Aziz was proud of how Ivy Inn put the clamps on Aria.

“Defensively, as always, we were there all the time, especially with the communication, ” said Aziz. “We got a lot of good pressure; we forced them to take difficult shots in traffic. It definitely helped.”

Aziz focuses on helping to raise the defensive intensity for Ivy Inn. “My role is anchoring the defense, first and foremost,” said Aziz, who has also played pro ball overseas.

“We have got some more scoring power with Sherm (Brittingham) and Tommy (Soulias) so that’s not my main concern. It is just a matter of playing defense and rebounding and not giving the refs a hard time.”

With Ivy Inn defeating Dr. Palmer 46-33 last Monday to improve to 4-0, Aziz believes the team could be a force this summer.

“We got a couple of new guys with us, they are gelling perfectly,” said Aziz.

“We all play well together and complement each other so well so it’s a great start for us. I am real surprised. I am real happy with how we have started so far.”

No matter how things end up this summer, Aziz is just happy to be on the court again for Ivy Inn.

“It is great to be back, for sure,” said Aziz. “It is a great group of guys and I love being here for sure. When you don’t play competitive any more throughout the year, you just look forward to getting together with these guys and taking advantage of the time together. It makes it a little more lighthearted.”

It was a muggy Thursday evening in mid-June but the atmosphere in the Hun School gym was reminiscent of a big game in mid-winter.

The bleachers in Shipley Pavilion were more than half full and the telltale sounds of whistles and squeaking sneakers filled the air.

While there wasn’t a key high school game in progress, it was a big night on the local hoops scene as it marked the opening night of the newly-formed Victory Sports Pro-Am Summer Basketball League.

League director Bryan Caver, a former Seton Hall men’s hoops standout, was happy to see the strong turnout for the triple-header which featured an entertaining run-and-gun brand of hoops under the league’s format of four 10-minute quarters with a running clock and a 24-second shot clock.

“I just think the avid fan really wants to see some good basketball and that is what we are trying to provide, guys competing at a high level in the summer time,” said Caver of the league, which is holding triple-headers on Tuesday and Thursday evenings at Hun starting at 6:00 p.m. with playoffs slated to begin on August 4.

“Guys that you get to see on TV, Charles Cook played at Dayton this year, Trey Lowe is going to Temple, you get to see them up close. You don’t realize how good these guys are until you see them up close.”

Caver, who has become familiar with the area through working for Mercer County Special Services as a Behavioral Interventionist, realized that there was a need for such high-level competition in the summer.

“I knew a couple of area guys and overseas guys that come home who play Division 1, who really didn’t have a place to play in the summer,” said Caver.

“They were just kind of watching leagues. The Jersey Shore League still exists but it is not the same competition that it was. About two years ago I kind of pondered it and I thought what I want for myself if I was still playing. We just wanted to create an environment where these guys could compete.”

Hun turned out to be an ideal environment for the league. “There were a couple of different places considered but this location is perfect,” said Caver.

“We have guys coming from all different areas so it is accessible. I really thank the Hun family for allowing us to do this, especially athletic director Bill Quirk. They love their basketball but to give an outside entity an opportunity to come and share the facility, I truly appreciate that.”

Caver was taken aback by the number of guys who wanted to get an opportunity to play in the league.

“The moment we started contacting these colleges and universities, they were all for it,” said Caver, pointing out that the league is NCAA-sanctioned.

“We had two tryouts because of the response. We thought we would have some area talent but the vast amount of talent has been a surprise. We have players from Rider, Princeton, and Rutgers. There are some from D-3 schools and some overseas guys. We have guys coming from as far away as Bloomfield. It is a vast array of talent and players.”

While Caver is happy with the talent the league has attracted this summer, he sees it as only a start.

“This season, I want to see an influx of guys, this is what the pro-am is about,” added Caver,

“Guys hearing about it and making room for those guys who want to compete and play in this league. I want the NBA guys to know there is a place they can come to near home. I want to get even more talent and raise the level. I want more than eight teams, I want 16 teams.”

Buoyed by the promising start, Caver is confident that the league can become a fixture on the local sporting scene.

“We hope to keep this going for many years to come,” said Caver, noting that Victory Sports is looking to start programs in other sports, including soccer, field hockey, and football.

“I feel there was a place for this. As you can see, we have some talent and these guys are competing. I just really want people to come out and watch and enjoy the level of competition that we have and the level of the basketball that we are bringing to this area. There is nothing like this in the area and there hasn’t been in a long time.”

PAYING THE PRICE: Amir Bell heads upcourt this winter in his freshman season with the Princeton University men’s basketball team. This summer, point guard Bell is honing his skills by playing for the T. Rowe Price team in the newly-formed Victory Sports Pro-Am summer basketball league. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

PAYING THE PRICE: Amir Bell heads upcourt this winter in his freshman season with the Princeton University men’s basketball team. This summer, point guard Bell is honing his skills by playing for the T. Rowe Price team in the newly-formed Victory Sports Pro-Am summer basketball league. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Playing for the T. Rowe Price team on opening night last Thursday in the newly-formed Victory Sports Pro-Am summer basketball league, Amir Bell displayed his competitive fire.

The rising sophomore guard for the Princeton University men’s basketball hit the floor hard at the Hun School gym, diving for loose balls and intensely going to the hoop.

Bell’s grit and 11 points, though weren’t enough as T. Rowe Price fell 77-64 to P.E.M.G.

Afterward, Bell showed another side of his competitive nature as he glumly assessed the defeat.

“We didn’t play defense down the stretch; we missed a lot of shots that we were making in the first half,” said a frowning Bell.

“We have to keep pushing through when we get tired. We should have won that game. That is what summer league is for, to get better at things like that so we have to continue working.”

Bell is looking forward to pushing himself in the summer league. “You get to play, make sure you stay fresh and solid until the season comes,” said Bell. “It should be a really good opportunity, really good competition.”

With incoming Princeton freshmen hoops players Myles Stephens, Devin Cannady, and Noah Bramlage, joining Bell on the T. Rowe Price roster, he is getting the opportunity to take his new teammates under his wing.

“We are trying to build some chemistry, teach them some things that will happen during the season,” said Bell. “We want to help them out, make them run parts of the system.”

Coming off a superb debut campaign, Bell is looking to build up his game individually.

“I have been working on my midrange jump shot and my three-point game,” said Bell, a 6’3, 160-pound native of East Brunswick who averaged 8.8 points a game as a freshman and dished out 77 assists. “I want to be a better leader and a better communicator with my teammates next year.”

Bell and the Tigers are poised to do better than last winter when they posted an overall record of 16-14 and went 9-5 in Ivy League play.

“It should be a really big year for us, trying to bring momentum that we gain over the summer into the season,” said Bell.

“We have a lot of guys who are back and have some experience. We are hungry and we have pretty big expectations for ourselves. It should be fun.”

June 17, 2015
SEVENTH HEAVEN: University of Denver men’s lacrosse head coach Bill Tierney, left, shakes hands with Maryland head coach John Tillman before the teams met in the NCAA championship game on Memorial Day.  Former Princeton University head coach Tierney, who guided the Tigers to six national championships during his 22-season tenure with the program, won a seventh NCAA title as the Pioneers posted a 10-5 win over the Terps.(Photo Courtesy of Will Schneekloth and Denver’s Office of Athletic Communications)(Photo by Will Schneekloth for The University of Denver)

SEVENTH HEAVEN: University of Denver men’s lacrosse head coach Bill Tierney, left, shakes hands with Maryland head coach John Tillman before the teams met in the NCAA championship game on Memorial Day. Former Princeton University head coach Tierney, who guided the Tigers to six national championships during his 22-season tenure with the program, won a seventh NCAA title as the Pioneers posted a 10-5 win over the Terps. (Photo Courtesy of Will Schneekloth and Denver’s Office of Athletic Communications)(Photo by Will Schneekloth for The University of Denver)

Bill Tierney was in Philadelphia on Memorial Day in 1992 and enjoyed one of the most memorable days of his life.

Tierney guided an upstart Princeton University men’s lacrosse team to a 10-9 overtime victory against Syracuse in the NCAA championship game to give the program its first-ever national title.

It was an improbable triumph for the Tigers considering that the team had gone 2-13 just four years earlier in Tierney’s first campaign as its head coach.

As Memorial Day rolled around this year, Tierney was back in Philly for the NCAA men’s lax title game and he once again made history, leading outsider University of Denver to a 10-5 win over Maryland and its first-ever NCAA crown.

The victory gave Hall of Fame coach Tierney a seventh national championship to go with the six he won during his 22 seasons at Princeton. He became the first coach to lead two different schools to an NCAA title and Denver is the first team from west of the Mississippi to earn a men’s lax national title.

For Tierney, there was a distinct sense of déjà vu as he walked off the field at  Lincoln Financial Field after Denver’s triumph.

“It was great, whenever you win a championship, it is crazy,” said Tierney, 62. “It felt like my first one at Princeton. It was in Philadelphia like that one. It was the first one for the program. It was different guys and a different team but you are thankful to the people who trusted in you.”

Coming into the season, Tierney felt his team had a great chance to contend for a national title.

“When we looked around the country, Syracuse and North Carolina had amazing talent but they had flaws like everyone else,” said Tierney, whose squad was ranked No. 1 in the Inside Lacrosse preseason media poll. “Duke had lost enough so you had a chance. I liked our talent.”

After falling 13-11 to Ohio State on March 14 to begin a spring road trip and then looking out of synch in a 10-4 win over Lehigh and a 10-8 victory over Penn State, the team was at a bit of a crossroad as it returned to Denver.

“We were not playing well, we won the last two games but we were disgruntled,” recalled Tierney.

“We played Georgetown the first game back and it was the nicest day of the year, it was 80 degrees. We played a great game (a 19-7 win on March 28) and that kicked us off. We won those regular season games and then we played well against Villanova and G-town in the [BIG EAST] tournament.

After beating Brown 15-9 in the first round of the NCAA tournament, the Pioneers faced a big challenge as it took on nemesis Ohio State in the quarters at Sports Authority Field at Mile High Stadium in Denver.

“That was a huge one; we tried not to use the revenge thing with the kids,” said Tierney.

“It was at the big stadium, that was a help. We were at home twice in a row for the playoffs. Our first road trip was not until the Final 4. They jumped out to a 7-1 lead. The guys were resilient. We thought if we got two or three goals, we could get back in the game and then we went on a 9-goal run. We went on some long runs this year and this was one of those.”

In the NCAA semis against rival Notre Dame, a late 5-1 run by the Fighting Irish nearly ended Denver’s season as the Pioneers squandered a 9-5 lead and the game went into overtime with the teams deadlocked at 10-10.

“When OT came, the kids were confident,” said Tierney. “We just needed to get the ball. Our senior captain, Carson Cannon, made a takeaway check. We thought we could do it without a timeout but then we took a timeout and the next thing I knew we had a goal.”

With Denver having lost in the national semis in 2014, 2013, and 2011, the 11-10 victory was meaningful on a number of levels.

“It was huge, there were so many things wrapped up in it,” said Tierney. “It was Notre Dame, our biggest rival; it was winning in the semis. We had lost our last three and it was getting a chance to win a championship.

In the title game against Maryland, Denver jumped out to a 4-1 first quarter lead and never looked back on the way to a 10-5 triumph.

“It just felt like things were going our way; we jumped out to a lead and that helped,” said Tierney, whose team won its last 13 games in 2015 to end the season at 17-2.

“They would get a chance and hit a pipe. They would get another chance and our goalie would make a save. We were winning face-offs evenly. We were clearing the ball well. We never got overly emotional.”

Tierney did get emotional when he crossed paths with members of his 1997 national championship team at Princeton who were in Philadelphia being honored as the “Champion of Champions” via an online tournament coordinated by the NCAA earlier this season.

“That kind of folded everything together, a bunch of the kids stayed in the same hotel and we talked a lot,” said Tierney.

“When we went in at halftime on Monday, they were getting pictures. I wanted to go over but I didn’t want my team to think that I was not focusing on them so I waved.”

Although Tierney has now been in Denver for six years, he has remained tight with many friends in the Princeton area.

“I am still close to a lot of people in Princeton and with the Hun School,” said Tierney. “They are very close to me and very important to me. I know that although they would rather have Princeton win, they are rooting for Denver.”

His Princeton connection resulted in Tierney receiving a special honor as U.S Lacrosse recently announced that the playing field at its new national headquarters in Sparks, Md., will be named “The William G. Tierney Field.” It will be used as a training field for the U.S. national teams, as well as for games involving college, high school, and youth teams.

“It goes back to Princeton, Eddie Calkins (a member of the 1992 championship team and the chair of the U.S. Lacrosse Foundation Board) did the fundraising,” said Tierney.

“He first contacted me two years to get my permission to have this done in my name. People stepped up, I don’t know how much they contributed but there were some who made major contributions. It is really humbling. I knew where it came from, it was clear that it was Princeton people. I had 22 special years there, there were a lot of terrific people.”

Tierney is looking forward to some more good years in Denver. “I am talking with them about a long term contract,” said Tierney, who has an 83-25 record in his six seasons at Denver and is now 355-118 overall.

“I feel good; I want to get this contract signed. I would like to win a couple more of these things.”

In reflecting on his trip to Philadelphia this spring, Tierney noted that the pleasure derived from accomplishing the goal of a national title doesn’t dim over the years.

“It is just a matter of working hard and trying to do the right things,” said Tierney.

“I told the guys that nobody can take this away from you and there is no feeling like it. In ’92, I was 40 and in ’15, I am 62 and the feeling is the same.”

STARTING POINT: Dana Smith heads upfield in action this spring during her freshman campaign for the Lafayette College women’s lacrosse team. Smith a former Princeton High standout, started 16 of 17 games for the Leopards on defense, picking up 21 ground balls and causing 12 turnovers.(Photo provided courtesy of Lafayette College)

STARTING POINT: Dana Smith heads upfield in action this spring during her freshman campaign for the Lafayette College women’s lacrosse team. Smith a former Princeton High standout, started 16 of 17 games for the Leopards on defense, picking up 21 ground balls and causing 12 turnovers. (Photo provided courtesy of Lafayette College)

Dana Smith was a bundle of nervous energy as she headed to make her debut for the Lafayette College women’s lacrosse team this February at Monmouth University.

“It was very exciting, it was a Saturday game so we went to team breakfast and then had a bus ride,” said former Princeton High standout Smith.

“In college, the games are farther away. It is good and bad to have that much time to think about it.”

Smith did get playing time in the opener, coming on as a substitute. “I got in at the end of the game,” recalled Smith. “I just got to play 15 minutes. I was able to hold my own; I had learned a lot from the fall.”

Utilizing her speed and Energizer Bunny approach to the game, the 5’1 Smith more than held her own over the rest of the season, starting the team’s next 16 games, picking up 21 ground balls and causing 12 turnovers.

For Smith, the move up to college lacrosse was daunting at first. “It was a big change, the amount of hours you put in, even in the offseason,” said Smith, who also starred for the PHS girls’ soccer team.

“It was unlike anything I had experienced; there was such a learning curve with the style and speed of play. Even the rules were different. I had a lot of great role models, playing for my club coaches and older girls who I knew had told me what to expect. I don’t know how it was going to feel but I was going to be prepared.”

Smith had to learn a new position as she was switched to defense from her customary midfield spot. “We had a lot of changes on defense,” said Smith.

“I played defense earlier at PHS so I have always been comfortable on defense, I played a zone defense for the first time. One of the things I love about this sport is that it is constantly changing. It has been fun learning zone defense and getting to play that.”

It was fun for Smith to test herself against the skilled players she competed with and against at the college level.

“Every game I had to give it my best shot,” asserted Smith. “There are 27 amazing players on our team so when you get on the field, you have to make the most of it. That was the mind-set.”

A 14-12 victory over UC Davis on February 22 and a solid effort in a February 28 loss to Temple, in which she had three ground balls and two caused turnovers, helped Smith gain a comfort level on the field.

“It was my first college win,” said Smith, referring to the UC-Davis game. “It was great to see what it felt like to win a game at Lafayette. In the Temple game, I felt I understood what I was supposed to do and I really contributed.”

While Lafayette didn’t get as many wins as Smith would have hoped as it went 4-13 overall, Smith sees a bright future for the Leopards.

“Our team was very young, we have an awesome sophomore class and a class of 10 freshmen,” said Smith, noting that the team went 2-3 in its last five games with two of the losses being by one goal.

“The juniors who are going to be seniors are going to give us really good leadership. We had a freshman goalie and we got better working with her. Last year, our assistant coach, Anna White, was one of the best on draw controls, she was the Patriot League record holder. We had trouble figuring that out for a while and we got better and better working together.”

Things came together for Smith off the field as well this year. “I have a lot of great friends on and off the lacrosse team,” said Smith, who was joined on the lax squad by fellow freshman and former Princeton Day school star Lucy Linville.

“Everyone in the class gets along. There are a lot of other athletes. It is a small school so we get to know each other.”

Smith will be spending the summer coaching with the Ultimate Lacrosse club and honing her game.

“I am working on my speed because in college the game is so fast,” said Smith.

“I want to take every inch because I don’t have the height. You don’t have much time to make decisions.”

Looking ahead to her sophomore year, Smith is primed to take things to a higher level.

“I think I will be a lot more confident,” said Smith. “When I was a captain in high school, I was able to direct things on the field. As a defender this year, I felt timid about speaking up. Getting into 17 games, I had to make decisions and there is not as much indecision. I was very gratified to get in. You feel good, I have worked hard and it has paid off. I was able to help the team; next year I will be able to contribute more.”

SHOOTING STAR: Hun School boys’ lacrosse star Chris Donovan heads to goal in a game this spring. Post-graduate and Georgetown-bound Donovan scored 105 points on 56 goals and 49 assists to help Hun got 19-1 and win its first state Prep A title since 1998.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

SHOOTING STAR: Hun School boys’ lacrosse star Chris Donovan heads to goal in a game this spring. Post-graduate and Georgetown-bound Donovan scored 105 points on 56 goals and 49 assists to help Hun got 19-1 and win its first state Prep A title since 1998. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Arriving at the Hun School as a post-graduate and boarding student this past fall, Chris Donovan quickly developed a comfort level with his new surroundings.

The lacrosse star forged bonds with new teammates and fellow post-grads Brendan Rooney and Chris Aslanian as they were in the same boat, moving to the school and living in the dorm.

“Half of the team boards and we are up with each other until 1 in the morning talking about lacrosse and the state championship before going to bed,” said the Georgetown-bound Donovan, who hails from Morristown. “Aslanian is my roommate, we talk about lacrosse all the time.”

It didn’t take long for the attack unit of Donovan, Rooney, and Aslanian to become the talk of local lacrosse circles as highly touted Hun posted wins over Don Bosco, Somerville, and national power IMG Academy (Fla.) in its three games.

The 6’0, 175-pound Donovan, for his part, served notice that he was going to be a force, tallying eight points on three goals and five assists in the 16-5 opening day win over Don Bosco.

As the season went on, Donovan and Hun kept rolling, going 15-0 in regular season play, highlighted by victories over perennial state Prep A champion Lawrenceville, St. Augustine, Episcopal (Pa.), Shawnee, Bergen Catholic, and Hill (Pa).

In the process, Hun gained national attention, climbing to the top 10 in the Under Armour Power Rankings and the Lax Power computer rankings.

“Chris, Rooney, and me had a great connection,” said Donovan, who had five goals against Lawrenceville, a goal and three assists against St Augustine, six goals and an assist against Episcopal, six goals and four assists versus Bergen Catholic, and two goals and four assists in the Shawnee win.

“We stay after practice everyday, catching passes. Rooney has taught me a lot of things I will never forget, like behind the back shots.”

Competing in the state Prep A tournament and the Inter-Ac Challenge after the season, Hun did a lot of good things with Donovan triggering the attack. In a 19-4 win over Peddie in the Prep A semifinals, Donovan chipped in two goals and two assists. As for the Inter-Ac Challenge, Donovan had three goals and three assists to help Hun beat Academy of New Church 13-4 in the quarters and then contributed two goals and four assist as Hun topped Episcopal 9-4 in a rematch of their regular season contest.

Donovan was at his best when the titles were on the line. Against top-ranked and undefeated Haverford School (Pa.) in the Inter-Ac final, Donovan distinguished himself in a losing cause, tallying six points on two goals and four assist as Hun fell 15-8.

Coming into the Prep A title game three days later against 13-time champion Lawrenceville, Donovan and his teammates were determined to end the season on a high note.

“Bouncing back from Monday night was very tough,” said Donovan. “We gave it our all against the No. 1 team in the nation, they played incredibly. We knew we had to come out hard, we knew we were going to be tired. This got pushed back because of that. We are just hungry and humble, that is our motto this year.”

Showing his hunger to score, Donovan fired in a game-high four goals and added an assist as Hun rolled to a 14-6 win over the Big Red to earn its first Prep A crown since 1998.

In helping the Raiders go 19-1 and finish No. 4 in the Under Armour poll and sixth in the Lax Power rankings, Donovan led the team with 105 points on 56 goals and 49 assists. He scored at least two points in every game he played, and he scored three or more goals 11 times.

After the win over Lawrenceville in the Prep A title game, Hun head coach MV Whitlow put into perspective what Donovan’s presence this year meant for the Raiders.

“Chris is an inspiring player; his performance Monday night against Haverford was truly an inspiring performance,” said Whitlow.

“They were shutting him off today so I put him in the midfield to let him be the athlete that he is and he had four goals. He is truly a generational player, no doubt about it. We are very fortunate to have had him here because he is such a good young man from a great family.”

For making such a great impact as he helped Hun to its best season in a generation, Donovan is the choice as the Town Topics’ top male performer of the spring season.

Top Female Performer

This year’s senior class on the Princeton High girls’ lacrosse team has gone through a lot.

During the last four years, the program has had three head coaches, been hit with some key injuries, and saw a star player leave the team in midseason this spring.

But amid the upheaval, Mira Shane has been a rock for the Class of 2015. Starting in goal from day-one as a freshman and never leaving her post, Shane provided dependability, a fiery competitive spirit, and skill.

As David Schlesinger took the helm of the program this spring, he quickly realized he had something special in Shane.

“I am incredibly fortunate to inherit a goalie like Mira Shane,” said Schlesinger.

“As great a goaltender as she is, she is a better person. She is one of our tri-captains.”

Shane’s leadership came in handy as the team hit a rough patch in the middle of the season, losing six in a row to fall to 5-10.

“We lost a lot of seniors from the year before, we needed to shape a new team, not building off what we had done,” said Shane.

“This season was about establishing a new foundation. I kept saying we need to grow up. It was about growing up and having the best head and heart to play lacrosse and be better people to see what a loving team can do.”

With Shane producing some incredible play in the cage, PHS showed that it could be a title contender. The fifth-seeded Little Tigers advanced to the Mercer County Tournament semifinals where they dropped a 5-4 heartbreaker to top-seeded and eventual champion Notre Dame with Shane making 16 saves in a losing cause.

“Mira is amazing; she is so athletic and so quick,” said Schlesinger, who consoled Shane afterward as the goalie slumped over in tears near the team huddle after giving her all physically and emotionally.

“Her understanding of the position has grown so much this year, the way she plays angles and now she is a step ahead of the shooters. She knows what she wants to give up. She is forcing the shooters to shoot where she wants them to shoot. She is an amazing leader, a great player.”

In the North Group 3 sectional, ninth-seeded PHS topped eighth-seeded Roxbury 13-9 in the opening round and then pulled off one of the upsets of the season as it stunned top-seeded Northern Highlands 7-4 in the quarters.

In Shane’s view, that win spoke volumes about the team’s character.

“I think it just showed the amount of heart we had,” added Shane. “We had faced a lot of adversity this year. It was an up and down season.”

While the season ended on a down note as PHS fell 9-8 in overtime to fourth-seeded Hopewell Valley in the sectional semis, Shane believed that the final record of 10-13 didn’t accurately reflect the kind of team that PHS developed into this spring.

“I was really proud of what we accomplished,” said Shane, who made 14 saves in the finale. “We may not have the killer record to reflect that but we grew as a team.”

Shane certainly accomplished a lot in her career making over 200 saves this spring and around 700 in her stellar career.

Shane’s intensity, skill, and leadership make her the pick as the top female performer this spring.

Top Newcomers

Earning the first singles spot on the Princeton High boys’ tennis team over two seniors was the first sign the freshman Noah Lilienthal was something special.

In describing Lilienthal’s game, PHS head coach Sarah Hibbert noted that he possessed a maturity on the court. “Noah is a very consistent player,” said Hibbert. “He is a seasoned tournament player. He is mostly a baseliner but has a good all around game.”

Lilienthal’s combination of skill and experience was on full display when he produced a breakout performance in the final day of the Mercer County Tournament in late April, overcoming a one-set deficit to upset top-seeded and defending champion Jerry Jiang 2-6, 6-1, 6-3 in the semis and then beating second-seeded Kabir Sarita of WW/P-S 6-3, 6-4 in the finals to earn the first singles crown.

The county title surprised even Lilienthal. “It was really exciting,” said Lilienthal, who was seeded third. “At first I couldn’t believe it, and that was the same with the last match. It is a win that will give me confidence but I am the same player I was yesterday and the same player I was the day before that. It just shows that I have been putting in the hard work and hopefully I can continue.”

Hibbert, though, believed all along that Lilienthal had such a performance in him.

“Noah is great, everyone today got to see his quality of tennis on display, his shotmaking, his feet, his footwork, his movement, all of that,” said Hibbert.

“The presence as a freshman to be able to take out last year’s champion in the semi and then take out another highly experienced, solid player in the finals back-to-back, he had an amazing day.”

Showing his presence, Lilienthal helped PHS win the Central Jersey Group 3 sectional title for the first time since 2008 and top Tenafly in the Group 3 semis before falling to perennial power Millburn in the state championship match.

Lilienthal, for his part, was thrilled to see PHS advance to the final.

“We have worked really hard to get to this spot, we all do it as a team,” said Lilienthal. “We all contribute. It shows that we have really good character and I was happy we could do it for Princeton.”

For making a huge contribution to that success, Lilienthal is the choice as the top male newcomer this spring.

Coming into this spring, it was clear that the Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team was undergoing a youth movement.

The Panthers’ roster featured 12 freshmen and and five sophomores with the only seniors being co-captain Morgan Foster and Kirsten Kuzmicz.

Looking ahead to the season, longtime head coach Jill Thomas believed that what her team lacked in experience, it could make up for with skill and enthusiasm.

“This team is a great group of girls who are fun to work with every day,” said Thomas. “There is lots of energy, potential, and talent. We will look to Morgan Foster and Kirsten Kuzmicz to lead this young team throughout the 2015 season.”

But from the outset, the young guns were on target for the Panthers. In the team’s season-opening 15-6 win over Sewickley Academy (Pa.), freshman Madison Mundenar tallied five points on three goals and two assists with freshman Kyra Hall adding three goals and sophomore Morgan Mills chipping in six goals.

Mundenar, for her part, kept up a torrid pace, scoring four goals with an assist in a 14-2 victory over WW/P-S and adding three more goals in an 18-7 win over Shipley (Pa.) as the Panthers jumped out to a 3-0 start.

While the Panthers suffered some growing pains in the middle of the season, going 4-4 after the sizzling start, Mundenar helped lead the way as the squad rolled to the state Prep B title.

The speedy, skilled attacker scored four goals as first-seeded PDS defeated eighth-seeded Morristown-Beard 18-9 in the Prep B quarterfinals and had two more in a 15-5 win over the Ranney School in the semis.

Saving her best for last, Mundenar contributed five goals and an assist as the Panthers defeated second-seeded Pennington 18-11 in the Prep B championship game. Her outburst in the finale gave Mundenar 54 points on the season with 40 goals and 14 assists as PDS went 11-6.

During the title celebration, Thomas tipped her hat to her freshman contingent.

“They are not freshmen any more,” said Thomas. “They have grown so much and that is pretty darn terrific.”

By growing into a star who helped PDS earn a state title, Mundenar is the choice as the top female newcomer.

Top Coaches

In 2013, MV Whitlow took over a Hun School boys’ lacrosse program that wasn’t in great shape, coming off a disappointing 7-11 campaign the previous spring.

Whitlow righted the ship guiding the Raiders to an 11-6 record and an appearance in the state Prep A title game where they fell 17-6 to perennial power Lawrenceville. He continued to solidify that foundation as Hun went 13-7 in 2014, making another trip to the Prep A finals, creeping closer to Lawrenceville, losing 11-6.

As Whitlow looked ahead to this spring, he believed that his players were poised to take things to a higher level.

“I think the guys are very committed to the team success and not individual stuff,” said Whitlow.

“We have high character guys who care a lot for each other. A theme we have shared is to focus on the process, consistent winning comes from the process; not focusing on the outcome. We have ramped up the schedule and the guys are hungry and ready to take the next step.”

The Raiders displayed their hunger and skill as they rolled to a 15-0 regular season campaign, beating such formidable foes Don Bosco, national power IMG Academy (Fla.), perennial state Prep A champion Lawrenceville, St. Augustine, Episcopal (Pa.), Shawnee, Bergen Catholic, and Hill, (Pa.).

Hun’s prowess turned heads nationally as the team made the top 10 in the Under Armour Power Rankings and the Lax Power computer rankings.

In the postseason, the Raiders showed that they belonged among the nation’s elite. In the prestigious Inter-Ac Challenge, Hun advanced to the finals where they fell 15-8 to top-ranked and undefeated Haverford School (Pa.) in a hard-fought battle. Three days later, the Raiders put the crowning touch on a memorable campaign as they topped Lawrenceville 14-6 to snap its 13-year title streak and win its first Prep A crown since 1998.

In the wake of earning the Prep A crown, Whitlow lauded his team for its achievements and character.

“I really wanted these guys to have champions next to their name and they will have it now and we will hang a banner,” said Whitlow, whose team ended the spring with a 19-1 record, ranked fourth nationally by Under Armour and sixth by LaxPower.

“This team will live on at the school because they deserve that and they worked for it. The group really didn’t care about individual stuff, they were all about the team and the teammates. They really worked hard in the offseason and they were a truly selfless, high character group of young men.

Whitlow’s role in bringing the group together to produce a legendary season makes him the choice as the top coach of a male team this spring.

After serving as an assistant coach for the Princeton Day School girls’ lacrosse team for 15 years, Liz Cook was ready to take a break from high school lax.

Planning to limit her coaching to club programs, Cook stepped down from her PDS post at the end of the 2014 season.

But weeks later, she got the chance to take the helm of a struggling Hun girls’ program coming off a 1-11 season and decided she couldn’t pass up the opportunity.

“Hun is very much like PDS, there are a lot of similarities between the kids at both schools,” said Cook, a former three-sport star at PDS who went on to play field hockey, ice hockey, and lacrosse at Brown University.

“I knew some of the players from Garden State Elite. I knew they were struggling; it was a chance to really make a difference. It was a good fit.”

In looking to reverse Hun’s fortunes, Cook took an upbeat approach. “My philosophy for this year is to make everything positive,” said Cook.

“We have a team motto, ‘TNT’, meaning today, not tomorrow; do it now. Each girl picked a word that is special to them and they will focus on that in addition to the team.”

After getting off to a 1-3 start, Hun got on the right track rallying to a 14-13 overtime win against PDS, the eventual state Prep B champions.

In Cook’s view, that win reflected how the squad had come together.

“They believe in each other and stand by each other, they have a gift in that way,” said Cook.

“There isn’t any drama on our team and they take care of each other. They knew when we were down, we could come back and they believed. They kept saying we believe and that was what our motto, believe. Before we went to bed we had a group chat last night, we were saying goodnight, we believe, we believe.”

That self-belief led to a number of impressive wins over the course of the season as Hun topped Prep B finalist Pennington, Mercersburg (Pa.) and posted two victories over Stuart Country Day. A major highlight came in late April when the Raiders edged Blair 10-9 in the state A quarterfinals.

In reflecting on the season which saw the Raiders improve to 7-8, Cook said the team’s progress came down to focusing on daily effort.

“I told them the culture of losing is over; they see that they are able to attain anything they go after,” said Cook.

“I told them they needed to improve every day in practice and in every game and they did that. They always had the talent, they just needed some guidance.”

For providing the guidance that changed the culture around the Hun team and helped it improve dramatically, Cook is the pick as the top coach of a female team this spring.

RETURN TO ACTION: Chris Hatchell heads upcourt last year for Winberie’s as he helped the team win the championship in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. After announcing his retirement from the league, Hatchell changed his mind and was back in action for Winberie’s last Monday as it topped King’s Pizzarama 63-54. In other action on Monday, Dr. Palmer defeated Princeton Youth Sports 50-30 and Princeton Pi topped Aria Health 67-64.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

RETURN TO ACTION: Chris Hatchell heads upcourt last year for Winberie’s as he helped the team win the championship in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. After announcing his retirement from the league, Hatchell changed his mind and was back in action for Winberie’s last Monday as it topped King’s Pizzarama 63-54. In other action on Monday, Dr. Palmer defeated Princeton Youth Sports 50-30 and Princeton Pi topped Aria Health 67-64. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Chris Hatchell appeared to have gone out in a blaze of glory last year in the Princeton Recreation Department Summer Men’s Basketball League.

Hatchell, the sharpshooting guard and longtime stalwart for Winberie’s, helped the team top King’s Pizzarama 2-0 in the best-of-three championship series and then said he was retiring from the league as he approached his 40th birthday.

But Hatchell couldn’t stay away from the game and he was back on the court for Winberie’s last Monday as it dueled King’s at John Witherspoon School in a rematch of last year’s finals.

“I wasn’t going to play but I asked Kurt to put me down on the roster too because a lot of guys don’t always show,” said Hatchell.

“When you have been playing the game for as long as I have been playing it is hard to get away from and I got an itch. I can still play. I probably won’t make all the games; it is more about staying in shape.”

Hatchell also had some family reasons for returning to the fray. “My son is two and I want him to see a little bit more,” said Hatchell, gesturing to the boy who was sitting in a corner of the gym.

“He was out there last year but he is a little older and I want him to see me running up and down the court.”

With Winberie’s trailing 17-7 in the early going on Monday, Hatchell caught fire from the outside to help the team forge ahead 31-30 at halftime.

“We are an older team so we just have to get into the rhythm of things,” said a smiling Hatchell who scored all six of his points on the evening in the first half.

With the game tied at 44-44 with about nine minutes left in regulation, Winberie’s went on a 19-10 run to pull away to a 63-54 win.

“In close games we have the advantage because of our experience,” said Hatchell, reflecting on the team’s late surge in a game that saw Terrence Bailey score a game-high 19 points for Winberie’s with Princeton University football star Anthony Gaffney scoring 18 for King’s in a losing cause.

“We had a little size against those guys so we were able to post up down low.”

Experiencing a 49-46 loss to Aria Health in its season opener last Friday helped Winberie’s sharpen its focus, according to Hatchell.

“I think it is kind of good to lose early with a new team because now we have the loss under our belt and we should be playing together a little bit more,” said Hatchell.

“We are a veteran team; as the season goes on and we get our legs back under us, we will be OK.”

In Hatchell’s view, the team’s veteran leadership makes it formidable. “I can’t say enough about our core, Kurt (Simmons), Chris (Edwards), and Cliff (Pollard),” said Hatchell.

“I think as long as we stay together and we just add pieces, we will be able to play for a long time.”

Having made the decision to keep playing with his buddies, Hatchell is poised for another title run.

“I didn’t come back for nothing,” said Hatchell with a laugh. “Kurt said let’s do it again so I said one more time.”

June 10, 2015
SOARING TO SUCCESS: Princeton University men’s track star ­Stephen Soerens soars through the air on a long jump. Last month, senior star Soerens took first place in the decathlon at the Ivy League Heptagonal Outdoor Track and Field Championships to help Princeton clinch the team title. This week, he is headed to the NCAA championships in Eugene to make his debut performance at the meet.(Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

SOARING TO SUCCESS: Princeton University men’s track star ­Stephen Soerens soars through the air on a long jump. Last month, senior star Soerens took first place in the decathlon at the Ivy League Heptagonal Outdoor Track and Field Championships to help Princeton clinch the team title. This week, he is headed to the NCAA championships in Eugene to make his debut performance at the meet. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Stephen Soerens took an immediate liking to the decathlon.

Taking his first stab at the grueling 10-event competition as a sophomore at Fayetteville High, Soerens excelled in the 2009 Arkansas decathlon.

“I came in fourth, that surprised me,” said Soerens. “I realized I was actually good at this and I enjoyed the experience.”

Soerens went on to place second in the next two Arkansas decathlons and the Princeton University men’s track coach Fred Samara, a former U.S. Olympic decathlon competitor, apparently realized how good he was.

“Fred called me on the first day of recruiting on July 1 before my senior year of high school,” recalled Soerens.

“I liked him. I had seen and liked Princeton from recruiting materials. It was definitely a big thing that he had that decathlon experience. By September, I realized that was what I wanted to do and I committed. I did a visit in early December and I liked it a lot.”

Coming to Princeton in the fall of 2011, Soerens steadily progressed under Samara’s tutelage. He placed third in the decathlon in the 2012 Ivy League Heptagonal Outdoor Track and Field Championships and then took second the next two years. Last month, he took first at the Heps decathlon to help Princeton clinch the team title.

This week, he is headed to the NCAA championships in Eugene, Ore. to make his debut performance at the national meet. He will be joined by five teammates at the NCAA competition, including senior Sam Pons in the 10,000, junior star and defending national champion Julia Ratcliffe in the hammer throw, junior Cecilia Barowski in the 800, sophomore Lizzie Bird in the steeplechase, and sophomore Megan Curham in the 10,000.

In his freshman year at Princeton, Soerens sensed that he could end up as a title contender in his event.

“It was definitely different; track immediately became a bigger thing for me,” said Soerens.

“It was important in high school, I spent at lot of time on it but this was different. I was thinking about it all the time and I was surrounded by good talent. I had older guys to practice with and I was able to hold my own. I was third outdoors as a freshman and I thought I can make my way to the best in the league.”

After taking second in the next two Heps decathlons, Soerens was primed for a big senior season.

“I think I had made a lot of progress,” said Soerens. “I was in position to bring up my athleticism.”

But Soerens experienced a setback as he competed in the heptathlon in the Indoor Heps.

“I had some hamstring issues; on my first step of the 60 something popped in my right hamstring,” recalled Soerens.

“I didn’t have serious damage. I just trotted through the jumps and threw the shot really well. It was a long recovery, I built up steadily. I was trying to make sure that I was both ready to go by Heps and that I had more resiliency. I came back gradually; the training staff helped a lot.”

Showing resilience, Soerens pulled out a dramatic victory in the Heps decathlon this May at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. With Princeton narrowly trailing Cornell in the team standings, the meet came down to the decathlon and the battle between Soerens and Big Red star Austin Jamerson.

“The fear of a decathlete is that decathlon will be the last event to finish and it will come down to 1500,” said Soerens.

“Everyone runs it hard but when you have done nine events, you don’t want to depend on that. You have a lot of fast twitch athletes and they are not used to that.”

After a big throw in the javelin to increase his lead over Jamerson, Soerens sealed the deal by taking first in the 1,500, the final event of the day. Soerens ended up with a winning total of 7,319 points with Jamerson second in 7,070. His heroics clinched a narrow 163-159.5 win for Princeton over the Big Red.

“I wanted to give it my best shot, it was a great feeling, my family was there, my teammates were all there,” said Soerens, reflecting on his triumph. “I had wanted that first place for two years, that was great.”

Qualifying for the NCAAs as one of the top 24 decathletes in the country this year, Soerens is hoping for a great performance at Eugene.

“The preparation has gone really well,” said Soerens. “We are doing short-focused training blocks, good workouts but not so much to wear you down. We tapered for Heps, this is not quite a taper. It is working on speed and some fine points on jumps and throws. One of the things I am excited about is that this is my meet in terms of being able to go for it. At Heps, there is a little extra caution, you need to complete it for the team. It should be a lot of fun, I have never been out there.”

In reflecting on his Princeton career, Soerens said it has been a lot of fun training and competing with his teammates.

“I think one of the most important things is that we have a really tight-knit group of guys,” said Soerens.

“It is a team that is especially close. I am rooming with some of the distance guys. It has been a great experience to be able to train with guys who are so committed to track and so talented.”

It has also been a great experience for Soerens to work with decathlon guru Samara.

“I got to spend a couple of hours a day, five days a week with him,” said Soerens, noting that he thrived on Samara’s training system which typically revolves around hard running workouts, the pole vault, and sprint starts on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, with Tuesdays and Thursdays devoted to throwing events and aerobic training.

“We have a great relationship. He has all that experience. He goes through the technical things in practice and gives you cues. He is also able to present things in a different light and that can really be helpful.”

Looking ahead, Soerens is hoping to experience more in his decathlon career.

“I would like to keep training for at least another year,” said Soerens, a civil and environmental engineering major who sees himself someday working in a job on an oilfield.

“I have a short window; I figure I might as well try to make that happen. If I like it and things are going well, I will keep doing it. If not, I won’t have any regrets. It is not a thing you can stop doing for a couple of years and then start up again.”

COLLEGE JOB: Mike Russo just completed his first season as an assistant coach for the Princeton University baseball team. Russo, a former Hun School standout who was a Division 3 All-American pitcher at Kean University, coached for three years at Hun before joining the Tiger program last fall.(Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

COLLEGE JOB: Mike Russo just completed his first season as an assistant coach for the Princeton University baseball team. Russo, a former Hun School standout who was a Division 3 All-American pitcher at Kean University, coached for three years at Hun before joining the Tiger program last fall. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

While Mike Russo was thrilled to start his college baseball career with Division 1 powerhouse N. C. State, he realized that D-3 Kean University would be a better fit.

“I loved the atmosphere at NC State; I loved the school,” said former Hun School standout pitcher Russo, who played two seasons for the Wolfpack.

“I wasn’t developing as much as I thought I could at N.C. State. I didn’t have an established role. The opportunities were limited, based on performance. Neil Ioviero at Kean was a well known pitching coach. They were in the top 5 in D-3 and in the College World Series a lot. It was definitely a good move on my part.”

Russo enjoyed a very good two-year stint at Kean, going 10-2 with a 1.93 ERA as a junior in 2011, earning D-3 All-American honors and getting named as the NJAC Pitcher of the year. As a senior, he went 7-1 and helped pitch the Cougars to a second straight College World Series.

But more importantly than his success on the mound, his experience at Kean changed the course of his future as he caught the coaching bug.

“Neil is one of the reasons I got into coaching; I liked his style, he inspired me,” said Russo.

“He is very hands-on, has a routine, an organization. There is always a practice plan, a drill progression and bullpens. He works with every pitcher individually. If a pitcher was committed to him, he was committed to the pitcher.”

Upon graduating from Kean, Russo returned to Hun to serve as an assistant coach for its baseball program.

Moving up the ladder after serving on the Hun staff from 2012-14, Russo went across town to Princeton University where he joined the baseball program as an assistant coach last fall.

“I was really getting into coaching, I wanted to get to a higher level,” said Russo.

“I e-mailed 15 college coaches looking for a volunteer job. There is usually a lot of movement in May and June. Scott (Princeton head coach Scott Bradley) got back to me, he said a guy was leaving a staff to go back to grad school and that there was an opening. I met with him, he said he had followed me over the years and he basically offered me a job on the spot.”

Russo’s experience at Hun under longtime head coach Bill McQuade helped him become a more well-rounded coach.

“It was great, McQuade always had respect for me,” said Russo. “I ran ideas by him. He would say what do you think. He valued my opinion. He let me take control of some things. I was hands-on. I started out with the pitching staff. I called pitches and took charge of the pitchers and was then doing a little bit of everything. pitching BP, working on team defense, and pickoffs.”

In joining the Princeton staff, Russo was able to take a similar approach under Bradley.

“I said I wanted to work with all of the pitchers individually and he was happy with that, he said do it,” said Russo.

“He wanted to have another pitching guy on the staff, sometimes it helps to have someone say different things to the pitchers, put some different words in their minds.”

While the Tigers endured a rough spring as they posted a record of 7-32, Russo believes that he helped lay a foundation for future success.

“The guys liked the organization, they got better as the season went on,” said Russo, who is running the Robbinsville Baseball Camp for players ages 7-12 from July 27-31 with former Steinert High pitching coach Bryan Rogers.

“We struggled with depth and injuries. The biggest thing is for them to be more accountable with their actions. It was a little bit of a challenge, towards the middle of the season. It was tough to go to the park, you don’t want to go and be losing all the time. They were excited and happy when they went to the ballpark. I think they learned how we have to practice and go about our business.”

Excited to still be going to the ballpark on a daily basis, Russo sees himself as a lifer in the coaching business.

“I definitely love it; I want to keep moving up, I want to become a head coach some day,” said Russo, who is planning to start working on a masters in athletic administration this fall.

“Scott is a big pro guy, he spent nine or 10 years in the big leagues. It is good to be around him. I am always bouncing things off of him. He knows Greg (fellow assistant Greg Van Horn) and I want to be head coaches. He is good role model. I look up to him and have a lot of respect for him.”

FINAL CUT: Princeton High baseball player John Reid follows through on a swing in a game this spring. Senior outfielder Reid hit .333 this season with 10 RBIs to help PHS post a final record of 10-15.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

FINAL CUT: Princeton High baseball player John Reid follows through on a swing in a game this spring. Senior outfielder Reid hit .333 this season with 10 RBIs to help PHS post a final record of 10-15. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Even though the Princeton High baseball team didn’t culminate its season with an appearance in the state tournament, it still had plenty to play for in the last week of action.

Bringing an 8-15 record into its final two games, PHS was determined to hit the 10-victory mark, something the program had not achieved under current head coach Dave Roberts in his seven seasons at the helm of the program.

With its bats booming, the Little Tigers achieved that goal, beating sectional quarterfinalist Nottingham 13-3 and then pulling away from Trenton 11-2 in its season finale.

Head coach Roberts, for his part, was thrilled to see his squad end on a high note.

“We were all very excited to win that game; to beat them by 10 was really nice,” said Roberts, referring to the victory over Nottingham.

“Against Trenton, the guys did a great job of wearing down their No. 1 pitcher and getting to their bullpen.”

For Roberts and his players, getting that 10th win was sweet. “We had gotten to nine and nine the last two years,” said Roberts. “As a team, no doubt getting to 10 wins was the biggest positive.”

Another big positive this spring was PHS’s productivity with the bat, as it posted a team batting average of .339 and averaging 5.7 runs a game. Freshman Paul Cooke led the hit parade for the Little Tigers, pacing the team in batting (.442) and RBIs (16). Junior Hayden Reyes batted .420 and classmate Joaquin Hernandez-Burt hit .403 with a team-best 12 doubles. Senior Steve Majeski hit .362 with senior John Reid and junior Matt Lambert both coming in at .333, junior Colin Taylor batting .311, and senior Ben Danis finishing at .306.

“The offensive performance was terrific; I think the highest team average we have had since I have been here was .270,” said Roberts.

“It was a talented group of kids who worked hard; all we did in March was hit. They were aggressive. They were listening to what we were telling them. We executed a lot of hit and runs; we had a lot of kids who could handle the bat. The offensive production and the infield play were the stories of the season; we had a great infield.”

Another great story of the season was the play of the squad’s seniors, three of whom (Majeski, Ben Grass, and Marcus Henderson) played junior varsity last year.

“The seniors were fantastic; Ben Grass and Marcus Henderson were huge on the mound, they hadn’t played at the varsity level before and they had six wins between the two of them,” said Roberts who got a 4-4 season from Grass with Henderson going 2-5. “Majeski, Reid, and Danis did a phenomenal job with the bat.”

With a good core of players returning, highlighted by a junior group of seven, PHS appears poised to take things to a higher level next season.

“I have been excited about them for a long time; the core three of Reyes, Taylor, and Hernandez-Burt have proven to be stellar,” said Roberts, referring to his junior class.

“You add Matt (Lambert), Tim (Frawley), and Micah (Daley-Harris) to that and Dan Gross should be back. Paul Cooke had a phenomenal year for a freshman with 34 hits; he has a really sweet swing. We took a huge step forward, it was good stuff from everyone. I think everybody who is returning left excited; wishing they could start next season a day later.”

LEAPING LEVY: Princeton High girls’ track star Noa Levy clears the bar at 5’2 in the high jump at the Meet of Champions last Wednesday at South Plainfield. The jump was a personal record for sophomore Levy and gave her a 15th place finish at the meet.(Photo by John Dowers)

LEAPING LEVY: Princeton High girls’ track star Noa Levy clears the bar at 5’2 in the high jump at the Meet of Champions last Wednesday at South Plainfield. The jump was a personal record for sophomore Levy and gave her a 15th place finish at the meet. (Photo by John Dowers)

Youth was served for the Princeton High track team as a number of its top athletes competed at the NJSIAA Meet of Champions last Wednesday at South Plainfield.

Sophomore distance star Alex Roth continued his strong spring campaign, taking 15th in the boys’ 3,200 with a time of 9:20.32.

Roth’s classmate, Noa Levy, produced a breakthrough performance in the girls’ high jump. With the competition starting at 5’2, a height she had never cleared, Levy made it on her second attempt. Her personal record jump gave Levy a 15th place finish at the meet.

In the boys’ 4×800, PHS took 15th as the quartet of sophomore Patrick O’Connell, sophomore Alex Roth, junior Noah Chen, sophomore Cy Watsky, and senior Ben Siegel posted a time of 8:16.58. The Little Tigers girls’ 4×800 of senior Paige Metzheiser, junior Lou Mialhe, senior Julie Bond, and sophomore Annefleur Hartmanshenn placed 23rd in a time of 9:46.64.

The girls 4×400 relay of junior Maia Hauschild, freshman Jackie Patterson, junior Jordan Vine, and Metzheiser, finished ninth in 3:59.03. Paced by two big splits from Hauschild (57.9) and Patterson (58.9), the quartet posted the  second best 4×400 in school history.

Hauschild made some history on her own, running in two open meets last week, one on June 2 and another last Saturday, producing two consecutive personal bests in the 400 meters, running 57.85 and then 57.47. Her 57.47 is a top-five time in Mercer County for the last five years.

PHS athletes will be looking for some more top performances as they compete in the 2015 New Balance Nationals Outdoor meet from June 19-21 at North Carolina A&T in Greensboro, N.C.

SENIOR LEADER: Princeton High softball player Sarah Eisenach displays her pitching form. Senior Eisenach went 4-9 this spring with a 4.40 ERA and 80 strikeouts as PHS went 7-16. Eisenach, the team’s lone senior, also contributed at the plate, hitting .263 with a team-high 15 RBIs.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

SENIOR LEADER: Princeton High softball player Sarah Eisenach displays her pitching form. Senior Eisenach went 4-9 this spring with a 4.40 ERA and 80 strikeouts as PHS went 7-16. Eisenach, the team’s lone senior, also contributed at the plate, hitting .263 with a team-high 15 RBIs. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Playing at WW/P-N in the Mercer County Tournament, the Princeton High softball team showed its potential.

Despite having previously lost 18-5 and 13-2 to the Northern Knights in regular season play, 11th-seeded PHS defeated sixth-seeded WW/P-N 8-3.

In reflecting on the upset, Little Tiger head coach Dave Boehm credited his squad with producing a sharp effort in all phases of the game.

“We didn’t make mistakes, we made the plays,” said Boehm, who got two hits apiece from Nancy Gray, Kelli Swedish, and Kayla Volante in the win with pitcher Sarah Eisenach going the distance, striking out seven and giving up two hits.

“We didn’t let things snowball. Sarah [Eisenach] pitched a heck of a game and we got some clutch hits.”

Unfortunately, the team’s 10-3 loss to Notre Dame on May 16 in its season finale was a more accurate reflection of how things went this spring as PHS posted a record of 7-16.

“In the Notre Dame game we were tied 3-3 in the fifth inning,” recalled Boehm, whose team was defeated in the MCT quarterfinals by third-seeded Steinert.

“There are two outs and there is a close play at first, they get the call, the next girl hits a single and then the next girl hits a three-run homer and we are down 5-3. They added some more. I said to the girls that the game summed up our season. We played well but it would be one bad call or giving the other team an extra run and it looks like a blow out but it was actually a better game.”

In reflecting on the season, Boehm acknowledged that he had hoped to see his team post a better record.

“Going 7-16 is a little disappointing, it is the same record we had last year,” said Boehm.

“I thought we could add to our win total. We lost some close games, we had two one-run losses to WW/P-S, a 7-6 loss to Trenton, and a 4-3 loss to Nottingham.”

The Little Tigers, though, had some memorable games this season “Winning the Teaneck tourney and beating WW/P-N in the counties were highlights,” said Boehm. “I think our best game was a 3-1 loss to Steinert in the regular season.”

Senior pitcher-first baseman Eisenach gave PHS her best effort over the last four years.

“She was our only senior and she was the leader of the team,” said Boehm, who went 4-9 with 80 strikeouts and hit .263 with a team-high 15 RBIs.

“She got the girls to run and work out. She wasn’t on a team that did great the last four years but she always played well. We are going to miss her. She pitched and could play first, second, or even shortstop.”

In Boehm’s view, PHS has potential to be a very good team next year in light of its group of returning players.

“I am looking forward to next year, I think we can do well,” said Boehm.

“We could have an infield of Swedish (.344 batting average in 2015) at third, Gray (.270) at shortstop, (Stephanie) Wu (.283) at second, (Emily) DiLella (.276) at first, and (Christina) Cuomo (.186) at catcher. Volante (2-7 record with 4.82 ERA and 69 strikeouts) will be the main pitcher, Gray will see some time in the circle. She has been working with a pitching coach. We will have six seniors; we realize that we only have them for one more year but we are hoping they can have big final year. We have a good core of sophomores with Volante (.314 battling average), Gray, and Cuomo. (Bianca) Guidi (.263) was a good freshman player.”

BIG THREE: Princeton Day School senior baseball stars, from left, Cole McManimon, Jake Alu, and JP Radvany, take a break during the team’s preseason trip to Florida. The trio were the mainstays of the program over the last four years and helped PDS go 10-14 this spring and reach the state Prep B semifinals. Each will be going on to play at a Division I college program with McManimon heading to Lehigh University, Alu to Boston College, and Radvany to Villanova University.

BIG THREE: Princeton Day School senior baseball stars, from left, Cole McManimon, Jake Alu, and JP Radvany, take a break during the team’s preseason trip to Florida. The trio were the mainstays of the program over the last four years and helped PDS go 10-14 this spring and reach the state Prep B semifinals. Each will be going on to play at a Division I college program with McManimon heading to Lehigh University, Alu to Boston College, and Radvany to Villanova University.

Murphy’s Law appeared to govern the Princeton Day School baseball team much of this spring.

In posting a 10-14 record, PDS lost eight games by one run and suffered five walk-off defeats. It had a potential win over Hamilton taken away from it when a game-tying 2-run homer in the bottom of the last inning was disallowed after one of the umpires made a hotly-disputed call that the batter didn’t touch home plate.

While senior star, James “JP” Radvany could have been bitter about how things unfolded, he was able to draw positives from the experience.

“It was a crazy up and down year; we had a lot of bad luck but we were also in a lot of exciting games and that was fun,” said Radvany.

“It was great to play one last season with Jake (Alu) and Cole (McManimon). It was not the year that we wanted to have but it was the most number of wins we have had in a season while I was at PDS. With everything that happened, we were still one out from making the Prep B finals. It was tough at times to go through a season like that but it was a really close group of guys. We leaned on each other and we really enjoyed playing with each other.”

Radvany enjoyed some big games this spring, hitting two homers and getting seven RBIs in an 11-10 loss to Allentown in the opening round of the Mercer County Tournament and starring in a 12-9 win over Pennington in an MCT consolation contest.

“That was one of my better games in high school; I was seeing the ball well,” said Radvany, referring to the Allentown game.

“The game against Pennington in the MCT consolation game was a highlight; we had lost to them before. I got my 100th career hit and got the win on the mound in relief.”

Over the spring, Radvany hit .371 and tied McManimon for the team lead in RBIs with 31. Radvany ended his PDS career ranked first in program history in RBIs and third in hits.

“That is surreal,” said Radvany, who also starred for the PDS boys’ basketball team and won the school’s Gold P senior athletics award. “I should stay in the record books for a while. It is a good form of recognition.”

PDS head coach Ray O’Brien lauded what his big three of Radvany, Alu, and McManimon brought to the program, both this spring and over the last four seasons.

“It is not often that three kids come in and step right in as freshman starters and have the career that they had,” said O’Brien, whose other seniors included Sean Flahive, Cody Meagher, and Davin Bialow.

“JP ended up third in hits and first in RBIs. I have been coaching at PDS for 10 years and I have not seen anyone have the all around season that Jake had (a team-best .523 average with 45 hits, 38 runs, 10 doubles, three triples, and three homers). It was a terrific year for him from start to finish. He ended up as the all-time hit leader. Cole was healthy in Florida for our spring trip and pitched a great game against Hill with a one hitter and 15 strikeouts. Cole couldn’t pitch as much as we wanted him to because he had a stress fracture in his shin (3-3 record, 2.11 ERA and 57 strikeouts in 2015) but he had a great year batting for us (.359 with a team-high four homers to go with 31 RBIs).”

In reflecting on the season overall, O’Brien lamented the team’s run of bad fortune.

“We started off 5-1 and then had that Hamilton game and it seemed like the baseball gods were against us after that,” said O’Brien. “You can’t believe all of the things that went wrong for us, injuries, bad breaks, and bad hops.”

A heartbreaking defeat to Gil St Bernard’s in the Prep B semis exemplified the team’s star-crossed campaign as PDS brought a 7-3 lead into the bottom of the last inning only to lose 8-7 on a walk-off grand slam.

“That game was a microcosm of the season,” said O’Brien. “On two separate occasions we were one strike away from going to the prep finals. The last inning you just couldn’t believe with bad hops, bloopers, two strikes on last batter who then hits a fly ball into the wind that turns into a grand slam.”

O’Brien believes he has a good core of returners in place with sophomore catcher Paul Franzoni, junior third baseman Dom Gasparro, and junior second baseman Sam Guarino along with a group of young pitchers.

“Paul is getting bigger and stronger; Dom had a good year, he was particularly good in the field,” said O’Brien.

“Sam was really good at second, he turned 20 double plays and started hitting at the end. We have some sophomore pitchers (Ryan Sparks, Chase Fleming, Russ Kirczow) that are still developing. As they mature and get bigger, our pitching will be OK.”

The returning players, though, have quite a void to fill as they follow the likes of Radvany, Alu, and McManimon. Each of the team’s big three is going on to play at a Division I college program with Radvany heading to Villanova University, Alu to Boston College, and McManimon to Lehigh University.

“For me and the seniors, it is a tough way to go out,” said O’Brien. “We felt that we had the best team in the preps. It is rare that we have 3 D-I players at the same time; they will be sorely missed.”

Radvany will certainly miss playing with his PDS teammates. “It has meant a lot, a lot of people say that high school ball is what you will enjoy the most, because it is not the pressure of college ball,” said Radvany.

“It was great to play with two of my best friends, all three of us are going on to play D-1. We are like brothers, we had dinner on Thursday night before graduation to talk about some of the glory days.”

As he looks ahead to starting his college carer, Radvany is determined to give it his best.

“The main thing in the summer is to get bigger and stronger physically; I am going from the oldest to the youngest and will be one of the frailest physically,” said Radvany, who is playing for the Lawrence Post 414 American Legion team this summer.

“There are a lot of studs. I am also making a transition into being more of an outfielder. They have an opening in the outfield. They have a senior at first base who is one of the best players in the Big East. If I have to sit a year and learn from him that would be fine but I want to do whatever I can to get on the field. As an athlete, you are always looking for a challenge and I am ready for the challenge.”

WINNING POSITION: Chris Edwards of Winberie’s establishes an inside position in a game last year in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Edwards helped Winberie’s win the 2014 championship series and will be back to help the team defend its title this summer. The league tips off its 27th season on June 10 with a triple-header at the Community Park basketball courts.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

WINNING POSITION: Chris Edwards of Winberie’s establishes an inside position in a game last year in the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League. Edwards helped Winberie’s win the 2014 championship series and will be back to help the team defend its title this summer. The league tips off its 27th season on June 10 with a triple-header at the Community Park basketball courts. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

When Winberie’s faced King’s Pizzarama last July in the best-of-three championship series of the Princeton Recreation Department Men’s Summer Basketball League, it was a clash of grizzled veterans against young turks.

Utilizing its savvy, Winberie’s was able to prevail over upstart King’s, posting two tightly contested victories to win the series 2-0.

As the summer hoops league tips off its 27th season on June 10 with a triple-header at the Community Park basketball courts, league commissioner Evan Moorhead expects a similar scenario to play out this year.

“I think the overall theme will be, can the old guard, Winberie’s, Ivy Inn, and Dr. Palmer, hold off the young guns, like King’s, Aria Health, Belle Mead Physical Therapy, and SAT Smart,” said Moorhead, noting that the league will have 10 teams this summer, up from nine in 2014, and that there has been a key rule change as it will take seven team fouls rather than 10, as in the past, to trigger one-on-one bonus free throws.

“The older teams have experience but not the youthful legs any more. Experience tends to win it, with Winberie’s and Ivy Inn winning the last two years.”

Winberie’s and Ivy Inn appear poised to lead the old guard again this summer.

“The big story is that Chris Hatchell is officially retired,” said Moorhead, the assistant director of the Rec Department.

“Kurt Simmons is the GM. Cliff Pollard, Chris Edward, and Terrence Bailey are back. Any time you have Bailey, you can score points. Ivy Inn is back and Skye Ettin (former Princeton High and TCNJ standout) is going to be playing with them. Shahid Abdul-Karim, Buddy Thomas, and Mark Aziz are all back.”

Another veteran unit, Dr. Palmer, has returned after a one-year hiatus from the league. “Dr. Palmer is back with some new names but also some familiar players,” added Moorhead. “They have Mika Palmer, Gary Wilson, Larry Upshur and Brad Billmeier. They say they have a 6’10 player.”

Last year’s finalist, King’s Pizzarama, figures to be a powerful young gun. “King’s will have a similar team; they had a really good season last summer,” added Moorhead.

“They have the two Princeton football players, Anthony Gaffney and Jakobi Johnson. They have also added Justin Leith (a former Princeton Day School standout and current Stuart Country Day athletic director who played pro basketball overseas).”

Another young gun, Jesse Krasna, who gave Winberie’s some young legs to help its title run last summer, will be heading a new league entry, Aria Health.

“Jess has broken off and has a new team,” said Moorhead. “He has the Sibol twins (John and Zach) from the old Blue Devils team. Jesse is a heck of a player and he brings people together. He has experience in the league and he knows what it takes to be competitive so I am assuming his team will be tough.”

SAT Smart, the TCNJ entry, has the potential to be a tough team. “Bobby Brackett will be one of the top players in the league,” said Moorhead. “They have a couple of guards back. They will be competitive if the guards can get Bobby the ball in the post.”

Princeton Youth Sports (PYS), the Princeton High boys’ hoops entry, along with Princeton Pi, Bring Me Food, and Belle Mead Physical Therapy, will be hoping to be competitive with rosters stocked with young players.

PYS should feature high-scoring Matt Hart, an ALL-CVC performer last winter for PHS while Princeton Pi returns last summer’s leading scorer, Juwan Harrison. New entry, Bring Me Food, figures to get firepower from Davon Black, a former PHS standout who was a first-team All League performer last summer for Northeast Realty. Belle Mead boasts strength on the perimeter with All-League performers Jalen Parham, Jonathan Gregory, and Matt Johnston.

Moorhead, for his part, believes the action on the Community Park courts will heat up with the temperatures.

“We have started to hit up the social media,” said Moorhead. “With the rain last week and 58 degree temperatures, it is hard to think about summer hoops. Hopefully the temps will be going up and that will bring people out.”

June 3, 2015

Things started out well for the Princeton University women’s open crew last weekend as it competed in the NCAA championship regatta at the Sacramento State Aquatic Center in Gold River, Calif.

In the first day of competition last Friday, Princeton advanced two of its three boats directly to the semifinals as the first varsity 8 placed second in its opening heat and varsity four won its heat.

“The 1V was able to squeak by Yale in its heat, which was great,” said Princeton head coach Lori Dauphiny, whose second varsity 8 placed fourth in both its opening heat and repechage race to move on to the C/D final. “The V4 won their heat and that was a big surprise.”

A day later, the varsity 4 was able to squeak into the grand final as it engaged in a three-boat battle in the semis with Ohio State and California for the last two spots in the championship race. The Tigers couldn’t catch Ohio State but they were able to edge Cal for third to book a place in the top six.

“It was like the V8 semis last year but we came out on the right side this time,” said Dauphiny, reflecting on the race. “The leader (Yale) was out there but the next three boats were duking it out for the next two spots and we got in by 2 hundredths.”

The varsity 8, though, placed fifth in its semi to slip to the B final while the second varsity 8 won its C/D semi to make the C final.

In the final day of action, there were mixed results as the varsity 4 took sixth while the varsity 8 placed fifth in the petite final to finish 11th overall and the second varsity 8 won the C race to earn 13th place.

“In a nutshell, there were a lot of up and downs,” said Dauphiny, reflecting on the weekend which saw her team finish 12th in the team standings at the competition as Ohio State took first overall. “I was disappointed.”

Dauphiny had hoped to see the varsity 8 and V4 end on a higher note. “I don’t know what happened, it was not bad,” said Dauphiny, in assessing the top
boat’s semifinal effort.

“We were trying to put a whole race together. After the semis, we were working on first 500; we lost significant ground there in the semi. We did a better job on that on Sunday. It was just a tough final race for the V4.”

The increasingly tougher competition at the NCAAs made Princeton’s task even more difficult.

“What I learned was that the field was much deeper than it ever has been,” said Dauphiny. “The races weren’t necessarily closer but the overall number of boats that were in the running to make the grand final was much bigger. There are a lot of new schools in there, it is great for the sport.”

Dauphiny is hoping that her returning rowers will bring a renewed focus next fall in the wake of their roller-coaster ride last weekend.

“I think we want to do better; it would not ring true if I was to say I was satisfied,” said Dauphiny.

“The 2V was in C final and beat two boats it had lost to earlier in Harvard and USC. The 1V had lost to Yale at Ivies and beat them to reach semis so there were strides forward. I think the returners will come back with a bit more knowledge and an increased enthusiasm and energy to do better next year.”

The program benefitted from the enthusiasm shown by its group of 10 seniors over their careers.

“I want to recognize the senior class, the seniors don’t get another chance but they taught us a tremendous amount about what the standards on the team need to be,” said Dauphiny, who also credited assistant coaches Kate Maxim and Steve Coppola with helping the team make progress.

“I wish we could have sent them out with better results but any improvement we have made has been due to them. There were two seniors in that V4.”

LIGHTING IT UP: The Princeton University men’s lightweight first varsity 8 races through the water in a regatta earlier this spring. The varsity 8 placed fourth in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta on Mercer Lake last Sunday. The varsity 4 took fifth in its grand final. A day earlier, the four without a coxswain earned gold with a win in its grand final.(Photo by Aleka Gurel, Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

LIGHTING IT UP: The Princeton University men’s lightweight first varsity 8 races through the water in a regatta earlier this spring. The varsity 8 placed fourth in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta on Mercer Lake last Sunday. The varsity 4 took fifth in its grand final. A day earlier, the four without a coxswain earned gold with a win in its grand final. (Photo by Aleka Gurel, Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Casey Ward believed that the Princeton University men’s lightweight varsity 8 crew was primed for a big finish as it competed in the grand final at the intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta last Sunday on Mercer Lake.

Having been bested by Cornell and Columbia in the regular season and the Eastern Sprints, Ward and his boat mates were determined to overcome their rivals in the season’s penultimate regatta.

“The race plan was to concentrate on utilizing the faster start we developed over the last two or three weeks,” said senior captain Ward.

“It was really trusting in cumulatively taking inches every stroke with faster paced speed that we felt we had developed since sprints by keeping the blades in the water a little bit longer. We were really focused on just rowing our own race and trusting that 100 base strokes in the middle thousand would add up to something more.”

Midway through the grand final last Sunday on Mercer Lake, the Tigers were right there with Cornell and Columbia. But over the last 1,000 meters, Princeton faded to fourth as the Big Red won its second straight national title with the Lions second and a hard-charging Harvard boat coming in third.

“To be honest we got caught a little flatfooted in the third 500 by Columbia and Harvard presses and didn’t respond in a unified way that produced more boat speed,” said Ward in assessing the race which saw Cornell post a winning time of  5:38.989 over the 2,000-meter course with Columbia taking second in 5:41.042, Harvard coming in third at 5:41.965 and Princeton next in 5:44.708.

“We responded in a scratchier way, we knew we had a good last 400 in our back pocket which I think we showed. It was from the 1000 to the 1700; it wasn’t the base speed we had planned on.”

Afterwards, Ward and his teammates huddled for minutes with heads down and arms interlocked as they listened solemnly to head coach Marty Crotty’s final words of the season.

“The post-race message is that the Tiger lights keep improving every year,” said Ward.

“If you look at the IRA finishes in the last three years, sixth place, last year fifth place, and this year fourth place peppered in with the gold medal in the men’s light 4 yesterday. The future is bright. The seniors who graduate this year, myself included, are good workers but we are not irreplaceable. I think these young guys are going to be awesome. They are a fiery group. We would have liked to have had a medal. It is okay to be upset with the result because you want more for yourself but don’t be disappointed because you can hold your head high and trust in all of the hard work that you did.”

Reflecting on his Princeton career, Ward is amazed at the improvement he made as a rower and a leader.

“I was recruited from a small club in Atlanta, Ga. and if you told me in my senior year in high school that I would be captain of the men’s lightweights at Princeton, I would have told you you were a liar,” said Ward.

“Physically, I developed in leaps and bounds with Marty’s guidance. He is a terrific mentor for creating peak athletic performance in terms of ergometer scores and what you think is possible there, shattering barriers. As a leader, there were some really good mentors in the generation of lightweight rowers before me who have stayed in touch with me to this day. They check in with me all the time.”

Princeton head coach Crotty believes that Ward emerged as a very good mentor in his own right, in and out of the water.

“He was at the cornerstone; any time you needed great leadership or any time you needed a guy to step up and support the locker room and hold things together, he was there” said Crotty.

“This is a tough business, what these guys do day in day out is really hard, win or lose. It is just as hard for Cornell as it is for the Princeton guys who got 4th today. Rowing teams go through some really tough times and you need a great captain and a great leader and Casey has fit that bill for us. He gets an A+ in addition to improving as an oarsman. I think where he was freshman year to where he ended up, he has showed tremendous improvement. It is always nice to get that out of your leader because obviously you want the younger guys to be able to emulate him athletically as well.”

Seeing his guys in the varsity 8 fall just short of a medal in the grand final was tough for Crotty. “Losing to Cornell and Columbia isn’t fun but the guys persevered and they keep a good attitude,” said Crotty.

“I think all the way up to the end, we were training toward being able to overtake them. Even taking the line today, we felt like we could overtake them. I have got to hand it to the guys, they never lost hope. They kept at it, they persevered, they were determined. Cornell and Columbia are flat out good; Harvard had a good last 1,000 like you are supposed to. I think we just stayed the same speed. It wasn’t us going down or falling off. It was a matter of we had to get up to get a medal and weren’t up to it today.”

In Crotty’s view, the result on the last day of the season can’t dim what the team accomplished over the course of the spring.

“Always after this race, I kind of reflect back on the season as a whole rather than just the race today,” said Crotty, whose varsity 4 with coxswain took fifth in its grand final.

“You are left with the dreaded unsatisfied feeling after this race but I think the season on a whole was productive. We made progress as a team, similar to last year and we sprinkled in some high points. Maybe this year, they were a little higher.”

The Tigers enjoyed a major highlight on Saturday as it varsity 4 without coxswain earned gold with a win in its grand final.

“Yesterday watching (senior) Fabrizio (Giovannini Filho) win a gold medal was good,” said Crotty. “I would call that a high point. Obviously we would have preferred to do that in the 8 but I am really happy for those guys.

Looking ahead, Crotty is happy about his program’s prospects. “We have got six guys returning from the 8, three guys returning from that 4 and three guys from the other 4,” noted Crotty.

“We have a really deep team. We have some great guys coming. We are excited. I think it is a situation that is full of promise. I have had emptier situations post-IRA than this year, that is for sure, that is my general feeling.

Ward, for his part, leaves the lightweight program feeling great about his experience.

“You remember the regattas at the end of the year because those are the championship season and that is the hardware you bring home,” said Ward, who will be working in Mexico City after graduation for a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO).

“But I will always remember knocking heads on Lake Carnegie with the  heavyweights and the lightweight guys. I race Cornell, Columbia, Harvard, and Yale, once or twice every year but I race the other guys at Princeton every day, day in and day out and we are competitive. I will remember having a group of guys around me who always pushed me to be more than I thought I was capable of and always demanded more from me. I will carry that forever.”

FINAL ACCOLADE: Princeton University women’s basketball star Blake Dietrick dribbles up the court in a game this  winter. Last week, Dietrick was named as the winner of the C. Otto von Kienbusch Award, the top honor for female senior athletes at Princeton. Men’s lacrosse star Mike MacDonald won the William Winston Roper Trophy, the top award for senior sportsmen.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

FINAL ACCOLADE: Princeton University women’s basketball star Blake Dietrick dribbles up the court in a game this
winter. Last week, Dietrick was named as the winner of the C. Otto von Kienbusch Award, the top honor for female senior athletes at Princeton. Men’s lacrosse star Mike MacDonald won the William Winston Roper Trophy, the top award for senior sportsmen. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Blake Dietrick, who led the Princeton University women’s basketball team to unprecedented success and national prominence this winter, and Mike MacDonald, who rewrote much of the Tiger men’s lacrosse record book in his career, were named the top senior sportswoman and sportsman at the Gary Walters ’67 Princeton Varsity Club Awards Banquet last Thursday evening.

For the first time in Princeton Athletics history, there were finalists named for the top two departmental awards, the C. Otto von Kienbusch Award and William Winston Roper Trophy.

The Kienbusch Award is the highest senior female student-athlete award at Princeton. C. Otto von Kienbusch was a staunch opponent of the addition of women to Princeton University in the late ’60s. Once women were admitted to the school, several early women athletes made a trip to his home in upstate New York to try to win him over. They were so successful that he became a major supporter of women’s athletics at Princeton and endowed this award.

The Roper Trophy was originally given by Mrs. William Winston Roper and the Class of 1902 in honor of Princeton’s famed football coach. It goes annually to “a Princeton senior male of high scholastic rank and outstanding qualities of sportsmanship and general proficiency in athletics.” It has been awarded annually since 1936.

Dietrick, a 5’10 native of Wellesley, Mass. who majored in English,  wrapped up a stellar senior season by leading the Princeton University women’s basketball team to an unblemished 30-0 regular season this winter and a fifth Ivy League title in six years, as well as the highest national ranking in Ivy League women’s basketball history (13).

Dietrick averaged career-highs in points (15.1), assists (4.9), and rebounds (4.5) per game this winter en route to Associated Press and WBCA Honorable Mention All-America honors. A seven-time Ivy Player of the Week, she was the conference’s unanimous choice for Player of the Year. Setting a single-season program record for assists (157), her 483 points in 2014-15 are tied for the third highest total in school history.

A two-time first-team All-Ivy selection, Dietrick wrapped up a decorated career ranked third on the Princeton charts in three-pointers made (210) and three-point shooting percentage (.395). Sitting fourth in assists (346) and 11th in scoring (1,233), she poured in a team-high 26 points on 10-of-18 shooting in her final collegiate contest, a NCAA second-round loss to eventual Final Four participant Maryland.

She later represented the Tigers in the annual State Farm College three-point Shooting Championships at Butler’s Hinkle Fieldhouse in Indianapolis, Ind., and signed a training camp contract with the Women’s National Basketball Association’s (WNBA) Washington Mystics.

The other finalists for the von Kienbusch award were Lindsay Graff of the women’s tennis team, Lauren Lazo of the women’s soccer team, and Erin McMunn of the women’s lacrosse team.

MacDonald, for his part, graduates as one of the greatest scorers in the long history of Princeton men’s lacrosse, with several accomplishments that no other player in program history has ever matched.

A 6’1, 190-pound native of Georgetown, Ontario, MacDonald set the school record for points in a season this past season, when he had 78 points on 48 goals and 30 assists. He graduates third all-time in goal scoring in program history with 132, as well as fourth all-time in points with 208 and ninth all-time in assists with 76.

In addition, he is the only player in program history with a season of at least 40 goals and at least 30 assists and the only player in program history with at least one game of seven goals and another of six assists. He is one of two players at Princeton in the top 10 all-time in both goals and assists. He scored at least three goals in a game 10 times as a senior.

His career numbers would have been even more off the charts had he not been slowed by injuries that required surgery to both hips after his junior year.

MacDonald was the 2015 Ivy League Co-Player of the Year and a unanimous first-team All-Ivy League selection, giving him two first-team All-Ivy selections in his career.

The other finalists for the Roper Trophy were Quinn Epperly of the football team, Cody Kessel of the men’s volleyball team, Sammy Kang of the men’s squash team, and Cameron Porter of the men’s soccer team.

GOOD AS GOLD: Princeton High boys’ lacrosse goalie Kenan Glasgold guards the crease in a game this season. Senior star Glasgold made 121 saves this season as PHS rebounded from a 2-6 start to finish with a 9-9 record.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

GOOD AS GOLD: Princeton High boys’ lacrosse goalie Kenan Glasgold guards the crease in a game this season. Senior star Glasgold made 121 saves this season as PHS rebounded from a 2-6 start to finish with a 9-9 record. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

On April 1, the Princeton High boys’ lacrosse team had to hang on for a 9-7 victory over Hightstown.

When the CVC foes met seven weeks later in the South Group 3 sectional quarterfinals, there was no drama as fourth-seeded PHS jumped out to a 7-1 first quarter lead and never looked back on the way to a 14-6 win over the fifth-seeded Rams.

For Little Tiger head coach Peter Stanton, the different margins of victory in the contests reflected a progress borne of resilience.

“After the game, their coach said ‘wow your guys are so much better than before,’” said Stanton.

“It was good to hear that from someone else. We answered the bell every time; we had a few bad games where we got beat by large margins. A lesser group could have given up but this group never stopped working.”

In the sectional semifinals at top-seeded Shawnee, PHS put in some good work, jumping out to a 3-0 lead after the first quarter. The roof fell in on the Little Tigers as they were outscored 8-1 and ended up losing 15-5 in the May 21 contest.

“The game plan was what we executed well in the first quarter — which was to play aggressively and go out and attack; we played to our strengths,” said Stanton, reflecting on the season-ending defeat.

“They are a mature and athletic team. They are a team comprised of seniors with a lot of success in football and lacrosse. I said to the guys it was liking holding a beach ball under water, eventually you lose your handle on the ball.”

Stanton liked how far his team came this spring as it rebounded from a 2-6 start to post a final record of 9-9.

“What we are most happy about is that we made progress,” said Stanton.

“Looking back at what I know now, the expectations were high and we held the boys to that. I think that is the only way to really progress. You can’t say, hey let’s just be OK, it is hard to make progress that way. We had seven sophomores on the field a lot of the time, that is an awful lot to ask of them.”

As a result, Stanton asked a lot of his team’s veteran-laden defense, which was spearheaded by senior defenders Jackson Andres, Joe Hawes and Colin Buckley along with senior goalie Kenan Glasgold.

“On defense we felt like we had so much talent that they could keep us in games and give us a chance to win and they did that against Rumson-Fair Haven (a  6-5 loss on April 27) and in the win over HoVal (7-6 on May 5),” asserted Stanton.

The senior class, which included attacker Chris Diver and midfielder Stephen Clark in addition to the defensive stars, provided talent and character.

“I have not had as many players who worked as hard as Colin; he would stay after practice running additional sprints,” said Stanton, noting that Andres, Buckley, and Hawes were named as first-team All-CVC performers while Glasgold was a second-team choice.

“Jackson has a rare combination of talent and passion for the game. Joe Hawes made the switch to defense. He didn’t play much lacrosse before coming to high school; it is amazing how far he came. Kenan gave us reason to believe that we could stay in games. Chris had a difficult transition to attack from midfield and by the end of the season, he really got it. Clark came a long way on the field.”

In Stanton’s view, there is plenty of reason for optimism going forward, considering the team’s progress this spring and the return of such talented players as junior midfielder Rory Helstrom, a first-team All-CVC selection, and sophomore attacker Johnny Lopez-Ona, an honorable-mention All-CVC performer.

“We are definitely excited about the future,” said Stanton, who was inducted into the New Jersey Lacrosse Hall of Fame earlier this year.

“Like I told the players after the last game, I am finishing my 20th year and the fact that the team improved so much and we have a good amount coming back makes me as excited as I have been to keep coaching.”

FAST COMPANY: Princeton High boys’ track star Patrick O’Connell, right, races through a turn as he helped the 4x800 relay take fourth in the Group 3 state championship meet last weekend in South Plainfield. By placing in the top 6 at the meet, the PHS quartet of O’Connell, Alex Roth, Noah Chen, and Cy Watsky booked a spot in the Meet of Champions (MOC) on June 3 at South Plainfield. The PHS girls’ 4x800 team took sixth to advance directly to the MOC while the girls’ 4x400 relay, Alex Roth (3200 meters), and Noa Levy (high jump) were chosen as wildcard entries to the meet.(Photo by John Dowers)

FAST COMPANY: Princeton High boys’ track star Patrick O’Connell, right, races through a turn as he helped the 4×800 relay take fourth in the Group 3 state championship meet last weekend in South Plainfield. By placing in the top 6 at the meet, the PHS quartet of O’Connell, Alex Roth, Noah Chen, and Cy Watsky booked a spot in the Meet of Champions (MOC) on June 3 at South Plainfield. The PHS girls’ 4×800 team took sixth to advance directly to the MOC while the girls’ 4×400 relay, Alex Roth (3200 meters), and Noa Levy (high jump) were chosen as wildcard entries to the meet. (Photo by John Dowers)

Excelling in group efforts, the Princeton High track team made its mark in relay events as it competed in the Group 3 state championship meet last weekend in South Plainfield.

The boys’ 4×800 team of sophomore Patrick O’Connell, sophomore Alex Roth, junior Noah Chen, and sophomore Cy Watsky took fourth in 8:00.17 to book their spot in the Meet of Champions (MOC) on June 3 as a top-six finisher. The quartet took a step closer to their goal of beating the 34-year old school record of 7:57.1.

On the girls’ side, the 4×800 team of senior Paige Metzheiser, junior Lou Mialhe, senior Julie Bond, and sophomore Annefleur Hartmanshenn took sixth in 9:40.40 to earn its way to the MOC, which is being held in South Plainfield.

Another relay, the girls’ 4×400, also advanced to the Meet of Champions as a wildcard based on time. Junior Maia Hauschild, freshman Jackie Patterson, junior Jordan Vine, and Metzheiser combined to break 4 minutes for the first time, running 3:59.46 in placing seventh at the group meet. Three of the girls had sub-60 second splits.

Also advancing to the MOC as individual wildcards were Roth in the 3,200 after taking eighth in 9:28.45, and sophomore Noa Levy, the eighth-place finisher in the high jump with a mark of 5’0.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT: Stuart Country Day School lacrosse junior stars, Julia Maser, right, and Tori Hannah go on attack in recent action. Hannah scored a team-high 56 goals this spring while Maser chipped in 42 as the Tartans posted a final record of 7-9.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT: Stuart Country Day School lacrosse junior stars, Julia Maser, right, and Tori Hannah go on attack in recent action. Hannah scored a team-high 56 goals this spring while Maser chipped in 42 as the Tartans posted a final record of 7-9. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Ending the spring with a bang, the Stuart Country Day School lacrosse team made the most out of the last week of its season.

Over a five-day stretch from May 7-12, Stuart reeled off three wins, topping Hightstown 15-12 and Hamilton 15-13 before edging Lawrence 10-9 in its season finale.

Stuart first-year head coach Kelsey O’Gorman liked the way her squad kept making progress.

“We had a really strong finish; it depicted that the girls really improved,” said O’Gorman. “They played smart in some tight games. Overall you could see them carrying out decisions and playing smarter.”

In O’Gorman’s view, her team’s increased lacrosse IQ was one of the biggest pluses to come out of the spring as the Tartans posted a final record of 7-9.

“I think it was decision-making all over the field,” said O’Gorman. “We had a lot fewer turnovers and everybody started playing their roles and playing as a team.”

Stuart came through at both ends of the field in its season-ending win. “The last game was 10-9 at Lawrence,” recalled O’Gorman. “It was great to end on a strong note, they went away in good spirits.”

The team’s two seniors, goalie Harlyn Bell and attacker Nneka Onukwugha, lifted spirits throughout the season.

“Harlyn just led the team so well; her attitude was always upbeat,” said O’Gorman of Bell, who passed the 400-save mark in her Tartan career.

“She is a great role model. She was also very consistent, that is not easy for a goalie. Nneka is quieter; she is very level-headed. She used her athleticism from basketball. She could turn it on offensively and defensively. It was a two-person senior class but it seemed like more. You always knew what you were going to get from them.”

With a large and talented group of juniors featuring Tori Hannah (56 goals and 7 assists in 2015), Julia Maser (42 goals, 6 assists), Sam Servis (10 goals, 5 assists), Harley Guzman (28 goals, 6 assists), Rose Tetnowski (1 goal, 1 assist), Izzy Engel (10 goals, 3 assists), Armani King, and Kimberly Rodas, the Tartans should continue getting better and better.

“It is a well-balanced class, there are good players on offense, defense, and in the midfield,” said O’Gorman.

“They trickle experience and talent all over the field, which will help the new players we get and the younger players we already have. They have already stepped up and I am sure they will step up more.”

O’Gorman, for her part, enjoyed stepping into the Stuart program. “It was nice to have a small team,” said O’Gorman, who was previously the head coach of the Princeton High girls’ lax squad.

“We were able to focus and concentrate on specifics of the game, whether long or short term. The progress was gratifying, they were able to compete and we had some nice wins.”

June 2, 2015
BRONZE AGE: The Princeton University men’s heavyweight first varsity 8 rows away wearing the bronze medals it earned in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta last Sunday on Mercer Lake. The Tigers placed third in the grand final while the second varsity eight earned a silver in its grand final and the third varsity 8 placed fifth. Princeton finished third in the Ten Eyck Team Trophy standings for heavyweights just behind California, while Washington won the title for the ninth straight season.(Photo by Beverly Schaefer Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

BRONZE AGE: The Princeton University men’s heavyweight first varsity 8 rows away wearing the bronze medals it earned in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship regatta last Sunday on Mercer Lake. The Tigers placed third in the grand final while the second varsity eight earned a silver in its grand final and the third varsity 8 placed fifth. Princeton finished third in the Ten Eyck Team Trophy standings for heavyweights just behind California, while Washington won the title for the ninth straight season. (Photo by Beverly Schaefer Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

As Greg Hughes presented his first varsity 8 heavyweight rowers with the bronze medals they earned for taking third in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) national championship grand final Sunday on Mercer Lake, he hugged each athlete one by one.

For Princeton head coach Hughes, that result was just one highlight in a superb weekend that saw the Tigers place third in the Ten Eyck Team Trophy standings for heavyweights at the regatta.

“I am very happy,” said a grinning Hughes, reflecting on his program’s overall performance. “I thought that was an incredible performance from the team. We had our best race in the last race of the year in the 1V and the 2V.”

As for the first varsity 8, it produced a valiant effort, closing with a rush as it nearly overtook California for second place behind winner and team champion Washington.

“We had focused a lot on the first half of that race because we knew that there was as an incredible amount of parity in the race and we knew that we had go and establish ourselves well in the piece in order to have a shot,” said Hughes, whose boat clocked a time of 5:30.942 over the 2,000-meter course with winner Washington coming in at 5:28.015 and Cal second in 5:30.798.

“We knew that we had that last 500; we had seen it in the Brown race, we had seen it at Eastern Sprints. So we were thinking about other stuff, quite honestly, knowing that when the time came, if we had done it right, we could always go and tap into that sprint. I thought they executed it perfectly.”

Princeton senior captain Jamie Hamp was proud of the way the top boat competed to the end.

“It was just go out there and be in the pack at the 1k and do what you need to do to finish the race off strong,” said Hamp.

“We saw Washington and Cal sort of going there from 750 to 1000 meters and our goal was just to go with them and we did that. It was absolutely our best race of the year. We obviously would have liked to catch Cal at the end but we started taking it up moving through the line from 700, 800 meters up. We were in a battle with Cal that whole way; they had a great sprint and we had a great sprint. It was two fast boats going at it, props to them but I thought we had a great race too.”

That race capped a great regatta for the Tigers as they showed their depth and talent.

“We set a little higher goals at the beginning of the season but it was a great finish for all the boats, with 2V getting silver and us getting bronze,” said Hamp.

“It is the highest finish for us in almost a decade in the grand final and the team got third in the team points trophy. I think the team really rose to the occasion. It was a great day for all three boats.”

Hughes, for his part, relished seeing his second varsity eight rise to the occasion as it came within an eyelash of a national title, placing second to Washington by just over a second.

“Honestly that was one of the gutsiest races I have ever watched,” said Hughes, whose boat posted a time of  5:34.667 with the Huskies first in 5:33.643.

“They were going hard right from the start. They did that yesterday and we knew that Washington was strong and had that push in the middle. Yesterday it got us so we talked a lot about that. We weren’t going to let that happen again and they did that very, very well. Obviously Washington was the stronger crew and they were able to find something there in the last 250. That is as much as we had right there, I am very proud of that one.”

While the third varsity 8 didn’t earn a medal as it took fifth in its grand final, it had reason to be proud of its performance.

“I think it has been a really great weekend for those guys,” said Hughes. “Maybe it was not the result they had been hoping for but overall, it was strong racing from those guys. There are three freshmen on the boat so there is a lot to look at for the future, which is exciting.”

With a total of only five seniors in the top three boats, the future looks exciting for the Tigers.

“I think obviously we have work to do,” said Hughes. “It is a positive thing to see. It is a good base for next year and in the incoming class of freshmen, there are some really talented, hard working kids too. I think we are going to be able to add to the depth of the team and that is going to be the goal.”

Hughes tipped his hat to his group of seniors, who will get one last chance to row for Princeton as the Tigers are sending three heavyweight boats to the Royal Henley Regatta in England this summer.

“That is the biggest part of today, that result for those senior guys on the 1V and the 2V,” asserted Hughes.

“That is something that they absolutely deserved. They have worked so hard. To see the attitude and the speed of the entire team, that is really a testament to what those guys created over the past four years so thanks to the seniors. It is an honor to have coached them, we are going to miss them.”

Hamp, for his part, was thankful to see that hard work result in a breakthrough campaign for the Tigers.

“It is nice to go out with a medal, this is something we put our sights on all season,” said Hamp.

“Getting the medal at the IRAs is something we hadn’t done in a decade. Obviously we are a little disappointed that we didn’t win but it is a great way to go out I think we had a tremendous season, the whole team. We had our first Rowe Cup (the heavyweight team points trophy at Eastern Sprints) in over a decade with three boats medaling at sprints. We had two medals here; we were the best team on the east coast really so I think we had a tremendous season. It is going to be great for the guys in the coming years.”

Forecasting continued improvement from the heavyweights in the coming years, Hamp believes he and his classmates are leaving a special legacy.

“All the seniors were great this year and the younger guys are really learning something from it,” said Hamp, a native of North Tonawanda, N.Y. who plans to compete for the U.S. rowing program upon returning from Henley.

“We had seven freshmen win at sprints this year, that is huge. It is a great foundation for them moving forward and I think the seniors were really  instrumental in leading that charge this year, especially in the early months. Everybody got more comfortable as the racing season went on.”

May 27, 2015
KEEPING THE FAITH: Princeton University women’s open crew star Faith Richardson churns through the water in recent action. Senior co-captain Richardson has been a mainstay for the varsity 8 the last two seasons. Earlier this month, Richardson and the Tigers took third at the Ivy League championship regatta. They are now headed to the NCAA Championships, which are taking place from May 29-31 at the Sacramento State Aquatic Center in Gold River, Calif.(Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

KEEPING THE FAITH: Princeton University women’s open crew star Faith Richardson churns through the water in recent action. Senior co-captain Richardson has been a mainstay for the varsity 8 the last two seasons. Earlier this month, Richardson and the Tigers took third at the Ivy League championship regatta. They are now headed to the NCAA Championships, which are taking place from May 29-31 at the Sacramento State Aquatic Center in Gold River, Calif. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

Faith Richardson started her high school sports career as a cross country star for Wellesley High near Boston.

But after suffering a series of injuries, she took up rowing in the winter of her sophomore year to rehab and stay in shape.

That decision changed the course of her life as Richardson fell in love with crew.

Transferring to Groton School (Mass.), Richardson continued to excel in running but her rowing career took off as she competed in the 2009 and 2010 Junior World Championships and led the Groton women’s 8 to victory at the 2011 Women’s Henley Regatta.

For Richardson, running and rowing complemented each other. “Both sports require the same kind of intensity and dedication,” said Richardson, who was the 2009 ISL cross country champion and was a three-year MVP for the Groton squad. “Running is tough.”

Opting to focus on rowing in college, Richardson joined the Princeton University women’s open crew program in 2011.

Richardson acknowledged that the first two years of college rowing were tough for her.

“Probably the volume and intensity was the biggest difference, any freshman will tell you that,” said Richardson, who rowed on the second varsity 8 her first two seasons, helping the boat take first in the Ivy championships and fourth in the NCAAs in 2012 and then place third in the Ivies and sixth at the NCAAs the next year.

“The biggest jump was from freshman to sophomore year; I did a lot of strength work that summer. I had some injuries freshman year. I had a hernia at the end of fall and a shoulder injury that winter that kept me out for 12 weeks.”

Competing on the second varsity helped Richardson become a stronger rower.

“The 2V has traditionally been a good boat, you can learn a lot from it,” said Richardson. “My freshman year on the boat was awesome. We had really good senior leadership. It was a really tough boat. It was also a really good boat in my sophomore year.”

As a junior, Richardson moved up to the varsity 8, helping it win the Ivy regatta and then finish seventh at the NCAAs.

“It was definitely tough, it was a different boat,” said Richardson, reflecting on moving up to the top boat.

“We had a rough start and then did well in Ivies. The NCAAs was definitely humbling for the boat coming off Ivies. Winning the petite final was good coming from where we were.”

Coming into her final season, Richardson had the honor of being selected as the co-captain of the open team along with classmate Nicki Byl.

“You always look up to the captain, we have had some very strong women on this team,” said Richardson. “I am a major believer in leading by example. Nicki is the co-captain and we both bring different things.”

Princeton head coach Lori Dauphiny credits Richardson with setting a good example on a daily basis.

“Faith is very hard working,” said Dauphiny. “She has a work ethic that very few have and is an example of what it takes.”

The Tigers had to work hard to get on track this spring, getting a late start on the water due to icy conditions on Lake Carnegie. Princeton suffered early season defeats to Virginia and Brown before
ending the regular season with a 4-0 run and taking third at the Ivy Regatta.

As a result of the strong finish, the Tigers earned an at-large bid to the NCAA Championships, which are taking place from May 29-31 at the Sacramento State Aquatic Center in Gold River, Calif. Princeton is one of three collegiate programs (Brown and Washington) to be invited to every NCAA Championships regatta since the inaugural event in 1997.

For Richardson, making the NCAAs is the ideal way to cap her Princeton career.

“Definitely getting the bid for the NCAAs was great, that was one of the goals we had this season,” said Richardson. “We need to find more speed against the boats we have raced, as well as the different boats we will see. We have been working pretty hard this week.”

Richardson and her classmates are bringing a sense of urgency to their final push.

“We are going at this as a team, looking to do well as a team,” said Richardson. “I am ready to graduate. We have a lot of seniors on the NCAA boats and we are all going at this with the same attitude.”

After graduation, Richardson has her eye on joining another special team, having applied to the U.S. Marine Corps’ Officer Candidates School.

“I am interested in doing intelligence, I appreciate military values,” said Richardson, who plans to row this summer for a club in Great Britain.

“I like the training. I may do government law enforcement. I figure it could be worth a shot.”

But this weekend, Richardson will be focused on taking a shot at NCAA glory.

WINNING LOOK: Princeton University men’s golfer Quinn Prchal looks down the course during the Ivy League Championships in late April at Saucon Valley in Bethlehem, Pa. Sophomore Prchal went on to win the individual title at the competition, carding six-under 210 in the three-round competition. Prchal’s heroics helped the Tigers finish second in the team standings by one stroke to Penn. Prchal went on to compete in the NCAA regional held at the Course at Yale earlier this month, where he shot a six-over 216 to tie for 37th in the 75-player field.(Photo Courtesy of the Ivy League/Sideline Photos)

WINNING LOOK: Princeton University men’s golfer Quinn Prchal looks down the course during the Ivy League Championships in late April at Saucon Valley in Bethlehem, Pa. Sophomore Prchal went on to win the individual title at the competition, carding six-under 210 in the three-round competition. Prchal’s heroics helped the Tigers finish second in the team standings by one stroke to Penn. Prchal went on to compete in the NCAA regional held at the Course at Yale earlier this month, where he shot a six-over 216 to tie for 37th in the 75-player field. (Photo Courtesy of the Ivy League/Sideline Photos)

Playing in the Ivy League Championship in 2013 as a freshman, Quinn Prchal got off to an inauspicious start.

“I was six-over for the first six holes,” said Prchal. “I was working my way back the rest of the event; it was a lot of patience. I hadn’t played in an Ivy championship and I let it get to me at first.”

Displaying his talent and poise, Prchal worked his way all the way back into a tie for fourth, helping Princeton win the team title and earning Ivy Rookie of the year honors in the process.

“It was a bunched leaderboard; there were five teams within a couple of shots coming into the last day,” recalled Prchal. “It was really exciting. In some tournaments, you plod along and it falls in your lap. We went out and won the event, that was exciting.”

After taking a hiatus from school for a year, Prchal returned this spring for his second Ivy tourney. Utilizing his experience, Prchal produced some exciting golf, carding a six-under 210 in the three-round competition at the Grace Course at Saucon Valley in Bethlehem, Pa. to earn the individual title.

Once again, Prchal started a little slowly, firing a three-over 75 in the first round before producing rounds of 68 and 67 to win the title by three strokes over Penn’s Austin Powell. He was the second Tiger in three years to win the title as Greg Jarmas prevailed in 2013.

“I think part of it was familiarity with the golf course,” said Prchal, whose heroics helped Princeton place second in the team standings at the event, just one stroke behind champion Penn.

“We had a practice round and then started on Friday. The final day was one of my best rounds. I was seven-under through 13; I made a couple of bogeys down the stretch. Mostly I putted the ball really well. I gave myself opportunities. It is very exciting. You work hard to try to put yourself in that position. My coach and teammates helped me all spring, pushing me to put everything together.”

Growing up in the suburbs of Chicago in Glenview, Ill., Prchal worked harder on baseball and hockey than golf.

“My parents both played a little bit, I picked up the game on the range when I was five or six playing with them,” said Prchal. “I played baseball and hockey more when I was younger. I fit the sports in with the seasons.”

Standing 5’0 in eighth grade, Prchal’s prospects in baseball and hockey weren’t great at the high school level so he started focusing on golf. After a spurt which saw him gain 10 inches in height by his sophomore year, Prchal grew into a star golfer.

“I had a couple of strong finishes in some state junior events,” recalled Prchal, a three-time All-Conference performer and two-time team MVP for Glenbook South High and the winner of the 2012 Illinois State Amateur tourney. “On the national level at AJGA (American Junior Golf Association), I didn’t win but I had solid finishes, some top 10s.”

Taking a tour of east coast schools after playing in a tournament held in Massachusetts, Prchal visited Princeton and felt an immediate comfort level.

“I am from the suburbs and I liked the suburban feel of the school,” said Prchal.

“I had an official visit later. I liked the guys and the coach (Will Green). The Springdale course is close to campus, I didn’t have to go 20 minutes to play.”

Prchal started playing from the start of his career, tying for 22nd in the season-opening McLaughlin Invitational, a three-round event hosted by St. John’s that wrapped up at Bethpage Red on Long Island.

“I was nervous, I was not exactly sure how well I would play,” said Prchal. “It was a different level from high school. Our first event was at St. John’s; I played two decent rounds and then had a good one.”

In the spring, Prchal had a good experience competing in the NCAA Regional, carding a six-over 222 to tie for 57th.

“It was exciting to play in a field that strong,” said Prchal. “I saw a different mentality. They were going out to make birdies and taking advantage of conditions. You had to find your second gear; I have been working on doing that. It is feeling comfortable at two-under and then working hard and pushing to make more birdies. It is something I needed to learn.”

In the NCAA regional held on the Course at Yale earlier this month, Prchal put that knowledge to work, shooting six-over 216 to tie for 37th in the 75-player field.

“It is a fun golf course; the first two days I didn’t play poorly but I didn’t score well,” said Prchal, who carded a three-under 67 in the final day of the competition to move up the leaderboard.

“I hit the ball well on the first day and I had a couple of bad swings. On the second day, I got stuck on the second hole. The third day, I hit the ball great. I was able to string together a bunch of birdies and finished in the middle of the pack.”

Looking ahead to his junior season at Princeton, Prchal believes the Tigers have the talent to be at the front of the pack.

“With everybody back, it is exciting,” said Prchal, who is planning to play in the Illinois State Amateur and the Illinois Open this summer and hopes to qualify for the U.S. Amateur which is being held in the Chicago area this year.

“We brought in three really good freshmen (Michael Davis, Marc Hedrick, and Eric Mitchell) this year. We learned what we need to work on. We came together later in the year. We want to start off strong in the fall and push things to a higher level.”

GETTING IT DONE: Hun School boys’ lacrosse player Chris Donovan heads to goal last Thursday in the state Prep A title game against Lawrenceville. Post-graduate and Georgetown-bound Donovan tallied four goals and an assist to help Hun prevail 14-6.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

GETTING IT DONE: Hun School boys’ lacrosse player Chris Donovan heads to goal last Thursday in the state Prep A title game against Lawrenceville. Post-graduate and Georgetown-bound Donovan tallied four goals and an assist to help Hun prevail 14-6. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

It was lights, camera, action for the Hun School boys’ lacrosse team as it started last week by facing Haverford School (Pa.) in the championship game of the Inter-Ac Challenge.

The battle of unbeatens between No. 4 Hun and top-ranked Haverford at PPL Stadium in Chester, Pa. on the evening of May 19 was billed as a national championship game and was broadcast on TV over the Comcast network.

The Raiders proved ready for prime time, battling the Fords hard for three quarters, trailing 10-7 entering the fourth. Haverford, though, pulled away over the last 12 minutes to earn a 15-8 victory.

Three days later, another crown was at stake as Hun hosted 13-time champion Lawrenceville in the state Prep A title game.

After licking their wounds from the Haverford game, Hun post-graduate star attacker Chris Donovan and his teammates weren’t going to let disappointment and fatigue stand in their way as they went for the program’s first Prep title since 1998.

“Bouncing back from Monday night was very tough,” said Donovan. “We gave it our all against the No. 1 team in the nation, they played incredibly. We knew we had to come out hard, we knew we were going to be tired. This got pushed back because of that. We are just hungry and humble, that is our motto this year.”

In the early going against the Big Red, Hun looked a little tired as it ended the first quarter clinging to a 4-3 lead. In the second quarter, however, the Raiders clicked at both ends of the field, outscoring Lawrenceville 7-1 to seize control of the contest.

“I think it was getting back to it, we were a little tired and took time getting the feel of the game again,” said Donovan.

“A lot of emotions were spent on Monday night obviously but getting back here was great. We knew what was at stake. We hadn’t won one since 1998; that was in the back of our minds. We just got back to practice and worked on things we needed to work on and obviously it showed here.”

In the second half, the Raiders took care of business, weathering a couple of Lawrenceville flurries to earn a convincing 14-6 win.

“We knew they were going to come back strong, they are a very talented team with a lot of big, strong guys,” said Donovan, who ended up with four goals and an assist on the day.

“I bounced right off of one of them and I was like oh my god. They have great players. We just kept going.”

In reflecting on Hun’s great campaign, which saw the Raiders post a 19-1 record, Donovan pointed to chemistry as a key ingredient in the squad’s success.

“I think it is just everybody loves each other, I have to say that,” said Donovan. “Half of the team boards at the school and we are up with each other until 1 in the morning, talking about lacrosse and the state championship. Since the fall, we have been going to bed every night dreaming about this.”

The attack line of Georgetown-bound Donovan and fellow post-graduates, Yale-bound Brendan Rooney and Hobart recruit Chris Aslanian, gave Hun’s foes nightmares this season.

“Chris, Rooney, and me had a great connection,” said Donovan, who led Hun in scoring this scoring with 105 points on 56 goals and 49 assists.

“Aslanian is my roommate, we talk about this all the time. We stay after practice every day, catching passes. Rooney has taught me a lot of things I will never forget, like the behind the back shots. Chris Aslanian is a great kid, a great person, a great athlete.”

Hun head coach MV Whitlow was thrilled to see his squad show its greatness in the win over Lawrenceville.

“The mindset was to finish,” said Whitlow. “I think the willfulness of this team and the character of the team really was evident coming off of that loss on Monday night to the No. 1 team in the country. Being able to rebound emotionally and physically and play a state championship game just says a lot about these boys and their character. This is a really special group of young men, a very high character group of men and they were a pleasure to coach.”

It was a pleasure for Whitlow to watch his team go on its 7-1 second quarter run.

“I think we opened the game up a little bit, we got into transition,” said Whitlow.

“We figured out what their defensive schematic was after one quarter and we knew where the openings are and we took advantage of them.”

Whitlow noted that Donovan has been particularly adept at taking advantage of his scoring chances.

“He is truly a generational type player,” asserted Whitlow, who also got three goals from Aslanian in the win with Rooney and Cole West chipping in two apiece.

“The level of lacrosse in the Princeton area is very good this year and I think some of that is due to Chris Donovan and his level of play. His performance Monday night against Haverford was truly an inspiring performance. They were shutting him off today so I put him in the midfield to let him be the athlete that he is and he had four goals.”

Achieving the goal of winning the Prep A title was sweet for Whitlow, a former assistant coach at Lawrenceville.

“It means everything to these guys,” said Whitlow. “I really wanted these guys to have champions next to their name and they will have it now and we will hang a banner. This team will live on at the school because they deserve that and they worked for it.”

In Whitlow’s view, the title run was fueled by a focus on team. “The closeness of the group, the selflessness stands out,” said Whitlow.

“The group really didn’t care about individual stuff, they were all about the team and the teammates. They really worked hard in the offseason and they were a truly selfless, high character group of young men.”

Donovan, for his part, will always remember his year with the group.

“It has been great, this school has given me everything I could ask for,” said Donovan. “I am going to miss the hell out of it.”