January 16, 2019

To the Editor:

There are many groups in Princeton who espouse fine civic concerns. I imagine that if several of them approached the authorities to suggest that we shut down the center of town for half a day in order to demonstrate peacefully, the idea would be dismissed out of hand. How ironic that the threat of some white supremacists standing in the middle of Princeton on January 12, 2019 to represent their own repugnant beliefs achieved this peaceful plan and more.

Lacking the white supremacists, the quiet demonstration by hundreds of townspeople, University people, and likeminded visitors, was a success. But we did not get to everyone’s civic concerns! I would be inclined to suggest that we do this again in a few weeks (minus the white supremacists), were I not concerned for Princeton’s beleaguered downtown merchants who lost revenue, and the taxpayer expense of the dozens and dozens of fine policemen who protected us all from each other.

Tobias D. Robison
Longtime Jefferson Road Resident 

To the Editor:

While the Dinky did lose 22 percent of its ridership after the relocation of the Station, 78 percent of its original ridership has remained and is holding strong!  Before the temporary suspension to help NJT with its Federal PTC retrofit deadline, ridership losses on the Dinky had leveled off despite the apparent allure of parking permits at the Junction. Princeton is slowing initiating it’s GoPrinceton transit campaign. The Dinky is now poised for some real growth.   

While there have a been a few days during the year where NJT unforgivably has had service problems, by-and-large the Dinky has delivered passengers day-in and day-out on-time at the Junction with just a short passenger hop onto waiting trains. There are a lot of advantages that Dinky riders enjoy over those who use Junction parking, hiking through the parking lot in the wind, rain, and snow, day-in and day-out. 

There are big problems with the substitute buses. Passengers get caught in traffic like everybody else, not to mention that big pause at the Alexander Street Bridge!  Use of the buses has added tremendously to commuter time and uncertainty for Dinky riders, and contributed to area congestion. more

To the Editor:

The Princeton organic recycling program’s last pickup will be on January 30, because the accepting farm kept finding too many non-organics, especially plastic, in the mix. There was a warning sent to all subscribers last fall which was not heeded, and the farm said NO MORE.

Suggestion: If the pickup people look into a green can and see unacceptable material, they should just flip open the top and not collect the contents. (It would be nice if they could leave a sticker saying “Unacceptable” or “Refused,” but they are busy and wearing gloves.)  

Sometimes the trash is put out by people who are not the owners/managers and may not be able to communicate with them directly. However, if the recycling is not picked up, the message should get through.

Ruth E. Scott
Governors Lane

LaVerne Edna Deik Hebert

LaVerne Edna Deik Hebert of Kendall Park, NJ, concluded a life well lived at the age of 95 as she passed away on January 8, 2019. The youngest of several children by hard working German parents, LaVerne was a lifelong resident of NJ, and is the last of her generation. She is survived by a niece Caroline Bradbury of Vadnais Heights, MN, and nephew William Dodds of Livingston, NJ. 

A graduate of the School of Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital, LaVerne was trained as a Registered Nurse and worked in the Radiology Department. In 1957, she married Jules Hebert and together they ventured into the printing business, purchasing The Copy Cat in Montgomery Township. Upon Jules’ early death, LaVerne took over the company located in Research Park, Princeton, and it became LDH Printing. The business thrived under LaVerne’s careful control and strict quality standards. She printed stationery and business cards for hundreds of local businesses, so her connections in the community were wide and varied. LaVerne was known for bringing in young folks to work with her. She served as a role model, demonstrating dedication and the work ethic that she was known for. A scholarship is provided every year to a Montgomery High School student in memory of LaVerne’s husband. 

LaVerne was a committed community volunteer serving as the Treasurer of The Rocky Hill Fire Company for decades. She belonged to Soroptimist International and the Present Day Club of Princeton. LaVerne was an original member of the Princeton Medical Center Auxiliary, serving on the board for many years. She ran the coffee and gift shop in the original hospital. LaVerne was best known for her leadership in organizing the White Elephant Rummage Sale which raised significant funds for the hospital and was one of the longest running events in the community, held annually for 100 years. 

LaVerne will be missed by many people in our community. Her positive spirit and can-do attitude were an inspiration not to be forgotten. The burial will be private, however a Memorial Service will be held in the upcoming months to celebrate the life of LaVerne Hebert, a life well lived. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Christ the King Lutheran Church in Kendall Park or The Rocky Hill Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 

———

Walter Scott Blomeley

Walter Scott Blomeley, formerly of Sullivan, Illinois, passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 10th, 2019 at Greenbriar Nursing Home in Bradenton, Florida, at the age of 91. Visitation will be Thursday, January 17th from 5 to 7 p.m. at Reed Funeral Home in Sullivan. Funeral services will be Friday, January 18th at 10:30 a.m. at Reed Funeral Home, with internment and military rites conducted by Sullivan American Legion Post 68 afterwards at Greenhill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Wounded Warriors Project in Scott’s memory. Online condolences may be sent to the family at reedfunerahome.net.

Scott was born on February 6th, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, to Ralph and Marion Hillard Blomeley. As a young man, Scott attended Farragut Naval Academy in New Jersey. While there he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. In 1945, Scott served in the Pacific after the end of World War II. Scott later attended Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. While attending Tulane, he was called back into service to fight in the Korean War. During his time in Korea, Scott was listed as Missing in Action while engaged in fighting as one of the “Chosin Few.” Scott was a highly-decorated veteran of the USMC, receiving the bronze star and three purple hearts.

After returning from Korea, Scott worked for his father’s company, Blomeley Engineering, in New York. He married Jane Harmon on September 18th, 1954 in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and lived in Princeton, New Jersey. Scott was an active member of the Princeton community; volunteering to coach JFL, serving on the First Aid and Rescue Squad, Princeton and Kingston Fire Districts, and helping start an “Up with People” group.

In 1974, Scott moved his family to Sullivan, Illinois. He worked as a pipe fitter at Clinton Power Plant until his retirement. Scott served on the Sullivan School Board, was on the Sullivan Fire Protection Squad, and was well known for being “Santa Claus” in Sullivan and elsewhere. He and his wife, Jane, also enjoyed helping at Shelby County Community Services. He was an active member of the VFW, DAV, KWVA, American Legion, and the Marine Corps League.

Scott was a very loving, jovial, and caring person, with a zest for life. He will be missed by his family and many friends. Surviving are his children Betty Jane Boyer (Ben) of Bethany, Illinois; Kathryn Ann Cantrall (Don) of Springfield, Illinois; Cynthia Lee Selby (John) of Shelbyville, Illinois; and Scott Harmon Blomeley (Marsha) of Sarasota, Florida. Also surviving are eight grandchildren, Shannon Patterson (JP), Blake Crockett (Jana), April Reagan (Zac), Sarah Nichols (Zach), Nicholas Selby, Nathan Nielson, Miles Cantrall, Amy Cantrall; and six great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents; first wife, Jane, in 2007; and his second wife, Barbara, in 2016. The family would like to thank Greenbriar staff for their care and friendship.

———

Stuart Joseph Bellows

Stuart Joseph Bellows, born December 29, 1931, died without warning at the home he shared with his loving and devoted partner of 35 years, Gerald Mushinski, in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico on December 28th, the eve of his 87th birthday.

A born musician, had an unusual childhood, both raising chickens, which included selling eggs to Albert Einstein, and practicing the piano or organ two hours a day! (When in high school, his devoted parents bought him a pipe organ, which required tearing out the staircase in order to install it in his bedroom.)  A graduate of Princeton High School, he attended the Yale School of Music before receiving a B.A. from Wesleyan University. He studied at the North German Organ Academy with Harold Vogel, and received a Master’s Degree from New York University Business School. Stuart then joined his parents at Bellows, Inc., their retail clothing store in Princeton, where he eventually became proprietor until he sold the business in the 1980s.

He was very engaged in the arts in Princeton, as former board member of The Westminster Choir College, and of the McCarter Theatre. In the mid-nineties, he and Gerald moved to San Miguel where he had wonderful friends and an active life.

Stuart is survived by his sister, Phyllis Bellows Wender, her husband Ira Wender, five nieces and nephews, ten grand-nieces and nephews, and many cousins. Especially cherished is Francine Greenberg Carlie. It is yet to be determined if there will be a memorial service. If so, it will be announced here.

———

Mary Balogh Hultse

Mary Balogh Hultse, 92, formerly of Princeton, passed away on December 10, 2018, in Flushing, New York. A warm, bubbly person, she had an encouraging word for all she met – from maintenance men to store clerks to people on the street.

As a successful advertising executive at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Mary Hultse commuted to Princeton from an apartment on the Upper West Side, where she was a regular at Riverside Church. Then she bought a second apartment, a fourth-floor corner walkup on Palmer Square, so that she could look out over Princeton University and enjoy walking around town. She retired in 1990.

With a passion for the arts – she loved to sing, act, and dance – she joined local theater groups and played Aunt Eller in Oklahoma at Washington Crossing. She was beloved by the staff at Richardson Auditorium, where she volunteered as an usher. Devoutly faithful, she enthusiastically participated in the life of Princeton United Methodist Church (PrincetonUMC) and was in charge of the altar guild. She reveled in her Hungarian heritage and loved Nora and Edina Ban, daughters of Tomas Ban and Ildiko Rosz, as if they were her grandchildren. 

Mary insisted on seeing the best in everyone. This served her well when, in her 70s, her memory failed to keep up with her very stubborn determination to chart her own course. Her many admirers — including a 10-member team from PrincetonUMC, the Ban family, social workers at Princeton Senior Resource Center, and Palmer Square staff — rallied to help with all aspects of daily life so that a charming elder could stay independent for as long as she could. Then she was cared for in her brother’s Long Island home before transitioning to a senior living facility.

Predeceased by her parents, Anna and John Balogh, and her brother, John Balogh Jr., she is survived by her nephew (John Frank Balogh), her niece (Nancy Ann Balogh) and Margaret Krach (Nancy’s wife, who cared for Mary in her later years), and also her special friends, Tomas Ban and Ildiko Rosz.    

A memorial service will be at Princeton United Methodist Church, 7 Vandeventer Avenue, on Monday, January 21, at 1 p.m. Everyone who knew Mary is invited to this celebration of her life and to a reception afterward.

———

Lynne (Lyn) Marcia Ransom

Lynne (Lyn) Marcia Ransom of Hopewell Township, a lifelong musician and composer whose spunk, generosity, and intellect transcended genres and generations, stepped down from the conductor’s podium on December 14, 2018, at age 71.

Lyn was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., and raised in Martinsville, Ind., where her family nurtured in her a love for music and education. A graduate of Oberlin College, she followed her passions wherever they led, including teaching at universities, writing early childhood curriculum for the HighScope Foundation, directing music at the Princeton United Methodist Church, and hitchhiking to India, where she studied sitar for a year with Vilayat Kahn. Lyn later earned graduate degrees at Eastern Michigan University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cincinnati, where she received a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting.

In 1987, Lyn founded Voices Chorale, a Princeton-area ensemble that toured Europe three times and premiered dozens of new works. She also served as a guest conductor throughout the region. In 1992, Lyn was honored by the Princeton, N.J. Arts Council for her outstanding contributions to the area’s cultural life and in 2007 by the YWCA Tribute to Women. In 2017, Chorus America awarded its Education and Community Engagement Award to Voices, citing how it “exemplifies the highest commitment to education and outreach programs.” Unique among these is Lyn’s Young Composers Project in which over 500 elementary school children have created compositions and heard them performed by Voices.

After three decades as artistic director, Lyn celebrated her retirement as she conducted the Voices Chorale and full orchestra in a stirring performance of Johannes Brahms’ “A German Requiem.”

In 1998, Lyn began working with Music Together, the internationally acclaimed early childhood music program, first directing their lab school, then teacher training and certification, and finally co-authoring an adaptation for preschool. Lyn’s work has touched millions of children around the world through this program — which she got to experience first-hand as a grandma!

Diagnosed with breast cancer in early 2005, Lyn’s creative response was key to her ongoing recovery: she began composing “Cancer Coping Songs,” using humor and music for alleviation. Even after the cancer returned in 2014, Lyn thrived for years, writing and performing more Cancer Coping Songs, conducting major works with Voices, and being a loving wife, mother, sister and grandmother.

She died peacefully in her home, with her husband at her side.

Predeceased by her parents, Hugh Wrislar and Audrey Faye (Banta) Ransom, Lyn is survived by her husband, Kenneth K. Guilmartin; her son, Coray Seifert and his wife, Katie; her daughter, Sophia Seifert and her husband, Dan Lopez-Braus; her stepdaughter, Lauren Kells Guilmartin and her husband, James Barry; her grandchildren, Jackson and Alicia Seifert; her sister, Gail Sandra Ransom; her sister, Janice (Ransom) Kerchner and her husband, Jim Kerchner; and many nieces and nephews.

A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2019, at 2 p.m., at Trinity Church in Princeton, NJ, located at 33 Mercer Street.

Contributions designated for the Young Composers Project Fund may be made to Voices Chorale NJ.

ON A “LOVE TRAIN”: Princeton University Professor Emeritus Cornel West addresses the crowd on Saturday in Palmer Square. Originally announced to be a march in Princeton by a white supremacist group, the event turned into a rally against hate, bigotry, and racism, and a call for solidarity. West and others gave short speeches after the hundreds of participants marched around the square, carrying signs and chanting. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn)

By Donald Gilpin

Originally anticipated as an event that would spread hate, bigotry, conflict, and possibly violence, a rally in Princeton last Saturday turned into an expression of solidarity and harmony, as the white supremacist group that had said it was coming to town didn’t show up and hundreds of counter-protestors joined “a love train,” in the words of Princeton University Professor Emeritus Cornel West.

Signs of all sizes proclaimed such messages as “Love Not Hate Makes America Great,” “Hate Has No Home Here,” and “Princeton Stands Against Hate and White Supremacy,” as the crowds paraded around the perimeter of Palmer Square chanting “Not in Princeton, not anywhere,” “No hate, no fear, Nazis are not welcome here,” and other expressions of solidarity in opposition to the originally planned white supremacist message. more

By Anne Levin

Princeton’s new parking rates, regulations, and technology dominated a meeting of the governing body on Monday night, January 14. At Witherspoon Hall, several downtown merchants aired their concerns to Princeton Council about the new system. But some also thanked the town for their efforts and said they understand that rates needed to be raised.

In addition, the meeting included the announcement that the town’s Food Waste Program is being put on a three-month hiatus. Mayor Liz Lempert also reported that there is no date yet for restarting the Dinky train line, which has been out of service for the past three months. Local high school students Aidan York, Brendan Bucceri, and Ryan Neumann were presented with an award of recognition by former Councilman Lance Liverman for their efforts helping stranded motorists during the unexpected snowstorm last November. more

By Anne Levin

On Monday, January 21, communities across the country will commemorate the life and legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. Locally, numerous events are planned, on and around that day. King, who was assassinated on April 4, 1968, was actually born on January 15, 1929. But the tradition is to honor him each year on the third Monday in January.

The Baptist minister and activist is one of only three people to have an American national holiday named after him (the others are George Washington and Christopher Columbus). Legislation designating the federal holiday in his honor wasn’t passed until 15 years after his death, and the day wasn’t officially commemorated until 1986. Since then, it has become a tradition to remember King by attending services, lectures, films, concerts, and — most of all — volunteering. Following is a sampling of local events and opportunities. more

MUSIC OF THE SOUL: Cantor Jeff Warschauer of The Jewish Center of Princeton and his wife Deborah Strauss, known as The Strauss/Warschauer Duo, will bring an evening of klezmer music and culture to the synagogue on Saturday, January 26.

By Anne Levin

Jeff Warschauer spent years playing bluegrass, country, folk, rock, soul, and rhythm and blues before he discovered the music that spoke to him. It was klezmer, a musical tradition of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, and he was hooked.

“I was playing everyone else’s ethnic music but my own,” said Warschauer, who has been the cantor at The Jewish Center of Princeton since last July. “Then one night I went to a concert by the Klezmer Conservatory Band, and I thought, ‘Oh my God, this is my music.’ I had my ‘aha’ moment.” more

By Donald Gilpin

Emily Mann

“A provocateur, a nurturer, and a creator, a fierce and brilliant woman,” according to her colleague Adam Immerwahr, Emily Mann will be moving on from McCarter Theatre following the upcoming 2019-2020 season. She has served as artistic director and resident playwright at McCarter since 1990.

Widely acclaimed as a champion of works by women and people of color, Mann, whose play Gloria: A Life, a bio-drama based on the life of Gloria Steinem, opened off-Broadway in October, looks forward to entering “a new personal and professional chapter of writing and directing opportunities,” after her final year at McCarter.

“As a producer, she championed several generations of artists whose work has gone on to shape our industry,” said Immerwahr, former McCarter associate artistic director who now serves as artistic director of Theater J in Washington, D.C., the nation’s largest Jewish theater.  more

LEADER OF THE PACK: Aaron Burt is co-director of a camp for local children in the summers — a change of pace from his main job teaching math to third, fourth, and fifth graders, and coaching cross country, girls’ basketball, and girls’ lacrosse at Princeton Charter School.  (Photo courtesy of Aaron Burt)

By Donald Gilpin

Among the driving forces in the life of Princeton Charter School (PCS) math teacher and coach Aaron Burt are his passions for math, coaching, working with elementary and middle school kids, and his hometown of Princeton. 

“I’ve always enjoyed the energy that kids have,” he said. “I enjoy working with that energy. I always thought I’d like to be a teacher. Especially at the elementary level, the kids’ love of learning, their eagerness to be at school, to be with friends, to be with teachers, is great. It’s so much work, but the energy and excitement make every day exciting and fun. I wake up every morning and I’m excited for another day.” more

By Stuart Mitchner

Had the trump of judgment blown, they could not have quivered more; yet still they felt no terror, rather pleasure.

—Herman Melville, from Moby-Dick.

The T-word again! I’ve been trying to think which great writer’s works are most evocative of the twilight zone we entered when Trump shut down the government rather than give up his fantasy of a border wall.

2019 being the 200th anniversary of Melville’s birth, I’ve just finished reading The Confidence Man (1857) and “Bartleby the Scrivener” (1853), both of which contain eerie intimations of the twilight zone. Not so nuanced are the closing walls pressing the victim of the Spanish Inquisition to the brink of the abyss in Poe’s “The Pit and the Pendulum,” with its last-second Hollywood ending as the French army enters Toledo. Given the ever-deepening menace of a foreign adversary, with twilight shadows verging on the depths of night, the present-day reality needs a writer who can suggest the subtle nightmare presence of powerful autocratic forces, like those, say, in Franz Kafka’s The Castle and The Trial, though what’s happening here begins to call for a variation on “The Metamorphosis” in which an entire country wakes up one morning to find itself transformed into a giant insect giving off an odor of kvass and speaking in a voice with a distinctly Russian accent.  more

By Nancy Plum

In the second installment of his year-long residency through Princeton University Concerts, Los Angeles Philharmonic Music Director Gustavo Dudamel returned to Princeton last week for several days of music-making, panel discussions, and educational activities focusing on the theme “Music and Faith.” Bracketed by a master class with the El Sistema-inspired Trenton Music Makers Orchestra and panel discussions on music education and music’s role in social change, the keynote concert last Monday night in Richardson Auditorium featured musicians from the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Violinists Bing Wang and Rebecca Reale, violist Teng Li, cellist Ben Hong, and clarinetist Boris Allakhverdyan, joined by Princeton University pianist and faculty member Juri Seo, presented a concert featuring music of 20th-century Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, a world premiere of a piece by Seo, and a solid gold standard from the master of chamber music — Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.   more

“BLUE BIRTH”: Close-up nature photography by Tasha O’Neill is featured in “From a Child’s Perspective.” The exhibit is at D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery at One Preservation Place in Princeton through February 7. Admission is free.

D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Olivia Rainbow Gallery presents “From a Child’s Perspective,” close-up nature photography by Tasha O’Neill, through February 7. The artist focused macro-lenses on rare minuscule plants and other species, giving D&R Greenway visitors the experience of the late Olivia Kuenne’s own enthusiasms outdoors. Whimsical titles add to the sense of having entered an enchanted forest. The Gallery was founded in this young artist’s memory.

O’Neill discovered some of her subjects on guided walks with Jim Amon (former director of stewardship) on Greenway preserves. Some species were introduced on daylong photo-safaris in New Jersey’s Pine Barrens, with Princeton Photography Club fellow members. Others presented themselves to the artist near her summer home, close to Maine’s Acadia National Park.  more

“OCELOT #6”: This hand-knitted textile is featured in “Ruth Marshall: Knitting the Endangered,” at the Hunterdon Art Museum through April 28. A textile-knit artist, Marshall hopes that her replications of endangered animals will remind people of the threat that animals face and the importance of wildlife conservation.

Ruth Marshall’s creations weren’t inspired by visits to art galleries or a university class, but by working at the Bronx Zoo.

Marshall is an Australian-American contemporary textile-knit artist, whose vivid hand-knit replications of endangered animals remind viewers of the threat the animals face and the importance of wildlife conservation. Her work is now spotlighted in a solo exhibition at the Hunterdon Art Museum (HAM).  “Ruth Marshall:  Knitting the Endangered” runs until April 28.

Marshall worked at the Bronx Zoo as an exhibition sculptor for 14 years and became very concerned about the plight of endangered animals. While on the job, she had a daily reminder of one such threatened creature. more

Xiaofu Zhou

On Sunday, February 3 at 1:30 p.m., violinist Xiaofu Zhou and pianist Yuan Ping will perform at Miller Chapel on the campus of Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer Street. The program will include works by Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart, Debussy, and DeFalla.

Zhou is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with Jascha Brodsky and Arnold Steinhardt. He did graduate studies with Dorothy DeLay at The Juilliard School. Zhou has been active both nationally and internationally, performing at Avery Fisher Hall, Carnegie Hall, the Kimmel Center, and the Academy of Music in Philadelphia. Ping has won prizes in numerous international piano competitions, and he often performs with leading orchestras and conductors in China and abroad.  He has also played accompaniment for different soloists.

Tickets are $30 ($15 for students). Visit http://nj23.eventbrite.com or xfPrinceton@gmail.com.

A NEW HOME: Animal shelter volunteer Lucas (Jonah Hauer-King) and receptionist Olivia (Alexandra Shipp) celebrate his adoption of puppy Bella. But Bella is later separated from Lucas and his mom, and embarks on an eventful 400-mile journey home. (Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures)

By Kam Williams

Life has proven to be quite a challenge for Bella (voiced by Bryce Dallas Howard) right from the start. Soon after birth, the puppy was separated from her mother, though she was lucky enough to be nursed back to health by a stray cat. 

The lovable mutt eventually lands at an animal shelter, where receptionist Olivia (Alexandra Shipp) introduces her to a volunteer, Lucas (Jonah Hauer-King). Lucas decides to adopt Bella, hoping she might help lift the spirits of his mom Terri (Ashley Judd), a military veteran suffering from PTSD. more

PHILLY SPECIAL: Princeton University men’s basketball player Jerome Desrosiers puts on the defensive pressure in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, sophomore forward Desrosiers contributed nine rebounds to help Princeton to defeat Penn 62-53 in Philadelphia. The win gave the Tigers, now 9-5 overall and 2-0 Ivy League, a sweep of the season series with the Quakers. Princeton is currently on exam break and returns to action when it hosts Division III foe Wesley on January 27.(Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Justin Feil

Jerome Desrosiers didn’t have a point, an assist, a block or a steal, but the Princeton University men’s basketball team wouldn’t have beaten Penn last weekend without him.

The sophomore forward contributed nine rebounds to the Tigers’ staggering 55-34 rebounding edge as they swept the season series with a 62-53 win over Penn last Saturday in Philadelphia before a crowd of 6,179 at The Palestra.

“It feels great,” said Desrosiers. “They’re our rivals, so getting those two wins to start the year feels good. The guys are happy. We have the momentum going. We just want to keep it going.” more

RICHE AND FAMOUS: Princeton University men’s hockey player Alex Riche looks for the puck in a game earlier this season. Last Friday, senior forward Riche scored a goal to help Princeton defeat Harvard 4-2 for its first win over the Crimson since 2013. The Tigers, who fell 5-0 to Dartmouth a night later to move to 6-11-2 overall and 4-7-1 ECAC Hockey, are currently on exam hiatus and return to action when they play at St. Lawrence on February 1. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

As the Princeton University men’s hockey team prepared to host Harvard last Friday, Ron Fogarty decided to shake things up.

“We switched up lines a little bit,” said Princeton head coach Fogarty, whose team was looking to snap an 11-game winless streak against Harvard.

“It made them not assume. It was just ‘do your job and make sure that the plays were there when making them.’” more

IN SYNC: Princeton High girls’ basketball player Erin Devine puts up a shot in a game earlier this season. Senior star Devine scored 17 points in a losing cause as PHS fell 40-37 to Hillsborough last Saturday. The Little Tigers, who moved to 8-3 with the setback, play at Allentown on January 18 and at Nottingham on January 22. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

As the Princeton High girls’ basketball team hosted Hightstown last week, it didn’t waste any time setting the tone.

Excelling at both ends of the court, PHS jumped out to an 11-0 lead in the January 8 contest.

“I don’t think we played our best on Saturday against New Egypt (a 32-13 win on January 5) so coming in we thought we were just going to put our best foot forward,” said PHS senior forward and team co-captain Erin Devine.

“We wanted to get going in the beginning to get momentum and keep going from there. We definitely wanted to get to the line more this game and we wanted to get layups.” more

TAKING HIS SHOT: Princeton High boys’ track thrower Paul Brennan gets ready to unload the shot put in competition last spring. Senior star Brennan has been enjoying a big winter season, recently hitting a mark of 54’11.5 in the shot, the top throw in the state so far this season. In upcoming action, PHS will be competing in the State Relays on January 19 and the county meet from January 25-26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

It has been a rough ride for the Princeton High track program so far this winter.

The boys’ team has been hit with the injury bug, with such star performers as Nils Wildberg, Acasio Pinheiro, and Matt Perello currently sidelined.

While that has made the squad less formidable in the short term, it could have long range benefits.

“It has given a chance for our younger guys to step into the void and get some really good experience, which actually has been a silver lining,” said PHS head coach Ben Samara. more

CHIPPING AWAY: Princeton Day School boys’ hockey player Chip Hamlett controls the puck in recent action. Senior star defenseman and assistant captain Hamlett has been a stalwart as the Panthers have started 9-7-1. PDS, which topped Bishop Eustace 10-1 last Monday, hosts LaSalle College High (Pa.) on January 16 before playing at Holy Ghost Prep (Pa.) on January 17. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Over the last month, the Princeton Day School boys’ hockey team has been tested by a gauntlet of quality foes.

In mid-December, PDS headed up to New England for the Barber Invitational at St Mark’s School (Mass.), where the Panthers lost to Vermont Academy (Vt.) 2-1, defeated Worcester Academy (Mass.) 7-1, and tied Kents Hill (Me.) 1-1.

The team started 2019 by playing at Don Bosco (a 4-1 loss on January 2) and then hosted Albany Academy (a 6-1 loss on January 4) and Vermont Academy (a 2-1 win on January 5) in its annual Harry Rulon-Miller Invitational.

As PDS came into its Mid-Atlantic Hockey League (MAHL) matchup against visiting Hill School (Pa.) last Wednesday, senior defenseman and assistant captain Chip Hamlett believed the squad was battle-tested. more

UP IN ARMS: Hun School girls’ basketball player Jada Jones puts up a shot in a game earlier this season. Last Saturday, senior guard and team captain Jones scored 18 points in a losing cause as Hun fell 51-42 to visiting Mercersburg Academy (Pa.). Jones moved to 989 points in her high school career with her output against the Blue Storm. The Raiders, who dropped to 3-7 with the setback, play at Hightstown on January 16, host Freire Charter School (Pa.) on January 17, play at Hopewell Valley on January 19 and host Nottingham on January 21. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Jada Jones knows that she has to be the offensive catalyst for the Hun School girls’ basketball team.

“If my shot is not falling, it is hard,” said Hun senior guard and two-time team captain Jones. “I try to make sure that everyone is involved. You feel better when you are scoring.”

Last Saturday again visiting Mercersburg Academy (Pa.), Hun fell behind 10-6 and Jones started hitting shots, tallying eight points in the second quarter as the Raiders found themselves down 23-18 at the half. Jones chipped in seven points in the third and hit a bucket early in the fourth to draw Hun to within 36-34. But the Blue Storm responded with an 11-1 run to pull away to 51-42 win.

“It has been a long week for us, we have been having games back to back,” said the 5’8 Jones, who ended up with 18 points in the game as the Raiders dropped to 3-7. more

By Bill Alden

It hasn’t been easy for Liam Gunnarsson to get on the court this winter in his first season with the Hun School boys’ basketball team.

The junior transfer guard, who previously played for Glen Ridge High, was sidelined for the first 10 games of the season due to back and rib problems.

As Gunnarsson prepared for his return to action, practicing with his new teammates helped get him up to speed.

“With how deep we are and how talented we are, I see a lot of improvement in myself,” said the 6’1 Gunnarsson. “I work every day in practice to be able to perform with the best of the best.” more

January 11, 2019

The Princeton Police have issued a statement prior to an expected march by a white supremacist group this Saturday at noon in Palmer Square. Princeton Police remind the public that groups taking part in planned protests need to obtain a permit. Princeton Police also plan to close several streets in and around the Palmer Square area on Saturday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Motorists are asked to avoid the area.

Princeton Police Chief Nick Sutter is urging groups to obtain a permit. The purpose of the permit is to give Princeton Police the opportunity to assist people in safely organizing peaceful protests. Protestors may carry signs that are not attached to poles or sticks. No weapons of any kind, glass, or plastic water bottles will be allowed in designated protest areas on Palmer Square.

Palmer Square and Hulfish Street will be closed to all motor vehicle traffic beginning at 5 a.m. on Saturday. Nassau Street will be shut down between University Place and Witherspoon Street at 10 a.m.

January 9, 2019

Alexander Perry Morgan Jr.

Alexander Perry Morgan Jr. (Perry), architect and longtime member of the Princeton community, died peacefully on January 4th in his home after a Christmas full of family. He was 94 years old.

Perry will be remembered as a man of great integrity, with a deep, warm sense of humor who loved his work as an architect and was always helping others. He loved reading to his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, as well as sailing, playing tennis and golf, painting, and appreciating classical music. He was a loving father and devoted husband. He adored the natural world and cherished summers spent with his family on North Haven, Maine.

He was born May 8th, 1924, in Paris, France to Janet Croll Morgan and Alexander Perry Morgan. One of his earliest memories included seeing Charles Lindbergh parade through the streets of Paris after his first transatlantic solo flight. The family moved to New York City in 1927, where Perry attended the Buckley School and grew up with his two younger sisters, Margaret and Caroline.

Perry went off to boarding school, St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, where he began a love of chemistry and rowing that continued at Princeton University. His college education was interrupted by World War II. He served three years in the Army, most of which was spent in Europe, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant in the 283rd Engineering Combat Battalion.  

On returning to Princeton, he joined the Ivy Club and studied architecture like his father, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, Woodrow Wilson Scholar, and as valedictorian for the class of 1946. He was on the first Princeton Lightweight rowing team to win at the Royal Henley Regatta. After graduation he continued his studies at Princeton, earning his master’s degree in architecture in 1952, and was honored with a Fulbright Scholarship to study architecture in Italy.

Perry’s European travels brought him both education and love. While skiing in Austria, he met two American women who, on their return to New York, introduced him to their roommate, Elisabeth Harrison (Liz). During a hurricane, on August 13th, 1955, Liz and Perry were married — a formidable, happy union that was to last 63 years.

Perry and Liz settled in Princeton in his family’s longtime home, Constitution Hill, and he continued, for a short time, to work as an architect in New York City. In the ensuing years they had four children: Jamie, Lisa, Peter, and Matthew.

Perry and Phil Holt, architecture school classmates, formed a nationally recognized architecture firm — Holt Morgan Russell — where he worked until his retirement. In the 1980s, he converted Constitution Hill from a Jacobean style estate into an innovative clustered-housing community, the first of its kind in Princeton, inspired by northern European design that prioritized open space and privacy, while preserving the historic structures and grounds.

Throughout his entire career, Perry volunteered his time in the Princeton community and beyond. For many years he served on the Princeton Zoning Board and worked with Dorothea’s House, the local Italian-American organization. He was on the North Haven Golf Club Board of Directors and was on the architect’s advisory board for the design of the new North Haven Public School. He was also a longtime member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, Springdale Golf Club, and the Nassau Club.

Perry is survived by his wife Liz, his sister Margaret, his four children and their spouses, 13 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his sister Caroline.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to one of the many causes for which he cared deeply: The Ocean Conservancy (oceanconservancy.org) or Habitat for Humanity (habitat.org).

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church on Saturday, February 2nd at 1:30 p.m.  

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Herman S. Ermolaev

Herman S. Ermolaev, Professor Emeritus of the Princeton University Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, died peacefully on January 6, 2019 at the age of 94.

Born on November 14, 1924 in Tomsk, Siberia, Herman spent his youth in the Don region of southern Russia. During the turbulent years of World War II, Herman left the USSR. He was part of the forced repatriation of Cossacks form Lienz, Austria in 1945, from which he escaped. Herman then completed Russian secondary school in Salzburg and entered the University of Graz.

In 1949, Herman came to the United States to finish his undergraduate degree at Stanford University. He then pursued doctoral work at the University of California-Berkeley, from which he earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1959.

In 1959, Herman started teaching in the Slavic Department at Princeton, where he spent his entire academic career. As an expert on Soviet literature and the Nobel-prize winning author Mikhail Sholokhov, Professor Ermolaev was widely published in both the United States and in Russia. He was particularly fond of teaching, and was known for his survey course on Soviet literature, which he brought alive through personal reminiscence, history, and literature. As many as 350 students a semester enrolled in this course. He also offered upper-level undergraduate courses on the Russian short story and advanced Russian courses. Professor Ermolaev retired in 2007.

Professor Ermolaev is survived by his loving wife Tatiana (Kusubova); son Michael Stigler (and his wife Mireille) of Lausanne, Switzerland; daughters Natalia (and her husband Theodor Brasoveanu) and Katya Ermolaeva, both of Princeton, NJ; four grandchildren, Natacha, Matthieu, Grégoire, and Nadezhda; and one great-grandchild, Alissa.   

A Russian Orthodox funeral service will be held on Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Vladimir’s Russian Orthodox Church in Jackson, NJ. Burial will follow at St. Vladimir’s Cemetery in Jackson. Flowers may be ordered through Narcissus Florals (732) 281-0333.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Timothy E. Ryan Home for Funerals (732) 505-1900. Condolences may be sent to www.ryanfuneralhome.com.

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Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron

Jane Spencer Hand Bonthron, 96, died in Princeton, New Jersey, on December 15th, 2018. Born in Cape May, NJ, in 1922, she grew up in Cape May and Jenkintown, PA. She graduated from Swarthmore College as an English major in 1943 and joined the Navy that same year. She was a Lieutenant Junior Grade stationed at Naval Supply Depot Mechanicsburg, PA, where she worked in Communications as a coder/decoder on the Enigma machine. There she met her future husband, the well-known Princeton miler Lt. William Robert Bonthron (d. 1983), a Naval Supply Officer recently returned from a lengthy tour in Oran, Algeria. They were married in 1946, lived briefly in Williamsville, NY, and moved to Princeton, where they raised four children: Jennifer Bonthron Waters, of Easton, MD; Susan Jane Bonthron of Guilford, VT; William Deas Bonthron of Hopewell, NJ (d. 2016); and Thomas Spencer Bonthron of Pittsburgh, PA (d. 2009). She was also a beloved stepmother to William Bonthron’s son William James Bonthron of Ottawa, Ontario (d. 2002), and daughter Katherine Katama Bonthron of Munich, Germany (d. 2014), and aunt of Jill Arace of Waitsfield, VT.

Jane enjoyed bridge and golf and was a longtime volunteer with the Princeton Hospital Aid Society and Meals on Wheels. She is survived by her two daughters; four grandchildren, Beatrice Waters Kalinich, Robert Knight Waters, Caitlin Bonthron Roper, and Anna Jane Ruff; three step-granddaughters, Alexandra and Fiona Bonthron and Catriona Gannon; and great-grandchildren, Emily and Helen Kalinich and Wyatt and June Kroyer. Her life will be celebrated at a private gathering in Cape May, NJ, in the late spring.

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Patricia Anne Peacock

August 5, 1944 – December 29, 2018

Dr. Patricia Anne Peacock (Speelman), 74, beloved mother, grandmother, and sister, passed away on December 29, 2018, after a long and bravely fought battle against cancer.

Pat was born in Crestline, Ohio, but spent her youth in Piscataway, New Jersey, where she, her three brothers and sister all participated in building their family home. She graduated from St. Peter’s High School in New Brunswick, New Jersey. An avid lifelong learner, she received advanced degrees from Colorado State University and Rutgers University, ultimately earning her doctorate in adult vocational education. She taught adult education classes at George Mason University and Strayer University. Prior to being diagnosed with cancer, Pat had gone back to school at The College of New Jersey to pursue a teaching certificate in early childhood education.

An ardent believer in working to achieve one’s dreams, Pat directed the George Mason University Enterprise Center on the Manassas, Virginia, campus. She also served as the Director of the Rutgers University Regional Small Business Development Center in Camden, New Jersey. At both of these centers, Pat helped small business owners develop business plans and launch their start-up companies.

A trailblazer for women, Pat was named Melita’s New Jersey Woman of the Year in 1993. In 1999, the YWCA honored her with the TWIN award, a Tribute to Women and INdustry.

Pat is predeceased by her parents, Daniel and Roseanne Speelman, sister Christine Spears, and brother, Jim Speelman. She is survived by her two daughters and sons-in-law, Carolyn and David Kwieraga and Kristin and Ron Menapace; her six grandchildren, Amanda and Noelle Kwieraga and Paige, Henry, Claire, and Julianne Menapace; as well as her brother Steve Speelman and brother and sister-in-law Tom and Sally Speelman.

Throughout her life, family was Pat’s inspiration and joy. She was always ready to play a game, design a craft, read a story, go on an adventure, or just spend time with her children and grandchildren. In 2011, Pat retired to join her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in Princeton to help raise their four children.

Pat cherished her Christian family in the various places she lived. As a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton, New Jersey, she spoke fondly and with affection for her fellow parishioners, especially the children that participated in the Children’s Chapel services she helped lead. She also inspired her daughter, Kristin, and son-in-law, Ron, in supporting the Princeton community, including the opening of their gift and furniture store, Homestead Princeton. In her free time, Pat enjoyed reading, sewing, knitting, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends.

A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church on Saturday, January 12, 2019, at 11 a.m., followed by a reception in the Parish House. Friends of all ages are welcome to share in the celebration of Pat’s life. Afterwards, Pat will be interred in the church’s memorial garden in a private family ceremony. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Trinity Episcopal Church children’s program.

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Fredric J. Spar

Fredric J. Spar, 70, died at home in Princeton, NJ, on December 22, 2018.

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Fred was a student-athlete who ran track at Midwood High School and Cornell University. His career had many chapters: He worked as an elementary-school science teacher before completing a Ph.D. (1980) at Brown University, where he studied Chinese history and spent a year in Taipei, Taiwan at the Stanford Center. He lectured at Keene State College before working 36 years as a communications consultant at Kekst & Company in Manhattan. He was a member of the 2010 class at Harvard University’s Advanced Leadership Initiative and applied his experience thereafter advising or serving on the boards of environmental and education organizations: The Watershed Institute, Friends of Princeton Open Space, New York City Audubon Society, Generation Schools, and City Year New York. He was also chair of Friends of the Rogers Refuge, for which he worked tirelessly on improvements to wildlife habitat and accessibility for human visitors.

Fred moved to Princeton when he married Winifred Hughes, a fellow graduate student at Brown University. Together they spent many hours birding and hiking, rooting for the Boston Red Sox, and engaged in a lifelong intellectual discussion. Fred was dedicated to his garden and continued to read and speak Mandarin throughout his life. He shared his passion for sports and the outdoors with his children through skiing, fishing, tennis, and coaching soccer and Little League baseball. Fred will be remembered as a loving husband and father, a great intellect in both scholarship and business, an environmentalist, a man of understated wit, and a soul of exceptional kindness and generosity of spirit.

He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Winifred Hughes Spar; his sons Adam and Alex; his sister Laurie, and her husband John Pierce. He also leaves his aunt, Edith Gilitos; cousins; sisters- and brothers-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Burial was in Princeton Cemetery on December 24, 2018. A memorial service will be Sunday, January 27, 1 p.m., at the The Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ. Donations in his memory would be welcomed at the organizations he served.

Arrangements by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing Township.

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Elias Menachem Stein

Elias Menachem Stein, a towering figure in mathematics for over half a century, died on December 23. He was 87.

The cause of death was complications related to mantle cell lymphoma, according to his family.

Renowned for deep and highly original contributions to his field of mathematics as well as the mentor of generations of younger mathematicians, including two winners of the Fields Medal, the profession’s highest distinction. Mr. Stein was a professor at Princeton University for 55 years, teaching, by popular demand, until the age of 86.

Born on January 13, 1931 in Antwerp to Elkan Stein, a diamond merchant, and Chana Goldman, both Polish citizens, he and his family fled Belgium in 1940, following the German invasion. With diamonds hidden in the soles of his shoes as part of his father’s effort to protect the family’s assets, he entered the United States in April 1941 aboard the SS Nyassa from Lisbon, spending his first three weeks in the country living on Ellis Island. There he first witnessed boys playing “a strange game with sticks,” as he would later tell his children, something he would come to understand to be baseball, a sport he would admire for the rest of his life. It was the beginning of his fierce, if not uncritical, devotion to his adopted homeland, its strange new customs and, above all, the glorious intricacies of its democratic processes, which he monitored with what would become his signature intensity.

After his family settled on New York’s Upper West Side, he enrolled in Stuyvesant High School, where he was captain of the math team, graduating in 1949.

Stein attended college at the University of Chicago and stayed on to earn his PhD in 1955. Following teaching stints there and at MIT, where, among others, he befriended future Nobel Prize winner John Nash, turning, in a rare moment of professional overlap, to his father’s Diamond District connections to help Mr. Nash buy a ring for his future wife, according to Sylvia Nasar’s book, A Beautiful Mind. 

Later, Mr. Stein spent an academic year at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. While there, he was offered a tenured position at Princeton University, joining the faculty in 1963. For decades, he held an endowed chair as the Albert Baldwin Dod Professor; at the time of his death he was Professor Emeritus. He served twice as chair of the mathematics department.

Stein’s research was primarily in harmonic analysis — roughly speaking, the study of vibrations — a basic tool in science and technology. Mr. Stein discovered new phenomena and unsuspected connections between seemingly unrelated problems. His work led to a deeper understanding of topics as varied as sound recording, the stock market, and gravitational waves. As Charles Fefferman, one of Stein’s star doctoral students and later a colleague at Princeton, has noted of his former thesis advisor, “[his] work often combines two remarkable qualities: an understanding of several branches of math, each of which normally is known only by specialists, and an astonishing ability to find connections between them. Before Stein tells you his solution, the problems involved look utterly hopeless…. Then, with exactly the right point of view and exactly the right few words, … [his] incredible insights … link everything together.”

Stein is the author of several books, now considered classics in their field. In his 70s he devoted his time to creating a series of advanced undergraduate mathematics courses at Princeton and writing, in collaboration with former student Rami Shakarchi, a four-volume textbook to accompany the course. One reviewer of the first volume referred to Stein as “certainly one of the great avatars and developers of Fourier Analysis in modern times.”

He was a prolific author and generous collaborator. His many honors include the Schock Prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1993, the Wolf Prize in 1999, and the National Medal of Science awarded by President George W. Bush at a White House ceremony in 2002. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he received honorary degrees from Peking University in 1988 (after his effort to help rebuild the local mathematical community following the devastation of the Cultural Revolution), and from his alma mater, the University of Chicago, in 1992.

Stein is survived by Elly, his wife of 59 years; a brother, Daniel; a son, Jeremy, the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics at Harvard University and a member of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve from 2012-2014; a daughter, Karen, an architecture critic and former member of the jury of the Pritzker Architecture Prize; a daughter-in-law, Anne; and three grandchildren, Carolyn, Alison, and Jason.

As a collaborator and teacher, he was known for the clarity, elegance, and enthusiasm he brought to his research, writing, and teaching. 

Stein dated his interest in science to a memory from when he was three years old, as he watched the spinning wheel of his father’s diamond polishing machine, believing he had discovered proof of perpetual motion. He soon came to understand that his so-called theory was a youthful illusion, but one that nonetheless propelled his lifelong view of mathematics as a brilliant balance of imagination and rational investigation. His interest in solving problems never waned. When he received a lifetime achievement award from the American Mathematical Society, with characteristic modesty his response focused not on himself but on the field he so loved, saying: “We can be confident that we are far from the end of this enterprise and that many exciting and wonderful theorems still await our discovery.”

———

Lorraine Erskine Garland

Lorraine Erskine Garland, 89, of Jamestown, RI, and Bradenton, FL, died peacefully with her family present on December 28, 2018 in Medway, MA.

She was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on December 9, 1929, the daughter of Madeleine Ellis and Frank Erskine. Lorraine spent her childhood in Massachusetts, Maine, and Virginia with her mother, Madeleine, and her stepfather, Alan D. Kinsley. She was an only child. Lorraine raised her children in Princeton, NJ. Later in life, she spent winters in Sarasota, FL, and summers in Jamestown, RI.

Lorraine was a graduate of Dana Hall School in Wellesley, MA.  She met her husband, Philip (“Pete”) Lincoln Garland, Jr., while studying Landscape Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, RI. She believed in civic engagement, participated in local government, and provided leadership to local associations including the Parent Teacher Association of her daughters’ school and the annual ‘fete,’ a fundraiser for the Princeton hospital. Lorraine was also a productive real estate agent in New Jersey’s Morris and Mercer counties, working for many years at Stockton Real Estate in Princeton, NJ. 

Lorraine lived her life surrounded by many beloved four-legged companions. She was a founding member of the Irish Wolfhound Association of the Delaware Valley. She was an equestrian and able coachwoman in her younger years, and an early supporter and frequent guest at polo matches in Newport, RI, and Sarasota, FL. Her final companion was Ares, a “rescue” poodle, who never left her side.

Lorraine was a loyal and devoted mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She is survived by her former husband Philip Lincoln Garland, Jr., of Englewood, FL, and Chatham, MA, and her children, Thomas Alan Garland, Katherine Garland Presswood, and Elizabeth Garland Deardorff. She also leaves behind three beloved grandchildren, Taylor, Whitney, and Sam. Finally, she will be missed by five great-grandchildren, Winston, Madeleine, Aiden, Fiona, and Ethan.

In lieu of flowers, donations will be welcome to the memory of Lorraine Garland to the Irish Wolfhound Foundation, David Milne, Treasurer, 150 Creek Rd., Phillipsburg, NJ 08865; Florida Poodle Rescue, P.O. Box 7336, St. Petersburg, FL 33734; Salmon Hospice, 37 Birch St., Milford, MA 01757; or Milford Regional Healthcare Foundation, 14 Prospect St., Milford, MA 01757.

———

Frances Brown Yokana

Frances Brown Yokana, 92, of Princeton and Greensboro, Vermont, passed away on Saturday, December 29, 2018.  

Frances was born in Princeton, NJ, and was a lifetime resident of Princeton. She graduated from Randolph-Macon College in 1948 and married Andre Yokana in 1954. In Princeton, she served as the president of the Present Day Club and was a member of Bedens Brook Country Club, the Nassau Club, and the Contemporary Garden Club of Princeton, and volunteered for numerous charitable organizations. She spent summers with her family in Greensboro, Vermont, where she was an active member of the community, and President of the Greensboro Association. She was an avid gardener and her gardens in Vermont were legendary. Her life was filled with family, friends, and flowers.

Predeceased by her parents Frederic Hamilton Brown and Frances Churchill (Woolaver) Brown; she is survived by her husband of 64 years, Andre Yokana; her son, Davis Yokana; her daughter and son-in-law, Lisa Yokana and Blake Auchincloss; and her granddaughters, Alice and Anne Longobardo.

A memorial service will be held on January 12, 2019 at 11 a.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 08542.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Nassau Presbyterian Church.

Arrangements are under the direction of Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.