May 13, 2015
CHILDHOOD MEMORY: That’s the title of this work by Taryn, a participant in the Arts Council of Princeton’s ArtsExchange program in conjunction with HomeFront. It will be shown with other works by children in the exhibition “All Eyes on Nature,” which opens Thursday, May 14, in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place. The show will continue through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

CHILDHOOD MEMORY: That’s the title of this work by Taryn, a participant in the Arts Council of Princeton’s ArtsExchange program in conjunction with HomeFront. It will be shown with other works by children in the exhibition “All Eyes on Nature,” which opens Thursday, May 14, in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place. The show will continue through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

D&R Greenway welcomes the public to “All Eyes on Nature,” an exhibition of innovative works by ArtsExchange students of the Arts Council of Princeton, through HomeFront. Dynamic images of nature from the insects’ perspective may be viewed in the land trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery from May 14 through June 26.

Since 1993, the Arts Council of Princeton has partnered with HomeFront, which serves thousands of Mercer County families to help break the cycle of poverty and end homelessness in offering ArtsExchange, a weekly program where year-round arts instruction is provided to more than 75 children, ages 5-18, whose families are currently living in transient circumstances.

For “All Eyes on Nature,” Arts Council of Princeton Outreach Program Manager/Instructor Eva Mantell guided her students to create paintings from the vantage point of insects. Ms. Mantell asked, “What are flowers, leaves, even surrounding landscapes, when you are an insect? Where is the horizon? Where is the ground? Where is the sun? What size are the elements in the painting?”

“All Eyes on Nature” comprises the children’s vibrant answers. The lively results are intended to catalyze a greater sensitivity to nature, its beauty and its peril. “They recreated nature’s own shifts in scale, colors, and textures, as well as its marvelous complexity and interconnectedness,” explained Ms. Mantell. “Native species were their starting point, each communicating his or her own ‘insect’ energy and excitement.”

D&R Greenway’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery is funded in memory of four-year-old Olivia Kuenne, who cherished nature and art. Sequential nature exhibitions by students extend Olivia’s enthusiasms into our time.

The Arts Council of Princeton thanks the following funders for their support of the ArtsExchange programming in 2014-15: ACP Fundraising Galas, Charles Galbraith Testamentary Trust, Colgate via United Way, The Concordia Foundation, The Firmenich Charitable Foundation, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies, Contributions Fund of the Community Foundation of New Jersey, Mary Owen Borden Foundation, The Migedan Foundation, Inc., New Jersey State Council on the Arts, NRG.

“All Eyes on Nature” will be on view at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, from May 14 through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

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May 6, 2015
TARASCON STAGECOACH: Vincent van Gogh’s 1888 painting will be back in Princeton this fall when it will be showcased in the exhibition “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” opening in September at the Princeton University Art Museum. The painting, which has been held by the art museum since 1976, has recently been on tour with other 19th and 20th century masterworks by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Manet, and Modigliani. The Princeton University Art Museum is open to the public at no charge. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-3788 or visit: artmuseum.princeton.edu.

TARASCON STAGECOACH: Vincent van Gogh’s 1888 painting will be back in Princeton this fall when it will be showcased in the exhibition “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” opening in September at the Princeton University Art Museum. The painting, which has been held by the art museum since 1976, has recently been on tour with other 19th and 20th century masterworks by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Manet, and Modigliani. The Princeton University Art Museum is open to the public at no charge. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-3788 or visit: artmuseum.princeton.edu.

A major exhibition of masterworks by Cézanne, Degas, Manet, Modigliani, and Van Gogh will be on view at the Princeton University Art Museum from September 12, through January 3, 2016.

The exhibition, “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” will feature works collected by American businessman Henry Pearlman (1895–1974) in the years after the Second World War. Fifty modern masterworks from the late 19th through the early 20th century will be on view.

Princeton is the concluding venue for the exhibition, organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in cooperation with the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, and the culmination of the first international tour of the entire collection since Henry Pearlman’s death 40 years ago.

The exhibition showcases works by leading Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and School of Paris artists, including Edgar Degas, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Amedeo Modigliani and Chaïm Soutine, as well as the collection’s centerpiece: a stellar group of oil paintings and watercolors by Pearlman’s favorite artist, Paul Cézanne.

“We are proud to have been the custodians of this superb collection since 1976, and now to have shared the collection with venues in four countries,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher-David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. “Its return to Princeton is an auspicious moment, marking the first time in decades that our visitors will have the opportunity to discover the whole of the collection at one time, and thus to appreciate the Pearlmans’ passion for some of the 19th and 20th centuries’ most important artists.”

Among the exhibition’s highlights are Cézanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire (ca. 1904–6), Van Gogh’s Tarascon Stagecoach (1888) and Modigliani’s portrait of Jean Cocteau (1916). The Pearlman Collection is especially known for an exceptional group of intimate works: 16 watercolors by Cézanne, forming perhaps the finest collection in the world in terms of their quality and condition, as well as the continuing freshness of their colors. Due to the delicacy of the medium, the watercolors can be shown only rarely, so this is likely to be the only opportunity for decades to see them in the context of Cézanne’s oils. Other artists represented in the exhibition include Gustave Courbet, Honoré Daumier, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lembruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Édouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

A richly illustrated catalogue, published by the Princeton University Art Museum and distributed by Yale University Press, accompanies the exhibition.

The Princeton University Art Museum is located on Princeton campus; admission is free. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum is closed Mondays and major holidays.

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April 15, 2015
THE GODDESS: That’s the title of this work by the late Jeanne Calo who will be remembered as a talented artist and generous spirit at an exhibition and sale of her work at the Princeton Senior Resource Center at 45 Stockton Street this Sunday, April 19, from 3 to 6 p.m. Ms. Calo donated her artwork to the Center and the exhibition of her colorful and highly stylized works will be on view through Friday, April 24. For more information, call (609) 924-7108; or visit: www.princetonsenior.org.(Image Courtesy of PSRC)

THE GODDESS: That’s the title of this work by the late Jeanne Calo who will be remembered as a talented artist and generous spirit at an exhibition and sale of her work at the Princeton Senior Resource Center at 45 Stockton Street this Sunday, April 19, from 3 to 6 p.m. Ms. Calo donated her artwork to the Center and the exhibition of her colorful and highly stylized works will be on view through Friday, April 24. For more information, call (609) 924-7108; or visit: www.princetonsenior.org. (Image Courtesy of PSRC)

The life and artistic creativity of the late local artist Jeanne Calo will be celebrated at the Princeton Senior Resource Center (PSRC) with an opening reception for an exhibition and sale of her work this Sunday, April 19, from 3 to 6 p.m. The public is invited to view Ms. Calo’s vibrant paintings, the sale of which will benefit the Center.

Ms. Calo, who passed away at age 98 in the spring of 2014, was a longtime resident of Princeton; she donated her paintings to the Center.

Born in Tunis in 1916, Ms. Calo took up painting later in life following a career at The College of New Jersey where she taught French. She traveled widely in Tunisia, Mexico, Ecuador, Indonesia, Morocco, Greece, Yugoslavia, and Thailand, acquiring objects from markets, festivals, dance, and music events. Such finds served as inspiration for Ms. Calo’s paintings, imbuing them with the essence of the countries and the cultures of the artist’s travels. She was also influenced by her love of Gauguin, Matisse, Derain, and Bonnard.

By many accounts, Ms. Calo was a remarkable woman with an indefatigable spirit. Her friends remember her as modest, unassuming and genuinely surprised when her paintings were appreciated and sought out by museums.

Long before she became an artist, Ms. Calo lived in Tunis as a young wife and mother. She moved to the United States with her cardiologist husband and children in 1958. After teaching for a while at a private school, she enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania in order to obtain a PhD degree so that she might pursue a career as a professor of French.

It wasn’t until her retirement at the age of 70 that she took up painting for the first time. It would become her major interest and a source of joy and achievement. According to her friend Paola Blelloch, Ms. Calo attended art courses at Mercer County Community College every week until shortly before her death last year. She studied under the famed New Jersey realist painter and teacher Mel Leipzig and discovered a favorite medium in acrylics. She quickly developed her own style which, said Ms. Blelloch, well-represented her personality. As artist, Ms. Calo favored strong colors and often added touches of humor.

Ms. Calo’s paintings have been exhibited in many museums and galleries. “Various institutions asked to exhibit her paintings which she did willingly, always giving the proceedings to charity,” said Ms. Blelloch.

“But her greater gift to me and her other many friends was the way she made each of us feel special, her optimism was contagious and her advice invaluable as it was always wise,” recalled Ms. Blelloch in a written account of her friend of 35 years. “The quality that can better sum her up is her ‘generosity,’ not only with presents that she gave to everybody in abundance, but with what she gave of herself. All her friends benefited from that.”

The exhibition and sale of Ms. Calo’s highly stylized works will be on view and available for purchase at the Princeton Senior Resource Center at 45 Stockton Street through Friday, April 24. For more information, (609) 924-7108; or visit: www.princetonsenior.org.

April 9, 2015
ELISHA’S MIRACLES: Bible enthusiasts have a treat in store at the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Center at 20 Library Place where illuminated images like this one of “Elisha and the Six Miracles” by renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson (here in collaboration with Aidan Hart) are on display in an exhibition of prints from The Saint John’s Bible project. The exhibition runs through May 10 with several educational events open to the public as well. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 9 p.m. For more information, call (609) 497-7990, or visit: www.ptsem.edu.(Image Courtesy of Erdman Center)

ELISHA’S MIRACLES: Bible enthusiasts have a treat in store at the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Center at 20 Library Place where illuminated images like this one of “Elisha and the Six Miracles” by renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson (here in collaboration with Aidan Hart) are on display in an exhibition of prints from The Saint John’s Bible project. The exhibition runs through May 10 with several educational events open to the public as well. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 9 p.m. For more information, call (609) 497-7990, or visit: www.ptsem.edu. (Image Courtesy of Erdman Center)

The idea of a handwritten illuminated Bible conjures up the image of a heavy leather-bound tome reverently presented for display in a glass case in some hushed library. Most of the examples we see today were created by monks laboring for years.

Thanks to the efforts of one contemporary calligrapher who is scribe to Queen Elizabeth II’s Crown Office at the House of Lords in London, England, the form has been revived. Donald Jackson has been commissioned by a Benedictine monastery to create the first completely handwritten and illuminated Bible since the invention of the printing press more than 500 years ago, the most extensive scribal commission the world has seen since the Middle Ages.

Mr. Jackson suggested the project to the monks at a monastery in Wales and he can be found talking about the project and demonstrating his skill with hand-cut quill and ink that he makes himself on You Tube (www.youtube.com/watch?v=BK9oCX5lBLQ). A team of scribes, artists, and crafts-people in a Welsh scriptorium worked on The Saint John’s Bible for more than 13 years.

Prints on loan from The Saint John’s Bible are currently on display in the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery. The exhibition runs through May 10.

The Erdman gallery exhibition, which is free and open to the public, is a rare chance to view a unique project intended to “ignite the spiritual imagination of Christian believers throughout the world and illuminate the Word of God using ancient traditions and today’s technology for a new millennium.” It features 25 approximately 22 by 30 inch giclée prints from the illuminated Bible that was commissioned in 1998 by the Benedictine monks of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minnesota.

Standout prints include Jacob’s Ladder by Donald Jackson in collaboration with Chris Tomlin; Faithful Friends by Diane von Arx with scribe Brian Simpson; Donald Jackson’s Village of the Dry Bones and The Life of Paul; and two works by Thomas Ingmire: Messianic Prediction and The Ten Commandments. For the latter, the artist’s brief was to combine five different passages from Exodus into one single illumination. Mr. Ingmire’s is a modern take on his subject. While the top half of the page depicts traditional images of burning bush, the first Passover, the crossing of the Red Sea, and the twelve pillars of Israel with Biblical texts arranged across them in gold lettering, the bottom half of the page contains the Ten Commandments in letters that are stenciled rather than penned, or should we say “quilled.” The result emphasizes the authoritative nature of the “laws.”

Don’t miss Chris Tomlin’s Monarch Butterflies, alongside which helpful wall notes explain the symbolic significance of the butterfly in Christian art. You will also learn that that the margins of medieval Bibles were often decorated with plants and animals that had symbolic meaning and that all of the species of flora and fauna depicted in the margins of the Saint John’s Bible are either native to the Minnesota woods surrounding St. John’s University or to the Welsh countryside near Donald Jackson’s home. Mr. Tomlin, a specialist in botanical and nature illustration, went to Minnesota to research marginalia subjects.

Along with the show, the Seminary plans three special events that are also open to the public. On Wednesday, April 22, at 7 p.m. Tim Ternes, director of The Saint John’s Bible at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library, will recount the story behind the project and discuss the art on display. His interactive presentation, “From Inspiration to Illumination: An Introduction to The Saint John’s Bible,” takes place in the Erdman Center. To attend, register at www.ptsem.edu/stjohnbible.

Working directly with the project’s artistic team, Mr. Ternes facilitates exhibitions for the original pages and reproductions, as well as curating and caring for the original folios of the Bible. He travels extensively offering presentations, exhibitions, and educational programs for the Bible project and library collections. “They’ve brought together a team of theologians and artists who thought through the entire project,” said Dayle Rounds, associate dean of continuing education at the Seminary. “It’s amazing to hear Tim [Ternes] walk you through each of the images on display.”

Following Mr. Ternes’s presentation, there will be a reception and a demonstration of techniques used in the creation of the Bible by calligrapher Diane Von Arx, whose own work is among those on display.

A native Minnesotan, Ms. Von Arx has been a graphic designer for more than 25 years. She specializes in creative lettering and calligraphy and conducts workshops throughout the U.S., Canada, Japan, and Australia. She has published three beginning calligraphy workbooks and her work has been included in numerous exhibitions and private collections.

One of only three U. S. calligraphers asked to participate in the creation of The Saint John’s Bible, Ms. Von Arx will share her experiences as an artist working on this more than a decade-long project as well as her personal insights on the creative process and the challenges of going from word to image with sacred texts.

For those interested in delving deeper into the project and even trying their hand at grinding inks and using hand-cut quills, the Seminary is offering a 24 hour retreat, “Seeing the Word: A Retreat with The Saint John’s Bible” on April 22 and April 23.

Led by Mr. Ternes and Ms. von Arx, participants will examine the creative and artistic processes involved and “enter into a deeper understanding of the scriptural passages with the new, exciting way of experiencing God’s Word: visio divina.” The cost of the retreat is $145 and includes the program and three meals. For a complete schedule or to register, visit www.ptsem.edu/stjohnsbible.

The Erdman Art Gallery is located in the Erdman Center at 20 Library Place, Princeton. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 9 p.m.

For more information, call (609) 497-7990, or visit: www.ptsem.edu.

April 2, 2015
PRINCETON OBSERVED: Local artist Jay McPhillips’s paintings of familiar spots around town feature in an exhibition opening at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, April 7. The show, which continues through May 9, is titled “Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton & Beyond,” and features original oil paintings. The artwork is for sale along with some of Mr. McPhillips’s Prince-Ton tote bags and mugs. For more on the artist, visit Prince-ton.com and JayMcPhillips.com.(Image Courtesy of the Artist)

PRINCETON OBSERVED: Local artist Jay McPhillips’s paintings of familiar spots around town feature in an exhibition opening at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, April 7. The show, which continues through May 9, is titled “Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton & Beyond,” and features original oil paintings. The artwork is for sale along with some of Mr. McPhillips’s Prince-Ton tote bags and mugs. For more on the artist, visit Prince-ton.com and JayMcPhillips.com. (Image Courtesy of the Artist)

Paintings of familiar scenes around town by local artist Jay McPhillips will feature in a display of his paintings opening at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, on April 7. The exhibition will continue through May 9.

“Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton and Beyond,” will feature original oil paintings, including Princeton locations and some New Jersey shore scenes. Some unframed oils on panel will be available for under $350.

Mr. McPhillips will also offer a complimentary digital file of the paintings to any local businesses for a limited usage should they purchase a painting. Also, the show will feature some of Mr. McPhillips “gift shop items” including Prince-Ton tote bags, mugs.

The award-winning artist has been celebrated for over a decade in the Princeton, New York City, and Bucks County areas.

Highlights of his art and design career include work for Comedy Central TV, The Guggenheim Museum, Chiat Day TBWA Ad Agency, and Princeton’s Tony Award Winning McCarter Theatre.

This year Mr. McPhillips work was featured on George Takei’s Facebook page (over 150,000 likes), Reddit.com, Buzzfeed.com, and Mo Rocca’s TV show My Grandmother’s Ravioli.

He is currently working on a book of his Princeton paintings to be Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton. His paintings can be viewed at Prince-ton.com and JayMcPhillips.com.

For more information (including pre-show orders), visit: Prince-TON.com.

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March 25, 2015
MARKING LOCAL HISTORY: George Frisbie captured the Southbound Trolley at North Main and Delaware in this vintage print from the collection of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society’s George H. Frisbie Collection that will be on display in the exhibition, “Pennington Comes of Age” at the Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art from March 27 through April 25. There will be a special reception Wednesday, April 1, from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition is part of the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of Pennington Borough and features vintage images from 1890 to 1915. Silva Gallery hours are: Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or by appointment. For more information, call Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at (609) 737-4133.(Image Courtesy of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society)

MARKING LOCAL HISTORY: George Frisbie captured the Southbound Trolley at North Main and Delaware in this vintage print from the collection of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society’s George H. Frisbie Collection that will be on display in the exhibition, “Pennington Comes of Age” at the Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art from March 27 through April 25. There will be a special reception Wednesday, April 1, from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition is part of the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of Pennington Borough and features vintage images from 1890 to 1915. Silva Gallery hours are: Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or by appointment. For more information, call Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at (609) 737-4133. (Image Courtesy of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society)

An exhibition of historic photographs from the Hopewell Valley Historical Society’s George H. Frisbie Collection goes on show at The Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art Friday, March 27. “Pennington Comes of Age,” will run through April 25 and there will be a special reception on Wednesday, April 1, from 5 to 8 p.m.

Curated by Jack Koeppel, the Historical Society’s archivist, the exhibition is part of the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of Pennington Borough and features vintage images from the first twenty-five years of the Borough’s incorporation, 1890–1915.

During these years George Frisbie, who had grown up in a family-run business on South Main Street, captured the world around him through the view-finder of his big wooden camera. His images not only document people and places, but record many of the changes that took place over this span of time. Descendants of Mr. Frisbie still reside in Pennington Borough, and in 1986 Alice Frisbie and her daughter, Mary Thornton, donated eight hundred negatives to the Historical Society.

The images selected for the exhibition will be accompanied by narratives written by Society historians Larry Kidder, Jack Davis, and David Blackwell. Areas in the display will discuss changes in architecture, transportation, and technology during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Images of the railroad, street railways, and horseless carriages will be accompanied by quotations and information gleaned from early newspapers and artifacts in the Society’s Archive of Hopewell Valley History.

Many of the photographs are being exhibited for the first time, including some showing important local Pennington residents such as Joseph Thompson, the flag crossing guard, and Charles Hendrickson, the town’s lamp-lighter.

Pennington Borough Council Member Catherine “Kit” Chandler and former Councilman Edwin Weed Tucker co-chair the Pennington 125th Anniversary Committee, which welcomes volunteers, sponsors, and patrons. For more information contact Borough Administrator Eileen Heinzel at (609) 737-0276 or eheinzel@penningtonboro.org.

The committee is working with other community organizations to plan events throughout the year.

For the latest information, visit: www.pennington125.org or visit Pennington 125 on Facebook.

Founded in 1838, The Pennington School is an independent coeducational school for students in grades 6 through 12, in both day and boarding programs.

“Pennington Comes of Age” will be on view at The Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or by appointment. All events and exhibitions at the Silva Gallery are free and open to the public. For more information, call Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at (609) 737-4133.

March 18, 2015
IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES: The wit and whimsy of children’s book illustrator Matthew Cordell will be on display in an exhibition at Princeton Day School’s Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery later this month. The artist’s “Hello! Hello!,” from Disney Hyperion Books, 2012, shown here, is part of “Drawing and Drawing Again,” which opens March 30 and runs through April 23. There will be an artists’ reception on Monday, April 20 from noon to 12:30 p.m. For more on the artist: visit: www.matthewcordell.com. Part of the school’s “Imagine the Possibilities” guest artist series, the exhibition is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information, call (609) 924-6700, ext. 1772, or visit:www.pds.org.

IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES: The wit and whimsy of children’s book illustrator Matthew Cordell will be on display in an exhibition at Princeton Day School’s Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery later this month. The artist’s “Hello! Hello!,” from Disney Hyperion Books, 2012, shown here, is part of “Drawing and Drawing Again,” which opens March 30 and runs through April 23. There will be an artists’ reception on Monday, April 20 from noon to 12:30 p.m. For more on the artist: visit: www.matthewcordell.com. Part of the school’s “Imagine the Possibilities” guest artist series, the exhibition is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information, call (609) 924-6700, ext. 1772, or visit:www.pds.org.

The Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School is pleased to present “Drawing and Drawing Again” featuring the artwork of book illustrator Matthew Cordell from March 30 through April 23. There will be an artists’ reception on Monday, April 20 from noon to 12:30 p.m., which is free and open to the public.

Mr. Cordell has been drawing and making art for as long as he can remember. He has illustrated many books for children, including works of poetry, novels, and picture books. He has written and illustrated Trouble Gum, Another Brother, Wish, and Hello! Hello!, a New York Times Notable Children’s Book. Mr. Cordell lives outside of Chicago with his wife, author, Julie Halpern, and their two children. (For more information, visit: www.matthewcordell.com)

The exhibition is part of the “Imagine the Possibilities” guest artist series at Princeton Day School, which is made possible through the generosity of the John D. Wallace, Jr. ’78 Memorial Guest Artist Series Fund.

The series has brought in celebrated authors, poets, and illustrators to work directly with Princeton Day School students for the past 20 years. Imagine the Possibilities coordinator Bev Gallagher remarked, “What a delight it has been working with this program for the past 20 years. It truly is inspiring to welcome amazing artists to our campus and watch teachers, students, and parents enjoy the experience. We are certainly thrilled that Matt will be with us this year — our 20th anniversary year!”

“Drawing and drawing again” is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information about the Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery, please call Jody Erdman, Art Gallery Director, at 609) 924-6700 x 1772 or visit www.pds.org.

 

March 11, 2015
MCCC RETROSPECTIVE: Work by the acclaimed local artist and MCCC educator Frank Rivera, such as his “Liar, Liar,” shown here, is part of a retrospective of his work at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College. There will be an opening reception tonight, March 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The show will run through April 2. Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.(Image Courtesy of MCCC).

MCCC RETROSPECTIVE: Work by the acclaimed local artist and MCCC educator Frank Rivera, such as his “Liar, Liar,” shown here, is part of a retrospective of his work at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College. There will be an opening reception tonight, March 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The show will run through April 2. Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery. (Image Courtesy of MCCC).

There will be an opening public reception tonight, Wednesday, March 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the gallery in Mercer County Community College (MCCC) for an exhibition of work by the acclaimed artist and former MCCC professor Frank Rivera.

The Gallery is located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road.

“Frank Rivera Retrospective: Selected Works 1945–2015” will continue through Thursday April 2.

Mr. Rivera taught art at MCCC from 1967 to 2003 and is now professor emeritus there. A resident of Hightstown, he has lived and worked in Mercer County for more than 40 years. His work has been exhibited prominently in the United States, including exhibits at the Whitney Museum, the Luise Ross Gallery, and the Abington Art Center, as well as numerous venues in Paris, where Rivera regularly spends time painting. He is a graduate of Yale Art School, with an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania.

According to MCCC Gallery Director Dylan Wolfe, the show will include work from all phases of the painter and educator’s creative career, which in earlier years featured large-scale abstractions, while in more recent times has focused on smaller narrative pieces inspired by storyboard graphics and computer art. The exhibition even includes a few pieces preserved from Rivera’s childhood.

“The work … has been arranged by theme and subject rather than by chronology. It is the persistence of these themes and subjects – not always linear – that has shaped my vision over the decades,” notes Mr. Rivera in the exhibition catalog,

The artist’s previous exhibitions have drawn glowing reviews. “There is an iconic quality to his pieces, recalling the carefully wrought panels and religious icons of medieval art,” wrote Cathy Vikso, of the Trenton Times. “Rivera says [his] paintings are autobiographical, but each [work] seems more like a distillation than a rapidly jotted down memory, and their complexity in such small dimensions is made the more interesting for their visual clarity, though their meanings are often elusive,” said Dan Bischoff of the Newark Star-Ledger. Dallas Piotrowski, former curator at the Chapin Gallery, has noted that “paintings of Rivera are for the mind.”

Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

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March 4, 2015
AZUL II: Simply titled, this 47 by 47 inch cement and acrylic on canvas painting by Mexican artist Emilia Sirrs can be seen by appointment only in an exhibition of the artist’s work in the home gallery of Ilana and Mauricio Gutierrez in Princeton. Ms. Sirrs’s paintings establish a rapport with the viewer through an empathic use of texture and color to convey emotional content. To make an appointment to view the exhibition, which will be on display through March, call (822) 275-6586, or email: gutierrez.ilana@gmail.com or yslebi@yahoo.com.(Image Courtesy of the Artist.)

AZUL II: Simply titled, this 47 by 47 inch cement and acrylic on canvas painting by Mexican artist Emilia Sirrs can be seen by appointment only in an exhibition of the artist’s work in the home gallery of Ilana and Mauricio Gutierrez in Princeton. Ms. Sirrs’s paintings establish a rapport with the viewer through an empathic use of texture and color to convey emotional content. To make an appointment to view the exhibition, which will be on display through March, call (822) 275-6586, or email: gutierrez.ilana@gmail.com or yslebi@yahoo.com. (Image Courtesy of the Artist.)

Using rich traces of rust with cement and ash, Mexican artist Emilia Sirrs creates depth and color in her large abstract canvases.

The artist’s bold technique is shown to good effect on the walls of a home gallery in an ultramodern home on Random Road in Princeton.

Ms. Sirrs has found a unique showcase for her work in the home of Ilana and Mauricio Gutierrez where the Mexican artist presents her most recent exhibition of work through March.

The artist’s palette is one of earth hues that evoke the familiar and have a soothing quality with touches of azure and crimson for dramatic effect.

Although born in Cincinnati, Ms. Sirrs defines herself as a Mexican artist. She has lived most of her life in Mexico; it is where she developed as an artist while engrossed in the cultural richness of that country.

Since 1990, she has experimented in diverse media and more than 40 individual, collective, and social responsibility events in Mexico, United States, Asia, and Europe have provided international visibility for her work, which has been shown in the Ibero American Art Fair, Seoul; Acento Gallery and Ghaf Gallery, Dubai; Fisher Island Design Center, Miami; Galeria Crisolart, Barcelona; and Galeria Johanna Martinez, Belgium, as well as at various events in Mexico.

The exhibition, which is open to the public, consists of a series of 14 abstract paintings. The artist’s use of metallic rust, cement, ashes, and bold dashes of striking red and blue hues results in work that has warmth and depth. The effect is one of mystery.

“Each of Emilia’s paintings begins with a simple idea that progresses in complexity until the work is finished, with no pre-conceived notions,” said home gallery owner Ilana Gutierrez. As Ms. Sirrs explained, her creative process “starts with an abstract concept that is not constrained by an established purpose, objective, or method. I prepare paints and materials using mundane elements, in this case rust, concrete, and ashes, and then let the brush strokes lead me to the place where my inner feelings reside. The final product always expresses my vision of how to mix innovative materials and techniques in a way that is vividly captivating.”

The paintings demonstrate an artistic style that establishes a rapport with the spectator by sharing and transmitting the abstraction of human feelings through textures and shades of color. Her work aims to establish a dialogue where matter and visual impact do the talking. According to Emilia, sometimes the material aspects of a painting surpass its intellectual or creative intent, which helps to establish an immediate connection.

Together with her husband Mauricio and their three children, Ms. Gutierrez shares a unique architect-designed ultra-modern home on Random Road in Princeton. Besides a large number of windows letting in natural light, the home has a great deal of wall space as well as gallery space dedicated to the showing of art. Ms. Gutierrez’s mother is the Mexican-based art dealer Eva Beloglovsky and the couple has a growing collection of canvas paintings, prints, and sculpture, including some displayed outside.

I have lived with art all of my life,” said Ms. Gutierrez, whose mother has been an art dealer for 40 years. “She always made it a point for us to be involved.”

When the couple moved to Princeton, they found a house that suited their own extensive art collection. Now they are keen to “expose the Princeton community to Mexican and Latin American Art,” said Ms. Gutierrez who was introduced to Ms. Sirrs’s work through her mother.

“My mother loves Emilia’s work and deeply believes in her as a professional artist who is producing abstract work that is emotional rather than purely intellectual. Emilia’s work shows a high sense of emotion as well as great academic standards. She created this work specially for the walls in our own gallery with the thought that it could go into any home, public, or corporate art space.”

Still, not many people would welcome strangers traipsing through their home looking at the artwork on the walls. Intrigued by the idea of a home gallery, I asked Ms. Gutierrez about the concept. “Even though this is not a public space, we feel comfortable sharing this experience with the community. Collectors and art lovers are welcome by appointment,” she said. “This experience is so satisfying we are planning another show sometime in the near future. It has been a great source of inspiration to pursue the idea and share responsibilities with my artistic business partner Yamile Slebi.”

Asked if the business partners might be opening an art gallery in Princeton at some time in the future, Ms. Gutierrez said that she hasn’t ruled it out. “Time will tell and the idea is not disregarded,” she said.

To make an appointment to view the exhibition, which will be on display through March, email: gutierrez.ilana@gmail.com or yslebi@yahoo.com.

 

February 25, 2015
LAMBERTVILLE ART SALE: Jacqui Alexander’s painting, titled “The End,” will be on display along with more of her work in the Pop-Up Gallery show at 22 Church Street in Lambertville on Saturday, February 28, starting at noon. There will be an opening reception with refreshments and a meet and greet with Ms. Alexander and her fellow artist in the show, Elina Lorenz, from 5 to 6:30 pm. Proceeds from the sale of the artists’ work will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County. For more information, visit: www.bbbsmercer.org.

LAMBERTVILLE ART SALE: Jacqui Alexander’s painting, titled “The End,” will be on display along with more of her work in the Pop-Up Gallery show at 22 Church Street in Lambertville on Saturday, February 28, starting at noon. There will be an opening reception with refreshments and a meet and greet with Ms. Alexander and her fellow artist in the show, Elina Lorenz, from 5 to 6:30 pm. Proceeds from the sale of the artists’ work will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County. For more information, visit: www.bbbsmercer.org.

A Pop-Up art show at 22 Church Street in Lambertville will showcase the works of two local artists, Elina Lorenz and Jacqui Alexander, on Saturday, February 28, starting at noon. There will be a reception with refreshments and a meet and greet with the artists from 5 to 6:30 pm.

Proceeds from the sale of the artwork will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County (BBBS) in the first ever partnership of this kind for the organization.

“We are honored that these talented artists have chosen to share the proceeds of their art show with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County,” said Susan Dunning, executive director of the organization. “Money raised will enable us to match qualified volunteers with local children who are in need of a caring adult mentor.”

Lauren Helfrich, a graduate student at Rider University in the MBA program, has organized the art show as a part of a project for a management course. She and her fellow group members are passionate about the mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters. “The future is in the hands of our nation’s youth; every small encounter, relationship, moment, or event that transpires in these children’s lives affects them immensely,” she said.

Both of the artists live and work in Mercer County. Ms. Alexander’s artwork can be described as a personal narrative, told using symbols and forms from the natural world. Her recent paintings are inspired by the wildlife of her home state of New Jersey, with a healthy dose of wanderlust mixed in. A graduate of Rhode Island School of Design, she currently lives and works in Princeton, where she is a marketing consultant to businesses large and small.

Ms. Lorenz has been painting since her early childhood. Her style is varied, but she mostly draws her inspiration from the nature and wildlife right outside her window in her home studio in Princeton. She currently also has pieces on display in the ArtJam Pop-Up Gallery. Ms. Lorenz graduated from the Art Lyceum in Kishinev in her native country of Moldova.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County is the oldest, largest and most effective youth mentoring volunteer organization in the United States. The BBBS-Mercer Mission is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one matches that change their lives for the better forever.

For more information, visit: www.bbbsmercer.org.

February 18, 2015
THE BAPTISM: This watercolor by local artist Terri McNichol won a Purchase Award from the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, and will be on display as part of the Mercer County Artists 2015 exhibition at the MCCC Gallery through February 27. For more information and gallery hours, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

THE BAPTISM: This watercolor by local artist Terri McNichol won a Purchase Award from the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, and will be on display as part of the Mercer County Artists 2015 exhibition at the MCCC Gallery through February 27. For more information and gallery hours, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

The Mercer County arts community came out in force earlier this month to view the rich and varied works of fellow artists at the Awards Ceremony and Opening Reception for “Mercer County Artists 2015,” which will be on display through February 27 at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College (MCCC), located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road.

The show features 89 works by 63 artists in a variety of media including oil, acrylic, and watercolor paintings, as well as mixed media collages and 23 sculptures.

Gallery Director Dylan Wolfe, who curated the show, announced the award winners with fellow presenters Tricia Fagan and Nora Añanos from the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission. “This exhibit clearly demonstrates the immense talent and culture of Mercer County,” said Mr. Wolfe. “Supporting the arts sustains the inspirations we can each find when we are living in a community flush with creativity, culture, and the expression of passions.”

Mr. Wolfe thanked juror Kyle Stevenson, an artist and MCCC Professor of Fine Arts, for making his selections from 244 pieces submitted by 138 artists. “Having been present during his deliberation, I can tell you with certainty that he made many difficult choices,” Wolfe told the crowd. Mr. Wolfe also acknowledged the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission for its continuing support of the exhibit. “The commission not only supports us through grant funding, but also purchased artwork totaling over $2500 from this exhibit. They continue to build a remarkable permanent collection of county created, county owned artwork, and provide direct support and encouragement to our community of artists,” he said.

Award winners include: the Utrecht-Blick Best in Show Prize to David Orban of Trenton for “The Work Party: The Workbench.” The Juror’s Choice Awards went to Janis Purcell of East Windsor for “Phoenix Rising” and Megan Uhaze of Hamilton for “The Eye.” Juror’s Honorable Mention recipients were Marina Ahun of Princeton for “New York Grand Central Terminal”; Elise Dodeles of Lambertville for “San Francisco Area Fighter A219, Ike O’Rourke”; James Doherty of Lawrence for “Wynwood Walls”; Timothy J. Fitzpatrick of Mercerville for “Low Tide”; and Bill Plank of Lawrenceville for “Birth.”

County Purchase Awards went to Jamie Greenfield of Lawrenceville for “Seven Gold Coins”; Libby Ramage of Princeton for “Incantation”; John Pietrowski of Ewing (untitled); Adam Hillman of Pennington (untitled); Terri McNichol of Cranbury for “The Baptism”; and Cathy Saska-Mydlowski of Hamilton for “South Beach.”

Arin Black, executive director of the West Windsor Arts Council, awarded the Council’s prize to Kathleen Liao of Princeton Junction for “Quantum Leap.”

Featured artists from the Princeton area included: Priscilla Snow Algava, Joanne Amantea, Mechtild Bitter, Katja De Rutyer, Mary Dolan, Janet Felton, Sejal Krishnan, Ronald A. LaMahieu, Ghislaine Pasteur, Christa Schneider, Judith Tallerman, Ellen Veden, and Andrew Werth.

For more information, directions and gallery hours, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

February 11, 2015
MERCER COUNTY’S SCOTTISH CONNECTION: This winter, volunteer stitchers at Morven Museum and Garden worked on this panel paying tribute to General Hugh Mercer as part of the Scottish Diaspora Tapestry project. When completed, the finished panel, which has the famous Mercer Oak as its centerpiece, will be sent back to Scotland to join others like it celebrating the achievements and contributions of Scots around the world.(Image Courtesy of Morven Museum and Garden)

MERCER COUNTY’S SCOTTISH CONNECTION: This winter, volunteer stitchers at Morven Museum and Garden worked on this panel paying tribute to General Hugh Mercer as part of the Scottish Diaspora Tapestry project. When completed, the finished panel, which has the famous Mercer Oak as its centerpiece, will be sent back to Scotland to join others like it celebrating the achievements and contributions of Scots around the world. (Image Courtesy of Morven Museum and Garden)

Morven Museum and Garden on Stockton Street is participating in a worldwide celebration of The Scottish Diaspora by bringing volunteer stitchers together to work on a single tapestry panel that is to be included in a larger work in tribute to the accomplishments of Scots around the world.

Princeton’s contribution features elements from the life of Revolutionary War hero General Hugh Mercer (1726-1777), who died a slow death over several days from bayonet wounds received at the hands of British soldiers during the Battle of Princeton.

After his horse had been shot from under him, Mercer was bayoneted repeatedly and left for dead. Legend has it that he lay under the famous oak tree that would become a symbol of the county named for him, before being taken to the William Clark house nearby.

But Mercer’s story goes back a long way before his friend George Washington, with whom he had fought in the French and Indian War, made him a brigadier general in the Continental Army.

Like many of his patriotic companions, Mercer had fled his native Scotland for the colony of America. As a battlefield surgeon at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, he had witnessed the bloody butchery that ended the Scottish attempt to restore the Stuarts to the British throne. Led by Charles Edward Stuart, the legendary Bonnie Prince Charlie, hopes for this Jacobite Rebellion were dashed at Drumossie Moor where the battle was fought, just north of Inverness.

Two years earlier, at the age of 19, and newly graduated from Aberdeen University, Mercer had been inspired by thoughts of replacing the German-speaking King George II with the prince that highlanders regarded as the rightful heir to the united monarchy of Scotland, England, and Ireland.

Centuries later, the name Culloden retains the power to evoke chills in the Scottish psyche and in a dramatic account of Mercer’s death in General Hugh Mercer: Forgotten Hero of the American Revolution, author Frederick English describes Mercer’s defiance of the British redcoats as a throwback to his days as a battlefield doctor. He would not ask for mercy of soldiers who called to him to surrender, calling him a “rebel.”

Morven’s contribution to the Scottish Diaspora Tapestry Project involved many hands. The Museum’s Barbara Webb commends “stalwart stitching volunteer” Alison Totten for the lion’s share of the work, helped also by Edie Tattersall during the recent holiday period.

The embroidered panel connects Princeton to two dozen other communities engaged in documenting their Scottish connections. The aim is to pay homage to emigrant Scots over the centuries by gathering and celebrating the stories of those individuals who had a profound impact on the areas where they settled.

“I hadn’t picked up a needle since the 1960s but knew this was something I could contribute to,” said Ms. Totten, who welcomed the opportunity to “honor all my Scottish ancestors, who represent a cross section of the Diaspora. I am part of the McLean clan of Argyll.”

According to the project’s organizers, Scots and their descendants “never lost a deeply held pride in Scotland’s culture and its democratic ideals: they took with them their religion, skills in medicine, engineering, botany, education, administration, agriculture, and more besides.”

“I saw a lot of people who, like me, had not done needlework in a long time, and who, like me, were taught by a mother or grandmother all those years ago,” said Ms. Totten who was quick to credit the skills of an accomplished embroiderer from the Embroidery Guild of America for stitching the Mercer Oak and the recumbent figure of Mercer under it. “It was a sheer delight to encourage them to put in a stitch or two and watch their faces transform with joy. We even got a few cub scouts to participate! One 4-year-old girl had to be pried away by a very patient mother.”

Soon to be shipped back to Scotland, Morven’s panel shows the Mercer Oak alongside the names of significant places in the life of the soldier physician. The international artwork of which it will form a part, is a successor to the first communal Scottish tapestry project, The Great Tapestry of Scotland, completed in 2013.

Hundreds of stitchers in 25 countries volunteered thousands of hours to craft panels which illustrate such contributions as the arrival of tea in India; the creation of a steelworks in Corby, England; military leadership in Sweden and Russia; national parks and tobacco growing in the United States; and the gold rush in Australia.

Mercer was one of Washington’s most trusted advisers. According to military historian and Washington biographer Douglas Southall Freeman, had Mercer lived, he “might have been [Washington’s] peer and possibly his superior.”

For more on the Morven project, visit: http://morven.org/the-scottish-diaspora-tapestry-project/. For more about the tapestry, visit: www.scottishdiasporatapestry.org.

February 4, 2015
ANGEL WINGS: As a trained botanist, Mary Allessio Leck combines a singular photographic eye for detail together with informed scientific knowledge. Shown here are her images of ice and water that will be included in the Gallery at Chapin’s “Parallel Views–Flowers and Ice,” through February 27, at the Chapin School, 4101 Princeton Pike. An opening reception for the artist is scheduled for tonight, Wednesday, February 4, from 5 to 7 p.m., but in case of inclement weather, visitors are advised to check for rescheduling details by calling (609) 924-7206 or visiting the Chaplin School website: www.chapinschool.org.

ANGEL WINGS: As a trained botanist, Mary Allessio Leck combines a singular photographic eye for detail together with informed scientific knowledge. Shown here are her images of ice and water that will be included in the Gallery at Chapin’s “Parallel Views–Flowers and Ice,” through February 27, at the Chapin School, 4101 Princeton Pike. An opening reception for the artist is scheduled for tonight, Wednesday, February 4, from 5 to 7 p.m., but in case of inclement weather, visitors are advised to check for rescheduling details by calling (609) 924-7206 or visiting the Chaplin School website: www.chapinschool.org.

The Gallery at Chapin’s latest exhibition brings artistry and botanical science together for a close look at flowers and ice, the twin interests of local photographer Mary Allessio Leck. “Parallel Views – Flowers and Ice,” will run through February 27. An opening reception for the artist is scheduled for tonight, Wednesday, February 4, from 5 to 7 p.m., but in case of inclement weather, visitors are advised to check for rescheduling details by calling (609) 924-7206 or visiting the Chapin School website: www.chapinschool.org.

Ms. Leck appreciates water in all its forms. Known locally for her work with the freshwater wetlands once called the Hamilton-Trenton-Bordentown Marsh and now known at the Abbott Wetlands, Ms. Leck was among the founders of the Friends of the Marsh (www.marsh-friends.org). She is also a member of the Delaware and Raritan Canal Commission (DRCC), which overseas and manages the Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park and protects the streams that feed into the canal.

As a photographer she is drawn to both ice and flowers. Although these seem to be such separate subjects, one suggesting coldness and the other passion; one inanimate and the other living, “the properties of water underlie both,” explained Ms. Leck in a recent interview.

While the connection is obvious in the case of ice, it’s a little more subtle in the case of flowers. “As a scientist I’m interested in flowers right down to the level in which water is transported into the cells,” said the trained botanist who is a Rutgers University professor emerita. “My interests in flowers and ice run in parallel, both subjects have a great variety of forms, textures, colors, and patterns. Both are dependent on particular properties of water. Both can be extraordinarily beautiful. Both, also, can surprise and prove opportunities for discovery,” she said.

Her photography reveals forms in flowers as “simple” as a tulip or as complex as an orchid. Recent photographic explorations of flowers have yielded “enlightening” views “of the sparkle and wrinkled surfaces of petals, for example. Flowers can be deconstructed, petals removed to reveal inner details.”

Ms. Leck, who gained a bachelor’s degree in botany from the University of Massachusetts and a PhD in the subject from the University of Colorado in Boulder, is partial to photographing irises, orchids, and white flowers in general, but feels that all deserve a look.

When it comes to ice, Ms. Leck has found just as much diversity. She has discovered that ice can be textured. “The surface, bottom, and/or internal crystal formation is critical to determining what happens to light; sometimes the light pattern on the bottom of a puddle can create a complex mosaic superimposed on the leaves that collected there,” she has observed.

Photographing her two subjects combined with her deep scientific knowledge has enriched Ms. Leck’s awareness of the natural world and its myriad of connections: “I’ve come to realize that regardless of the subject, light is critically important to what I see (or that my camera captures). It is the properties of the cells and cell walls of flowers and features of ice crystal formation that determine whether light is transmitted, reflected, or refracted. Ultimately, it is the transparency of water to light that allows us to see, and to see patterns in ice or the pigments in petal cells.”

Her work draws upon the basic scientific techniques of observation and experimentation. “Underlying my photography is the fun of exploring, discovering, and trying to figure out explanations for what I’ve seen.”

Ms. Leck has participated in many shows including Phillips Mill Photography Exhibit, Grounds for Sculpture, Ellarslie at the Museum of Trenton, and D&R Greenway Land Trust.

The Chapin School is located at 4101 Princeton Pike, Princeton. The exhibition can be viewed during school hours by appointment. For more information, call (609) 924-7206, or email: sgomberg@chapinschool.org.

January 28, 2015
MOONLIGHT ON JUDGE’S SHACK: Ray Yeager’s star studded scene is just one of the evocative images in the D&R Greenway Land Trust exhibition, “High Noon to Midnight Moon–Talismans of the Horizon,” on view through March 20. An Artists’ Opening and reception will be held this Friday, January 30, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Johnson Education Center, One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road. The exhibition features work by Silver Boureau, Annelies van Dommelen, Lora Durr, Deborah Land, Kathleen Liao, Paula Pearl, Rye Tippett, Diane Tomash and Ray Yeager. All the art is for sale with a percentage going to support the D&R Greenway’s preservation and stewardship mission. To register for the free reception, call (609) 924-4646 or rsvp@drgreenway.org. For more information, visit: www.drgreenway.org.

MOONLIGHT ON JUDGE’S SHACK: Ray Yeager’s star studded scene is just one of the evocative images in the D&R Greenway Land Trust exhibition, “High Noon to Midnight Moon–Talismans of the Horizon,” on view through March 20. An Artists’ Opening and reception will be held this Friday, January 30, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Johnson Education Center, One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road. The exhibition features work by Silver Boureau, Annelies van Dommelen, Lora Durr, Deborah Land, Kathleen Liao, Paula Pearl, Rye Tippett, Diane Tomash and Ray Yeager. All the art is for sale with a percentage going to support the D&R Greenway’s preservation and stewardship mission. To register for the free reception, call (609) 924-4646 or rsvp@drgreenway.org. For more information, visit: www.drgreenway.org.

In celebration of its current art exhibition, “High Noon to Midnight Moon–Talismans of the Horizon,” the D&R Greenway Land Trust will host a reception and artists’ opening this Friday, January 30, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Curated by Diana Moore, the exhibition features the work of artists Silver Boureau, Annelies van Dommelen, Lora Durr, Deborah Land, Kathleen Liao, Paula Pearl, Rye Tippett, Diane Tomash and Ray Yeager. All the art is for sale with a percentage going to support the D&R Greenway’s preservation and stewardship mission.

Viewing the work on display has been described as a “virtual Whistler experience.” The artwork celebrates “the half-light, first glimmers of morning, last rays of evening and especially light in darkness” and is “the ideal tonic for occluded winter days.”

“The exhibit is dark, deep, yet sublime, with magical moons, suns, and stars illuminating rich land & skyscapes, encouraging one to contemplate the immense solitude of the skies,” said Ms. Moore. “The moons symbolize D&R Greenway’s silver anniversary; the suns suggest looking forward to the golden 50th celebration, and the stars remind us of land preserved in perpetuity.”

The art on display is characterized by Whistler-like delicacy. It includes intriguing boxes, which evoke the mysterious constructions of Joseph Cornell; and whisper-soft evocations of light on New Jersey landscapes, including the Pine Barrens and Island Beach by night.

High Noon to Midnight Moon–Talismans of the Horizon,” may be viewed in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries at the D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center, One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road, on business hours of business days through March 20. For unscheduled gallery visits, call to be sure rooms are not rented at the time of prospective arrival.

The D&R Greenway’s home—a circa-1900 restored barn—the Johnson Education Center, has become a focal point for conservation activity. Through programs, art exhibits and related lectures at One Preservation Place, the non-profit inspires greater public commitment to safeguarding land.

Admission to both the exhibition and the reception is free. To register for the reception/artists’ opening, call (609) 924-4646 or rsvp@drgreenway.org. For more information, visit: www.drgreenway.org.

January 21, 2015
MARCH ON WASHINGTON: Danny Lyon’s iconic images such as this August 23, 1963, shot of demonstrators during the march on Washington will be on view in an exhibition that will open at The College of New Jersey on Wednesday, January 28 and run through March 1 at the TCNJ Gallery on the campus at 2000 Pennington Road in Ewing. Gallery hours are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from noon to 7 p.m., and Sundays from 1 to 3 p.m. For more information, call (609) 771-2633, or visit: tcnj.edu/artgallery.(Photo Courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York)

MARCH ON WASHINGTON: Danny Lyon’s iconic images such as this August 23, 1963, shot of demonstrators during the march on Washington will be on view in an exhibition that will open at The College of New Jersey on Wednesday, January 28 and run through March 1 at the TCNJ Gallery on the campus at 2000 Pennington Road in Ewing. Gallery hours are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from noon to 7 p.m., and Sundays from 1 to 3 p.m. For more information, call (609) 771-2633, or visit: tcnj.edu/artgallery. (Photo Courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York)

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Selma to Montgomery in Alabama that ultimately saw President Lyndon Johnson sign the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Besides being the subject of the recent feature film drama, Selma, the march, which was led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., together with James Bevel, Hosea Williams, and John Lewis, is documented by the work of photographer Danny Lyon who lived through the period and witnessed the sit-ins, freedom rides, and the 1963 March on Washington that brought about the 1964 Civil Rights Act and legal desegregation of the South.

Some 50 iconic photographs of the period will be on view in an exhibition opening at The College of New Jersey on Wednesday, January 28. “Danny Lyon: Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement” includes works by the renowned photographer and filmmaker that are considered to be some of the era’s most defining.

Born in Brooklyn in 1942, Mr. Lyon became a leading post-World War II documentary photographer and filmmaker, helping create a mode of photojournalism in which the picture-maker is deeply and personally embedded in the subject matter.

As the first staff photographer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), he began his career in the thick of SNCC and Civil Rights Movement activities.

From 1962 to 1964, Mr. Lyon traveled the South and Mid-Atlantic regions. His photographs were published in The Movement, a documentary book about the Southern Civil Rights Movement, and later in Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement, the photographer’s memoir of his SNCC year.

“This young white New Yorker came South with a camera and a keen eye for history. And he used these simple, elegant gifts to capture the story of one of the most inspiring periods in America’s 20th century,” said former SNCC member and U. S. Congressmen John Lewis.

Presented as part of a campus-wide exploration of justice and in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, the TCNJ exhibition features some of the photographer’s most powerful images, including the 1963 “Sit in Toddle House Atlanta” and Sheriff Jim Clark arresting two demonstrators with placards on the steps of the federal building in Selma. Both are exhibited courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery of New York.

Largely self-taught, Mr. Lyon is a graduate of the University of Chicago. He has had one-person exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Menil Collection in Houston.

“Danny Lyon: Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement” is on loan to TCNJ by art2art Circulating Exhibitions, a non-profit group that organizes traveling exhibitions. It is presented courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery of New York.

Cinéma-Vérité

In conjunction with the exhibition, TCNJ’s Department of Communications Studies will screen Mr. Lyon’s 1975 film Los Niños Abandonados on Wednesday, February 11, at 10 a.m. in the Kendall Hall Screening Room.

Acclaimed as “one of the great cinéma-vérité documentaries,” the film focuses on homeless children in Columbia.

The exhibition, which will continue through March 1, and related programs are free and open to the public. The Art Gallery is located in the AIMM Building on the campus at 2000 Pennington Road in Ewing. Gallery hours are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from noon to 7 p.m., and Sundays from 1 to 3 p.m. For more information, call (609) 771-2633, or visit: tcnj.edu/artgallery.

January 14, 2015
DRAPEAU VODOU: These sequin-covered flags are part of a display of Haitian Art in the Considine Gallery at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart, 1200 Stuart Road. The two-part exhibition, which opened January 12 and runs through February 12, features Haitian flags from the private collections of Bucks County resident Jill Kearney and Indigo Arts in Philadelphia as well as drawings by the Haitian artist Edens Cathyl. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. when school is in session. There will be an opening reception on Friday, January 23, from 5 to 7 p.m. and a talk by exhibition curator Madeleine Shellaby on Tuesday, January 27 at 11 a.m. For more information, call (609) 921-6105, or visit www.stuartschool.org.

DRAPEAU VODOU: These sequin-covered flags are part of a display of Haitian Art in the Considine Gallery at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart, 1200 Stuart Road. The two-part exhibition, which opened January 12 and runs through February 12, features Haitian flags from the private collections of Bucks County resident Jill Kearney and Indigo Arts in Philadelphia as well as drawings by the Haitian artist Edens Cathyl. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. when school is in session. There will be an opening reception on Friday, January 23, from 5 to 7 p.m. and a talk by exhibition curator Madeleine Shellaby on Tuesday, January 27 at 11 a.m. For more information, call (609) 921-6105, or visit www.stuartschool.org.

Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart’s winter gallery exhibition in the Considine Gallery has two parts to it. Both concern the art and culture of Haiti. One is a display of black and white drawings by the Haitian artist Edens Cathyl, the other is a striking collection of vividly colored Haitian flags from the private collections of Bucks County resident Jill Kearney and Tony Fisher of Indigo Arts in Philadelphia.

An opening reception is scheduled for Friday, January 23, from 5 to 7 p.m. and a talk by the exhibition’s curator Madeleine Shellaby will take place on Tuesday, January 27 at 11 a.m.

Ms. Shellaby is the co-founder of the non-profit Princeton Haiti KONEKTE (www.konekteprincetonhaiti.com), which supports educational initiatives in Haiti, and the exhibition commemorates the fifth anniversary of the devastating earthquake in that country. A fund raising event at Stuart will be held on January 25, from 5 to 8 p.m.

Titled “Stories from Haiti,” Mr. Cathyl’s series of drawings depict his life there. A member of the Art Matenwa community on the island of Gonave, Mr. Cathyl began his artistic journey as a “restavek” or indentured servant who was “given away by his mother to his uncle” as a boy.

According to the Art Matenwa website, Mr. Cathyl’s is one of the organization’s success stories (see: http://artmatenwa.org/life-in-matenwa/) having arrived “as an undernourished 13-year-old with enormous eyes and serious demeanor. Long and thin, with the dry skin of an old man, Edens had been abandoned by his mother to his uncle’s family. In spite of his quietness, the school principal recognized his intelligence and artistic ability and sent him to us to learn to make art which he practiced with energy and concentration.”

“First I learned how to make silver jewelry with two other students. When that stopped I learned how to paint and make prints and now I make my own drawings,” said Mr. Cathyl, who has expressed his desire to go to art school. “I want people to love my drawings so I can live,” he said.

Now 26, the artist channels his own experiences through the story of a boy’s life in rural Haiti; several of the drawings are from a book that he is working on. The book will feature images such as Country Boy Leading Goat, which shows a slim figure clad in shorts striding ahead of several goats and donkeys. The drawing, which is black and white ink on gesso board, conveys an almost timeless scene with details suggestive of narrative. The thick rope is slack, its frayed end loosely held by the boy’s hand.

As a developing artist, Mr. Cathyl learned the technique that has allowed him to create such elegant and bold compositions from the artist Ellen LeBow, who divides her time between the Haitian artistic community and her Massachusetts home. He credits Ms. Lebow’s tutelage for helping to develop his keen eye for detail and for teaching him how to use materials such as the India ink he brushed onto the surface of a hard board coated with soft white kaolin clay in order to create images like Country Boy Leading Goat. The artist used a blade to “draw” into the ink-covered gesso board and carve away the ink to reveal the white beneath.

Vodou Symbolism

That part of the exhibition devoted to Haitian flags is a display of traditional sequined cloth festival flags with images of the Haitian Iwa, or spirits.

Known as Drapeau Vodou in Kreyol (or Haitian Creole), the flags constitute a spectacular Haitian art form. Created originally as sacred ritual objects within the Vodou religious community, the flags welcome a pantheon of spirits to temple ceremonies. Once objects of interest primarily to anthropologists, the flags have captured the attention of tourists in recent years and are now being made for the art market.

According to a press release from Stuart, “with this new purpose, the artistic imagery of the flags is changing from a strict adherence to tradition to a freer, more expressive form.”

The exhibition, which includes recent works by contemporary artisans, will be on view at Stuart Country Day School, 1200 Stuart Road, through February 12, when school is in session Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

For more information, call (609) 921-6105, or visit www.stuartschool.org. Tickets ($60) for the January 25 KONEKTE fund raiser include presentations on the life and work of Edens Cathyl by Ellen LeBow and on the creation and significance of Haitian flags by Tony Fisher. For tickets, visit: www.konekteprincetonhaiti.com.

January 7, 2015
ISLAND LIGHT: The light of Cuba is captured in a series of photographic portraits by John Clarke at Hopewell’s Gallery 14. Works by fellow photographer Samuel Vovsi will also be on display. Gallery 14 is located at 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell N.J. 08525. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: http://photogallery14.com.

ISLAND LIGHT: The light of Cuba is captured in a series of photographic portraits by John Clarke at Hopewell’s Gallery 14. Works by fellow photographer Samuel Vovsi will also be on display. Gallery 14 is located at 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell N.J. 08525. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: http://photogallery14.com.

A new exhibition of work by members of Hopewell’s Gallery 14 opens January 9 and runs through February 8 with an opening reception Friday January 9 from 6 to 8 p.m. In addition, the Gallery will hold a “Meet the Photographer” event on Sunday January 11, from 1 to 3 p.m.

The show features local photographer John Clarke, a new Gallery 14 member having his first exhibition at the gallery. Titled “Portraits of Cuba,” the exhibition in the main gallery space features images that capture the rich colors and warm light of the island.

Mr. Clarke is the retired founding partner of Clarke Caton Hintz, an award winning architectural and planning firm based in Trenton. Having spent his professional career immersed in architectural and urban design issues, since retiring, he has devoted his artistic talents to photography.

According to a statement by the artist, “the photographer’s background in architecture is evident in the organization and structure of ‘Portraits of Cuba,’ which were shot during a week-long visit to the island in the spring of 2014. The images from the streets and markets of Havana, show people who appear happy and not shy or displeased about being photographed. An amputee does his exercise on a sea wall in the early morning light, not in a gymnasium. A cab driver pedals a bicycle outfitted to carry passengers rather than driving an auto. Grand old buildings are decaying but their strong character remains. A man wearing the image of Che Guvara salutes the photographer and seems to say, ‘Long live the revolution.’ The photos show a country that is extremely poor by U.S. standards, but one whose people have a vibrant spirit.”

Mr. Clarke used a hand held Nikon d800e with a 24-70 mm lens to produce digital prints on fine art Baryta 325 archival paper.

In addition to “Portraits of Cuba,” Gallery 14 will also display the exhibition, “Twos,” by local photographer, Samuel Vovsi, who has shown at the gallery previously and elsewhere.

Mr. Vovsi has described the works on display in the Jay Goodkind gallery as “not directly related: they were taken at different times and in different places, but they all have one unifying feature: each has precisely two main characters.”

“Sometimes it could be two friends, sometimes two lovers, sometimes a parent and a child, sometimes even a man and a pet,” said the artist. “The whole in such images is bigger that a mechanical sum of parts because not only do they show one character plus another character, but also a relation between them. And sometimes this relation is not clear, which is especially interesting, because it provokes your curiosity and it draws you in, wanting to figure out what the relationship is.”

Gallery 14 is located at 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell N.J. 08525. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: http://photogallery14.com.

December 31, 2014
HUMOR AND MENACE BY THADDEUS ERDAHL: Titled “Op One,” 2014, this 33 by 20 by 16 inch ceramic work by Princeton Day School faculty member Thaddeus Erdahl is on show in a solo exhibition by the artist in the school’s Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery. The exhibition “Yes Sir No Sir This Way That” runs from January 12 through January 29 with a public reception for the artist Friday, January 16 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more information call (609) 924-6700 extension 1772 or visit:www.pds.org.

HUMOR AND MENACE BY THADDEUS ERDAHL: Titled “Op One,” 2014, this 33 by 20 by 16 inch ceramic work by Princeton Day School faculty member Thaddeus Erdahl is on show in a solo exhibition by the artist in the school’s Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery. The exhibition “Yes Sir No Sir This Way That” runs from January 12 through January 29 with a public reception for the artist Friday, January 16 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more information call (609) 924-6700 extension 1772 or visit:www.pds.org.

The Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School will present the work of faculty member Thaddeus Erdahl in an exhibition titled “Yes Sir No Sir This Way That.” The show, which opens on January 12 will continue through January 29. There will be an opening reception with Mr. Erdahl on Friday, January 16 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Mr. Erdahl has exhibited throughout the United States. After receiving an MFA in ceramics from the University of Florida, he was the artist-in-residence and program manager at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. More recently, he was artist-in-residence at the Arts Council of Princeton and a visiting artist at Princeton Day School, where he is currently a member of the art faculty. He also recently had a solo exhibition at Greenwich House Pottery in New York City.

Mr. Erdahl uses ceramic sculpture and portraiture as visual narrations to document what he sees around him. He often uses an artifact or imaginary person to allow the viewer to disconnect from the present and look into their own personal histories. His work evokes the humor in human behavior; he uses humor to get through tragedies.

Of his work, Gallery Director Jody Erdman has said: “his manipulation and mastery of ceramic materials is only trumped by his ability to accentuate the human condition in both humorous and menacing ways.”

Mr. Erdahl is represented by the Obsidian Gallery in Tucson, Arizona, and the Signature Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia.

“Yes Sir No Sir This Way That” is open to the public at Princeton Day School, an independent, coeducational school educating students from Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information, call Ms. Erdman at (609) 924-6700 extension 1772, or visit:www.pds.org.

December 17, 2014
VILLAGE HOTEL: The hotel in Lumberville, Pa, that wood engraver Herbert Stewart Pullinger (1878-1961) depicts here brings to mind more tranquil days. Just under 10 by 12 inches, the image on paper is one of over 20 works by the artist in the exhibition “Spirit of the Everyday: Prints by Herbert Pullinger” opening at the James A. Michener Art Museum Saturday, December 20, and continuing through March 29. For more information, call (215) 340-9800, or visit: MichenerArtMuseum.org.(Image Courtesy of the Michener Museum)

VILLAGE HOTEL: The hotel in Lumberville, Pa, that wood engraver Herbert Stewart Pullinger (1878-1961) depicts here brings to mind more tranquil days. Just under 10 by 12 inches, the image on paper is one of over 20 works by the artist in the exhibition “Spirit of the Everyday: Prints by Herbert Pullinger” opening at the James A. Michener Art Museum Saturday, December 20, and continuing through March 29. For more information, call (215) 340-9800, or visit: MichenerArtMuseum.org. (Image Courtesy of the Michener Museum)

A small exhibition of works by one of America’s foremost engravers goes on display at the James A. Michener Museum of Art Saturday. For lovers of the wood cut and the art of wood-engraving, this show should not be missed.

Titled, “Spirit of the Everyday: Prints by Herbert Pullinger,” the exhibition showcases a select group of wood engravings and wood blocks given to the museum by Ann and Martin Snyder. According to the show’s curator, Constance Kimmerle, the artist was Mr. Snyder’s great uncle.

This will be the first time the collection has been shown at the Michener. It is perfectly suited to the intimate setting of the gallery space devoted to works on paper, the Bette and Nelson Pfundt Gallery, and a perfect fit for the Michener’s mission of collecting, preserving, interpreting, and exhibiting American Art, with a focus on art of the Bucks County region.

Herbert S. Pullinger (1878-1961) emerged as one of America’s foremost wood engravers during the 1920s. Born and raised in Philadelphia, where he lived, he also spent many summers in Lumberville, Pa. He studied at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Arts (University of the Arts) and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and taught graphic arts and watercolor at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. Several of his works, such as his 1934 engraving of Dock Street from Delaware Avenue, are in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, although not currently on view.

“It seemed appropriate to show this work in the wintertime because the collection includes several snow scenes,” said Ms. Kimmerle, the museum’s curator of collections, who had not been familiar with the artist’s work until the collection was donated to the museum in 2005.

Ms. Kimmerle, who has been with the Michener for some 14 years, is particularly fond of Mr. Pullinger’s snow scenes and country scenes. “The collection includes some very nice images of Bucks County and some of Philadelphia; they can be divided into urban scenes, country scenes, and scenes of heavy industry.”

The images depict everyday life, landscapes, houses, stores, barns, post offices, bridges, canals, lighthouses, coal breakers, and steel furnaces that the artist encountered in Pennsylvania and New Jersey during the 1920s and 1930s.

“Expressing the ‘spirit of the everyday’ was a genuine concern for many American artists at the beginning of the 20th century, and Herbert Pullinger was no exception,” commented Ms. Kimmerle. “As the works in the show reveal, whether he was rendering a snow scene in rural Bucks County or a dynamic industrial scene in Pittsburgh, Pullinger’s creations moved beyond the mere description of a place to fully capture its distinctive spirit and vital energy.”

Presented by Vivian Banta and Robert Field, “Spirit of the Everyday: Prints by Herbert Pullinger,” will be at the James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, from December 20 through March 29. The Museum is open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call (215) 340-9800, or visit: MichenerArtMuseum.org.

December 10, 2014
SHADOW COURT: That’s the title of this photograph by Mercer County Community faculty artist Aubrey J. Kauffman. An exhibition of Mr. Kauffman’s images of basketball courts, stadiums, soccer, and lacrosse fields is on display in the solo exhibition, “It’s Not About the Game,” in the Marguerite and James Hutchins Gallery in the Lawrenceville School’s Gruss Center of Visual Arts though January 23. A public reception with the artist will be held on Sunday, December 14, from 2 to 4 p.m. The Lawrenceville School is located at 2500 Main Street in Lawrenceville. Gallery hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 9 a.m. to noon. and 1 to 4:30 p.m.; and Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. The Gruss Center will be closed from December 18 through January 5. For more information, visit www.lawrenceville.org.

SHADOW COURT: That’s the title of this photograph by Mercer County Community faculty artist Aubrey J. Kauffman. An exhibition of Mr. Kauffman’s images of basketball courts, stadiums, soccer, and lacrosse fields is on display in the solo exhibition, “It’s Not About the Game,” in the Marguerite and James Hutchins Gallery in the Lawrenceville School’s Gruss Center of Visual Arts though January 23. A public reception with the artist will be held on Sunday, December 14, from 2 to 4 p.m. The Lawrenceville School is located at 2500 Main Street in Lawrenceville. Gallery hours are Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 9 a.m. to noon. and 1 to 4:30 p.m.; and Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. The Gruss Center will be closed from December 18 through January 5. For more information, visit www.lawrenceville.org.

Photographic works by the Princeton-born and Lawrenceville-raised artist Aubrey J. Kauffman, are currently on display in the Marguerite and James Hutchins Gallery in the Lawrenceville School’s Gruss Center of Visual Arts.

The exhibition, titled “It’s Not About the Game,” will run though January 23. There will be a public reception with the artist on Sunday, December 14, from 2 to 4 p.m.

In this exhibit, Kauffman has created images of several sites including basketball courts, stadiums, soccer, and lacrosse fields. In all cases the images are devoid of activity and human interaction. “Urban studies have long been a major part of my photographic practice,” explained Kauffman. “My work extends from abandoned urban structures and shopping malls to building facades, parks, and ball fields.”

The artist has said that his interest “… lies not in the portrayal of teams, sports, or players but in the visual elements of where play takes place. For me, ‘It’s Not About the Game.’”

Now a resident of Ewing, Mr. Kauffman received his BA from Jersey City State College and his MFA in visual arts from Rutgers University’s Mason Gross School of the Arts. He teaches photography at Mercer County Community College and is the gallery manager for Mason Gross Galleries at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

He was the creator and coordinator of “Trenton Takes: 24 Hours in the City,” a photo-documentary project featuring the work of 29 photographers who spent one 24 hour period photographing life in the city of Trenton, for which he edited the catalog. His work has been exhibited across the region in group exhibits in the Newark Museum, Philadelphia Photo Arts, New York’s Prince Street Gallery, and the Biggs Museum of American Art in Dover, Delaware, among others. His solo shows include the New Jersey State Museum, Mercer County Community College, the Southern Light Gallery in Amarillo, Texas, and New York’s 2nd and 7th Gallery.

Mr. Kauffman was guest curator for Rider University’s “Landscapes: Social, Political, Traditional” and was recently awarded the Mason Gross School of the Arts Brovero Photography Prize for Excellence in Photography and the New Brunswick Art Salon “Best in Collection.”

Founded in 1810, The Lawrenceville School is located at 2500 Main Street in Lawrenceville. The gallery is open Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Visitors are also welcome on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. The Gruss Center will be closed from December 18 through January 5. The galleries are open to the public, free of charge. For more information, visit www.lawrenceville.org.

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December 3, 2014
MEET DANNY SIMMONS: Brooklyn-based abstract painter Danny Simmons will read from his latest book “The Brown Beatnick Tomes” at the Princeton Public Library this Sunday, December 7, at 3 p.m. Mr. Simmons is the older brother of hip hop impresario Russell Simmons and rapper Joseph Simmons. In addition to being a visual artist Mr. Simmons originated and co-produced the hit HBO series “Def Poetry Jam.” His appearance marks a collaboration between the Library and the Baker Street Social Club, founded by Taneshia Nash Laird.

MEET DANNY SIMMONS: Brooklyn-based abstract painter Danny Simmons will read from his latest book “The Brown Beatnick Tomes” at the Princeton Public Library this Sunday, December 7, at 3 p.m. Mr. Simmons is the older brother of hip hop impresario Russell Simmons and rapper Joseph Simmons. In addition to being a visual artist Mr. Simmons originated and co-produced the hit HBO series “Def Poetry Jam.” His appearance marks a collaboration between the Library and the Baker Street Social Club, founded by Taneshia Nash Laird.

Danny Simmons is known primarily as an artist but it is as a poet that he will appear at the Princeton Public Library this Sunday, December 7, to read from his latest collection of prose and paintings, The Brown Beatnick Tomes.

As an American abstract painter, he’s been lauded for “meticulously rendered and decoratively impressive” work, which hangs in the Smithsonian Institution and is owned by the likes of music industry executive Lyor Cohen and actor Will Smith.

In addition to an impressive portfolio of what he calls “neo-African Abstract Expressionism,” Mr. Simmons also originated and co-produced the hit HBO series Def Poetry Jam. The Broadway version of the show earned him a Tony Award.

According to a recent article in the International Review of African American Art, the Queens, New York native is number three on its list of movers and shakers in the African American art world.

Along with his equally famous brothers, music mogul Russell Simmons and hip hop legend Joseph Simmons (aka “Rev Run”), Danny Simmons co-founded the Rush Arts Gallery and serves as vice president of the Rush Philanthropic Arts Foundation which provides arts exposure and access to the arts to disadvantaged urban youth.

Mr. Simmons holds a bachelor’s degree in social work from New York University, a master’s in public finance from Long Island University, and is the recipient of an honorary PhD from Long Island University. Currently a resident of Brooklyn, New York, he comes to Princeton at the invitation of Taneshia Nash Laird, founder of the newly formed Baker Street Social Club (BSSC), which is co-sponsoring the event with the Princeton Public Library. His visit is the second such event from the BSSC, which was formed to promote African American art and artists in the Princeton area. The Club is an event-driven initiative focusing on music, theater, art openings, and film premieres.

Originally from White Plains, Ms. Laird lived in Brooklyn with her late husband Roland Laird until moving to the Princeton area. She lived in Trenton for some eight years and in West Windsor for about the same amount of time. Today, West Windsor is where she’s raising her two young daughters, Naima, 4, and Imani, 8.

Baker Street Social Club

Named for the Baker Street that was once part of the African American neighborhood in downtown Princeton until it was removed in 1929 to make way for the expansion of Palmer Square, the Baker Street Social Club aims to honor past history by supporting fine arts and film from the African Diaspora.

Ms. Laird acknowledged Princeton’s rich African American community and the writings of the influential Trenton Central High School (TCHS) teacher Jack Washington as inspiration for her founding of the Club. Known as “a keeper of the African-American legacy,” Mr. Washington has taught American history at the TCHS Chambers Street campus for decades. HIs books include In Search of a Community’s Past: The Black Community in Trenton, New Jersey, 1860-1900 and The Quest for Equality: Trenton’s Black Community 1890-1965.

The BSSC, said Ms. Laird, will also support black artists in nearby Trenton, which has a resident population that is predominantly African American and Latino, as well as the Crossroads Theatre Company in New Brunswick. Membership in the club in its first year is free.

“Our goal is to group like-minded individuals who not only share a love of black arts, but a passion for uplifting the community. In the future, we anticipate trips to the African American Museum in Washington, D.C., the Studio Museum in Harlem, Philadelphia African American Museum, and wherever black arts can be found,” said Ms. Laird, who is a trustee for the Art Pride New Jersey Foundation and the Advocates for New Jersey History. She is a Senior Fellow in the Eastern Regional Network of the Environmental Leadership Program and formerly served as director of economic development in the Douglas H. Palmer administration and later as the executive director of the Trenton Downtown Association.

In 1997, with her late husband, she co-authored Still I Rise: A Graphic History of African Americans. The book was updated and re-published in 2008.

“My late husband had created My Image Studios (MIST), a 20,000 square foot, $21 million entertainment center in Harlem that focuses on cultural offerings–including film, live music, and theater — from the African and Latin Diaspora. He co-developed MIST with real estate developer partners Carlton Brown and Walter Edwards.”

A week after MIST opened officially in January 2013, Mr. Laird died in the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro just two days after his 52nd birthday.

“The mission of the BSSC, to support fine arts and film from the African Diaspora, aligns with the type of programming we do all year round at the library,” said Library Program Coordinator Janie Hermann, whom Ms. Laird credits for helping to get BSSC events off the ground.

“After I had taken my daughters to the Princeton University Art Museum’s exhibition on the African American Presence in Renaissance Europe and to the Princeton Symphony’s performance of a piece inspired by the work of Jacob Lawrence, I wanted to do something to put my arms around what was happening locally and bring it all under one umbrella,” recalled Ms. Laird. “Janie Hermann at the Princeton Public Library has been a fantastic help.”

“I first met Taneshia in March 2009 when she and her late husband Roland gave a reading at the library of their book Still I Rise: A Graphic History of African Americans,” said Ms. Hermann. “We kept in touch over the years and when Taneshia approached me with the idea of having the library be the first venue to co-sponsor events for her fledgling Baker Street Social Club I knew immediately that we would be able to create unique programming that would fill a much needed gap in town.”

“I didn’t want to have to take my kids all the way to Philadelphia or Manhattan for cultural activities so I thought it would be great to develop an audience for African American related material and bring African American artists to the Princeton area,” said Ms. Laird. “This event marks my second collaboration with the Princeton Public Library as part of the Baker Street Social Club and I am thrilled that Danny Simmons is able to be here.” said Ms. Laird. “I have found a lot of support in Princeton and I look forward to bringing some stellar speakers, artists and performers here.”

Mr. Simmons will read in the Library’s Community Room between 3 and 5 p.m. Admission is free.

 

November 26, 2014

The Artists’ Gallery at 18 Bridge Street in Lambertville will hold its 19th annual Holiday Exhibition featuring artwork by its 16 member artists from Thursday, December 4, through Sunday, February 1, 2015. There will be a free opening reception for the artists on Saturday, December 6, from 4 to 7 p.m.

Each year, Artists’ Gallery, one of Lambertville’s longest running art galleries, celebrates the holiday season and the beginning of the new year with a group show. “Our Holiday Show is an excellent opportunity both for collectors and art lovers to meet the gallery artists and for the artists to offer a selection of work they are especially excited to present,” said gallery artist Beatrice Bork. “It is a fun event with serious artworks but at a variety of price points just in time for the holidays,” said fellow gallery artist Paul Grecian.

For the show, each gallery artist will offer personally selected pieces or work. Besides Ms. Bork and Mr. Grecian, the artists include Jane Adriance, José Anico, Gail Bracegirdle, Richard Harrington, Joe Kazimierczyk, Alan Klawans, Patricia Lange, Alla Podolsky, James Pryor, Eric Rhinehart, Carol Sanzalone, Michael Schweigart, Charles David Viera, and Andrew Werth.

Since its inception in 1995, Artists’ Gallery has exhibited the work of area artists in a variety of styles and media. This diversity of styles is a point of pride for the artist-run gallery and means collectors of all types can enjoy exploring the gallery’s many different rooms. Visitors will find paintings, photography, digital prints, sculpture, and more in media that include oil, watercolor, pastel, acrylic, ink, and ceramic.

Each of the artists on the gallery’s roster was juried by their peers based upon the quality and style of their work. Because Artists’ Gallery is run by the artists, visitors benefit from being able to speak with at least one exhibitor during each visit and may meet several artists during a group show. The artists are always pleased to speak about their materials, techniques, and motivations.

Artists’ Gallery hours are Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by private appointment. For more information, visit: www.lambertvillearts.com.

 

November 19, 2014
WHAT SHALL WE EAT? The title of Judy Brodsky’s painting brings to mind the old nursery rhyme, “If all the world were paper and all the seas were ink, and all the trees were bread and cheese, what should we have to drink?” It’s not known whether the esteemed artist had Mother Goose in mind, subliminally or otherwise. Perhaps her question relates to a more contemporary environmental problem. Or perhaps she’s just referring to the glorious abundance of the peaches, pears, plums, grapes, and apples that she renders here. Ms. Brodsky’s work, as well as paintings and drawings by Mel Leipzig and Harry I. Naar, are on view in the exhibition, “Rendering, Representing & Revealing” through December 13 in the Romano Gallery of the Armstrong-Hipkins Center for the Arts at Blair Academy in Blairstown. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. For more information, call (908) 362-6121, or visit: www.blair.edu.

WHAT SHALL WE EAT? The title of Judy Brodsky’s painting brings to mind the old nursery rhyme, “If all the world were paper and all the seas were ink, and all the trees were bread and cheese, what should we have to drink?” It’s not known whether the esteemed artist had Mother Goose in mind, subliminally or otherwise. Perhaps her question relates to a more contemporary environmental problem. Or perhaps she’s just referring to the glorious abundance of the peaches, pears, plums, grapes, and apples that she renders here. Ms. Brodsky’s work, as well as paintings and drawings by Mel Leipzig and Harry I. Naar, are on view in the exhibition, “Rendering, Representing & Revealing” through December 13 in the Romano Gallery of the Armstrong-Hipkins Center for the Arts at Blair Academy in Blairstown. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. For more information, call (908) 362-6121, or visit: www.blair.edu.

Paintings and drawings by three renowned local artists will be on display at the Armstrong-Hipkins Center for the Arts at Blair Academy in Blairstown.

The show is an opportunity to examine differences and parallels in the work and careers of Judith K. Brodsky, Mel Leipzig, and Harry I. Naar, all of whom have played significant roles in teaching and mentoring young artists in New Jersey.

Ms. Brodsky worked for many years as an artist, printmaker, and arts advocate. She is a distinguished professor emerita of visual arts at Rutgers University, where she established two art institutes — The Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions and The Rutgers University Institute for Women and Art.

For 45 years, Mr. Leipzig taught painting and art history at Mercer County Community College (MCCC) where he earned the respect and love of generations of young artists.

Mr. Naar began his teaching career some 30 years ago at Rider University, where he serves as director of the Art Gallery to which he consistently brings stellar and surprising artists and their work.

Besides their teaching roles, however, each of the artists featuring in the Blair Academy demonstrates a singular artistic vision.

“With a background in 20th-century modernism, the artists’ work also includes representational and figurative elements of a 21st-century perspective,” said gallery co-director Rita Baragona. “Though their work often reflects similar origins and motifs, Mr. Naar, Mr. Leipzig, and Ms. Brodsky create very individual artworks that often explore the intellectual, political, and social issues of our time.”

Ms. Brodsky, who has a master of fine arts from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art and a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University, where she majored in art history, has organized and curated numerous exhibitions. Her work is in the permanent collections of more than 100 museums and corporations around the world, such as the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.; the Victoria & Albert Museum in London; The Stadtmuseum in Berlin, Germany; the Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at the University of California at Los Angeles; the Rhode Island School of Design Museum; The New Jersey State Museum; and The Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University. She has also written extensively about women’s influence on the arts.

During his long career at MCCC, Mr. Leipzig maintaind his career as a painter, exhibiting his work in solo and group showings across the country, as well as in New Jersey. His paintings can be found in the White House Collection in Washington, D.C.; the Whitney Museum in New York City; the Yale Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut; the National Endowment for the Arts Gallery in Washington, D.C.; the Cooper-Hewitt Museum in New York City, and closer to home in the the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton. His work is regularly featured at the Gallery Henoch in New York City.

Mr. Naar’s work is also frequently exhibited in private and public collections throughout New Jersey, including The New Jersey State Museum, the American Council on Education, The Morris Museum of Arts and Sciences, Newark Museum, the Montclair Art Museum, Rutgers University’s The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, and The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center in New York City. At the Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, he won the Hassam, Speicher, Betts, and Symons Purchase Fund award and his numerous group shows include The Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; The Canton Art Institute in Canton, Ohio; The High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia; and The Boca Raton Museum of Art in Boca Raton, Florida. Currently, Mr. Naar’s drawings are in the New Jersey State Museum’s exhibition, “America Through Artists’ Eyes.”

“Rendering, Representing & Revealing” will continue through December 13 in the Romano Gallery of the Armstrong-Hipkins Center for the Arts at Blair Academy in Blairstown. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. For more information, call (908) 362-6121, or visit: www.blair.edu.

 

November 12, 2014
NEW JERSEY NATIVE: As a member of the artist’s group Art+10, local photographer Tasha O’Neill was among a number of artists asked to focus their attention on the native species of the Garden State for a stunning show at the D&R Greenway, opening this Friday, November 14. In addition to her photograph “Wild Columbine,” shown here, Ms. O’Neill captured the beauty of state treasures such as Trout Lily, Royal Fern, Beach Plum, and the tiny orchid with the big name, “Dragon’s Mouth.”(Image courtesy of Ms. O’Neill)

NEW JERSEY NATIVE: As a member of the artist’s group Art+10, local photographer Tasha O’Neill was among a number of artists asked to focus their attention on the native species of the Garden State for a stunning show at the D&R Greenway, opening this Friday, November 14. In addition to her photograph “Wild Columbine,” shown here, Ms. O’Neill captured the beauty of state treasures such as Trout Lily, Royal Fern, Beach Plum, and the tiny orchid with the big name, “Dragon’s Mouth.” (Image courtesy of Ms. O’Neill)

If you haven’t been to the D&R Greenway Land Trust’s galleries of late, a new exhibition opening this Friday, November 14, is sure to entice old friends and new visitors to the Johnson Education Center’s lovingly restored barn, circa 1900, off Rosedale Road.

Titled, “Botanicals Illuminated,” the exhibition is designed to show just what there is in New Jersey that is worth the work of preserving. The works on display have all been inspired by native species that can be found on lands preserved by the D&R Greenway.

The exhibition opens this Friday, November 14, with a reception for the artists from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. To register for the free reception email rsvp@drgreenway.org. It takes place during the D&R Greenway’s 25th Anniversary Year, which has seen continued preservation and protection of natural lands, farmlands, and open spaces throughout central and southern New Jersey, including most recently, preservation of the former Norma Pratico property in Trenton for use as an urban community farm. The site was acquired by the City of Trenton through a partnership organized by D&R Greenway.

The multi-media show features work by members of the Princeton area artists group Art+10, as well as work by award-winning botanical illustrators and sumptuous pieces by three regional artists selected for the show by curator Diana Moore, who has been curating shows at the Greenway for four years now. A fan of the Land Trust and its programs, she started out as a volunteer, but with two degrees in art, one in medieval art from Princeton University, she has found a niche in curating for the organization.

“I have always loved botanical illustrations of the past such as you see in early herbals,” said Ms. Moore. “The work by the artists in this exhibition is exceptionally fine and it is a treat to be able to present these images.”

Known for championing art as an effective means of highlighting the serious work of land preservation and stewardship, President and CEO Linda Mead and her staff have turned the Johnson Education Center into a focal point for conservation activity with inspiring programs, art exhibitions, and related lectures. “Botanicals Illuminated” is one in a long list of singular exhibitions that they have put on in service to their conservationist mission.

“As always, our exhibits are mounted to demonstrate the importance of preservation of New Jersey land and species,” said Ms. Mead. “I am delighted to share the results of a year-long process, which began with lists of native plants of New Jersey and the D&R Greenway preserves where they are most likely to be found.”

Along with botanist emeritus of Rider University Dr. Mary Leck, a D&R trustee, as well as staff members Emily Blackman and Diana Rachel, Ms. Moore asked the artists participating in the exhibition to select specific D&R Greenway sites and plants on which to focus.

“Diana is brilliant in bringing artists of the area together under one roof,” said participating fine art photographer Tasha O’Neill. “I admire her calm in the midst of a storm and the always gracious D&R staff have done a tremendous job in pulling together information about the subject and from the artists.”

In addition to the work of eight botanical illustrators: Chiara Becchi, Carrie Di Constanzo, Fran Henig, Ann Hoffenberg, Robin Jess, Lanis Monfried, Carol O’Neill, and Carol Woodin, the work of regional artists from the Art+ 10 group is being featured.

Collectively titled “Native Plants of New Jersey,” Art+ 10’s members (there are 11, incidentally) Priscilla Algava, Heather Barros, Jim Bongartz, Betty Curtiss, Katja De Ruyter, Suzanne Dinger, Jeaninne Honstein, Ryan Lilienthal, Meg Michael, the above mentioned Ms. O’Neill, and Gill Stewart offer a diverse and pleasing collection of creative and colorful photographs and paintings of plants from the familiar to the rarely celebrated.

Art+ 10 offers its members an artistic home and provides opportunities for solo and group shows. Being a member, “challenges my creativity,” said Ms. O’Neill, who expressed admiration not only for the Land Trust’s efforts but also for the use to which it puts its gallery space. “The Land Trust is the only gallery in Princeton where the themes of exhibitions consistently deal with nature. Buyers of the art support the mission to preserve New Jersey farmland.”

The theme of preservation was not a hard sell to members of Art+ 10. “We are grateful to D&R Greenway Land Trust for their deep commitment to stewarding and preserving nature and also for the many opportunities we have as artists to exhibit and share our work,” said member Priscilla Algava, who described the D&R galleries as “a magic space where community members come together to meet and appreciate the worlds of art and nature.”

The three regional artists selected by the curator are Karen McLean, Carol Sanzalone, and Madelaine Shellaby.

Each artist found their subject in plants across a broad spectrum of beauty and scientific interest. Thus you will find Columbine, Trout Lily, fern, and orchid. Even poison ivy has its place here.

All the art on display is for sale with a percentage going to support D&R Greenway’s preservation and stewardship mission. According to Ms. Moore, there is an attempt to be as inclusive as possible and have prices that range from $100 up into the thousands of dollars.

“Botanicals Illuminated” will be on display through January 9 in the Marie L. Matthews Galleries, Johnson Education Center, D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road, Princeton. The gallery is open during business hours of business days.

For more information and to be sure Galleries are open on day of visit, call (609) 924-4646, email info@drgreenway.org, or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

 

November 5, 2014
ANNUAL ART ALL DAY: ArtWorks third annual Art All Day event will take place at sites all over Trenton this Saturday, November 8. Last year’s event saw artist Steven Morris (above) painting at Gallery 219. This year’s event promises to be bigger and better than ever before. Activities begin and end at Artworks, located at 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, N.J. 08611 (off South Stockton Street, across from NJ Motor Vehicle Commission building). For more information, call (609) 394-9436, or visit: http://artworkstrenton.org/art-all-day/.(Photo by Jeff

ANNUAL ART ALL DAY: ArtWorks third annual Art All Day event will take place at sites all over Trenton this Saturday, November 8. Last year’s event saw artist Steven Morris (above) painting at Gallery 219. This year’s event promises to be bigger and better than ever before. Activities begin and end at Artworks, located at 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, N.J. 08611 (off South Stockton Street, across from NJ Motor Vehicle Commission building). For more information, call (609) 394-9436, or visit: http://artworkstrenton.org/art-all-day/. (Photo by Jeff

Trenton is reinventing itself through art as visitors can see for themselves this Saturday, November 8, when the city becomes a huge outdoor gallery courtesy of ArtWorks, the visual art center at 19 Everett Alley in Trenton, which hosts its third annual “Art All Day” (AAD), a companion to the ever popular 24-hour Art All Night event each year in June.

Aptly described as the Capital City’s own open studio tour and creative showcase, Art all Day transforms Trenton into a vibrant arts destination and if other ArtWorks-organized events are anything to go by, Art All Day will be well-attended. Over a thousand visitors are expected to enjoy free art, music, and entertainment at some 30 sites across the city.

To facilitate access to the many studio tours and performances around town there will be docent-led trolley, walking, and bicycling tours to the art studios and exhibition sites as well as numerous activities for art-lovers.

Three new art-oriented venues have been added this year. The Hive Community of Art & Design is among the city’s latest collective spaces for local artists. The New Trenton Store & Studio is a combination collectibles shop, photo studio, and gallery. Both join The College of New Jersey’s CommunityWorks Art Gallery and Art All Day’s existing roster of 27 other Trenton sites showcasing the work of more than 80 artists and craftspeople.

“What I love about Art All Day is that every year there is so much that is new to see and do,” said Art All Day Director Lauren Otis. “Trenton is just bursting with new ideas, new ventures, new art. It is a city with a lot of history, some of it not so great, so it is really gratifying to show people how Trenton is reinventing itself right now before their very eyes,” he said.

Visitors will find some of their favorite activities from last year with artists like Mel Leipzig painting for all to see at the New Jersey State Museum from noon until 4 p.m., and Trenton muralists doing their stuff around town. The city’s latest public murals will be featured on the Art All Day public art tour.

In addition, the S.A.G.E. Coalition’s Gandhi Garden and Gallery 219 will be open and members of the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen’s A-Team artists will be showcasing their work.

Cast iron sculpture by members of the AbOminOg International Arts Collective will be on view at the Old Barracks Museum.

All of the activities are free with suggested donations for tours (see below). Don’t forget to pick up a free map showing all the sites around town where art will be on view throughout the day.

Tours and Activities

Events begin with a group exhibition from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the Artworks main gallery. From noon through 5 p.m. there will be open studios and pop-up galleries in unexpected places throughout Trenton.

Special trolley tours guided by Art all Day staff will leave from the ArtWorks parking lot at noon, 1:30 p.m., and 3 p.m. The tours operate on two separate loops (Northeast Loop and Southwest Loop). Each loop features three tours and each tour takes approximately one and one half hours. There is a suggested donation of $10 for one tour, $15 for two, and $20 for three.

For those who prefer to walk, there will be one hour docent-led tours of the downtown and central Trenton sites leaving at 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3:30 p.m., for which the suggested donation is $5.

And if bicycling is your preference, you can bring along your own bike and be guided by Wills Kinsley. These tours will operate continuously throughout the day from noon to 5 p.m., returning to the Artworks site to pick up new riders approximately every hour on the hour. A donation of $5 is also suggested for participants.

Throughout the afternoon from noon until 5 p.m, there will be live painting/demos at multiple AAD sites. Dean “Ras” Innocenzi and Jonathan “Lank” Connor will be at TerraCycle; Will Kasso will be at Gallery 219, Leon Rainbow will be at Zienowicz Signs, and Kenneth Lewis and Julia “Kito” Kirtley will be at the Conservatory Mansion.

Also from noon to 5 p.m., there will be a JuJu Crossing World Music & Art Fete with live drumming and dance featuring DanceSpora, Akoma House, and Ahmed Davis, at the Conservatory Mansion

At the New Jersey State Museum, Curator of Fine Art Margaret O’Reilly will lead a gallery tour of “American Perspectives: The Fine Art Collection,” at 2 p.m. on the museum’s third floor.

Classics Books will host poetry readings from 2 to 4 p.m. and a reception in celebration of the day, kicks off in the ArtWorks main gallery at 5 p.m.

The evening will conclude with a showcase of work by local filmmakers at the Mill Hill Playhouse from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m. when the Trenton Film Society in conjunction with Cinema Thursdays presents “Trenton Makes Movies.”

A comprehensive map showing all the sites can be viewed at: http://artworks.rockbridgeservic.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/ArtMap-AAD-2014.pdf.

Free parking all day will be available at Artworks, which will serve as Art All Day headquarters, where visitors can obtain information on sites and activities, view on-site studios, take in the “Artists of Art All Day” group show, sample from food trucks, and gather before embarking on trolley, bike, and walking tours.

Artworks is located at 19 Everett Alley, Trenton (off South Stockton Street, across from the N.J. Motor Vehicle Commission building). For more information, call call (609) 394-9436, or visit: http://artworkstrenton.org/art-all-day/.