November 11, 2015

Art 2

“BARNES HALL”: This still image from the “Barnes Hall 2012-14” exhibit at the Princeton Day School (PDS) Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery will be on display from November 24 to December 17. The exhibit features the photography and video work of PDS alumna Eleanor Oakes ’03.

A new exhibition is opening at the Princeton Day School (PDS) Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery on November 24 and will run through December 17. The exhibit titled Barnes Hall 2012-2014 features the photography and video work of PDS alumna Eleanor Oakes ‘03. There will be an opening reception on Tuesday, November 14 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the gallery. There will also be an open house with the artist on Friday, November 27 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the gallery. Both events are free and open to the public.

PDS alumna Eleanor Oakes is an artist and photography professor currently living in Detroit. She received a BA in Visual Arts and Art History from Princeton University in 2007 and an MFA in Art Practice from Stanford University in 2014. Her work has received awards, such as a Murphy and Cadogan Contemporary Art Award from the San Francisco Foundation (2013) among others, and has been featured in publications and exhibitions such as 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers and a recent solo exhibition at Tyler Wood Gallery in San Francisco. Her work can be viewed online at www.eleanoroakes.com more

November 4, 2015

Art Rev 1

“MOONSCAPE”: The watercolor pictured above titled “Moonscape” will be among the paintings by Jane Adriance displayed at the University Medical Center of Princeton (UMCP) through February 2016. On Friday, November 20 there will be an opening reception for the exhibit from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery at UMCP.

The University Medical Center of Princeton (UMCP) will host a wine and cheese reception on Friday, November 20, to mark the opening of an exhibit featuring works by Princeton watercolor artist Jane Adriance.

The reception is scheduled from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, which is located in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. To attend, please RSVP at www.princetonhcs.org/art by November 13. more

October 28, 2015

Rider Art

“ABRAHAM AND ISAAC”: This 62” x 62” oil on canvas by orthopedic surgeon, drawer, and painter Marc Malberg will be among the artworks displayed in the Rider University Art Gallery’s newest exhibit, “Biblical Inspiration in a Secular Age” running from November 5 to December 6. Malberg is one of five exhibiting artists whose work is based on a 21st century revisionist perspective on the Bible. Malberg’s images of Abraham and Isaac, Abraham and Aaron, Moses and the Burning Bush, and Absalom, King David’s son, will be on view in the exhibition.

Rider University’s Art Gallery opens an exhibition on Thursday, November 5 titled Biblical Inspiration in a Secular Age. Organized by guest curator Judith Brodsky, the exhibition will run from November 5 through Sunday, December 6. A reception in honor of the artists will take place on Thursday, November 5, and is free and open to the public. The artists will speak about their work in a free program open to the public on Thursday, November 12 at 7 p.m. more

October 21, 2015

Art TCNJ

Back in the late 1970s when video games were still a novelty, visual art was prominent in packaging and marketing but had yet to transfer to the screen. Fast forward a decade or so. Video game designers, some of whom are traditional painters and artists, are now able to experiment and express themselves in ways they may have imagined but didn’t think were possible.

It is this progression, and beyond, that an ambitious exhibit at The College of New Jersey Art Gallery is exploring through December 13. “A Palette of Pixels: The Evolving Art of Video Games” looks at the last three decades of the medium with concept art, sketches, and sculptures from video games, as well as interactive game stations. Curator Chris Ault, associate professor of interactive multimedia and the former chair of the department at TCNJ, said the question of whether video games are art has been a hot topic in recent years. more

Art Review 2

Cézanne…was the greatest. The greatest for always. — Ernest Hemingway

Hemingway’s love of Cézanne is expressed more guardedly in his posthumous Paris memoir, A Moveable Feast (1964). Even there, after saying he was learning “very much” from Cézanne, he admits he was “not articulate enough to explain it to anyone. Besides it was a secret.” Here’s a world-famous writer entering his 60s and he’s still celebrating his enthusiasm as if he were a boy with a secret. Writing as his youthful alter ego in The Nick Adams Stories (1972) he lets his feelings show (Cezanne “was the greatest”) in a short hitherto unpublished piece titled “On Writing.”  more

Art Leon

“HEAR, SEE, SPEAK”: Leon Rainbow’s “Hear, See, Speak” is among 32 works by 22 artists in “Art Served Up Trenton Style,” at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College until October 29. More information is available at www.mccc.edu/gallery.

The Gallery at Mercer County Community College (MCCC) presents “Art Served Up Trenton Style,” an exhibition of works from the Trenton Artists Workshop Association (TAWA) and the SAGE Coalition. The show runs now until Thursday, October 29 with an opening reception today, Wednesday, October 14 from 5 to 7 p.m. The MCCC Gallery is located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the College’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Directions and a campus map can be found at www.mccc.edu. more

October 7, 2015

Silk Road Page 14

MOGAO CAVE 158: This photograph by James Lo features a reclining Buddha in nirvana in Mogao Cave 158. This image is among the paintings, sculpture, and manuscripts in the “Sacred Caves of the Silk Road: Ways of Knowing and Re-creating Dunhuang” exhibit at the PU Art Museum. The exhibit aims to provide a greater understanding of the Silk Road site.

“Sacred Caves of the Silk Road: Ways of Knowing and Re-creating Dunhuang” is on view at the Princeton University Art Museum now until January 10. The exhibit brings together paintings, sculpture, and manuscripts from the Mogao Caves to provide a greater understanding of the Silk Road site.

Since their creation over 1,500 years ago, the Mogao Caves, located on the outskirts of the city of Dunhuang in northwestern China, continue to narrate the history of religious art and connect the Eastern and Western worlds through their once central location at the gateway to the Silk Road. The caves come to Princeton through a time capsule of objects dating from A.D. 270 to the 1960s. The exhibit explores the aesthetic and transcontinental nature of this World Heritage Site.  more

September 16, 2015

Art Rev web

“INTIMATIONS”: This oil on linen by painter Audrey Ushenko will be among those on display in her solo exhibit at the Rider University Art Gallery called “In Natural Habitat” from September 24 through October 25.

The Rider University Art Gallery will present an exhibition titled “In Natural Habitat” featuring the work of Audrey Ushenko from Thursday, September 24 through Sunday, October 25. The exhibit will include an opening reception on Thursday, September 24 from 5 to 7 p.m. and an artist’s talk on Thursday, October 1 at 7 p.m. Admission is free. more

September 10, 2015

Nassau Web 2

To celebrate the beginning of the Fall 2015 semester and an exciting new year of programming at the Princeton University Art Museum (including the opening of Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection) students and the greater Princeton community are invited to the seventh annual Nassau Street Sampler. Visit the PU Art Museum galleries and taste what local restaurants have to offer while enjoying musical performances by some of Princeton’s most beloved student groups. more

September 9, 2015

Art 2

A LOVELY SHOT: Photographer Donna Lovely’s “Great Blue Heron” will be among the works on view at “A New Leaf,” a show by The River Queen Artisans Gallery located at 8 Church Street in Lambertville. The show features local artists like Jay and Joanne Eisenberg who will be hosting its opening reception Saturday, September 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. “A New Leaf” will run until November 15.

New Hope artists, Jay and Joanne Eisenberg will be hosting the opening reception for the show “A New Leaf” at The River Queen Artisans Gallery on Saturday, September 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. “A New Leaf” will run through November 15 and many of the artists will be available at the opening.  more

September 2, 2015

Art Modigliani

“JEAN COCTEAU”: Modigliani’s well-known 1916 image of the French writer is among the works in the exhibit, “Cézanne and the Modern” at the Princeton University Art Museum from September 19 through January 3, 2016.

“Cézanne and the Modern,” a new exhibit at the Princeton Art Museum running from September 19 through January 3, 2016, includes works by Paul Cézanne — and a great deal more. Drawn from the Pearlman Collection, it will feature the artists PaulGauguin, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Édouard Manet, Amedeo Modigliani, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, Chaïm Soutine, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Vincent van Gogh. more

August 26, 2015

Art Rev

Lucy Graves McVicker is one of Princeton’s most well-loved artists. A founding member of the Princeton Artists’ Alliance, she is also a prime mover in the Garden State Watercolor Society (GSWS), which is having its 46th Annual Juried Show, “Nature’s Beauty,” at the D&R Greenway now through September 25. more

August 19, 2015

Art Lead

Fans of the California-born London transplant Kaffe Fassett should mark their calendars now for a new show coming to the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown later this year.

“Blanket Statements: New Quilts by Kaffe Fassett and Historical Quilts from the collection of the Quilt Museum and Gallery, York, U.K.” will open November 14 and continue through February 21, 2016. more

August 12, 2015
REFLECTIONS ON SURVIVAL: Barbara Warren’s thought provoking image will be part of an exhibition by members of the Princeton Photography Club at Gallery 14 in Hopewell from August 14 through September 6. Titled “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” the exhibition includes work that is a personal response to the emotional experiences of each photographer. There will be an opening reception at the Gallery on Friday, August 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. and a “Meet the Photographers,” on Sunday, August 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. The show can be viewed Saturdays and Sundays, from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Sheila or Carl Geisler at (732) 422-3676 or visit: www.princetonphotoclub.org. For more on Gallery 14, visit: http://photogallery14.com.(Image Courtesy of the Artist).

REFLECTIONS ON SURVIVAL: Barbara Warren’s thought provoking image will be part of an exhibition by members of the Princeton Photography Club at Gallery 14 in Hopewell from August 14 through September 6. Titled “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” the exhibition includes work that is a personal response to the emotional experiences of each photographer. There will be an opening reception at the Gallery on Friday, August 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. and a “Meet the Photographers,” on Sunday, August 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. The show can be viewed Saturdays and Sundays, from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Sheila or Carl Geisler at (732) 422-3676 or visit: www.princetonphotoclub.org. (Image Courtesy of the Artist).

The Princeton Photography Club (PPC) presents an original photographic exhibit entitled “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” from August 14 through September 6. at Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell.

There will be an opening reception at the Gallery on Friday, August 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. and a “Meet the Photographers,” on Sunday, August 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. This opportunity to meet and talk with the photographers is a way to understand more about each person’s individual path to healing. For all of the exhibitors, “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” is a very personal show as is evidenced by the images on display.  more

August 5, 2015

Art ReviewA mini-exhibition on early American typewriters currently on display at the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park, Trenton, will run through November 8.

Located on the second floor of the museum, the exhibition was curated by Richard Willinger, Chair of the Museum Society’s Collections Management Committee, and a typewriter collector.

Because people stopped using typewriters many years ago when the personal computer came out, many young people have never used a typewriter. Older people remember typewriters as the standard four-bank machine with a typed sheet visible on the rubber platen in front of you. more

July 29, 2015

Zodiac 2

After a four-year ban that prevented him from all international travel and kept him from visiting Princeton in 2012, Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei has had his passport returned to him.

Last week, Mr. Ai posted a photo of himself on Instagram holding the document, which had been confiscated by Chinese authorities following the artist’s outspoken remarks on number of national scandals, including collapse of badly-constructed schools during a 2008 earthquake.  more

July 22, 2015

Art GardenAnyone strolling through the alleyway between Palmer Square and Witherspoon Street these days will find a tiny garden tucked away in a corner opposite the outdoor dining spot of Teresa’s Caffe.

If you haven’t yet seen it, it’s worth finding — and observing the reaction of town residents who come upon it for the first time. Passers-by are generally enchanted.

Bounded by slim logs of silver birch, the garden is just a few square feet and yet to a child’s imagination it offers a wealth of possibility. Lichen covered rocks and remnants of wood are interspersed with a selection of flowering plants, mosses, and ferns forming a “fairy garden” in a formerly unused spot.

The nurturing hand behind this miniature elfland kingdom is landscape artist Peter Soderman who is known for his playful attitude — he’s been known to describe himself as the “Jackson Pollock of Lawn Care” and the “Court Jester of Synchronicity.” more

July 15, 2015
ART THAT HEALS: Images such as this painting, titled “Indian Summer Bouquet,” will be among the works by local artist Joanne Augustine on view and for sale (with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting the hospital) at University Medical Center of Princeton through November 8. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 31, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to www.princetonhcs.org/art by Friday, July 24. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

ART THAT HEALS: Images such as this painting, titled “Indian Summer Bouquet,” will be among the works by local artist Joanne Augustine on view and for sale (with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting the hospital) at University Medical Center of Princeton through November 8. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 31, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to www.princetonhcs.org/art by Friday, July 24. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

The University Medical Center of Princeton (UMCP) will host a wine-and-cheese reception on Friday, July 31, to mark the opening of an exhibition featuring work by local artist Joanne Augustine.  more

June 24, 2015
SEWARD JOHNSON ON BROADWAY: Famed sculptor and philanthropist J. Seward Johnson will be in New York City’s Garment District today, Wednesday, June 24, to open an exhibition of of 18 of his most iconic and popular pieces, selected from Grounds for Sculpture’s “Seward Johnson: The Retrospective,” which was scheduled to close last September, but has proved to be so popular that it has been extended to July 1 of this year (www.groundsforsculpture.org). “Seward Johnson in New York, Selections From the Retrospective,” can be seen in Garment District plazas on Broadway, between 38th Street and 39th Street until September 15. (Image courtesy of Seward Johnson Atelier, Inc.)

SEWARD JOHNSON ON BROADWAY: Famed sculptor and philanthropist J. Seward Johnson will be in New York City’s Garment District today, Wednesday, June 24, to open an exhibition of of 18 of his most iconic and popular pieces, selected from Grounds for Sculpture’s “Seward Johnson: The Retrospective,” which was scheduled to close last September, but has proved to be so popular that it has been extended to July 1 of this year (www.groundsforsculpture.org). “Seward Johnson in New York, Selections From the Retrospective,” can be seen in Garment District plazas on Broadway, between 38th Street and 39th Street until September 15. (Image courtesy of Seward Johnson Atelier, Inc.)

If you’ve strolled down Broadway through New York City’s Garment District in recent months you will have observed some intriguing public art on display in the city streets. Donna Dodson and Andy Moerlein’s colossal bird sculptures constructed out of maple saplings stopped pedestrians in their tracks between 36th and 41st streets.

The latest artwork to be unveiled there promises to do the same. Eighteen life-size sculptures by J. Seward Johnson will be on show on Broadway between 38th Street and 39th Street.

Mr. Johnson will open the exhibition, today, June 24, between 11 a.m. and noon, at a reception at which he is expected to reflect on a lifetime of creative achievement. The New Jersey artist has been paying homage to American society through realistic bronze sculptures for almost half a century.

The artwork on display has been selected from the retrospective of Mr. Johnson’s work at Grounds For Sculpture (GFS), the sculpture park and arboretum he founded on the site of the old New Jersey Fairgrounds in Hamilton.

Mr. Johnson led the team that transformed the once derelict site into a showcase for prominent and emerging artists. The park evolved as an offshoot of Mr. Johnson’s foundry, The Johnson Atelier.

The renowned sculptor and philanthropist has dedicated his career to public art. His life-like bronze and monumental figures are familiar sights throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. His best known works are lifelike sculptures in his “Celebrating the Familiar” series, which draws attention to the details of ordinary life: a nap on a park bench, a trip to the grocery story, the pleasure a child takes in an ice cream cone.

GFS opened its doors to the public in 1992 with works by Mr. Johnson and contributions from notable artists such as Clement Meadmore, Anthony Caro, Beverly Pepper, George Segal, and Isaac Witkin. “Seward Johnson: The Retrospective” opened there in May of last year. Although it was scheduled to close last September, the show drew so many visitors that it was extended to July 1 of this year.

“There has been a remarkable response from both the media and the continuing flood of visitors to the park, local and international,” said Paula Stoeke, the exhibition’s guest curator. “This gathering of sculptures will never be seen all together again and I encourage everyone to plan a visit.”

The GFS exhibition sculptures chosen to spend their summer in the city include several of the artist’s signature “man on the street” bronzes. Princeton residents are familiar with such works. One of the artist’s first public pieces, The Newspaper Reader, was made for the municipality and sits outside Monument Hall. Another, Out to Lunch, is in Palmer Square. Both were created in the 1970s, when Mr. Johnson hoped to encourage people to “get back out-of-doors” at a time when a crime wave had them avoiding public spaces. “I wanted to put sculptures into parks to act like decoys and entice people back to parks,” he explained in a 2012 Princeton Magazine interview.

In addition, tourists and New Yorkers alike will be able to enjoy one of Mr. Johnson’s most charismatic trompe l’oeil painted bronzes, a three-dimensional version of a sailor kissing a nurse in New York’s Times Square on VJ-Day at the end of World War II. Perhaps his most famous work, Unconditional Surrender, has been displayed in Times Square, San Diego, Sarasota, and Rome.

Incidentally, owners of the copyright to the image, made famous by LIFE magazine photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, refused Johnson permission to use it, so Johnson based his work on a slightly different photograph of the kissing couple taken by another photographer and in the public domain.

Among the iconic pieces on show in the Garment District is his Forever Marilyn, a three dimensional version of a photograph of the star with her white skirt billowing around her legs from the updraft of an air vent from the New York subway; a scene from the movie, The Seven Year Itch.

Also on view on Broadway will be some of Mr. Johnson’s well-known 3-dimensional life-scale tableaux of paintings by the French Impressionists. Visitors to GFS are fond of inserting themselves into his take on Renoir’s The Boating Party, titled Were You Invited, from his “Beyond the Frame” series. The park also boasts the artist’s rendition of Claude Monet’s Garden at Sainte-Addresse and Edouard Manet’s Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe. 

The general popularity of these works stands in marked contrast to the reception that met Mr. Johnson’s first major show at the Corcoran Gallery. “Beyond the Frame: Impressionism Revisited,” was panned by critics, one of whom likened the feeling it gave him to that of riding a Ferris Wheel after eating a sardine milkshake.

The artist relishes the memory of that response and credits the critic for doing him an enormous favor. “People flocked to the show to see what all the fuss was about,” he once said.

At 85, Mr. Johnson has more than 450 life-size cast bronze works featured in city parks and museums worldwide including in London, Paris, Rome, Madrid, Kiev, Sydney, and Osaka. Often hailed as “America’s most popular sculptor;” he was inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame in 2013.

The retrospective at Grounds for Sculpture includes works indoors and out. One of the most monumental pieces is The Awakening, a 70-foot long giant emerging from the earth whose 17-foot arm extends dramatically into the sky. For this and other works such as his interactive rendition of Mona Lisa called A Reason to Smile, and Vermeer’s Girl with the Pearl Earring á la Johnson titled The Nature of Obsession, you will have to visit Grounds for Sculpture before the show ends on July 1. For more information, visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

“Seward Johnson in New York, Selections From the Retrospective” at Garment District plazas on Broadway, between 38th Street and 39th Street, will run until September 15.

June 10, 2015
CUBAN LIVES: Alina Bliach’s photograph of Ardelio is one of 45 portraits of Cuban immigrants from the past 50 years on display at the Mercer County Community College Gallery from June 13 through June 24. An opening reception with Ms. Bliach, a 2006 alumna of the MCCC Photography program, will be held Saturday, June 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

CUBAN LIVES: Alina Bliach’s photograph of Ardelio is one of 45 portraits of Cuban immigrants from the past 50 years on display at the Mercer County Community College Gallery from June 13 through June 24. An opening reception with Ms. Bliach, a 2006 alumna of the MCCC Photography program, will be held Saturday, June 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

A special photography exhibition featuring Mercer County Community College (MCCC) alumna Alina Bliach (’06) opens with a reception in the Gallery at MCCC on Saturday, June 13, from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibition will continue through June 24.

“A Voyage of Many,” includes images and stories of 45 Cuban immigrants over the past half century in their new American homeland. Each photograph is accompanied by a printed excerpt from interviews Bliach conducted. The photos and narratives tell stories of forced exile, escape, loss, hope, and triumph.

Ms. Bliach notes that many of those who came to the United States in the 1960s are now in their 70s, 80s, and 90s, and most of their stories remain unrecorded. “Since the 1960s more than one million Cubans have immigrated to the United States — the children of the Peter Pan flights, the people of Camarioca, the Freedom Flights, the Mariel Boatlift, the people known as the Balceros, and the Immigration Visa Lottery winners …. Their’s are the stories of sacrifice, perseverance, and survival in their ultimate quest for freedom. These are their portraits,” she said.

Ms. Bliach’s portraits are rich in detail that connects their subjects to their Cuban heritage. “Forced to leave their homeland, their love for family, art, religion, and music is often apparent throughout their homes. Photographs of loved ones, brightly colored art and religious relics are proudly displayed …. More than decorations, these objects reveal the deep relationship between these immigrants’ cultural background and the new lives they built for themselves in America,” she said.

The photographer’s work has won numerous awards and honors: as a finalist in Best of Photography 2013; First and Second Prize honors in the Pollux Awards; Merit Awards in the Professional Photographers of America International competitions; PPA Loan Collection honor; Hasselblad Photographer of the Month; and several International Photography Honorable Mentions. Her work has been exhibited at the Borges Cultural Center in Buenos Aires, Argentina; The Room in SoHo, N.Y.; Arts Council of Princeton in Princeton; Grounds for Sculpture; Phillips Mill in New Hope, Pa.; Artworks in Trenton; and Art Along the Fence in Hoboken.

The MCCC Gallery is located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Gallery hours for “A Voyage of Many,” are Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Saturday, June 20, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

———

June 3, 2015

 

CHAIRMAKING IN THE GARDEN STATE: Morven’s latest exhibition “Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking” examines the chairmaker’s craft from the 1790s to the end of the 19th century. Guest curator Joseph W. Hammond documents the work of chairmakers who once worked in virtually every corner of the Garden State, with examples of their work, period photographs, and advertisements in four rooms on the museum’s second floor. The exhibition will be on view at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, through October 18. For more information, call (609) 924-8144, or visit: www.morven.org.(Photo by L. Arntzenius)

CHAIRMAKING IN THE GARDEN STATE: Morven’s latest exhibition “Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking” examines the chairmaker’s craft from the 1790s to the end of the 19th century. Guest curator Joseph W. Hammond documents the work of chairmakers who once worked in virtually every corner of the Garden State, with examples of their work, period photographs, and advertisements in four rooms on the museum’s second floor. The exhibition will be on view at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, through October 18. For more information, call (609) 924-8144, or visit: www.morven.org. (Photo by L. Arntzenius)

Where else but Princeton’s Morven Museum & Garden would you find an exhibition devoted entirely to the history of chair-making in New Jersey?

Even though the museum’s staff is currently working behind the scenes on what promises to be a landmark show this fall, they have brought in a guest curator for a small and informative exploration of the history of chair making in New Jersey that will run through the summer until mid-October.

In spite of its cumbersome title, “Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking(derived from an 1828 newspaper advertisement of Morristown chair maker J. D. Humphreyville), the exhibition showcases some of the most sleek and elegant examples of the chairmaker’s craft from the 1790s to the end of the 19th century.

The show came about after the museum was contacted by a New Jersey collector who offered his chairs for display. “We saw his collection and thought it was an excellent idea; to his items, others were added,” said Morven’s Curator of Collections and Exhibitions Elizabeth Allan.

Formerly of Winterthur and now engaged in New Jersey historic projects, guest curator Joseph W. Hammond was called in to review and make selections from the private collection and to seek out appropriate additions from sources across the state. About half of the items on display come from a single private collection and the rest from multiple sources. “It’s not just about chairs but about chair-making in New Jersey, including regional characteristics,” said Mr. Hammond. “Chairmakers once worked in virtually every corner of the Garden State, from large cities and towns to small crossroad communities and 35 examples are on display here along with chair-making tools and stencils, portraits and photographs, period advertisements, and plates from sales catalogs.”

Mr. Hammond has enhanced the display with period advertisements from the early part of the 19th century for some of the hundreds of craftsmen known today through census records, business directories, account books, and research conducted by furniture students and local historians. He will discuss the exhibition during a gallery talk on September 17.

The exhibition is presented in four rooms on the museum’s second floor and comprises sections on, “The Craft of Chairmaking,” “Windsor Chairs,” “Common and Fancy Chairs,” and “Factory Made Chairs.”

The first of these introduces visitors to the process of making 19th-century chairs, including the technique and tools for traditional rush seating.

Most of the equipment and tools on display have been drawn from an important collection assembled in the late 1920s by William H. MacDonald of Trenton. Period photographs illustrate how many of the tools were used.

Check out the chairmaker’s bench, a rotating stand for weaving rush seats, color grinders used in Allentown for preparing paint, and decorative stencils from several shops in the Allentown and Englishtown areas.

Replications of several stencils on loan from the Monmouth County Historical Collection are cut from scrap paper. “It’s amazing that they have survived at all, some of them are so delicate,” said Ms. Allan as she pointed out some for crest rails, some with corner designs and one bearing a chair-maker’s name. They’d be used to apply painted designs. Beside them are some patterns that would be copied by hand.

Eight Windsor chairs made between 1790 and 1835 range in form from fan-back and bow-back to rod-back styles, some with bamboo-shaped turnings popular in the early 19th century. They were made in Trenton, Pemberton, Moorestown, Salem, and Monmouth County by Ezekiah Hewes, William Bowen, Samuel Jaques, Samuel Roberts, William McElroy, Ebenezer P. Rose, and others. Brands were often stamped on the undersides of chair seats and can be used to identify the work of specific craftsmen.

Throughout the 19th century, a wide range of common and fancy chairs were made in all parts of New Jersey and there are 15 examples of these in the exhibition. Seven of them were produced by the renowned Ware family of South Jersey, who made slat-back, rush seated chairs in the Delaware Valley tradition in Cumberland and Salem counties. Nineteen Wares over four generations engaged in chairmaking from the late 18th century to the 1940s. The techniques passed down in the family remained so similar that it is often difficult, if not impossible, to tell the work of one craftsman from another.

After the Civil War, chair production in New Jersey shifted from small shops to factories. Three of the most prominent were the Gardner Manufacturing Company of Glen Gardner, Hunterdon County; the Tunis R. Cooper chair factory in Bergenfield, Bergen County; and the Collignon Brothers in what is now River Vale, Bergen County. Twelve examples from all three factories display the special characteristics developed by each, including the Collignan Brothers’s patented folding chairs.

Highlights include the hand-painted crest rail depicting a compote of berries on a Windsor side chair made by Ebenezer P. Rose, Jr., of Trenton, ca. 1815-25, and the graceful bow-back Windsor armchair made by William McElroy of Moorestown, N.J., ca. 1795-1810.

One period photograph shows Samuel Sloan Ware (1848-1920) on the porch roof of his second floor chair shop in Alloway, New Jersey, ca. 1875, which comes from the Joseph Downs Collection of Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera at the Winterthur Library.

Another, by Edward W. Humphrey, records the interior of Dan Ware’s chair shop in Woodstown, Salem County, circa 1895.

Miniatures made between 1960 and 1985 by Ware family descendent Allen M. Loveland, Jr., of Camden, are on loan from the Salem County Historical Society,

“Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking” will be on view at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, through October 18. Hours are Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $6, adults; $5, seniors/students; free to children 6 and under and Friends of Morven. For more information, call (609) 924-8144, or visit: www.morven.org.

And the landmark show coming up in the fall? “Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age,” the first large-scale exhibition to explore the vices and virtues of this prominent couple, will open November 13. For a sneak peek, visit: www.morven.org.

May 27, 2015
SUMMER SUN: Work such as this by the Pennsylvania Impressionist Albert Van Nesse Greene (1887-1971) will be on show in the exhibition “Impressions of Life” at the Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio, 5230 Silo Hill Road in Doylestown, from May 30 through August 31. There will be an opening reception Saturday, May 30 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The show of over 60 pieces, will be one of the largest offerings of A.V. Greene’s work in recent years. It showcases a number of Pennsylvania landscapes and Maine harbor scenes, as well as some beautiful depictions of Europe. A color catalogue will be available for purchase and all featured works will be available on the gallery’s website a week prior to the opening. Gallery hours are Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m., as well as by appointment. For more information, call (215) 348-2500 or visit: www.gratzgallery.com.

SUMMER SUN: Work such as this by the Pennsylvania Impressionist Albert Van Nesse Greene (1887-1971) will be on show in the exhibition “Impressions of Life” at the Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio, 5230 Silo Hill Road in Doylestown, from May 30 through August 31. There will be an opening reception Saturday, May 30 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The show of over 60 pieces, will be one of the largest offerings of A.V. Greene’s work in recent years. It showcases a number of Pennsylvania landscapes and Maine harbor scenes, as well as some beautiful depictions of Europe. A color catalogue will be available for purchase and all featured works will be available on the gallery’s website a week prior to the opening. Gallery hours are Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m., as well as by appointment. For more information, call (215) 348-2500 or visit: www.gratzgallery.com.

The Gratz Gallery & Conservation Studio, at its new location, 5230 Silo Hill Road in Doylestown, is pleased to announce “Albert Van Nesse Greene (1887-1971) Impressions of Life,” an exhibition of paintings by the Pennsylvania Impressionist.

This inaugural exhibition at the gallery’s new space, will run from May 30 through August 31. There will be an opening reception at the gallery and studio on Saturday, May 30 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Born in Jamaica, New York, Albert Van Nesse Greene, often referred to as A.V. Greene, grew up in Washington, D.C. and studied at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. He furthered his studies at the Art Students League, the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, under Daniel Garber. While serving during World War I, the artist was seriously injured. After recovering he moved to Philadelphia in 1917. He began part-time work at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art’s Country School in Chester Springs (now Historic Yellow Springs) and ultimately settled in Chester Springs; choosing the area’s beautiful landscapes at the subjects of many of his compositions.

Mr. Van Nesse Greene was strongly influenced by the French Impressionists. His early work is highly impressionistic and embraces a palette more aligned with French painters than his American counterparts. Although his subjects tend to favor Pennsylvania landscapes, he also painted in Booth Bay, Maine and throughout Europe; creating a diverse and varied range of compositions. He was also an adept draftsman known for his beautiful pastel compositions. Greene’s artwork was exhibited extensively throughout the United States and France during his lifetime.

The forthcoming exhibition at Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio will be one of the largest offerings of A.V. Greene’s work in recent years. The exhibition features over 60 pieces by Greene; a culmination of 30 years of collecting the artist’s finest works. “Impressions of Life” showcases a number of Pennsylvania landscapes and Maine harbor scenes, as well as some beautiful depictions of Europe. Mr. Van Nesse Greene enjoyed transcribing the landscape as it changed throughout the seasons; therefore, the exhibition includes a number of sunny springtime and crisp winter compositions.

In celebration of the forthcoming opening Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio will be donating a portion of its proceeds to the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown. Gratz Gallery salutes the work the museum has done since it opened its doors in 1988, and would like to thank them for their dedication to the arts.

A color catalogue will be available for purchase throughout the exhibition. All featured works of art will be available on the gallery’s website a week prior to the opening.

The Gratz Gallery & Conservation Studio specializes in 19th and 20th century American paintings, with a focus on painters from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. In addition to art investment Gratz Gallery also offers custom framing and fine art conservation services. The gallery is open Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m., as well as by appointment. For more information, call (215) 348-2500 or visit: www.gratzgallery.com.

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May 20, 2015
GALLERY 353 GETS READY TO OPEN: Gallery Director Patrick Ryan pauses from hanging new work by local artist Heather Sturt Haaga for the inaugural exhibition, “California Colors: Plein Air and Still Life Paintings,” that will launch Princeton’s newest art gallery this Friday, May 22. An opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mr. Ryan is currently installing 24 oil paintings by Ms. Haaga. Located in the McCarthy building at 353 Nassau Street, the gallery will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, from noon to 6 p.m., with additional hours during Princeton University Reunions Weekend: Friday, May 29, from 2 to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, May 31, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (803) 334-8838, or visit: www.gallery353.com. For more on the featured artist, visit: www.heatherhaaga.com.(Photograph by L. Arntzenius)

GALLERY 353 GETS READY TO OPEN: Gallery Director Patrick Ryan pauses from hanging new work by local artist Heather Sturt Haaga for the inaugural exhibition, “California Colors: Plein Air and Still Life Paintings,” that will launch Princeton’s newest art gallery this Friday, May 22. An opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mr. Ryan is currently installing 24 oil paintings by Ms. Haaga. Located in the McCarthy building at 353 Nassau Street, the gallery will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, from noon to 6 p.m., with additional hours during Princeton University Reunions Weekend: Friday, May 29, from 2 to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, May 31, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (803) 334-8838, or visit: www.gallery353.com. For more on the featured artist, visit: www.heatherhaaga.com. (Photograph by L. Arntzenius)

A new art gallery opens in Princeton this Friday, May 22, with an exhibition of oil paintings by Heather Sturt Haaga. Ms. Haaga is well-known in Princeton as both a painter and a philanthropist.

The aptly named Gallery 353 is located in the McCarthy building at 353 Nassau Street, just north of the intersection with Harrison Street and next door to the Cloak and Dagger Mystery Bookstore. The grand opening and reception will take place from 5:30-8:30 p.m.

The gallery is the brainchild of Patrick Ryan, who was born and raised in the Princeton area and formerly directed the largest art gallery in Charleston, South Carolina, for five years until 2005 when it relocated to Chicago.

Gallery 353’s inaugural exhibition of Ms. Haaga’s work, “California Colors: Plein Air and Still Life Paintings,” will include 23 pieces from the artist and one that is on loan from Princeton’s municipal Judge Jack McCarthy, who owns the building in which the gallery is housed. “I’ve known Jack since since the 1960s and so when I returned to Princeton and wanted to set-up my own gallery, the basement space in the McCarthy building presented itself,” said Mr. Ryan during a pause in his preparations for the opening.

Although partially below ground, the gallery has a light, airy feel that belies its location, with a deep window along one exterior wall so that it benefits from daylight. Lots of interior lighting ensures a bright space. The main entrance to the gallery is in the rear of the building where there is some parking.

The work in the opening exhibition is all relatively recent and ranges in price from the 8 by 10 inch Barn Country at $500 to the 24 by 36 inch California Spring at $3,000, the show’s piece de resistance and also its largest.

Ms. Haaga’s titles yield a flavor of what is on view: Adirondack Afternoon, Hollyhock Cottage, Lily Pond, Pears on a Sideboard, The Turkish Vase, with a touch of humor thrown in, Time to Brush Your Teeth, and Mailbox Line Up. There are several Normandy scenes, including a landscape diptych, and still lifes.

For these paintings, the artist worked in oil, either out-of-doors or in her studio in La Cañada Flintridge, California. “Perhaps it is because of the light, the warmth, the character of the place, but colors in California seem to be heightened, more intense. The palette of the paintings adds to their story, enhances the viewer’s response to the object or landscape, and helps convey the spirit of the piece,” said Ms. Haaga, who hopes that viewers will engage with the exhibition not only through subject matter but through color as well.

Here is an artist who explores and ponders the ways in which light and color are observed. “There is a theory that anyone can draw; it is simply a matter of learning how to observe the world more carefully. And, whenever you do observe more specifically, you find the world is full of interesting spaces and colors — colors that may or may not be obvious,” she explained. “Some people see color in a different way, literally. Apparently, we do not see the same way — one more miracle of nature.”

“Heather is a gifted painter,” said Mr. Ryan, “as well as a philanthropist and worker for good causes. In addition to being a trustee of the seminary and of Vassar College, she chairs the board of the Salzburg Global Seminar, whose mission is to challenge current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern.”

With her husband, Paul Haaga, a trustee of Princeton University as well as of several other educational and cultural organizations (he was formerly acting CEO of NPR and chair of the board of the Huntington Library, said Mr. Ryan), Ms. Haaga divides her time between Princeton, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

“Heather is a passionate painter and her use of color is very compelling; this show is bound to be a success,” said the gallery director, who is looking to build up a stable of Gallery 353 artists. So far, he’s working with Ms. Haaga, the art photographer Richard Trenner, and painter Nancy Merrill who lives in Pennington. It is Mr. Ryan’s intention to have regular exhibitions of the work of Gallery 353 artists. Work by Mr. Trenner will be exhibited from mid-September through early October and new work by Ms. Merrill will be on display after that. “I’m interested in contemporary and local artists and there are many fine creative talents in this area,” said Mr. Ryan, adding that he’s looking to include work in three dimensions. “I have enormous admiration for creative artists who put their work out there before the public; that can be a scary thing.”

According to the new gallery’s director, its relatively small size suits him after running a much bigger operation in South Carolina, where he inherited some 50 artists and an inventory of over 1,000 pieces. “That was challenging; Gallery 353 will be a pleasure; it will allow me to give each artist their due and to really get to know their work.”

In addition to contemporary art, Gallery 353 will showcase estate antiques on consignment as well as unusual pieces that catch Mr. Ryan’s eye. Right now, he is taken by the work of the late Czech artist Antonin Marek Machourek (1913–1991), a pupil of Mark Chagall. He has an inventory of his paintings for sale.

The gallery will take 50 percent of all sales, which Mr. Ryan said is pretty typical, although really prominent artists whose work commands prices in the hundreds of thousand would receive a higher percentage.

Although he is not an artist himself, Mr. Ryan, who lives on Cherry Valley Road, discovered a love of art when he was an undergraduate at Princeton University. Having grown up on a family dairy farm in Pennington, he said, he had little exposure to art. He did, however, develop a feeling for history. The family home, the historic Benjamin Temple house dating to 1750, incidentally, was once threatened by the construction of I-95 and in 1973 was moved from the old Hopewell-Trenton Road (Route 31) to Federal City Road, where it is now the headquarters of the Ewing Township Historic Preservation Society.

Mr. Ryan graduated with a degree in medieval history in 1968. Since then, he’s traveled extensively. “I’m a bit of a gypsy at heart,” he said, “I’ve lived all over, in Hawaii, in La Jolla, in Sante Fe …” And he’s tried his hand at a variety of things along the way, most recently as a pecan farmer in South Carolina.

Following the launch of Gallery 353 on Friday, May 22, gallery hours will be Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, from noon to 6 p.m. In addition, there will be special gallery hours during Princeton University Reunions Weekend on Friday, May 29, from 2 to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, May 31, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

For more information, call (803) 334-8838, or visit: www.gallery353.com. For more on the featured artist, visit: www.heatherhaaga.com.

May 13, 2015
CHILDHOOD MEMORY: That’s the title of this work by Taryn, a participant in the Arts Council of Princeton’s ArtsExchange program in conjunction with HomeFront. It will be shown with other works by children in the exhibition “All Eyes on Nature,” which opens Thursday, May 14, in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place. The show will continue through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

CHILDHOOD MEMORY: That’s the title of this work by Taryn, a participant in the Arts Council of Princeton’s ArtsExchange program in conjunction with HomeFront. It will be shown with other works by children in the exhibition “All Eyes on Nature,” which opens Thursday, May 14, in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place. The show will continue through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

D&R Greenway welcomes the public to “All Eyes on Nature,” an exhibition of innovative works by ArtsExchange students of the Arts Council of Princeton, through HomeFront. Dynamic images of nature from the insects’ perspective may be viewed in the land trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery from May 14 through June 26.

Since 1993, the Arts Council of Princeton has partnered with HomeFront, which serves thousands of Mercer County families to help break the cycle of poverty and end homelessness in offering ArtsExchange, a weekly program where year-round arts instruction is provided to more than 75 children, ages 5-18, whose families are currently living in transient circumstances.

For “All Eyes on Nature,” Arts Council of Princeton Outreach Program Manager/Instructor Eva Mantell guided her students to create paintings from the vantage point of insects. Ms. Mantell asked, “What are flowers, leaves, even surrounding landscapes, when you are an insect? Where is the horizon? Where is the ground? Where is the sun? What size are the elements in the painting?”

“All Eyes on Nature” comprises the children’s vibrant answers. The lively results are intended to catalyze a greater sensitivity to nature, its beauty and its peril. “They recreated nature’s own shifts in scale, colors, and textures, as well as its marvelous complexity and interconnectedness,” explained Ms. Mantell. “Native species were their starting point, each communicating his or her own ‘insect’ energy and excitement.”

D&R Greenway’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery is funded in memory of four-year-old Olivia Kuenne, who cherished nature and art. Sequential nature exhibitions by students extend Olivia’s enthusiasms into our time.

The Arts Council of Princeton thanks the following funders for their support of the ArtsExchange programming in 2014-15: ACP Fundraising Galas, Charles Galbraith Testamentary Trust, Colgate via United Way, The Concordia Foundation, The Firmenich Charitable Foundation, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies, Contributions Fund of the Community Foundation of New Jersey, Mary Owen Borden Foundation, The Migedan Foundation, Inc., New Jersey State Council on the Arts, NRG.

“All Eyes on Nature” will be on view at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, from May 14 through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

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May 6, 2015
TARASCON STAGECOACH: Vincent van Gogh’s 1888 painting will be back in Princeton this fall when it will be showcased in the exhibition “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” opening in September at the Princeton University Art Museum. The painting, which has been held by the art museum since 1976, has recently been on tour with other 19th and 20th century masterworks by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Manet, and Modigliani. The Princeton University Art Museum is open to the public at no charge. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-3788 or visit: artmuseum.princeton.edu.

TARASCON STAGECOACH: Vincent van Gogh’s 1888 painting will be back in Princeton this fall when it will be showcased in the exhibition “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” opening in September at the Princeton University Art Museum. The painting, which has been held by the art museum since 1976, has recently been on tour with other 19th and 20th century masterworks by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Manet, and Modigliani. The Princeton University Art Museum is open to the public at no charge. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-3788 or visit: artmuseum.princeton.edu.

A major exhibition of masterworks by Cézanne, Degas, Manet, Modigliani, and Van Gogh will be on view at the Princeton University Art Museum from September 12, through January 3, 2016.

The exhibition, “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” will feature works collected by American businessman Henry Pearlman (1895–1974) in the years after the Second World War. Fifty modern masterworks from the late 19th through the early 20th century will be on view.

Princeton is the concluding venue for the exhibition, organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in cooperation with the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, and the culmination of the first international tour of the entire collection since Henry Pearlman’s death 40 years ago.

The exhibition showcases works by leading Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and School of Paris artists, including Edgar Degas, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Amedeo Modigliani and Chaïm Soutine, as well as the collection’s centerpiece: a stellar group of oil paintings and watercolors by Pearlman’s favorite artist, Paul Cézanne.

“We are proud to have been the custodians of this superb collection since 1976, and now to have shared the collection with venues in four countries,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher-David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. “Its return to Princeton is an auspicious moment, marking the first time in decades that our visitors will have the opportunity to discover the whole of the collection at one time, and thus to appreciate the Pearlmans’ passion for some of the 19th and 20th centuries’ most important artists.”

Among the exhibition’s highlights are Cézanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire (ca. 1904–6), Van Gogh’s Tarascon Stagecoach (1888) and Modigliani’s portrait of Jean Cocteau (1916). The Pearlman Collection is especially known for an exceptional group of intimate works: 16 watercolors by Cézanne, forming perhaps the finest collection in the world in terms of their quality and condition, as well as the continuing freshness of their colors. Due to the delicacy of the medium, the watercolors can be shown only rarely, so this is likely to be the only opportunity for decades to see them in the context of Cézanne’s oils. Other artists represented in the exhibition include Gustave Courbet, Honoré Daumier, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lembruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Édouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

A richly illustrated catalogue, published by the Princeton University Art Museum and distributed by Yale University Press, accompanies the exhibition.

The Princeton University Art Museum is located on Princeton campus; admission is free. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum is closed Mondays and major holidays.

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