September 23, 2016

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These gorgeous books are full of style and substance.

 

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September 22, 2016

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REVOLUTION AT PRINCETON: Artillery demonstrations will start the day’s celebrations this Saturday at Princeton Battlefield, as the Battlefield Society hosts a series of educational and entertaining events in approaching the 240th anniversary of the Battle of Princeton, a pivotal clash in the American Revolution. (Photo by John Lien)

On January 3, 1777 General George Washington’s revolutionary forces fought and defeated British troops in the Battle of Princeton, a pivotal event in the American Revolution. more

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GROUND AND POUND: Princeton University football player Joe Rhattigan carries the ball last Saturday in the season opener against visiting Lafayette. Senior running back and tri-captain Rhattigan rushed for a career-high 136 yards on 22 carries and three touchdowns to help Princeton defeat the Leopards 35-31. Princeton plays at Lehigh (1-2) on September 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Princeton University football head coach Bob Surace will tell you that senior running back and tri-captain Joe Rhattigan is the strong and silent type. more

September 21, 2016

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(Photo Credit: @urbanoutfittersmens)

The retro bomber jacket has been revamped for Fall 2016 with luxurious fabrics and rich autumn tones. 

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FRESH APPROACH: Princeton University men’s soccer player Ben Martin controls the ball in recent action. Last Friday, freshman midfielder Martin tallied a goal and an assist as Princeton edged Boston University 2-1 to post its second straight win. Martin was later named the Ivy League Player of the Week and the Ivy League co-Rookie of the Week for his performance. The Tigers, who improved to 2-2 with the win, host Fairleigh Dickinson University on September 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

After losing its first two games, getting outscored 4-1 in the process, the Princeton University men’s soccer team found itself locked in a 0-0 stalemate in the second half against No. 22 Rider last week and needing a lift to avoid a 0-3 start. more

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WEBB MASTER: Princeton High football player Isaac Webb looks to break loose from a foe earlier this season. Last Friday evening at Hightstown, sophomore receiver Webb enjoyed a breakout game, making six catches for 177 yards and four touchdowns as the Little Tigers rolled to a 33-0 win over the Rams. PHS, now 1-1, plays at WW/P-N (1-1) on September 23. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

With the Princeton High football team locked in a scoreless tie in the second quarter at Hightstown last Friday evening, Isaac Webb caught the ball in the flat and decided it was time for him to make a breakthrough. more

For the Princeton High girls’ tennis program, overcoming perennial power and nemesis WW/P-S has proven to be a tall order through the years.

PHS has been in the running for many a county and district title, only to be denied by the Pirates.

This fall, however, the Little Tigers posted a pair of wins over WW/P-S in the first two weeks of the season, defeating the Pirates 4-1 on September 9 and then prevailing 3-2 in a rematch last Wednesday. more

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FINISHING TOUCH: Gretchen Lindenfeldar goes after the ball in action last season. Junior forward Lindenfeldar has emerged as a key scoring threat for the Panthers this season, tallying a goal in a 2-0 win over South Hunterdon on September 12 and then adding three more goals in a 7-0 rout of Academy of New Church (Pa.) last Wednesday. The Panthers, who improved to 5-0 with a 5-0 win over the George School (Pa.) last Friday, are slated to host Peddie School on September 22 and Blair Academy on September 24 before playing at Northern Burlington on September 27. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

After not scoring a goal in her first two seasons on the Princeton Day School field hockey team, Gretchen Lindenfeldar has mastered the art of finishing this fall. more

While Ed Tseng is pleased to see his Princeton Day School girls’ tennis team produce a 3-1 start, he is more impressed by the approach his players have been taking this season.

“I think the No. 1 thing is that it really is a nice group of girls, everybody gets along and everyone is supportive of everyone else,” said PDS head coach Tseng.

“We are having fun. Also, we set the tone every season and we say look we are going to give our best effort every single day in practice and matches.” more

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SHINING COYNE: Princeton Day School girls’ soccer player Madison Coyne advances the ball up the field in recent action. Junior defender Coyne’s brilliance on the back line has helped PDS produce a 4-0 start this season. The Panthers will look to keep on the winning track as they play at Peddie on September 22 before hosting Blair Academy on September 24 and South Hunterdon on September 26. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

In recent years, the rivalry between the Princeton Day School girls’ soccer team and Hun has been heated, producing a slew of tightly contested one-goal games. more

Joanna Hallac was pleased by the way her Hun School girls’ soccer team performed in the first half as it hosted Princeton Day School last week.

The local rivals were locked in a scoreless tie at halftime in the September 13 contest, with Hun generating some superb chances by Nicole Apuzzi and Bryonna Worthy.

“I thought in the first half we were more dangerous,” said Hun head coach Hallac. “We had better looks at the goal.” more

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NO JOSHING: Hun School football star Joshua Henderson runs to daylight in season-opening action against visiting Royal Imperial Collegiate of Canada earlier this month. Sophomore running back Henderson rushed for two touchdowns to help Hun prevail 38-13 in the September 10 contest The Raiders are next in action when they play at Capital Preparatory Magnet School (Conn.) on September 24. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

While it may appear that things came easily for the Hun School football team as it rolled to a 38-13 win over Royal Imperial Collegiate of Canada in its season opener, the Raiders faced a number of challenges in the encounter. more

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CHEERS! “Bourbon is very, very popular today. Really hot! The brown spirits, including Scotch, are generally favored now, but especially bourbon.” Toni Carver, store manager of Joe Canal’s Discount Liquor Outlet in the Mercer Mall, is shown by a display of a variety of bourbon choices.

Whether the event is a cocktail party for 25, dinner for six, or a wedding reception for hundreds, Joe Canal’s Discount Liquor Outlet will provide the necessary advice, professional expertise, and quality products to make it an evening to remember. more

movie-rev-9-21-16Earlier this year, the film Citizenfour won the Academy Award in the Best Documentary category. But because the movie made less than $4 million worldwide, one might reasonably conclude that the details of Edward Snowden’s (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) release of National Security Agency documents is relatively unknown.

This is perhaps the reasoning of Oscar-winner Oliver Stone (Platoon and Born on the Fourth of July), who turns the story into a cloak-and-dagger drama about the NSA whistleblower’s leak of classified information who then went into hiding from the U.S. government. The movie unfolds in June of 2013 in a Hong Kong hotel room where Snowden met with journalists Glenn Greenwald (Zachary Quinto), Ewen Macaskill (Tom Wilkinson), and Laura Poitras (Melissa Leo), the director of Citizenfour.

After four days of interviews, Greenwald published his first story in the British daily newspaper, The Guardian. The Pulitzer Prize-winning series related in stunning detail the extent of the NSA’s surveillance of American citizens, in direct contradiction to a recent denial — given under oath — to Congress by James Clapper the nation’s Director of National Intelligence.

Because the articles identified Snowden as the source of the information, he immediately became the subject of an international manhunt. He somehow managed to evade the dragnet and boarded a commercial airliner bound for Moscow, even though his passport had been revoked and the U.S. had requested his extradition from Hong Kong.

Upon landing in Russia, Snowden was awarded temporary asylum and has remained there ever since. However, this movie has revived interest in his case, and he has recently make a public appeal for clemency.

A presidential pardon is unlikely to be forthcoming, even though President Obama considered the apprehension of the “29 year old-hacker” a very low priority in June 2013. So today, Snowden remains a fugitive from justice charged in absentia with theft, espionage, and conversion of government property.

Through a series of flashbacks, we are informed by the film that Snowden was a high school dropout who suffers from epilepsy. He also has a lasting relationship with Lindsay Mills (Shailene Woodley), his girlfriend who followed him from Virginia, to Hawaii, and then to Moscow. The movie portrays Snowden as a patriot who was willing to jeopardize his future in order to blow the whistle on the NSA’s violations of our constitutional rights.

Excellent (***½ stars). Rated R for profanity, sexuality, and nudity. In English and Russian with subtitles. Running time: 138 minutes.

Distributor: Open Road Films.

To the Editor:

We strongly support the candidacy of Liz Lempert as mayor of Princeton. We have a general interest in the fiscal health of the town and the quality of its services. Our specific interests are parks and open spaces, and special education; particularly autism education and treatments. Pamela has served on the Town’s Environmental Commission and on its Shade Tree Commission. In addition, she has served as president of the Marquand Park Foundation. Roland has served as investment director of the State for over 20 years and finally as State Treasurer, retiring in 2001. From time to time, we have brought our concerns to Liz, in her capacity as mayor, and she has always been open and attentive, and has always made positive recommendations. She has been directly involved with the care of Marquand Park, and she attended special occasions at The Princeton Child Development Institute, a school for autistic children that our family founded in 1970. She provides intelligence and commitment at the highest level to the citizens of Princeton.

Roland and Pamela Machold

Prospect Avenue

To the Editor:

Princeton’s Democrats might reasonably ask why they should consider voting for an aging, white, often grumpy, Protestant male — i.e. a stereotypical Republican.

Perhaps the beginning of an answer can be found in what I think it means to be Republican.

I am the son of a historian who met his future wife at Princeton Theological Seminary. Both cared deeply about people, language, and religion, both became teachers, and both were lifelong Democrats.

I cast my first presidential vote for George McGovern, a man whose faith in human decency caused him to trust that public sector employees would tend to act in the public interest — with the result that government would tend to be a force for good.

Forty years in banking, finance, and real estate have broadened my perspective, making me much less trusting. I have watched in stunned disbelief as fortunes are
accumulated by people whom my principled banking employers would not have permitted to come through the door; as large organizations thrive despite wasting appallingly large sums of money; and as adventurers earn obscene profits by acquiring and gutting old line businesses — cheapening product lines, discharging legions of employees, and shipping production facilities offshore.

And I have watched with increasing dismay as government divides our nation, impairs our economy, obfuscates causes and effects, flouts our laws, and enriches the officials who claw their way to national prominence. In a pattern that is as old as time, federal, state, and municipal officials extract more and more tribute from the populations they govern. Grand sounding laws are enacted. Regulations are imposed. With each new law and regulation we become a little less free. Problems fester; hiring becomes increasingly impractical and/or unaffordable; favored entities are enriched; out of favor entities are savaged; curtailed access to private sector credit throttles our economy; and our elected officials respond by promising more of the same.

I agree that big business is often predatory, but so is big government. The premise of big government is that people are pirates at heart and that, if left to themselves, the strong and the wily will prey upon the weak and the gullible. That may be so. But why would anyone believe that the solution is to submit to government by the pirates? In the private sector I at least have the freedom to choose which products, if any, I wish to buy. Government decrees, by contrast, are compulsory. They usually benefit few but their sponsors. And, more often than not, despite grand sounding titles, they compound existing problems.

I would greatly prefer to lead my own life, make my own choices, bear the costs of my many mistakes, impose as little as possible on my neighbors, and grant my fellow citizens the freedom to do the same. That, to me, is the essence of what it means to be a Republican.

Peter Marks

Moore Street

To the Editor:

This summer we celebrated The Fresh Air Fund’s 140th summer of serving children from New York City’s low-income communities. I would like to take this opportunity to extend my gratitude to our extraordinary Fresh Air volunteers, hosts, and supporters in Central and Southern New Jersey for their dedication and commitment.

Fresh Air host families open their hearts and homes, and share the everyday joys of summertime with their Fresh Air friends. I am inspired by the commitment of our local volunteer leaders, many of whom are also hosts. They
volunteer to interview prospective host families, help recruit new families, and plan special activities. I would also like to thank the individuals and local businesses who so generously give their time and resources to make The Fresh Air Fund’s Friendly Towns Program throughout Central and Southern New Jersey a great success each year.

Since 1877, The Fresh Air Fund has provided free summer experiences to more than 1.8 million New York City children from low-income communities. Each year, nearly 7,000 children enjoy outdoor summer adventures through visits with volunteer host families along the East Coast and Southern Canada and at The Fund’s five overnight camps in Fishkill, N.Y. Fresh Air children also participate in year-round leadership and educational programs.

Contact Colin Reinstedt at (212) 897-8970 or visit www.freshair.org to learn more about hosting a child through The Fresh Air Fund.

Fatima Shama

Executive Director, The Fresh Air Fund

To the Editor:

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes is to be commended for advocating the stockpiling of food and other necessities against the day when these might become unavailable. [“Hughes Urges Residents To Prepare for Emergencies,” Town Topics, Aug. 31, page 6]. I hope all who can will respond to his message and set up emergency supplies of their own.

The goal of stockpiling a three-day supply can be attained by nearly everyone. But it is only a token amount of preparation. There are many threats that would cause greater shortages for longer durations.

The British people have been told that they are only nine meals away from chaos. The German government has recently advised its citizens to have a ten-day supply of food and water(!) on hand for emergencies. Our Mormons require each family to stockpile a year’s food, in preparation for the next year that the crops fail. When they formulated this rule, no Federal or State government was able to provide emergency supplies. On a large scale, there still isn’t any government that can (remember Katrina?).

Now a local government official has implicitly admitted as much, and by doing so now has also implied that the likelihood of an emergency has increased, and the time for action has arrived. We need to fully understand that we are individually responsible for our own survival in a large-scale emergency and that we should be personally prepared for it.

Ronald Nielsen

Humbert Street

obit-bardzilowski-9-21-16Owen Gerrard Bardzilowski

It is with broken hearts that we announce the sudden passing of Owen G. Bardzilowski, at home on Thursday, September 15, 2016 at age 14.

A lifelong resident of Princeton, he began his freshman year at Princeton High School. Over the years, he loved to play golf with his Dad and Grandpa, was an expert in solving various kinds of Rubik’s cubes, an enthusiastic skateboarder, and active in various youth sports programs.

Owen is survived by his parents Joe and Marie Evelyn Bardzilowski; his siblings Miles, Ella, and Maria; maternal grandmother Marie Thomas of Plainsboro; paternal grandparents Joseph and Julia Bardzilowski of Clark; and Carole Vill’Neuve of Las Vegas; aunt Lisa (Ron) Rapolas; uncles Charles “Eddie” (Carolyn) Thomas, Michael Thomas (Northern Ireland), Mike and Jon Bardzilowski; great uncle Leon Bardzilowski; Dawn and Arturo Pacheco; and special cousin Evelyn Torres (Pensacola, Fla.); and loved in life by a host of cousins, extended family, and friends.

Owen faithfully attended Princeton Police Department Youth Academy over the past few years and this past summer was a counselor in the program.

Visiting hours were held on Monday, September 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. at Kimble Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08542. Funeral services will be private.

Since it was Owen’s dream to be a Princeton police officer, in lieu of flowers, his family requests donations be sent to Princeton PD Youth Academy Fund, c/o PBA Local 130, 1 Valley Road Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

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obit-ruiz-9-21-16David F. Ruiz

David F. Ruiz passed away suddenly, unexpectedly but peacefully, on August 15, 2016 from cardiac arrhythmia while at his beloved work place, The International Student House (ISH) of Washington D.C. He was 49 years old.

Born in New York City, David grew up in Princeton, attending Princeton Regional Schools from Kindergarten until his High School graduation in 1984. David was an honors student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst majoring in history. David later went on to receive a Master Degree in international affairs from George Washington University in Washington D.C. During his time as a graduate student David lived at the International Student House. After a short stint working as a researcher, David returned to the International Student House in 1996 taking a position as their business manager. However, in time, David’s role grew far beyond that.

The inception for ISH of Washington, D.C. began in 1934 when a small group of Quakers explored how they might make a contribution to peace and a better understanding among people of diverse national backgrounds. They believed that contributions to real peace could result from contacts between ordinary people, particularly young adults. This was a mission that was dear to David and, in his role at ISH, David became a powerful global ambassador and friend to people from every corner of the world. His kindness, and gentle soul touched the lives of countless individuals. Through the friendships he made David also had the opportunity to travel around the world extensively including through Europe, Asia, and the Americas; over the years every page of his passports became full of stamps from different lands.

David was known for his gentle and humble demeanor as well as his quiet but dry and sarcastic wit. He was also well known for his epic walking abilities and would regularly walk many miles at a stretch. He even ran the New York City Marathon in 2003. In his spare time David was an avid movie-goer attending nearly every opening night showing. He was also a staunch supporter of the arts, attending nearly every large production and independent theater performance throughout the D.C. area. David was also a supporter of several causes including the Human Rights Campaign and the Democratic Party.

David leaves behind his mother, Rosalia Ruiz of Princeton; his father Teofilo Ruiz (and spouse Scarlett Freund) of Los Angeles, California; his brother Daniel Ruiz (and spouse Maria Bruno Ruiz) as well as a niece, Sofia and nephew, Mateo who adored him. David also leaves behind his grandmother, aunt, his five cousins, and their families as well as many, many good friends.

A well-attended memorial service was held for David on September 10, 2016 at The International Student House. In lieu of flowers, a memorial fund has been set up in David’s honor to support the mission of The International Student House. Contributions in his name can be made to the International Student House, 1825 R Street NW, Washington DC 20009.

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obit-maxwell-9-21-16David Clark Maxwell

David Clark Maxwell, age 78, died Monday September 12, 2016 in Chandler Hall Hospice in Newtown, Pa. He was born in Trenton, to Robert Chester and Marie Ringkamp Maxwell.

David was raised in Princeton, New Jersey and attended Princeton Country Day School, graduating in 1957 from Malvern Prep School in Malvern, Pa. He received his bachelor’s degree in political science from Villanova University in 1961. He served in the National Guard 50th Armored Division, and was honorably discharged.

David served as president of the R.C. Maxwell Company for 38 years. The R.C. Maxwell Company was established in 1894 by David’s father R.C. Maxwell, who was a pioneer in the outdoor advertising industry.

David also served as assistant treasurer of Martin House in Trenton, and tutored children for Big Brothers and Sisters in Vero Beach, Fla. He was president of the Outdoor Advertising Association of New Jersey, and the Legal Committee of the National Outdoor Advertising Association of America. He was a member of Kiwanis Club, president of The Trenton YMCA, president of the Friends of the New Jersey State Museum, a member of The Mercer/Bucks Running Club, a volunteer for The American Cancer Society, past member of Trenton Country Club, Bedens Brook Club, The Nassau Club, The Moorings Club (Vero Beach, Fla.), Springdale Golf Club, and the Barnegat Light Yacht Club. His interests included running, tennis, golf, windsurfing, sailing, flying, extensive travel, avid reading, aspiring inventor.

He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Mary Anne; daughter Jocelyn (Bill Froehlich) and son David (Sherri); as well as three grandchildren, Kyle, Emma, and Jack.

He and his wife resided in Edgehill Gardens in Morrisville Pa., Yardley Pa., Elm Ridge Park in Hopewell, Long Beach Island, N.J., Cherry Valley Country Club in Skillman, Wellington Manor in Pennington, as well as Vero Beach, Fla. His final home was in Twining Village, Holland Pa.

He donated his body to The University of Pennsylvania Hospital Medical School. A private service will be held. Donations may be sent to Better Community Housing of Trenton, 802 East State Street, Trenton NJ 08602 c/o Pearleen Waters.

David was beloved by friends, family and colleagues alike. He was intelligent, unpretentious, hilarious (sometimes unintentionally), genuinely kind, honest, and selfless. His family and his business were his whole world. He will be missed by all who knew him.

“Long Live Life” — David C. Maxwell

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Sheila P. Zalvino

Sheila P. Zalvino, 75, of Mercerville, passed away peacefully surrounded by her loving family on Wednesday, September 14, 2016, at Compassionate Care Hospice at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in Hamilton.

Born in Princeton, Sheila has been a resident of Hamilton Township since 1965. Sheila was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, sister, aunt, great aunt and true friend and she will be missed deeply by everyone whose life she touched.

Sheila was an extremely energetic person who started working at a young age answering phones for her father’s taxi business. While raising her children, she worked for ETS and then Koenig Plastics and then became an executive administrative assistant at Universal Process Equipment (UPE/IPPE) and retired in 2004 after 20 years of service.

Growing up in Princeton, she attended Princeton Public Schools where she created and forever maintained special friendships to this day. She always looked forward to the luncheons with her childhood friends JoAnne, Barbara, and her sister Sandy. Throughout her life she loved being a part of her children’s and later her grandchildren’s sports activities. She rarely missed a game and was the biggest fan to each of her grandchildren. She just simply adored and lived for them. She loved vacationing in LBI where she and Frank would bring the whole family and host extended family and friends, making a lifetime of joyful memories for all. Christmas Eve parties at the Zalvinos were just as memorable because of Sheila and she would put on incredible spreads for everyone to enjoy. She had a big heart and a way of making everyone around her feel loved and at home.

Predeceased by her parents, Frank and Alice (Rousseau) Petrone; her mother-in-law and father-in-law, Luigi and Rose (Tamasi) Zalvino; and her husband’s grandparents, Rosario and Almerinda Tamasi; she is survived by her loving husband of 54 years (-1 day) Frank Zalvino; her two children, Susan Groninger (Kenneth Giovanelli) and Mark Zalvino; her 5 grandchildren, Chase and Cody Groninger (Cheyenne) and Julia, James and Parker Zalvino; her great-grandchild, Raelyn Groninger; her 4 siblings, John “Jack” Petrone (Jean), Thomas Petrone (Ellen), Dolores Vandegrift (James), and Sandra Towne (Ronald); and many cherished nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.

Funeral services will be held on Tuesday, September 20, 2016, at 10 a.m. at the Saul Colonial Home, 3795 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square, NJ. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 11 a.m. at Our Lady of Sorrows R.C. Church, 3816 East State Street Extension, Hamilton, NJ.

Interment will follow at Greenwood Cemetery in Hamilton.

Visitation for friends and family will be held on Monday September 19, 2016, from 6 until 9:00 p.m. at the Saul Colonial Home.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Mrs. Zalvino’s memory to the American Diabetes Association by visiting In Memory Of at www.inmemoryof-memorial.org.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Saul Colonial Home, 3795 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square, NJ. www.saulfuneralhomes.com.

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Jean Louise Friedmann

Jean Louise (Mulvey) Friedmann died on July 25, 2016, in Princeton after a brief illness.

Born in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1927, Jean was the daughter of the late Joseph and Leona (Buckley) Mulvey. She grew up in Andover, Mass., attending local schools and then Abbot Academy, now Phillips Academy, in Andover. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1949 with a Bachelor of Arts in history and worked for several years as an editor for The MacMillan Company Publishers in New York City. In later years, using the pen name of Emily Vincent, she became a free-lance book reviewer for The Houston Chronicle, Best Sellers, and other publications as well as serving as a long-time editor of The Wellesley Magazine book review section.

In 1956, she married John Friedmann in New York City. They raised their three children in New York City, Hastings on Hudson, N.Y., and Houston, Tex., retiring to Princeton in 1984. Jean continued her editing and free-lance writing, volunteered for Literacy Volunteers of America and the Princeton Public Library, and served as an officer of the local Wellesley College clubs in Houston and Princeton. Jean was a familiar figure around town, attending many town and university events, and riding her bicycle and swimming. She and John also traveled extensively until his death in 2009.

Jean is survived by her children, Pamela Lowe, and her husband Russell; Andrew Friedmann, and his wife Darcy (Davis) Friedmann; and Thomas Friedmann. and his wife, Amy Anderson; grandchildren Brian (Hillary Anderson) Lowe, Peter Lowe, and David (Heather Pratt) Lowe, Michael and Christopher Friedmann, Charlotte and John Friedmann; great-grandson, Sawyer Anderson Lowe; her sister, Susan Mulvey Rattray, and her husband Bret; sister-in-law, Nancy Mumford Mulvey; cousin, Joanne Marlatt Otto; nephews and nieces Steven Mulvey, Kathryn (Patricia Lambert) Mulvey, Will (Heather Malin) Swarts, Hilary Swarts; and great-nephew Noah Malin Swarts. She was predeceased by her loving brother, Donald Mulvey. She deeply loved and respected, and was loved and respected by, her entire extended family and friends.

A memorial service will be held at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton on October 8th in the afternoon to which friends and family are cordially invited. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be sent to the Princeton Public Library, Wellesley College, Phillips Academy (Abbott) Andover, or the donor’s choice of charity.

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obit-murphy-9-21-16Jean C. Murphy 

Jean C. Murphy, 90, the former Jean Elizabeth Campbell, was born in Philadelphia, May 18, 1926. She grew up and lived in Wynnewood, Pa. before moving to Princeton in 1961. In 1950 she married John S. Murphy of Philadelphia and they were happily married for 60 years.

She received a Bachelor of Science degree from Drexel University in 1948. She received a graduate degree in elementary education from The College of New Jersey.

She taught in the Princeton Regional Schools for several years in the field of special education and as a substitute teacher in the elementary grades.

She was the daughter of the late Robert and Lillian Campbell and was predeceased by her husband, John Slaughter Murphy. She is survived by her sister Catherine Richie; daughter and son-in-law Susan and Ted Strempack; son Robert Murphy; grandchildren Kymberly Clark and Guy Strempack; great granddaughters Taylor and Camy Clark, Mia Strempack; and nieces and nephews.

She was a volunteer at the University Medical Center of Princeton for many years and a member of the Women’s College Club of Princeton.

She was an avid reader and gardener and loved to travel with her husband.

A graveside service will be held Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 11 a.m. at Trinity-All Saints’ Cemetery, 16 All Saints Road, Princeton, NJ. Donations in her memory may be made to All Saints’ Church at the above address.

Arrangements are under the direction of The Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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Memorial Service

Elizabeth S. Ettinghausen

Elizabeth S. Ettinghausen, passed away on June 12, 2016. Her friends are invited to a service in her remembrance on Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 6:30 p.m. at the Princeton University Chapel. A reception will follow the service. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in her memory to her favorite environmental charities — the Audubon Society, the Wilderness Society, or the Environmental Defense Fund.

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Princeton’s 25th Jazz Feast drew a standing-room-only crowd to Palmer Square Sunday. Performers included Alan Dale and the New Legacy Jazz Band, Chuck Redd, Spanglish Fly, the Pete and Will Anderson Quintet, and Professor Cunningham and his Old School. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

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RALLYING THE FAITHFUL: A crowd of more than 1000 filled Democratic headquarters, the Triumph Brewery overflow area below and the sidewalks of Nassau Street to hear U.S. Senator Cory Booker (shown here) and to support Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign on Sunday. (Photo by Timothy K. Quinn)

More than a thousand Hillary Clinton supporters filled the Democratic Campaign headquarters, filled an overflow area in The Triumph Brewery below, and lined up on Nassau Street Sunday to celebrate their candidate and greet U.S. Senator Cory Booker. more

Owen Bardzilowski, 14-year-old ninth grader at Princeton High School who took his own life at his family’s home on Henry Street last Thursday, has been remembered and mourned by many different people in many different ways during the past week. more

Fed up with the ongoing shutdown of transportation projects including the replacement of a bridge on Carter Road, Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes has announced that the county has served a “notice of claim” against the State of New Jersey and the Department of Transportation. more

Responding to the explosions in New York City and Seaside Park last weekend, the Coalition for Peace Action and Muslims for Peace are collaborating on a rally and candlelight vigil to take place Friday evening, September 23, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in Palmer Square. more

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Sarah Churgin and Katherine Van Dell, appraisers at Rago Auctions and “Antiques Roadshow,” will be at Morven Museum and Garden on September 27 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to appraise jewelry. “Unused heirlooms are a source of financing for vacations, tuition or even more jewelry,” says Sarah, who directs Rago’s jewelry department. Should you choose to sell, Rago will donate a percentage of that sale to Morven Museum and Garden. Sarah and Katherine are scheduling appointments from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (no appointment is necessary from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.).  more