September 2, 2015

Art Modigliani

“JEAN COCTEAU”: Modigliani’s well-known 1916 image of the French writer is among the works in the exhibit, “Cézanne and the Modern” at the Princeton University Art Museum from September 19 through January 3, 2016.

“Cézanne and the Modern,” a new exhibit at the Princeton Art Museum running from September 19 through January 3, 2016, includes works by Paul Cézanne — and a great deal more. Drawn from the Pearlman Collection, it will feature the artists PaulGauguin, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Édouard Manet, Amedeo Modigliani, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, Chaïm Soutine, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Vincent van Gogh. more

August 26, 2015

Art Rev

Lucy Graves McVicker is one of Princeton’s most well-loved artists. A founding member of the Princeton Artists’ Alliance, she is also a prime mover in the Garden State Watercolor Society (GSWS), which is having its 46th Annual Juried Show, “Nature’s Beauty,” at the D&R Greenway now through September 25. more

August 19, 2015

Art Lead

Fans of the California-born London transplant Kaffe Fassett should mark their calendars now for a new show coming to the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown later this year.

“Blanket Statements: New Quilts by Kaffe Fassett and Historical Quilts from the collection of the Quilt Museum and Gallery, York, U.K.” will open November 14 and continue through February 21, 2016. more

August 12, 2015
REFLECTIONS ON SURVIVAL: Barbara Warren’s thought provoking image will be part of an exhibition by members of the Princeton Photography Club at Gallery 14 in Hopewell from August 14 through September 6. Titled “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” the exhibition includes work that is a personal response to the emotional experiences of each photographer. There will be an opening reception at the Gallery on Friday, August 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. and a “Meet the Photographers,” on Sunday, August 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. The show can be viewed Saturdays and Sundays, from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Sheila or Carl Geisler at (732) 422-3676 or visit: www.princetonphotoclub.org. For more on Gallery 14, visit: http://photogallery14.com.(Image Courtesy of the Artist).

REFLECTIONS ON SURVIVAL: Barbara Warren’s thought provoking image will be part of an exhibition by members of the Princeton Photography Club at Gallery 14 in Hopewell from August 14 through September 6. Titled “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” the exhibition includes work that is a personal response to the emotional experiences of each photographer. There will be an opening reception at the Gallery on Friday, August 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. and a “Meet the Photographers,” on Sunday, August 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. The show can be viewed Saturdays and Sundays, from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Sheila or Carl Geisler at (732) 422-3676 or visit: www.princetonphotoclub.org. (Image Courtesy of the Artist).

The Princeton Photography Club (PPC) presents an original photographic exhibit entitled “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” from August 14 through September 6. at Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell.

There will be an opening reception at the Gallery on Friday, August 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. and a “Meet the Photographers,” on Sunday, August 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. This opportunity to meet and talk with the photographers is a way to understand more about each person’s individual path to healing. For all of the exhibitors, “We Are More Than Our Diseases,” is a very personal show as is evidenced by the images on display.  more

August 5, 2015

Art ReviewA mini-exhibition on early American typewriters currently on display at the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park, Trenton, will run through November 8.

Located on the second floor of the museum, the exhibition was curated by Richard Willinger, Chair of the Museum Society’s Collections Management Committee, and a typewriter collector.

Because people stopped using typewriters many years ago when the personal computer came out, many young people have never used a typewriter. Older people remember typewriters as the standard four-bank machine with a typed sheet visible on the rubber platen in front of you. more

July 29, 2015

Zodiac 2

After a four-year ban that prevented him from all international travel and kept him from visiting Princeton in 2012, Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei has had his passport returned to him.

Last week, Mr. Ai posted a photo of himself on Instagram holding the document, which had been confiscated by Chinese authorities following the artist’s outspoken remarks on number of national scandals, including collapse of badly-constructed schools during a 2008 earthquake.  more

July 22, 2015

Art GardenAnyone strolling through the alleyway between Palmer Square and Witherspoon Street these days will find a tiny garden tucked away in a corner opposite the outdoor dining spot of Teresa’s Caffe.

If you haven’t yet seen it, it’s worth finding — and observing the reaction of town residents who come upon it for the first time. Passers-by are generally enchanted.

Bounded by slim logs of silver birch, the garden is just a few square feet and yet to a child’s imagination it offers a wealth of possibility. Lichen covered rocks and remnants of wood are interspersed with a selection of flowering plants, mosses, and ferns forming a “fairy garden” in a formerly unused spot.

The nurturing hand behind this miniature elfland kingdom is landscape artist Peter Soderman who is known for his playful attitude — he’s been known to describe himself as the “Jackson Pollock of Lawn Care” and the “Court Jester of Synchronicity.” more

July 15, 2015
ART THAT HEALS: Images such as this painting, titled “Indian Summer Bouquet,” will be among the works by local artist Joanne Augustine on view and for sale (with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting the hospital) at University Medical Center of Princeton through November 8. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 31, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to www.princetonhcs.org/art by Friday, July 24. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

ART THAT HEALS: Images such as this painting, titled “Indian Summer Bouquet,” will be among the works by local artist Joanne Augustine on view and for sale (with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting the hospital) at University Medical Center of Princeton through November 8. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 31, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Art for Healing Gallery, in the concourse connecting UMCP to the Medical Arts Pavilion and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Community Health Center. Those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP to www.princetonhcs.org/art by Friday, July 24. For more information, visit www.princetonhcs.org.

The University Medical Center of Princeton (UMCP) will host a wine-and-cheese reception on Friday, July 31, to mark the opening of an exhibition featuring work by local artist Joanne Augustine.  more

June 24, 2015
SEWARD JOHNSON ON BROADWAY: Famed sculptor and philanthropist J. Seward Johnson will be in New York City’s Garment District today, Wednesday, June 24, to open an exhibition of of 18 of his most iconic and popular pieces, selected from Grounds for Sculpture’s “Seward Johnson: The Retrospective,” which was scheduled to close last September, but has proved to be so popular that it has been extended to July 1 of this year (www.groundsforsculpture.org). “Seward Johnson in New York, Selections From the Retrospective,” can be seen in Garment District plazas on Broadway, between 38th Street and 39th Street until September 15. (Image courtesy of Seward Johnson Atelier, Inc.)

SEWARD JOHNSON ON BROADWAY: Famed sculptor and philanthropist J. Seward Johnson will be in New York City’s Garment District today, Wednesday, June 24, to open an exhibition of of 18 of his most iconic and popular pieces, selected from Grounds for Sculpture’s “Seward Johnson: The Retrospective,” which was scheduled to close last September, but has proved to be so popular that it has been extended to July 1 of this year (www.groundsforsculpture.org). “Seward Johnson in New York, Selections From the Retrospective,” can be seen in Garment District plazas on Broadway, between 38th Street and 39th Street until September 15. (Image courtesy of Seward Johnson Atelier, Inc.)

If you’ve strolled down Broadway through New York City’s Garment District in recent months you will have observed some intriguing public art on display in the city streets. Donna Dodson and Andy Moerlein’s colossal bird sculptures constructed out of maple saplings stopped pedestrians in their tracks between 36th and 41st streets.

The latest artwork to be unveiled there promises to do the same. Eighteen life-size sculptures by J. Seward Johnson will be on show on Broadway between 38th Street and 39th Street.

Mr. Johnson will open the exhibition, today, June 24, between 11 a.m. and noon, at a reception at which he is expected to reflect on a lifetime of creative achievement. The New Jersey artist has been paying homage to American society through realistic bronze sculptures for almost half a century.

The artwork on display has been selected from the retrospective of Mr. Johnson’s work at Grounds For Sculpture (GFS), the sculpture park and arboretum he founded on the site of the old New Jersey Fairgrounds in Hamilton.

Mr. Johnson led the team that transformed the once derelict site into a showcase for prominent and emerging artists. The park evolved as an offshoot of Mr. Johnson’s foundry, The Johnson Atelier.

The renowned sculptor and philanthropist has dedicated his career to public art. His life-like bronze and monumental figures are familiar sights throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. His best known works are lifelike sculptures in his “Celebrating the Familiar” series, which draws attention to the details of ordinary life: a nap on a park bench, a trip to the grocery story, the pleasure a child takes in an ice cream cone.

GFS opened its doors to the public in 1992 with works by Mr. Johnson and contributions from notable artists such as Clement Meadmore, Anthony Caro, Beverly Pepper, George Segal, and Isaac Witkin. “Seward Johnson: The Retrospective” opened there in May of last year. Although it was scheduled to close last September, the show drew so many visitors that it was extended to July 1 of this year.

“There has been a remarkable response from both the media and the continuing flood of visitors to the park, local and international,” said Paula Stoeke, the exhibition’s guest curator. “This gathering of sculptures will never be seen all together again and I encourage everyone to plan a visit.”

The GFS exhibition sculptures chosen to spend their summer in the city include several of the artist’s signature “man on the street” bronzes. Princeton residents are familiar with such works. One of the artist’s first public pieces, The Newspaper Reader, was made for the municipality and sits outside Monument Hall. Another, Out to Lunch, is in Palmer Square. Both were created in the 1970s, when Mr. Johnson hoped to encourage people to “get back out-of-doors” at a time when a crime wave had them avoiding public spaces. “I wanted to put sculptures into parks to act like decoys and entice people back to parks,” he explained in a 2012 Princeton Magazine interview.

In addition, tourists and New Yorkers alike will be able to enjoy one of Mr. Johnson’s most charismatic trompe l’oeil painted bronzes, a three-dimensional version of a sailor kissing a nurse in New York’s Times Square on VJ-Day at the end of World War II. Perhaps his most famous work, Unconditional Surrender, has been displayed in Times Square, San Diego, Sarasota, and Rome.

Incidentally, owners of the copyright to the image, made famous by LIFE magazine photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, refused Johnson permission to use it, so Johnson based his work on a slightly different photograph of the kissing couple taken by another photographer and in the public domain.

Among the iconic pieces on show in the Garment District is his Forever Marilyn, a three dimensional version of a photograph of the star with her white skirt billowing around her legs from the updraft of an air vent from the New York subway; a scene from the movie, The Seven Year Itch.

Also on view on Broadway will be some of Mr. Johnson’s well-known 3-dimensional life-scale tableaux of paintings by the French Impressionists. Visitors to GFS are fond of inserting themselves into his take on Renoir’s The Boating Party, titled Were You Invited, from his “Beyond the Frame” series. The park also boasts the artist’s rendition of Claude Monet’s Garden at Sainte-Addresse and Edouard Manet’s Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe. 

The general popularity of these works stands in marked contrast to the reception that met Mr. Johnson’s first major show at the Corcoran Gallery. “Beyond the Frame: Impressionism Revisited,” was panned by critics, one of whom likened the feeling it gave him to that of riding a Ferris Wheel after eating a sardine milkshake.

The artist relishes the memory of that response and credits the critic for doing him an enormous favor. “People flocked to the show to see what all the fuss was about,” he once said.

At 85, Mr. Johnson has more than 450 life-size cast bronze works featured in city parks and museums worldwide including in London, Paris, Rome, Madrid, Kiev, Sydney, and Osaka. Often hailed as “America’s most popular sculptor;” he was inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame in 2013.

The retrospective at Grounds for Sculpture includes works indoors and out. One of the most monumental pieces is The Awakening, a 70-foot long giant emerging from the earth whose 17-foot arm extends dramatically into the sky. For this and other works such as his interactive rendition of Mona Lisa called A Reason to Smile, and Vermeer’s Girl with the Pearl Earring á la Johnson titled The Nature of Obsession, you will have to visit Grounds for Sculpture before the show ends on July 1. For more information, visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

“Seward Johnson in New York, Selections From the Retrospective” at Garment District plazas on Broadway, between 38th Street and 39th Street, will run until September 15.

June 10, 2015
CUBAN LIVES: Alina Bliach’s photograph of Ardelio is one of 45 portraits of Cuban immigrants from the past 50 years on display at the Mercer County Community College Gallery from June 13 through June 24. An opening reception with Ms. Bliach, a 2006 alumna of the MCCC Photography program, will be held Saturday, June 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

CUBAN LIVES: Alina Bliach’s photograph of Ardelio is one of 45 portraits of Cuban immigrants from the past 50 years on display at the Mercer County Community College Gallery from June 13 through June 24. An opening reception with Ms. Bliach, a 2006 alumna of the MCCC Photography program, will be held Saturday, June 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

A special photography exhibition featuring Mercer County Community College (MCCC) alumna Alina Bliach (’06) opens with a reception in the Gallery at MCCC on Saturday, June 13, from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibition will continue through June 24.

“A Voyage of Many,” includes images and stories of 45 Cuban immigrants over the past half century in their new American homeland. Each photograph is accompanied by a printed excerpt from interviews Bliach conducted. The photos and narratives tell stories of forced exile, escape, loss, hope, and triumph.

Ms. Bliach notes that many of those who came to the United States in the 1960s are now in their 70s, 80s, and 90s, and most of their stories remain unrecorded. “Since the 1960s more than one million Cubans have immigrated to the United States — the children of the Peter Pan flights, the people of Camarioca, the Freedom Flights, the Mariel Boatlift, the people known as the Balceros, and the Immigration Visa Lottery winners …. Their’s are the stories of sacrifice, perseverance, and survival in their ultimate quest for freedom. These are their portraits,” she said.

Ms. Bliach’s portraits are rich in detail that connects their subjects to their Cuban heritage. “Forced to leave their homeland, their love for family, art, religion, and music is often apparent throughout their homes. Photographs of loved ones, brightly colored art and religious relics are proudly displayed …. More than decorations, these objects reveal the deep relationship between these immigrants’ cultural background and the new lives they built for themselves in America,” she said.

The photographer’s work has won numerous awards and honors: as a finalist in Best of Photography 2013; First and Second Prize honors in the Pollux Awards; Merit Awards in the Professional Photographers of America International competitions; PPA Loan Collection honor; Hasselblad Photographer of the Month; and several International Photography Honorable Mentions. Her work has been exhibited at the Borges Cultural Center in Buenos Aires, Argentina; The Room in SoHo, N.Y.; Arts Council of Princeton in Princeton; Grounds for Sculpture; Phillips Mill in New Hope, Pa.; Artworks in Trenton; and Art Along the Fence in Hoboken.

The MCCC Gallery is located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Gallery hours for “A Voyage of Many,” are Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Saturday, June 20, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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June 3, 2015

 

CHAIRMAKING IN THE GARDEN STATE: Morven’s latest exhibition “Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking” examines the chairmaker’s craft from the 1790s to the end of the 19th century. Guest curator Joseph W. Hammond documents the work of chairmakers who once worked in virtually every corner of the Garden State, with examples of their work, period photographs, and advertisements in four rooms on the museum’s second floor. The exhibition will be on view at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, through October 18. For more information, call (609) 924-8144, or visit: www.morven.org.(Photo by L. Arntzenius)

CHAIRMAKING IN THE GARDEN STATE: Morven’s latest exhibition “Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking” examines the chairmaker’s craft from the 1790s to the end of the 19th century. Guest curator Joseph W. Hammond documents the work of chairmakers who once worked in virtually every corner of the Garden State, with examples of their work, period photographs, and advertisements in four rooms on the museum’s second floor. The exhibition will be on view at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, through October 18. For more information, call (609) 924-8144, or visit: www.morven.org. (Photo by L. Arntzenius)

Where else but Princeton’s Morven Museum & Garden would you find an exhibition devoted entirely to the history of chair-making in New Jersey?

Even though the museum’s staff is currently working behind the scenes on what promises to be a landmark show this fall, they have brought in a guest curator for a small and informative exploration of the history of chair making in New Jersey that will run through the summer until mid-October.

In spite of its cumbersome title, “Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking(derived from an 1828 newspaper advertisement of Morristown chair maker J. D. Humphreyville), the exhibition showcases some of the most sleek and elegant examples of the chairmaker’s craft from the 1790s to the end of the 19th century.

The show came about after the museum was contacted by a New Jersey collector who offered his chairs for display. “We saw his collection and thought it was an excellent idea; to his items, others were added,” said Morven’s Curator of Collections and Exhibitions Elizabeth Allan.

Formerly of Winterthur and now engaged in New Jersey historic projects, guest curator Joseph W. Hammond was called in to review and make selections from the private collection and to seek out appropriate additions from sources across the state. About half of the items on display come from a single private collection and the rest from multiple sources. “It’s not just about chairs but about chair-making in New Jersey, including regional characteristics,” said Mr. Hammond. “Chairmakers once worked in virtually every corner of the Garden State, from large cities and towns to small crossroad communities and 35 examples are on display here along with chair-making tools and stencils, portraits and photographs, period advertisements, and plates from sales catalogs.”

Mr. Hammond has enhanced the display with period advertisements from the early part of the 19th century for some of the hundreds of craftsmen known today through census records, business directories, account books, and research conducted by furniture students and local historians. He will discuss the exhibition during a gallery talk on September 17.

The exhibition is presented in four rooms on the museum’s second floor and comprises sections on, “The Craft of Chairmaking,” “Windsor Chairs,” “Common and Fancy Chairs,” and “Factory Made Chairs.”

The first of these introduces visitors to the process of making 19th-century chairs, including the technique and tools for traditional rush seating.

Most of the equipment and tools on display have been drawn from an important collection assembled in the late 1920s by William H. MacDonald of Trenton. Period photographs illustrate how many of the tools were used.

Check out the chairmaker’s bench, a rotating stand for weaving rush seats, color grinders used in Allentown for preparing paint, and decorative stencils from several shops in the Allentown and Englishtown areas.

Replications of several stencils on loan from the Monmouth County Historical Collection are cut from scrap paper. “It’s amazing that they have survived at all, some of them are so delicate,” said Ms. Allan as she pointed out some for crest rails, some with corner designs and one bearing a chair-maker’s name. They’d be used to apply painted designs. Beside them are some patterns that would be copied by hand.

Eight Windsor chairs made between 1790 and 1835 range in form from fan-back and bow-back to rod-back styles, some with bamboo-shaped turnings popular in the early 19th century. They were made in Trenton, Pemberton, Moorestown, Salem, and Monmouth County by Ezekiah Hewes, William Bowen, Samuel Jaques, Samuel Roberts, William McElroy, Ebenezer P. Rose, and others. Brands were often stamped on the undersides of chair seats and can be used to identify the work of specific craftsmen.

Throughout the 19th century, a wide range of common and fancy chairs were made in all parts of New Jersey and there are 15 examples of these in the exhibition. Seven of them were produced by the renowned Ware family of South Jersey, who made slat-back, rush seated chairs in the Delaware Valley tradition in Cumberland and Salem counties. Nineteen Wares over four generations engaged in chairmaking from the late 18th century to the 1940s. The techniques passed down in the family remained so similar that it is often difficult, if not impossible, to tell the work of one craftsman from another.

After the Civil War, chair production in New Jersey shifted from small shops to factories. Three of the most prominent were the Gardner Manufacturing Company of Glen Gardner, Hunterdon County; the Tunis R. Cooper chair factory in Bergenfield, Bergen County; and the Collignon Brothers in what is now River Vale, Bergen County. Twelve examples from all three factories display the special characteristics developed by each, including the Collignan Brothers’s patented folding chairs.

Highlights include the hand-painted crest rail depicting a compote of berries on a Windsor side chair made by Ebenezer P. Rose, Jr., of Trenton, ca. 1815-25, and the graceful bow-back Windsor armchair made by William McElroy of Moorestown, N.J., ca. 1795-1810.

One period photograph shows Samuel Sloan Ware (1848-1920) on the porch roof of his second floor chair shop in Alloway, New Jersey, ca. 1875, which comes from the Joseph Downs Collection of Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera at the Winterthur Library.

Another, by Edward W. Humphrey, records the interior of Dan Ware’s chair shop in Woodstown, Salem County, circa 1895.

Miniatures made between 1960 and 1985 by Ware family descendent Allen M. Loveland, Jr., of Camden, are on loan from the Salem County Historical Society,

“Of the Best Materials and Good Workmanship: 19th-Century New Jersey Chairmaking” will be on view at Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, through October 18. Hours are Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $6, adults; $5, seniors/students; free to children 6 and under and Friends of Morven. For more information, call (609) 924-8144, or visit: www.morven.org.

And the landmark show coming up in the fall? “Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Couple of an Age,” the first large-scale exhibition to explore the vices and virtues of this prominent couple, will open November 13. For a sneak peek, visit: www.morven.org.

May 27, 2015
SUMMER SUN: Work such as this by the Pennsylvania Impressionist Albert Van Nesse Greene (1887-1971) will be on show in the exhibition “Impressions of Life” at the Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio, 5230 Silo Hill Road in Doylestown, from May 30 through August 31. There will be an opening reception Saturday, May 30 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The show of over 60 pieces, will be one of the largest offerings of A.V. Greene’s work in recent years. It showcases a number of Pennsylvania landscapes and Maine harbor scenes, as well as some beautiful depictions of Europe. A color catalogue will be available for purchase and all featured works will be available on the gallery’s website a week prior to the opening. Gallery hours are Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m., as well as by appointment. For more information, call (215) 348-2500 or visit: www.gratzgallery.com.

SUMMER SUN: Work such as this by the Pennsylvania Impressionist Albert Van Nesse Greene (1887-1971) will be on show in the exhibition “Impressions of Life” at the Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio, 5230 Silo Hill Road in Doylestown, from May 30 through August 31. There will be an opening reception Saturday, May 30 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The show of over 60 pieces, will be one of the largest offerings of A.V. Greene’s work in recent years. It showcases a number of Pennsylvania landscapes and Maine harbor scenes, as well as some beautiful depictions of Europe. A color catalogue will be available for purchase and all featured works will be available on the gallery’s website a week prior to the opening. Gallery hours are Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m., as well as by appointment. For more information, call (215) 348-2500 or visit: www.gratzgallery.com.

The Gratz Gallery & Conservation Studio, at its new location, 5230 Silo Hill Road in Doylestown, is pleased to announce “Albert Van Nesse Greene (1887-1971) Impressions of Life,” an exhibition of paintings by the Pennsylvania Impressionist.

This inaugural exhibition at the gallery’s new space, will run from May 30 through August 31. There will be an opening reception at the gallery and studio on Saturday, May 30 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Born in Jamaica, New York, Albert Van Nesse Greene, often referred to as A.V. Greene, grew up in Washington, D.C. and studied at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. He furthered his studies at the Art Students League, the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, under Daniel Garber. While serving during World War I, the artist was seriously injured. After recovering he moved to Philadelphia in 1917. He began part-time work at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art’s Country School in Chester Springs (now Historic Yellow Springs) and ultimately settled in Chester Springs; choosing the area’s beautiful landscapes at the subjects of many of his compositions.

Mr. Van Nesse Greene was strongly influenced by the French Impressionists. His early work is highly impressionistic and embraces a palette more aligned with French painters than his American counterparts. Although his subjects tend to favor Pennsylvania landscapes, he also painted in Booth Bay, Maine and throughout Europe; creating a diverse and varied range of compositions. He was also an adept draftsman known for his beautiful pastel compositions. Greene’s artwork was exhibited extensively throughout the United States and France during his lifetime.

The forthcoming exhibition at Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio will be one of the largest offerings of A.V. Greene’s work in recent years. The exhibition features over 60 pieces by Greene; a culmination of 30 years of collecting the artist’s finest works. “Impressions of Life” showcases a number of Pennsylvania landscapes and Maine harbor scenes, as well as some beautiful depictions of Europe. Mr. Van Nesse Greene enjoyed transcribing the landscape as it changed throughout the seasons; therefore, the exhibition includes a number of sunny springtime and crisp winter compositions.

In celebration of the forthcoming opening Gratz Gallery and Conservation Studio will be donating a portion of its proceeds to the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown. Gratz Gallery salutes the work the museum has done since it opened its doors in 1988, and would like to thank them for their dedication to the arts.

A color catalogue will be available for purchase throughout the exhibition. All featured works of art will be available on the gallery’s website a week prior to the opening.

The Gratz Gallery & Conservation Studio specializes in 19th and 20th century American paintings, with a focus on painters from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. In addition to art investment Gratz Gallery also offers custom framing and fine art conservation services. The gallery is open Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays, noon to 6 p.m., as well as by appointment. For more information, call (215) 348-2500 or visit: www.gratzgallery.com.

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May 20, 2015
GALLERY 353 GETS READY TO OPEN: Gallery Director Patrick Ryan pauses from hanging new work by local artist Heather Sturt Haaga for the inaugural exhibition, “California Colors: Plein Air and Still Life Paintings,” that will launch Princeton’s newest art gallery this Friday, May 22. An opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mr. Ryan is currently installing 24 oil paintings by Ms. Haaga. Located in the McCarthy building at 353 Nassau Street, the gallery will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, from noon to 6 p.m., with additional hours during Princeton University Reunions Weekend: Friday, May 29, from 2 to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, May 31, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (803) 334-8838, or visit: www.gallery353.com. For more on the featured artist, visit: www.heatherhaaga.com.(Photograph by L. Arntzenius)

GALLERY 353 GETS READY TO OPEN: Gallery Director Patrick Ryan pauses from hanging new work by local artist Heather Sturt Haaga for the inaugural exhibition, “California Colors: Plein Air and Still Life Paintings,” that will launch Princeton’s newest art gallery this Friday, May 22. An opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mr. Ryan is currently installing 24 oil paintings by Ms. Haaga. Located in the McCarthy building at 353 Nassau Street, the gallery will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, from noon to 6 p.m., with additional hours during Princeton University Reunions Weekend: Friday, May 29, from 2 to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, May 31, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (803) 334-8838, or visit: www.gallery353.com. For more on the featured artist, visit: www.heatherhaaga.com. (Photograph by L. Arntzenius)

A new art gallery opens in Princeton this Friday, May 22, with an exhibition of oil paintings by Heather Sturt Haaga. Ms. Haaga is well-known in Princeton as both a painter and a philanthropist.

The aptly named Gallery 353 is located in the McCarthy building at 353 Nassau Street, just north of the intersection with Harrison Street and next door to the Cloak and Dagger Mystery Bookstore. The grand opening and reception will take place from 5:30-8:30 p.m.

The gallery is the brainchild of Patrick Ryan, who was born and raised in the Princeton area and formerly directed the largest art gallery in Charleston, South Carolina, for five years until 2005 when it relocated to Chicago.

Gallery 353’s inaugural exhibition of Ms. Haaga’s work, “California Colors: Plein Air and Still Life Paintings,” will include 23 pieces from the artist and one that is on loan from Princeton’s municipal Judge Jack McCarthy, who owns the building in which the gallery is housed. “I’ve known Jack since since the 1960s and so when I returned to Princeton and wanted to set-up my own gallery, the basement space in the McCarthy building presented itself,” said Mr. Ryan during a pause in his preparations for the opening.

Although partially below ground, the gallery has a light, airy feel that belies its location, with a deep window along one exterior wall so that it benefits from daylight. Lots of interior lighting ensures a bright space. The main entrance to the gallery is in the rear of the building where there is some parking.

The work in the opening exhibition is all relatively recent and ranges in price from the 8 by 10 inch Barn Country at $500 to the 24 by 36 inch California Spring at $3,000, the show’s piece de resistance and also its largest.

Ms. Haaga’s titles yield a flavor of what is on view: Adirondack Afternoon, Hollyhock Cottage, Lily Pond, Pears on a Sideboard, The Turkish Vase, with a touch of humor thrown in, Time to Brush Your Teeth, and Mailbox Line Up. There are several Normandy scenes, including a landscape diptych, and still lifes.

For these paintings, the artist worked in oil, either out-of-doors or in her studio in La Cañada Flintridge, California. “Perhaps it is because of the light, the warmth, the character of the place, but colors in California seem to be heightened, more intense. The palette of the paintings adds to their story, enhances the viewer’s response to the object or landscape, and helps convey the spirit of the piece,” said Ms. Haaga, who hopes that viewers will engage with the exhibition not only through subject matter but through color as well.

Here is an artist who explores and ponders the ways in which light and color are observed. “There is a theory that anyone can draw; it is simply a matter of learning how to observe the world more carefully. And, whenever you do observe more specifically, you find the world is full of interesting spaces and colors — colors that may or may not be obvious,” she explained. “Some people see color in a different way, literally. Apparently, we do not see the same way — one more miracle of nature.”

“Heather is a gifted painter,” said Mr. Ryan, “as well as a philanthropist and worker for good causes. In addition to being a trustee of the seminary and of Vassar College, she chairs the board of the Salzburg Global Seminar, whose mission is to challenge current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern.”

With her husband, Paul Haaga, a trustee of Princeton University as well as of several other educational and cultural organizations (he was formerly acting CEO of NPR and chair of the board of the Huntington Library, said Mr. Ryan), Ms. Haaga divides her time between Princeton, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

“Heather is a passionate painter and her use of color is very compelling; this show is bound to be a success,” said the gallery director, who is looking to build up a stable of Gallery 353 artists. So far, he’s working with Ms. Haaga, the art photographer Richard Trenner, and painter Nancy Merrill who lives in Pennington. It is Mr. Ryan’s intention to have regular exhibitions of the work of Gallery 353 artists. Work by Mr. Trenner will be exhibited from mid-September through early October and new work by Ms. Merrill will be on display after that. “I’m interested in contemporary and local artists and there are many fine creative talents in this area,” said Mr. Ryan, adding that he’s looking to include work in three dimensions. “I have enormous admiration for creative artists who put their work out there before the public; that can be a scary thing.”

According to the new gallery’s director, its relatively small size suits him after running a much bigger operation in South Carolina, where he inherited some 50 artists and an inventory of over 1,000 pieces. “That was challenging; Gallery 353 will be a pleasure; it will allow me to give each artist their due and to really get to know their work.”

In addition to contemporary art, Gallery 353 will showcase estate antiques on consignment as well as unusual pieces that catch Mr. Ryan’s eye. Right now, he is taken by the work of the late Czech artist Antonin Marek Machourek (1913–1991), a pupil of Mark Chagall. He has an inventory of his paintings for sale.

The gallery will take 50 percent of all sales, which Mr. Ryan said is pretty typical, although really prominent artists whose work commands prices in the hundreds of thousand would receive a higher percentage.

Although he is not an artist himself, Mr. Ryan, who lives on Cherry Valley Road, discovered a love of art when he was an undergraduate at Princeton University. Having grown up on a family dairy farm in Pennington, he said, he had little exposure to art. He did, however, develop a feeling for history. The family home, the historic Benjamin Temple house dating to 1750, incidentally, was once threatened by the construction of I-95 and in 1973 was moved from the old Hopewell-Trenton Road (Route 31) to Federal City Road, where it is now the headquarters of the Ewing Township Historic Preservation Society.

Mr. Ryan graduated with a degree in medieval history in 1968. Since then, he’s traveled extensively. “I’m a bit of a gypsy at heart,” he said, “I’ve lived all over, in Hawaii, in La Jolla, in Sante Fe …” And he’s tried his hand at a variety of things along the way, most recently as a pecan farmer in South Carolina.

Following the launch of Gallery 353 on Friday, May 22, gallery hours will be Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, from noon to 6 p.m. In addition, there will be special gallery hours during Princeton University Reunions Weekend on Friday, May 29, from 2 to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, May 31, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

For more information, call (803) 334-8838, or visit: www.gallery353.com. For more on the featured artist, visit: www.heatherhaaga.com.

May 13, 2015
CHILDHOOD MEMORY: That’s the title of this work by Taryn, a participant in the Arts Council of Princeton’s ArtsExchange program in conjunction with HomeFront. It will be shown with other works by children in the exhibition “All Eyes on Nature,” which opens Thursday, May 14, in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place. The show will continue through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

CHILDHOOD MEMORY: That’s the title of this work by Taryn, a participant in the Arts Council of Princeton’s ArtsExchange program in conjunction with HomeFront. It will be shown with other works by children in the exhibition “All Eyes on Nature,” which opens Thursday, May 14, in the Olivia Rainbow Gallery at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place. The show will continue through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

D&R Greenway welcomes the public to “All Eyes on Nature,” an exhibition of innovative works by ArtsExchange students of the Arts Council of Princeton, through HomeFront. Dynamic images of nature from the insects’ perspective may be viewed in the land trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery from May 14 through June 26.

Since 1993, the Arts Council of Princeton has partnered with HomeFront, which serves thousands of Mercer County families to help break the cycle of poverty and end homelessness in offering ArtsExchange, a weekly program where year-round arts instruction is provided to more than 75 children, ages 5-18, whose families are currently living in transient circumstances.

For “All Eyes on Nature,” Arts Council of Princeton Outreach Program Manager/Instructor Eva Mantell guided her students to create paintings from the vantage point of insects. Ms. Mantell asked, “What are flowers, leaves, even surrounding landscapes, when you are an insect? Where is the horizon? Where is the ground? Where is the sun? What size are the elements in the painting?”

“All Eyes on Nature” comprises the children’s vibrant answers. The lively results are intended to catalyze a greater sensitivity to nature, its beauty and its peril. “They recreated nature’s own shifts in scale, colors, and textures, as well as its marvelous complexity and interconnectedness,” explained Ms. Mantell. “Native species were their starting point, each communicating his or her own ‘insect’ energy and excitement.”

D&R Greenway’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery is funded in memory of four-year-old Olivia Kuenne, who cherished nature and art. Sequential nature exhibitions by students extend Olivia’s enthusiasms into our time.

The Arts Council of Princeton thanks the following funders for their support of the ArtsExchange programming in 2014-15: ACP Fundraising Galas, Charles Galbraith Testamentary Trust, Colgate via United Way, The Concordia Foundation, The Firmenich Charitable Foundation, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson Family of Consumer Companies, Contributions Fund of the Community Foundation of New Jersey, Mary Owen Borden Foundation, The Migedan Foundation, Inc., New Jersey State Council on the Arts, NRG.

“All Eyes on Nature” will be on view at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, One Preservation Place, from May 14 through June 26. For more information, call (609) 924-4646 or visit: www.drgreenway.org.

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May 6, 2015
TARASCON STAGECOACH: Vincent van Gogh’s 1888 painting will be back in Princeton this fall when it will be showcased in the exhibition “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” opening in September at the Princeton University Art Museum. The painting, which has been held by the art museum since 1976, has recently been on tour with other 19th and 20th century masterworks by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Manet, and Modigliani. The Princeton University Art Museum is open to the public at no charge. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-3788 or visit: artmuseum.princeton.edu.

TARASCON STAGECOACH: Vincent van Gogh’s 1888 painting will be back in Princeton this fall when it will be showcased in the exhibition “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” opening in September at the Princeton University Art Museum. The painting, which has been held by the art museum since 1976, has recently been on tour with other 19th and 20th century masterworks by the likes of Cézanne, Degas, Manet, and Modigliani. The Princeton University Art Museum is open to the public at no charge. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (609) 258-3788 or visit: artmuseum.princeton.edu.

A major exhibition of masterworks by Cézanne, Degas, Manet, Modigliani, and Van Gogh will be on view at the Princeton University Art Museum from September 12, through January 3, 2016.

The exhibition, “Cézanne and the Modern: Masterpieces of European Art from the Pearlman Collection,” will feature works collected by American businessman Henry Pearlman (1895–1974) in the years after the Second World War. Fifty modern masterworks from the late 19th through the early 20th century will be on view.

Princeton is the concluding venue for the exhibition, organized by the Princeton University Art Museum in cooperation with the Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, and the culmination of the first international tour of the entire collection since Henry Pearlman’s death 40 years ago.

The exhibition showcases works by leading Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and School of Paris artists, including Edgar Degas, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Amedeo Modigliani and Chaïm Soutine, as well as the collection’s centerpiece: a stellar group of oil paintings and watercolors by Pearlman’s favorite artist, Paul Cézanne.

“We are proud to have been the custodians of this superb collection since 1976, and now to have shared the collection with venues in four countries,” said James Steward, Nancy A. Nasher-David J. Haemisegger, Class of 1976, director. “Its return to Princeton is an auspicious moment, marking the first time in decades that our visitors will have the opportunity to discover the whole of the collection at one time, and thus to appreciate the Pearlmans’ passion for some of the 19th and 20th centuries’ most important artists.”

Among the exhibition’s highlights are Cézanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire (ca. 1904–6), Van Gogh’s Tarascon Stagecoach (1888) and Modigliani’s portrait of Jean Cocteau (1916). The Pearlman Collection is especially known for an exceptional group of intimate works: 16 watercolors by Cézanne, forming perhaps the finest collection in the world in terms of their quality and condition, as well as the continuing freshness of their colors. Due to the delicacy of the medium, the watercolors can be shown only rarely, so this is likely to be the only opportunity for decades to see them in the context of Cézanne’s oils. Other artists represented in the exhibition include Gustave Courbet, Honoré Daumier, Oskar Kokoschka, Wilhelm Lembruck, Jacques Lipchitz, Édouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

A richly illustrated catalogue, published by the Princeton University Art Museum and distributed by Yale University Press, accompanies the exhibition.

The Princeton University Art Museum is located on Princeton campus; admission is free. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum is closed Mondays and major holidays.

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April 15, 2015
THE GODDESS: That’s the title of this work by the late Jeanne Calo who will be remembered as a talented artist and generous spirit at an exhibition and sale of her work at the Princeton Senior Resource Center at 45 Stockton Street this Sunday, April 19, from 3 to 6 p.m. Ms. Calo donated her artwork to the Center and the exhibition of her colorful and highly stylized works will be on view through Friday, April 24. For more information, call (609) 924-7108; or visit: www.princetonsenior.org.(Image Courtesy of PSRC)

THE GODDESS: That’s the title of this work by the late Jeanne Calo who will be remembered as a talented artist and generous spirit at an exhibition and sale of her work at the Princeton Senior Resource Center at 45 Stockton Street this Sunday, April 19, from 3 to 6 p.m. Ms. Calo donated her artwork to the Center and the exhibition of her colorful and highly stylized works will be on view through Friday, April 24. For more information, call (609) 924-7108; or visit: www.princetonsenior.org. (Image Courtesy of PSRC)

The life and artistic creativity of the late local artist Jeanne Calo will be celebrated at the Princeton Senior Resource Center (PSRC) with an opening reception for an exhibition and sale of her work this Sunday, April 19, from 3 to 6 p.m. The public is invited to view Ms. Calo’s vibrant paintings, the sale of which will benefit the Center.

Ms. Calo, who passed away at age 98 in the spring of 2014, was a longtime resident of Princeton; she donated her paintings to the Center.

Born in Tunis in 1916, Ms. Calo took up painting later in life following a career at The College of New Jersey where she taught French. She traveled widely in Tunisia, Mexico, Ecuador, Indonesia, Morocco, Greece, Yugoslavia, and Thailand, acquiring objects from markets, festivals, dance, and music events. Such finds served as inspiration for Ms. Calo’s paintings, imbuing them with the essence of the countries and the cultures of the artist’s travels. She was also influenced by her love of Gauguin, Matisse, Derain, and Bonnard.

By many accounts, Ms. Calo was a remarkable woman with an indefatigable spirit. Her friends remember her as modest, unassuming and genuinely surprised when her paintings were appreciated and sought out by museums.

Long before she became an artist, Ms. Calo lived in Tunis as a young wife and mother. She moved to the United States with her cardiologist husband and children in 1958. After teaching for a while at a private school, she enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania in order to obtain a PhD degree so that she might pursue a career as a professor of French.

It wasn’t until her retirement at the age of 70 that she took up painting for the first time. It would become her major interest and a source of joy and achievement. According to her friend Paola Blelloch, Ms. Calo attended art courses at Mercer County Community College every week until shortly before her death last year. She studied under the famed New Jersey realist painter and teacher Mel Leipzig and discovered a favorite medium in acrylics. She quickly developed her own style which, said Ms. Blelloch, well-represented her personality. As artist, Ms. Calo favored strong colors and often added touches of humor.

Ms. Calo’s paintings have been exhibited in many museums and galleries. “Various institutions asked to exhibit her paintings which she did willingly, always giving the proceedings to charity,” said Ms. Blelloch.

“But her greater gift to me and her other many friends was the way she made each of us feel special, her optimism was contagious and her advice invaluable as it was always wise,” recalled Ms. Blelloch in a written account of her friend of 35 years. “The quality that can better sum her up is her ‘generosity,’ not only with presents that she gave to everybody in abundance, but with what she gave of herself. All her friends benefited from that.”

The exhibition and sale of Ms. Calo’s highly stylized works will be on view and available for purchase at the Princeton Senior Resource Center at 45 Stockton Street through Friday, April 24. For more information, (609) 924-7108; or visit: www.princetonsenior.org.

April 9, 2015
ELISHA’S MIRACLES: Bible enthusiasts have a treat in store at the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Center at 20 Library Place where illuminated images like this one of “Elisha and the Six Miracles” by renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson (here in collaboration with Aidan Hart) are on display in an exhibition of prints from The Saint John’s Bible project. The exhibition runs through May 10 with several educational events open to the public as well. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 9 p.m. For more information, call (609) 497-7990, or visit: www.ptsem.edu.(Image Courtesy of Erdman Center)

ELISHA’S MIRACLES: Bible enthusiasts have a treat in store at the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Center at 20 Library Place where illuminated images like this one of “Elisha and the Six Miracles” by renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson (here in collaboration with Aidan Hart) are on display in an exhibition of prints from The Saint John’s Bible project. The exhibition runs through May 10 with several educational events open to the public as well. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 9 p.m. For more information, call (609) 497-7990, or visit: www.ptsem.edu. (Image Courtesy of Erdman Center)

The idea of a handwritten illuminated Bible conjures up the image of a heavy leather-bound tome reverently presented for display in a glass case in some hushed library. Most of the examples we see today were created by monks laboring for years.

Thanks to the efforts of one contemporary calligrapher who is scribe to Queen Elizabeth II’s Crown Office at the House of Lords in London, England, the form has been revived. Donald Jackson has been commissioned by a Benedictine monastery to create the first completely handwritten and illuminated Bible since the invention of the printing press more than 500 years ago, the most extensive scribal commission the world has seen since the Middle Ages.

Mr. Jackson suggested the project to the monks at a monastery in Wales and he can be found talking about the project and demonstrating his skill with hand-cut quill and ink that he makes himself on You Tube (www.youtube.com/watch?v=BK9oCX5lBLQ). A team of scribes, artists, and crafts-people in a Welsh scriptorium worked on The Saint John’s Bible for more than 13 years.

Prints on loan from The Saint John’s Bible are currently on display in the Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery. The exhibition runs through May 10.

The Erdman gallery exhibition, which is free and open to the public, is a rare chance to view a unique project intended to “ignite the spiritual imagination of Christian believers throughout the world and illuminate the Word of God using ancient traditions and today’s technology for a new millennium.” It features 25 approximately 22 by 30 inch giclée prints from the illuminated Bible that was commissioned in 1998 by the Benedictine monks of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minnesota.

Standout prints include Jacob’s Ladder by Donald Jackson in collaboration with Chris Tomlin; Faithful Friends by Diane von Arx with scribe Brian Simpson; Donald Jackson’s Village of the Dry Bones and The Life of Paul; and two works by Thomas Ingmire: Messianic Prediction and The Ten Commandments. For the latter, the artist’s brief was to combine five different passages from Exodus into one single illumination. Mr. Ingmire’s is a modern take on his subject. While the top half of the page depicts traditional images of burning bush, the first Passover, the crossing of the Red Sea, and the twelve pillars of Israel with Biblical texts arranged across them in gold lettering, the bottom half of the page contains the Ten Commandments in letters that are stenciled rather than penned, or should we say “quilled.” The result emphasizes the authoritative nature of the “laws.”

Don’t miss Chris Tomlin’s Monarch Butterflies, alongside which helpful wall notes explain the symbolic significance of the butterfly in Christian art. You will also learn that that the margins of medieval Bibles were often decorated with plants and animals that had symbolic meaning and that all of the species of flora and fauna depicted in the margins of the Saint John’s Bible are either native to the Minnesota woods surrounding St. John’s University or to the Welsh countryside near Donald Jackson’s home. Mr. Tomlin, a specialist in botanical and nature illustration, went to Minnesota to research marginalia subjects.

Along with the show, the Seminary plans three special events that are also open to the public. On Wednesday, April 22, at 7 p.m. Tim Ternes, director of The Saint John’s Bible at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library, will recount the story behind the project and discuss the art on display. His interactive presentation, “From Inspiration to Illumination: An Introduction to The Saint John’s Bible,” takes place in the Erdman Center. To attend, register at www.ptsem.edu/stjohnbible.

Working directly with the project’s artistic team, Mr. Ternes facilitates exhibitions for the original pages and reproductions, as well as curating and caring for the original folios of the Bible. He travels extensively offering presentations, exhibitions, and educational programs for the Bible project and library collections. “They’ve brought together a team of theologians and artists who thought through the entire project,” said Dayle Rounds, associate dean of continuing education at the Seminary. “It’s amazing to hear Tim [Ternes] walk you through each of the images on display.”

Following Mr. Ternes’s presentation, there will be a reception and a demonstration of techniques used in the creation of the Bible by calligrapher Diane Von Arx, whose own work is among those on display.

A native Minnesotan, Ms. Von Arx has been a graphic designer for more than 25 years. She specializes in creative lettering and calligraphy and conducts workshops throughout the U.S., Canada, Japan, and Australia. She has published three beginning calligraphy workbooks and her work has been included in numerous exhibitions and private collections.

One of only three U. S. calligraphers asked to participate in the creation of The Saint John’s Bible, Ms. Von Arx will share her experiences as an artist working on this more than a decade-long project as well as her personal insights on the creative process and the challenges of going from word to image with sacred texts.

For those interested in delving deeper into the project and even trying their hand at grinding inks and using hand-cut quills, the Seminary is offering a 24 hour retreat, “Seeing the Word: A Retreat with The Saint John’s Bible” on April 22 and April 23.

Led by Mr. Ternes and Ms. von Arx, participants will examine the creative and artistic processes involved and “enter into a deeper understanding of the scriptural passages with the new, exciting way of experiencing God’s Word: visio divina.” The cost of the retreat is $145 and includes the program and three meals. For a complete schedule or to register, visit www.ptsem.edu/stjohnsbible.

The Erdman Art Gallery is located in the Erdman Center at 20 Library Place, Princeton. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 1:30 to 9 p.m.

For more information, call (609) 497-7990, or visit: www.ptsem.edu.

April 2, 2015
PRINCETON OBSERVED: Local artist Jay McPhillips’s paintings of familiar spots around town feature in an exhibition opening at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, April 7. The show, which continues through May 9, is titled “Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton & Beyond,” and features original oil paintings. The artwork is for sale along with some of Mr. McPhillips’s Prince-Ton tote bags and mugs. For more on the artist, visit Prince-ton.com and JayMcPhillips.com.(Image Courtesy of the Artist)

PRINCETON OBSERVED: Local artist Jay McPhillips’s paintings of familiar spots around town feature in an exhibition opening at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, April 7. The show, which continues through May 9, is titled “Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton & Beyond,” and features original oil paintings. The artwork is for sale along with some of Mr. McPhillips’s Prince-Ton tote bags and mugs. For more on the artist, visit Prince-ton.com and JayMcPhillips.com. (Image Courtesy of the Artist)

Paintings of familiar scenes around town by local artist Jay McPhillips will feature in a display of his paintings opening at Small World Coffee, 254 Nassau Street, on April 7. The exhibition will continue through May 9.

“Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton and Beyond,” will feature original oil paintings, including Princeton locations and some New Jersey shore scenes. Some unframed oils on panel will be available for under $350.

Mr. McPhillips will also offer a complimentary digital file of the paintings to any local businesses for a limited usage should they purchase a painting. Also, the show will feature some of Mr. McPhillips “gift shop items” including Prince-Ton tote bags, mugs.

The award-winning artist has been celebrated for over a decade in the Princeton, New York City, and Bucks County areas.

Highlights of his art and design career include work for Comedy Central TV, The Guggenheim Museum, Chiat Day TBWA Ad Agency, and Princeton’s Tony Award Winning McCarter Theatre.

This year Mr. McPhillips work was featured on George Takei’s Facebook page (over 150,000 likes), Reddit.com, Buzzfeed.com, and Mo Rocca’s TV show My Grandmother’s Ravioli.

He is currently working on a book of his Princeton paintings to be Princeton Studies, Paintings of Princeton. His paintings can be viewed at Prince-ton.com and JayMcPhillips.com.

For more information (including pre-show orders), visit: Prince-TON.com.

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March 25, 2015
MARKING LOCAL HISTORY: George Frisbie captured the Southbound Trolley at North Main and Delaware in this vintage print from the collection of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society’s George H. Frisbie Collection that will be on display in the exhibition, “Pennington Comes of Age” at the Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art from March 27 through April 25. There will be a special reception Wednesday, April 1, from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition is part of the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of Pennington Borough and features vintage images from 1890 to 1915. Silva Gallery hours are: Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or by appointment. For more information, call Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at (609) 737-4133.(Image Courtesy of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society)

MARKING LOCAL HISTORY: George Frisbie captured the Southbound Trolley at North Main and Delaware in this vintage print from the collection of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society’s George H. Frisbie Collection that will be on display in the exhibition, “Pennington Comes of Age” at the Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art from March 27 through April 25. There will be a special reception Wednesday, April 1, from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition is part of the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of Pennington Borough and features vintage images from 1890 to 1915. Silva Gallery hours are: Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or by appointment. For more information, call Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at (609) 737-4133. (Image Courtesy of the Hopewell Valley Historical Society)

An exhibition of historic photographs from the Hopewell Valley Historical Society’s George H. Frisbie Collection goes on show at The Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art Friday, March 27. “Pennington Comes of Age,” will run through April 25 and there will be a special reception on Wednesday, April 1, from 5 to 8 p.m.

Curated by Jack Koeppel, the Historical Society’s archivist, the exhibition is part of the 125th anniversary of the incorporation of Pennington Borough and features vintage images from the first twenty-five years of the Borough’s incorporation, 1890–1915.

During these years George Frisbie, who had grown up in a family-run business on South Main Street, captured the world around him through the view-finder of his big wooden camera. His images not only document people and places, but record many of the changes that took place over this span of time. Descendants of Mr. Frisbie still reside in Pennington Borough, and in 1986 Alice Frisbie and her daughter, Mary Thornton, donated eight hundred negatives to the Historical Society.

The images selected for the exhibition will be accompanied by narratives written by Society historians Larry Kidder, Jack Davis, and David Blackwell. Areas in the display will discuss changes in architecture, transportation, and technology during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Images of the railroad, street railways, and horseless carriages will be accompanied by quotations and information gleaned from early newspapers and artifacts in the Society’s Archive of Hopewell Valley History.

Many of the photographs are being exhibited for the first time, including some showing important local Pennington residents such as Joseph Thompson, the flag crossing guard, and Charles Hendrickson, the town’s lamp-lighter.

Pennington Borough Council Member Catherine “Kit” Chandler and former Councilman Edwin Weed Tucker co-chair the Pennington 125th Anniversary Committee, which welcomes volunteers, sponsors, and patrons. For more information contact Borough Administrator Eileen Heinzel at (609) 737-0276 or eheinzel@penningtonboro.org.

The committee is working with other community organizations to plan events throughout the year.

For the latest information, visit: www.pennington125.org or visit Pennington 125 on Facebook.

Founded in 1838, The Pennington School is an independent coeducational school for students in grades 6 through 12, in both day and boarding programs.

“Pennington Comes of Age” will be on view at The Pennington School’s Silva Gallery of Art Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or by appointment. All events and exhibitions at the Silva Gallery are free and open to the public. For more information, call Gallery Director Dolores Eaton at (609) 737-4133.

March 18, 2015
IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES: The wit and whimsy of children’s book illustrator Matthew Cordell will be on display in an exhibition at Princeton Day School’s Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery later this month. The artist’s “Hello! Hello!,” from Disney Hyperion Books, 2012, shown here, is part of “Drawing and Drawing Again,” which opens March 30 and runs through April 23. There will be an artists’ reception on Monday, April 20 from noon to 12:30 p.m. For more on the artist: visit: www.matthewcordell.com. Part of the school’s “Imagine the Possibilities” guest artist series, the exhibition is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information, call (609) 924-6700, ext. 1772, or visit:www.pds.org.

IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES: The wit and whimsy of children’s book illustrator Matthew Cordell will be on display in an exhibition at Princeton Day School’s Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery later this month. The artist’s “Hello! Hello!,” from Disney Hyperion Books, 2012, shown here, is part of “Drawing and Drawing Again,” which opens March 30 and runs through April 23. There will be an artists’ reception on Monday, April 20 from noon to 12:30 p.m. For more on the artist: visit: www.matthewcordell.com. Part of the school’s “Imagine the Possibilities” guest artist series, the exhibition is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information, call (609) 924-6700, ext. 1772, or visit:www.pds.org.

The Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School is pleased to present “Drawing and Drawing Again” featuring the artwork of book illustrator Matthew Cordell from March 30 through April 23. There will be an artists’ reception on Monday, April 20 from noon to 12:30 p.m., which is free and open to the public.

Mr. Cordell has been drawing and making art for as long as he can remember. He has illustrated many books for children, including works of poetry, novels, and picture books. He has written and illustrated Trouble Gum, Another Brother, Wish, and Hello! Hello!, a New York Times Notable Children’s Book. Mr. Cordell lives outside of Chicago with his wife, author, Julie Halpern, and their two children. (For more information, visit: www.matthewcordell.com)

The exhibition is part of the “Imagine the Possibilities” guest artist series at Princeton Day School, which is made possible through the generosity of the John D. Wallace, Jr. ’78 Memorial Guest Artist Series Fund.

The series has brought in celebrated authors, poets, and illustrators to work directly with Princeton Day School students for the past 20 years. Imagine the Possibilities coordinator Bev Gallagher remarked, “What a delight it has been working with this program for the past 20 years. It truly is inspiring to welcome amazing artists to our campus and watch teachers, students, and parents enjoy the experience. We are certainly thrilled that Matt will be with us this year — our 20th anniversary year!”

“Drawing and drawing again” is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday when the school is in session, and by appointment on weekends. For more information about the Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery, please call Jody Erdman, Art Gallery Director, at 609) 924-6700 x 1772 or visit www.pds.org.

 

March 11, 2015
MCCC RETROSPECTIVE: Work by the acclaimed local artist and MCCC educator Frank Rivera, such as his “Liar, Liar,” shown here, is part of a retrospective of his work at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College. There will be an opening reception tonight, March 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The show will run through April 2. Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.(Image Courtesy of MCCC).

MCCC RETROSPECTIVE: Work by the acclaimed local artist and MCCC educator Frank Rivera, such as his “Liar, Liar,” shown here, is part of a retrospective of his work at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College. There will be an opening reception tonight, March 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The show will run through April 2. Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery. (Image Courtesy of MCCC).

There will be an opening public reception tonight, Wednesday, March 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the gallery in Mercer County Community College (MCCC) for an exhibition of work by the acclaimed artist and former MCCC professor Frank Rivera.

The Gallery is located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road.

“Frank Rivera Retrospective: Selected Works 1945–2015” will continue through Thursday April 2.

Mr. Rivera taught art at MCCC from 1967 to 2003 and is now professor emeritus there. A resident of Hightstown, he has lived and worked in Mercer County for more than 40 years. His work has been exhibited prominently in the United States, including exhibits at the Whitney Museum, the Luise Ross Gallery, and the Abington Art Center, as well as numerous venues in Paris, where Rivera regularly spends time painting. He is a graduate of Yale Art School, with an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania.

According to MCCC Gallery Director Dylan Wolfe, the show will include work from all phases of the painter and educator’s creative career, which in earlier years featured large-scale abstractions, while in more recent times has focused on smaller narrative pieces inspired by storyboard graphics and computer art. The exhibition even includes a few pieces preserved from Rivera’s childhood.

“The work … has been arranged by theme and subject rather than by chronology. It is the persistence of these themes and subjects – not always linear – that has shaped my vision over the decades,” notes Mr. Rivera in the exhibition catalog,

The artist’s previous exhibitions have drawn glowing reviews. “There is an iconic quality to his pieces, recalling the carefully wrought panels and religious icons of medieval art,” wrote Cathy Vikso, of the Trenton Times. “Rivera says [his] paintings are autobiographical, but each [work] seems more like a distillation than a rapidly jotted down memory, and their complexity in such small dimensions is made the more interesting for their visual clarity, though their meanings are often elusive,” said Dan Bischoff of the Newark Star-Ledger. Dallas Piotrowski, former curator at the Chapin Gallery, has noted that “paintings of Rivera are for the mind.”

Gallery hours are Mondays through Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

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March 4, 2015
AZUL II: Simply titled, this 47 by 47 inch cement and acrylic on canvas painting by Mexican artist Emilia Sirrs can be seen by appointment only in an exhibition of the artist’s work in the home gallery of Ilana and Mauricio Gutierrez in Princeton. Ms. Sirrs’s paintings establish a rapport with the viewer through an empathic use of texture and color to convey emotional content. To make an appointment to view the exhibition, which will be on display through March, call (822) 275-6586, or email: gutierrez.ilana@gmail.com or yslebi@yahoo.com.(Image Courtesy of the Artist.)

AZUL II: Simply titled, this 47 by 47 inch cement and acrylic on canvas painting by Mexican artist Emilia Sirrs can be seen by appointment only in an exhibition of the artist’s work in the home gallery of Ilana and Mauricio Gutierrez in Princeton. Ms. Sirrs’s paintings establish a rapport with the viewer through an empathic use of texture and color to convey emotional content. To make an appointment to view the exhibition, which will be on display through March, call (822) 275-6586, or email: gutierrez.ilana@gmail.com or yslebi@yahoo.com. (Image Courtesy of the Artist.)

Using rich traces of rust with cement and ash, Mexican artist Emilia Sirrs creates depth and color in her large abstract canvases.

The artist’s bold technique is shown to good effect on the walls of a home gallery in an ultramodern home on Random Road in Princeton.

Ms. Sirrs has found a unique showcase for her work in the home of Ilana and Mauricio Gutierrez where the Mexican artist presents her most recent exhibition of work through March.

The artist’s palette is one of earth hues that evoke the familiar and have a soothing quality with touches of azure and crimson for dramatic effect.

Although born in Cincinnati, Ms. Sirrs defines herself as a Mexican artist. She has lived most of her life in Mexico; it is where she developed as an artist while engrossed in the cultural richness of that country.

Since 1990, she has experimented in diverse media and more than 40 individual, collective, and social responsibility events in Mexico, United States, Asia, and Europe have provided international visibility for her work, which has been shown in the Ibero American Art Fair, Seoul; Acento Gallery and Ghaf Gallery, Dubai; Fisher Island Design Center, Miami; Galeria Crisolart, Barcelona; and Galeria Johanna Martinez, Belgium, as well as at various events in Mexico.

The exhibition, which is open to the public, consists of a series of 14 abstract paintings. The artist’s use of metallic rust, cement, ashes, and bold dashes of striking red and blue hues results in work that has warmth and depth. The effect is one of mystery.

“Each of Emilia’s paintings begins with a simple idea that progresses in complexity until the work is finished, with no pre-conceived notions,” said home gallery owner Ilana Gutierrez. As Ms. Sirrs explained, her creative process “starts with an abstract concept that is not constrained by an established purpose, objective, or method. I prepare paints and materials using mundane elements, in this case rust, concrete, and ashes, and then let the brush strokes lead me to the place where my inner feelings reside. The final product always expresses my vision of how to mix innovative materials and techniques in a way that is vividly captivating.”

The paintings demonstrate an artistic style that establishes a rapport with the spectator by sharing and transmitting the abstraction of human feelings through textures and shades of color. Her work aims to establish a dialogue where matter and visual impact do the talking. According to Emilia, sometimes the material aspects of a painting surpass its intellectual or creative intent, which helps to establish an immediate connection.

Together with her husband Mauricio and their three children, Ms. Gutierrez shares a unique architect-designed ultra-modern home on Random Road in Princeton. Besides a large number of windows letting in natural light, the home has a great deal of wall space as well as gallery space dedicated to the showing of art. Ms. Gutierrez’s mother is the Mexican-based art dealer Eva Beloglovsky and the couple has a growing collection of canvas paintings, prints, and sculpture, including some displayed outside.

I have lived with art all of my life,” said Ms. Gutierrez, whose mother has been an art dealer for 40 years. “She always made it a point for us to be involved.”

When the couple moved to Princeton, they found a house that suited their own extensive art collection. Now they are keen to “expose the Princeton community to Mexican and Latin American Art,” said Ms. Gutierrez who was introduced to Ms. Sirrs’s work through her mother.

“My mother loves Emilia’s work and deeply believes in her as a professional artist who is producing abstract work that is emotional rather than purely intellectual. Emilia’s work shows a high sense of emotion as well as great academic standards. She created this work specially for the walls in our own gallery with the thought that it could go into any home, public, or corporate art space.”

Still, not many people would welcome strangers traipsing through their home looking at the artwork on the walls. Intrigued by the idea of a home gallery, I asked Ms. Gutierrez about the concept. “Even though this is not a public space, we feel comfortable sharing this experience with the community. Collectors and art lovers are welcome by appointment,” she said. “This experience is so satisfying we are planning another show sometime in the near future. It has been a great source of inspiration to pursue the idea and share responsibilities with my artistic business partner Yamile Slebi.”

Asked if the business partners might be opening an art gallery in Princeton at some time in the future, Ms. Gutierrez said that she hasn’t ruled it out. “Time will tell and the idea is not disregarded,” she said.

To make an appointment to view the exhibition, which will be on display through March, email: gutierrez.ilana@gmail.com or yslebi@yahoo.com.

 

February 25, 2015
LAMBERTVILLE ART SALE: Jacqui Alexander’s painting, titled “The End,” will be on display along with more of her work in the Pop-Up Gallery show at 22 Church Street in Lambertville on Saturday, February 28, starting at noon. There will be an opening reception with refreshments and a meet and greet with Ms. Alexander and her fellow artist in the show, Elina Lorenz, from 5 to 6:30 pm. Proceeds from the sale of the artists’ work will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County. For more information, visit: www.bbbsmercer.org.

LAMBERTVILLE ART SALE: Jacqui Alexander’s painting, titled “The End,” will be on display along with more of her work in the Pop-Up Gallery show at 22 Church Street in Lambertville on Saturday, February 28, starting at noon. There will be an opening reception with refreshments and a meet and greet with Ms. Alexander and her fellow artist in the show, Elina Lorenz, from 5 to 6:30 pm. Proceeds from the sale of the artists’ work will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County. For more information, visit: www.bbbsmercer.org.

A Pop-Up art show at 22 Church Street in Lambertville will showcase the works of two local artists, Elina Lorenz and Jacqui Alexander, on Saturday, February 28, starting at noon. There will be a reception with refreshments and a meet and greet with the artists from 5 to 6:30 pm.

Proceeds from the sale of the artwork will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County (BBBS) in the first ever partnership of this kind for the organization.

“We are honored that these talented artists have chosen to share the proceeds of their art show with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County,” said Susan Dunning, executive director of the organization. “Money raised will enable us to match qualified volunteers with local children who are in need of a caring adult mentor.”

Lauren Helfrich, a graduate student at Rider University in the MBA program, has organized the art show as a part of a project for a management course. She and her fellow group members are passionate about the mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters. “The future is in the hands of our nation’s youth; every small encounter, relationship, moment, or event that transpires in these children’s lives affects them immensely,” she said.

Both of the artists live and work in Mercer County. Ms. Alexander’s artwork can be described as a personal narrative, told using symbols and forms from the natural world. Her recent paintings are inspired by the wildlife of her home state of New Jersey, with a healthy dose of wanderlust mixed in. A graduate of Rhode Island School of Design, she currently lives and works in Princeton, where she is a marketing consultant to businesses large and small.

Ms. Lorenz has been painting since her early childhood. Her style is varied, but she mostly draws her inspiration from the nature and wildlife right outside her window in her home studio in Princeton. She currently also has pieces on display in the ArtJam Pop-Up Gallery. Ms. Lorenz graduated from the Art Lyceum in Kishinev in her native country of Moldova.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mercer County is the oldest, largest and most effective youth mentoring volunteer organization in the United States. The BBBS-Mercer Mission is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one matches that change their lives for the better forever.

For more information, visit: www.bbbsmercer.org.

February 18, 2015
THE BAPTISM: This watercolor by local artist Terri McNichol won a Purchase Award from the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, and will be on display as part of the Mercer County Artists 2015 exhibition at the MCCC Gallery through February 27. For more information and gallery hours, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

THE BAPTISM: This watercolor by local artist Terri McNichol won a Purchase Award from the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission, and will be on display as part of the Mercer County Artists 2015 exhibition at the MCCC Gallery through February 27. For more information and gallery hours, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

The Mercer County arts community came out in force earlier this month to view the rich and varied works of fellow artists at the Awards Ceremony and Opening Reception for “Mercer County Artists 2015,” which will be on display through February 27 at the Gallery at Mercer County Community College (MCCC), located on the second floor of the Communications Building on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road.

The show features 89 works by 63 artists in a variety of media including oil, acrylic, and watercolor paintings, as well as mixed media collages and 23 sculptures.

Gallery Director Dylan Wolfe, who curated the show, announced the award winners with fellow presenters Tricia Fagan and Nora Añanos from the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission. “This exhibit clearly demonstrates the immense talent and culture of Mercer County,” said Mr. Wolfe. “Supporting the arts sustains the inspirations we can each find when we are living in a community flush with creativity, culture, and the expression of passions.”

Mr. Wolfe thanked juror Kyle Stevenson, an artist and MCCC Professor of Fine Arts, for making his selections from 244 pieces submitted by 138 artists. “Having been present during his deliberation, I can tell you with certainty that he made many difficult choices,” Wolfe told the crowd. Mr. Wolfe also acknowledged the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission for its continuing support of the exhibit. “The commission not only supports us through grant funding, but also purchased artwork totaling over $2500 from this exhibit. They continue to build a remarkable permanent collection of county created, county owned artwork, and provide direct support and encouragement to our community of artists,” he said.

Award winners include: the Utrecht-Blick Best in Show Prize to David Orban of Trenton for “The Work Party: The Workbench.” The Juror’s Choice Awards went to Janis Purcell of East Windsor for “Phoenix Rising” and Megan Uhaze of Hamilton for “The Eye.” Juror’s Honorable Mention recipients were Marina Ahun of Princeton for “New York Grand Central Terminal”; Elise Dodeles of Lambertville for “San Francisco Area Fighter A219, Ike O’Rourke”; James Doherty of Lawrence for “Wynwood Walls”; Timothy J. Fitzpatrick of Mercerville for “Low Tide”; and Bill Plank of Lawrenceville for “Birth.”

County Purchase Awards went to Jamie Greenfield of Lawrenceville for “Seven Gold Coins”; Libby Ramage of Princeton for “Incantation”; John Pietrowski of Ewing (untitled); Adam Hillman of Pennington (untitled); Terri McNichol of Cranbury for “The Baptism”; and Cathy Saska-Mydlowski of Hamilton for “South Beach.”

Arin Black, executive director of the West Windsor Arts Council, awarded the Council’s prize to Kathleen Liao of Princeton Junction for “Quantum Leap.”

Featured artists from the Princeton area included: Priscilla Snow Algava, Joanne Amantea, Mechtild Bitter, Katja De Rutyer, Mary Dolan, Janet Felton, Sejal Krishnan, Ronald A. LaMahieu, Ghislaine Pasteur, Christa Schneider, Judith Tallerman, Ellen Veden, and Andrew Werth.

For more information, directions and gallery hours, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

February 11, 2015
MERCER COUNTY’S SCOTTISH CONNECTION: This winter, volunteer stitchers at Morven Museum and Garden worked on this panel paying tribute to General Hugh Mercer as part of the Scottish Diaspora Tapestry project. When completed, the finished panel, which has the famous Mercer Oak as its centerpiece, will be sent back to Scotland to join others like it celebrating the achievements and contributions of Scots around the world.(Image Courtesy of Morven Museum and Garden)

MERCER COUNTY’S SCOTTISH CONNECTION: This winter, volunteer stitchers at Morven Museum and Garden worked on this panel paying tribute to General Hugh Mercer as part of the Scottish Diaspora Tapestry project. When completed, the finished panel, which has the famous Mercer Oak as its centerpiece, will be sent back to Scotland to join others like it celebrating the achievements and contributions of Scots around the world. (Image Courtesy of Morven Museum and Garden)

Morven Museum and Garden on Stockton Street is participating in a worldwide celebration of The Scottish Diaspora by bringing volunteer stitchers together to work on a single tapestry panel that is to be included in a larger work in tribute to the accomplishments of Scots around the world.

Princeton’s contribution features elements from the life of Revolutionary War hero General Hugh Mercer (1726-1777), who died a slow death over several days from bayonet wounds received at the hands of British soldiers during the Battle of Princeton.

After his horse had been shot from under him, Mercer was bayoneted repeatedly and left for dead. Legend has it that he lay under the famous oak tree that would become a symbol of the county named for him, before being taken to the William Clark house nearby.

But Mercer’s story goes back a long way before his friend George Washington, with whom he had fought in the French and Indian War, made him a brigadier general in the Continental Army.

Like many of his patriotic companions, Mercer had fled his native Scotland for the colony of America. As a battlefield surgeon at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, he had witnessed the bloody butchery that ended the Scottish attempt to restore the Stuarts to the British throne. Led by Charles Edward Stuart, the legendary Bonnie Prince Charlie, hopes for this Jacobite Rebellion were dashed at Drumossie Moor where the battle was fought, just north of Inverness.

Two years earlier, at the age of 19, and newly graduated from Aberdeen University, Mercer had been inspired by thoughts of replacing the German-speaking King George II with the prince that highlanders regarded as the rightful heir to the united monarchy of Scotland, England, and Ireland.

Centuries later, the name Culloden retains the power to evoke chills in the Scottish psyche and in a dramatic account of Mercer’s death in General Hugh Mercer: Forgotten Hero of the American Revolution, author Frederick English describes Mercer’s defiance of the British redcoats as a throwback to his days as a battlefield doctor. He would not ask for mercy of soldiers who called to him to surrender, calling him a “rebel.”

Morven’s contribution to the Scottish Diaspora Tapestry Project involved many hands. The Museum’s Barbara Webb commends “stalwart stitching volunteer” Alison Totten for the lion’s share of the work, helped also by Edie Tattersall during the recent holiday period.

The embroidered panel connects Princeton to two dozen other communities engaged in documenting their Scottish connections. The aim is to pay homage to emigrant Scots over the centuries by gathering and celebrating the stories of those individuals who had a profound impact on the areas where they settled.

“I hadn’t picked up a needle since the 1960s but knew this was something I could contribute to,” said Ms. Totten, who welcomed the opportunity to “honor all my Scottish ancestors, who represent a cross section of the Diaspora. I am part of the McLean clan of Argyll.”

According to the project’s organizers, Scots and their descendants “never lost a deeply held pride in Scotland’s culture and its democratic ideals: they took with them their religion, skills in medicine, engineering, botany, education, administration, agriculture, and more besides.”

“I saw a lot of people who, like me, had not done needlework in a long time, and who, like me, were taught by a mother or grandmother all those years ago,” said Ms. Totten who was quick to credit the skills of an accomplished embroiderer from the Embroidery Guild of America for stitching the Mercer Oak and the recumbent figure of Mercer under it. “It was a sheer delight to encourage them to put in a stitch or two and watch their faces transform with joy. We even got a few cub scouts to participate! One 4-year-old girl had to be pried away by a very patient mother.”

Soon to be shipped back to Scotland, Morven’s panel shows the Mercer Oak alongside the names of significant places in the life of the soldier physician. The international artwork of which it will form a part, is a successor to the first communal Scottish tapestry project, The Great Tapestry of Scotland, completed in 2013.

Hundreds of stitchers in 25 countries volunteered thousands of hours to craft panels which illustrate such contributions as the arrival of tea in India; the creation of a steelworks in Corby, England; military leadership in Sweden and Russia; national parks and tobacco growing in the United States; and the gold rush in Australia.

Mercer was one of Washington’s most trusted advisers. According to military historian and Washington biographer Douglas Southall Freeman, had Mercer lived, he “might have been [Washington’s] peer and possibly his superior.”

For more on the Morven project, visit: http://morven.org/the-scottish-diaspora-tapestry-project/. For more about the tapestry, visit: www.scottishdiasporatapestry.org.