December 7, 2016

Your Honor:

Thanks for allowing our mean-spirited university to increase my suffering. I am 72 years old with congestive heart failure. Before the heartless decision to move the station, I could walk there. That is no longer possible. Because of a recent procedure, I am forbidden to drive for the next two weeks. My surgeon is in New Brunswick, and I am happy to take New Jersey Transit there for my follow-up appointment on December 8. But getting to the train will be a major inconvenience.

Respectfully,

David Zinkin

Humbert Lane 

Dear David,

The decision to move the station was made between New Jersey Transit and the University. There are options to help you get to the new station. For example, you may want to avail yourself of the Crosstown service, which is run through the Senior Resource Center. Here is a link for more information: www.princetonsenior.org/crosstown.cfm

In addition, the free Tiger Transit shuttle runs from Palmer Square to the Dinky station.

Here is a link to the schedule: www.princeton.edu/transportation/ttroutes/ForrestalF2016.pdf.

There is another Tiger Transit line that runs from the Friend Center on Olden and Williams to the Dinky Station: www.princeton.edu/transportation/ttroutes/EQuadLineF2016.pdf.

I hope your recovery goes well.

Liz Lempert

Mayor of Princeton, Witherspoon Street

To the Editor:

As members of the board of Not in Our Town, Princeton’s racial justice organization, we applaud the mayor and Council for re-establishing a Civil Rights Commission for Princeton. We also recognize the dedicated work of the members of the Civil Rights Subcommittee of the Human Services Commission, Leticia Fraga, Elizabeth Bidwell Bates, John Heilner, Thomas Parker, and Larry Spruill, who spent years researching and creating a plan for the new Commission.

We hope that members of the Commission will have sufficient access to reports and information about any civil rights complaints that are received — whether from private residents, visitors, or employees of businesses, the municipality or the University — so that they can do a good job advising the mayor and Council members. More than ever, town officers and elected officials need to give a high priority to the safeguarding of civil rights, the personal liberties that belong to an individual owing to his or her status as a citizen or resident of a particular country or community.

Linda Oppenheim

South Harrison Street

Barbara Fox

Cedar Lane

Shelley Krause

Western Way

Wilma Solomon

Tee-Ar Place

To the Editor:

As chair of the Princeton Democratic Municipal Committee (PDMC) and as president of the Princeton Community Democratic Organization (PCDO), respectively, we are writing to encourage all Princeton Democrats to consider serving their community by getting more involved in the local Democratic Party or the local government.

We invite you to join us at an open house meeting on Sunday, December 11, from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Suzanne Patterson Center (behind Monument Hall), just before the PCDO meeting, to learn more about the different ways that you can get involved.

This is an informal opportunity for Democrats to learn about the local political process and municipal elections. Topics to be covered include how candidates get on the ballot, the local Democratic Party endorsement process, and the different Democratic organizations in Princeton.

Membership in the PCDO is open to all registered Democrats, and members who reside in Princeton may vote on candidates and resolutions. There is an associate category for Democrats who do not reside in Princeton. The PCDO works to elect progressive candidates and has free monthly public programs to discuss issues affecting all of us on local, state, and national levels.

Elections for the PCDO executive board will be held in January and we welcome interest from those who wish to learn more about the organization and to serve, either now or in the future. If you are not able to attend the open house, information on becoming a member of the PCDO is available at www.princetondems.org/join.

The members of the Princeton Democratic Municipal Committee are elected in each voting district. You may email municipal-chair@princetondems.org if you would like more information about the municipal committee or running for local office. For further information, please email swmacrae@yahoo.com or text (609) 468-1720.

While Democrats are disappointed at the outcome of the 2016 presidential election, New Jersey remained blue and worked tirelessly to elect national, state, and local candidates. We said goodbye in 2016 to Rich McClellan, Mercer County Democratic chair, who left a legacy of activism, warmth, and humor. And we were pleased to welcome the dynamic Trenton Councilwoman, Verlina Reynolds-Jackson, as chair. We want to thank the members of the Democratic Municipal Committee and the PCDO for their support of a transparent and vibrant political culture in Princeton that helps keep our government responsive to its citizens.

Scotia W. MacRae

Chair, Princeton Democratic Municipal Committee

Owen O’Donnell

President, Princeton Community 

Democratic Organization

To the Editor:

What a wonderful community we live in! Once again, many caring individuals, congregations, civic groups, corporations, and organizations made Thanksgiving a wonderful holiday for the families served by HomeFront in Mercer County. We received donations of Thanksgiving baskets that were stocked full of dinner supplies, holiday plates and napkins, and healthy everyday food items, and distributed them to 2,200 grateful families.

We extend our deepest thanks and appreciation to our community for its generosity that enabled so many others to truly celebrate a day of being together and sharing a home-cooked meal. Together, you all continue to make an enormous difference in many lives.

Meghan Cubano

Community Engagement Manager

Tiana Hall

Drive Coordinator

To the Editor:

One recent afternoon, I walked into my front yard with a rake in my hands. At the same moment, a crew of three yardmen drove up to my neighbor’s house across the street, armed with massive leaf-blowers — the kind that require a shoulder harness to handle — and one large riding mower. It was a true Paul Bunyan moment — me and Babe, my rake, against a small army of 2-cycle engines. The lawnmower and two of the leaf blowers attacked the neighbor’s yard just as I dug in with my rake. The lawnmower kicked up a tremendous cloud of dust in addition to the 100+ decibels of noise that the three machines contributed to the otherwise quiet air around us. When the guy on the mower had finished his work, he started up the third leaf blower and began blowing. The men finished the yard, put away their equipment, got into the truck and pulled away from the curb … just as I raked the last rake-full of leaves onto the curb. One silent man vs. three internal combustion machines — a dead tie. But I still think I won the contest.

Mark Censits

Moore Street

If you only see one movie this year, La La Land is the picture to catch. This nostalgic homage to the Golden Age of Hollywood is a panoramic masterpiece that makes effective use of every inch of the big screen.

Written and directed by Oscar nominee Damien Chazelle (Whiplash), the picture was shot in CinemaScope, an obsolete technology that fell out of favor with filmmakers in the late 60s. Chazelle resurrects the wide-angled lens to produce an old-fashioned musical that unfolds against a breathtaking array of Los Angeles backdrops. La La Land also features an enchanting original score composed by Justin Hurwitz, who has also collaborated before with his college classmate Damien on the movies Whiplash and Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench.

This romantic film is about Sebastian Wilder and Mia Dolan, struggling artists who are played to perfection by Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone respectively. Their supporting cast includes J.K. Simmons, John Legend, and Rosemarie DeWitt.

After a show-stopping opening staged on a gridlocked freeway where stuck motorists suddenly break into song and dance, we’re introduced to the lead actors. We learn that jazz pianist Sebastian is a purist who plays for tips in dingy dives while trying to save enough cash to open his own nightclub. Mia is an aspiring actress who divides her time between auditions and a job as a barista at a coffee shop on the Warner Brothers lot.

Sebastian and Mia are strangers who initially annoy each other whenever their paths cross. Eventually, however, sparks do fly which inspires them to sing mellifluous and melancholy tunes. They also fall in love and encourage each other to pursue their dreams.

Since it would be unfair to spoil any of the ensuing plot developments, suffice it to say that Gosling and Stone are delightful, whether singing or generating screen chemistry. The movie is a charming pleaser that deserves all the superlatives it’s about to receive in the upcoming awards season.

Excellent (****). Rated PG-13 for profanity. Running time: 128 minutes. Distributor: Summit Entertainment/Lionsgate Films.

FAMILY TRADITION: Princeton University women’s basketball player Leslie Robinson, left, goes in for a lay-up in recent action. Last Wednesday, junior forward Robinson contributed 17 points, five rebounds, and five assists to help Princeton defeat Seton Hall 94-67 and post its third straight win. Robinson, the daughter of Princeton men’s hoops legend Craig Robinson and the niece of  President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama (nee Robinson), is averaging 9.1 points and 7.3 rebounds a game and leads the Tigers with 20 assists. Princeton, now 3-4, hosts Lafayette on December 7 and plays at Fordham on December 10. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Craig Robinson enjoyed a legendary career with the Princeton University men’s basketball team, scoring 1,441 points and getting named the Ivy Player of the Year in both 1982 and 1983. more

SWITCHED UP: Princeton University women’s hockey player Kelsey Koelzer guards the defensive zone in a game earlier this season. Last weekend, senior star Koelzer was moved up to forward from defense and responded with three goals and an assist in a 4-0 win over Rensselaer on Friday and an assist in a 7-0 win at Union the next day. Princeton, now 7-6-1 overall and 5-4-1 ECAC Hockey, hosts Mercyhurst for a two-game set on December 10 and 11. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Legendary football coach Bill Parcells is well known for his declaration that “you are what your record says you are.” more

CHAMPIONSHIP RUN: Princeton High boys’ cross country runner Alex Roth heads to the finish line in a 2015 race. This fall, senior star Roth set the pace as PHS produced a season for the ages, winning the Mercer County Championship, the Central Jersey Group 4 sectional meet, the state Group 4 meet, and the Meet of Champions (MOC). It was the first-ever MOC team title for the Little Tigers and just the second ever for a Mercer County school (WW/P-N boys in 2008). Roth, for his part, placed first individually at the county meet, fourth at the Sectionals, second at the Group meet, and third at the MOC. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Coming into this fall, Alex Roth wasn’t satisfied with his career for the Princeton High boys’ cross country team. more

As the Princeton High boys’ swimming team entered the 400-yard freestyle relay against visiting Notre Dame last Thursday, it had no chance to win the meet.

“I looked at them and said I don’t care what the score is, they may have already won by now but the meet is not over and so we finish that relay and go out there and win,” said PHS head coach Carly Misiewicz.

The quartet of senior Alex Petruso, freshman Jeshurun Reyen, senior Will Kinney, and junior Oliver Hunsbedt followed their coach’s instructions to a tee, coming from behind in thrilling fashion to win the race with the crowd at the John Witherspoon pool roaring in appreciation. more

MAKING WAVES: Princeton High girls’ swimmer Melinda Tang shows her form in a freestyle race last season. Last Thursday, senior star Tang won the 200-yard and 500 freestyle races as PHS fell 97-72 to Notre Dame to move to 0-2. In upcoming action, the Little Tigers host Nottingham on December 8 and then swim at WW/P-N on December 13. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Months before the season even started, the Princeton High girls’ swimming team suffered a major loss as superstar and state individual champion Abbey Berloco opted to transfer to Notre Dame for the last two years of her high school career. more

BOUNCING BACK: Hun School girls’ basketball player Leah Sutphen heads to the basket in a game last season. Sophomore forward Sutphen figures to be a key weapon in the front court for the Raiders this winter as they look to bounce back from going 1-22 last year. Last Friday, Sutphen scored six points in a losing cause as Hun fell 54-46 to Friends Central (Pa.) The Raiders, who moved to 1-1 with the defeat, host Agnes Irwin School (Pa.) on December 8 and the Baldwin School (Pa.) on December 10. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Having suffered through a rough winter last year with a depleted squad, an influx of new faces has lifted the mood around the Hun School girls’ basketball team. more

Andrew Hicks

Andrew Crozer Reeves Hicks, longtime Princeton resident, lawyer, and community leader, passed away on November, 30, 2016, at his home at Stonebridge in Rocky Hill, with his family by his side. He was 92 with eyes of blue.

Reeves, “Reevo,” was born in Trenton, on October 12, 1924, son of Thomas Edward and Mary Lucille Reeves Hicks, and grandson of Sarah Conrad Reeves and New Jersey State Senator, Andrew Crozer Reeves of Lawrenceville. He lived in Princeton from 1932 until his move to Skillman in 2002.

Reeves attended Princeton Public schools as a child. In 1938 he attended Phillips Exeter Academy and in 1942 was admitted to the class of 1946 at Princeton. While at Princeton, Reeves enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and was assigned to the V-12 Officers Training Program. Reeves resumed his studies at Princeton where he has served as the class president of the great class of 1946. Reeves attended the University of Pennsylvania Law School, receiving his law degree in 1949. He married Joan Stewart of Huntington Valley, Pa., the love of his life, in 1947, while in law school.

After law school Reeves worked with the Warner Lambert Company and Gallup and Robinson until returning to the law in 1950. He was a partner in the law firms of McCarthy and Hicks and later Smith, Lambert, Hicks, and Miller. Reeves served as a partner in the law firm of Drinker, Biddle, and Reath until his retirement in 1995. Reeves also served as magistrate for West Windsor Township from 1958 to 1966 where he was known for his kindness and fairness. His most memorable case was the West Windsor School Board vs. Trifan, in which the Trifan family was sued for schooling their musical children at home. Reeves found the family ‘not guilty’ because evidence showed the children were receiving an ‘equivalent education’ at home.

During his years in Princeton, Reeves was a member and/or officer and trustee of the New Jersey Bar Association, Princeton Chamber of Commerce, Princeton YMCA, Princeton Arts Council, the Nassau Club, the Princeton Investor’s Group, the Nassau Gun Club, and other organizations including the Tred Avon Yacht Club in Oxford, Md. He received many citations and awards for his community service, including the National Conference for Community and Justice award for his interest in the subject of community diversity and the Bud Vivian Award for dedication and commitment to the Princeton Community. In 2002 Reeves and his wife, Joan, moved across the county line to a new retirement community, Stonebridge at Montgomery. Reeves was the first president of the Residents’ Association, a position he held for five years.

Reeves referred to himself as a ‘townie’ and was a proud Princeton graduate, Marine, husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Throughout his life Reeves worked for the common good of the Princeton community. He has been described by community leaders and friends as a gentle, sure-handed navigator who steered diverse interests of the town, borough, and university to common ground, and as a gentle listener and troubleshooter who brought diverse interests together to move Princeton forward. Reeves was involved in the expansion of the Princeton Public Library and formed the coalition that worked to bring the town and borough to an agreement on its expansion.

As a lawyer, Reeves was active in the purchase of the 102 Witherspoon Street building for the Arts Council, again bringing diverse groups together to move the project forward. He was the first president of the Arts Council under its new governing structure. Reeves served twice as president of the Chamber of Commerce and worked tirelessly to preserve and improve the quality of living of the community as well as to create a better business climate. He served on the Chamber Advisory Council and the Princeton Business Association, which strove to enable town and university to develop ideas and solve their common problems in the Central Business District. Reeves was an active Rotarian. At the university, Reeves has served as secretary and president of the class of 1946 and was a member of the Chapel Advisory Committee.

Reeves was an avid sailor. As a boy he sailed his dinghies on Lake Carnegie and in Mantoloking on the Jersey shore. He sailed and raced star boats, including his favorite Osopeachee, on the Chesapeake Bay. He later enjoyed traveling and sailing throughout European and Aegean waters with his family and friends. At home, Reeves enjoyed gardening, especially tending his roses. A quiet Quaker, Reeves was also a lover of music, in particular the music of the 40s, Dixieland, and New Orleans jazz. He was well-known for his dapper dress and his wonderful dancing. Reeves had a wonderful sense of humor and was known to enjoy many a martini with good friends and family. A longtime member of Pretty Brook Tennis Club, he also enjoyed a rowdy game of tennis.

Reeves and Joan were married for 69 years. They have four daughters and a son. Reeves is predeceased by his parents, his son, Ted, in 2012, and his sister, Patricia McNitt. He is survived by his wife, Joan; his sister, Joan Mitchell; daughters, Andrea, Lindsey, Daren, and Libby; his sons-in-law; his nine grandchildren; many loving nieces and nephews; and his first great granddaughter.

A joyful Gathering of Remembrance for Reeves will be held on December 26, 2016 at 2 p.m. at Stonebridge.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that contributions be made to the Princeton YMCA or a local charity in his name.

———

Louise Jefferys Morse

Louise Jefferys Morse, a longtime Princeton resident, died peacefully November 29, 2016. She was 105.

Mrs. Morse was the wife of the late Professor Marston Morse, a mathematician who was among the first generation of faculty at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Born in 1911 in Hanging Rock, Ohio, Mrs. Morse attended both the Academy and the College of the Sacred Heart in Cincinnati, Ohio, before enrolling at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland, where she earned her R.N. After graduation she was a head nurse on a medical research unit at Johns Hopkins’ Osler Clinic for three years. She also worked at Queen’s Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii, for two years.

From January 1940, when Louise and Marston Morse were married, until his death in 1977, the Morses opened their home on Battle Road to Institute visitors from all over the world. They gave welcome parties in the fall and spring for new members particularly of the school of mathematics, and Mrs. Morse was deeply involved in helping the new members get settled in Princeton. Many became lifelong friends.

Mrs. Morse and her husband were among a group of parents who shared a dream of founding an independent Catholic school in Princeton, serving on the Stuart Country Day School Founders Committee in 1962. They were also instrumental in establishing the Friends of the Raissa Maritain Library shortly after Stuart opened. For almost 50 years, Mrs. Morse continued to be active in organizing the ongoing funding of the library.

In addition to her interest in Sacred Heart education, Mrs. Morse volunteered for many community organizations. Early in her years in Princeton she supported the Princeton Nursery School on Leigh Avenue. Later she helped found the Crossroads Nursery School at the Institute for Advanced Study. She served as a board member of the Princeton Family Services Society and the Diocesan Catholic Welfare Board. She also helped the Princeton YWCA raise funds to purchase the Bramwell House.

Mrs. Morse had a strong interest in peace and justice issues throughout her life. She was active in the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, the Freedom Writers for Amnesty International, Pax Christi, the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the Coalition for Peace Action, and the Mercer Alliance for the Mentally Ill. In 1997 she was honored as one of a group of senior citizens selected for their history of volunteer service and their continuing involvement in the Princeton community. In 2010 the Princeton Committee of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund gave her its annual service award, honoring her for her tireless work over three decades within that organization.

Mrs. Morse was an avid gardener who shared her expertise and perennials with many friends throughout the Princeton community and beyond. When a severe storm in 2000 destroyed the 300-year–old Mercer Oak in Princeton’s historic Battlefield State Park, Mrs. Morse donated an offspring of the ancient tree, an 8-foot sapling she had nurtured in her front yard.

Beloved wife, mother, stepmother, mother-in-law, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Mrs. Morse is predeceased by her husband Marston Morse and her children Meröe Marston Morse, Dryden Phelps Morse, and Peter Farnsworth Morse. She is survived by her daughter, Louise A. Morse, who lived with her for the last several decades of her life; and her granddaughter, Maria Fortiz-Morse, whom she co-parented; as well as her children Julie, William, Elizabeth; her sons-in-law Thomas Cone and Daniel Reardon; her daughters-in-law Teri Beck Morse, Cece Saunders and Melissa Gabel Morse; 16 other grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

A Memorial Mass and celebration of her life will be held at St. Charles Borromeo Church, 47 Skillman Road, Skillman, NJ, at 11 a.m. on Saturday, January 14, 2017. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Raissa Maritain Library Endowment Fund of Stuart Country Day School, 1200 Stuart Road, Princeton, NJ 08540, or to the Marston Morse Lecture Fund of the Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540.

———

Irene M. Perna

Irene M. Perna, 78, of Lawrenceville, passed away on Sunday, December 4, 2016 at St. Joseph’s Skilled Nursing Center, Lawrenceville.

Born on May 17, 1938 in Lawrenceville, she remained a lifelong resident of the area. Irene graduated from Princeton High School in 1956 and graduated from Pennsylvania School of Horticulture for Women, which became the Ambler Campus of Temple University in 1958. She married Alfred R. Perna on October 29, 1960. Throughout the 1960s she worked at various flower shops in the Princeton area including Applegate’s and the Flower Basket. In 1974, she became a partner in Mazur Nursery, plant nursery started by her father, George E. Mazur in 1933 and became the owner of Mazur Nursery with her husband Alfred in 1975. In 1976, Irene and Alfred opened Perna’s Plant and Flower Shop in West Windsor. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Mazur Nursery was one of the leading wholesale and retail bedding plant nursery establishments. In 1991, Irene decided to focus on her local retail customers, offering the broadest and largest and most unique selection of annuals, perennials, and vegetables in the area. Irene continued to actively lead the nursery through this year, taking great enjoyment and pride in growing the types and varieties of plants her customers came to appreciate. When not working at her business, Irene enjoyed reading, traveling with her husband, visiting Atlantic City, dining out, and watching and attending NASCAR races.

She was predeceased by her parents, George E Mazur and Stephanie (née Zepka) Mazur; her sister Dorothy Guzikowski; she is survived by her husband of 56 years, Alfred R. Perna; her daughter Sarah Conte and husband Scott; her son Steven Perna, and wife Maria (née Wood); grandchildren, Nicole, Michael, and Christina Conte; and her devoted cousin Christine Braun.

The funeral will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, December 10, 2016 at Poulson & Van Hise Funeral Directors, 650 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9 a.m. at St. Hedwig Church, 872 Brunswick Avenue, Trenton, NJ 08638.

Interment will follow at St. Hedwig Cemetery, Ewing, NJ.

Relatives and friends can call on Friday evening from 5-8 p.m. at the funeral home.

To send a condolence to the family or for directions, please visit www.poulsonvanhise.com.

———

Patrick J. Dolan

Patrick J. Dolan, 89, of Lawrenceville died Thursday, December 1, 2016, at the University Medical Center of Princeton surrounded by his loving family. Born in West Orange to the late Matthew J. and Rose M. Dolan (née Keenan) of Co. Roscommon and Co. Monaghan, Ireland, respectively, he was predeceased by his sisters, Mary and Kae, and brothers, Matthew, John, and James and his infant son Mark. For most of his life Mr. Dolan resided in West Orange and Princeton.

He is survived by his loving wife of 68 years, Janice (née Gallagher); his two daughters, Nadine Podd and Colleen Hayles, and their respective husbands, Bill and Kent; his five grandsons, Brad and his wife Courtney, Sean, Kevin and his wife Chelsie, Ryan, and Derron and his wife Megan; and his three great-grandchildren, Olivia, Ian, and Shelby.

After graduating from Immaculate Conception High School in Montclair, New Jersey, in 1943 he volunteered for the Army, entering into the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) where he concurrently undertook college studies and military training. During the Second World War he served in the Philippines and received an honorable discharge.

In his professional life he was a management information systems executive. His career spanned more than five decades at IBM, CSC, Itel, and SBU. Mr. Dolan was an alumnus of St. Bonaventure University and the Stern School of Business at NYU. He was a Pre-Cana facilitator at his Church, served on numerous municipal boards, and for decades worked as an election-day poll volunteer.

A couple for 75 years, Mr. and Mrs. Dolan won their high school’s dance competition in 1942. In 2009 at the wedding reception of Kevin and Chelsie Hayles they delighted the guests with their dancing ability. With his wife always by his side, he enjoyed going to parties, eating out, and having coffee with his family and friends, especially his three sisters-in-law. He attended every recital, school play, soccer match, birthday party, and graduation that he could. He always woke up early, often to attend weekday Mass and to go to the gym. A model husband, father, and grandfather, his unwavering friendship, generosity, loyalty, kindness, and warmth will be missed by his friends and large extended family, including his many nieces and nephews and their children.

A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 11 a.m. on Monday, December 5, 2016, at St. Paul’s Church, 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. In lieu of flowers, Mr. Dolan requested that donations be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

SIDE BY SIDE: Mayor Liz Lempert and Santa Claus are beaming with the Christmas spirit during Saturday’s holiday celebration at the Princeton Shopping Center. Santa arrived in style on a Princeton Hook & Ladder Fire truck and the mayor led the countdown to the lighting of the courtyard Christmas tree as the Princeton High School Girls Choir performed songs of the season. (Photo by Emily Reeves)

Princeton Charter School has applied to the New Jersey Department of Education (DOE) to expand its enrollment by 76 students next year, a proposal that Princeton Public Schools (PPS) superintendent Steve Cochrane has claimed would drain funds from PPS and ”compromise the quality of our students’ education.” more

BREAKING THE ICE: Princeton University men’s hockey player Max Veronneau heads up the ice in recent action. Last Saturday, sophomore forward Veronneau tallied two goals and two assists to help Princeton rally to a 6-5 win over Rensselaer in overtime as it earned its first ECAC Hockey victory of the season. Princeton, now 3-6-1 overall and 1-6-1 ECACH, faces Quinnipiac this week in a home-and-home set, hosting the Bobcats on December 9 before playing them at Hamden, Conn. a day later. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Max Veronneau was feeling snakebitten in the first nine games of the season for the Princeton University men’s hockey team. more

At a meeting of Princeton’s Planning Board last week, developer Charles Yedlin received approval to put an office building on the site of the former headquarters of a longtime animal shelter. The Herrontown Road location was home to SAVE, a Friend to Homeless Animals, for 74 years before the organization moved to a 10-acre expanse in Skillman in August, 2015. more

The successful Dual Language Immersion Program at Community Park School will be an ongoing initiative in the district, after last month’s unanimous affirmation by the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education.

Started as a pilot initiative at the beginning of the 2015-16 year for sections in kindergarten and first grade, the program expanded to second grade, with 43 kindergarteners, 41 first graders, and 38 second graders. It is scheduled to include K-3 in 2017-18, K-4 in 2018-19, and K-5 with full implementation in 2019-20. more

American Repertory Ballet (ARB) brings the beloved classic “Nutracker” to the stage with Tchaikovsky’s magnificent score, new sets, thrilling choreography, and more than 100 performers. A holiday tradition for more than 50 years, ARB’s is one of the longest continuously running “Nutcracker” productions in the nation. Directed by Artistic Director Douglas Martin, ARB’s professional company will be joined by select students from Princeton Ballet School to tell the story of a young girl named Clara and how a mysterious gift from her Uncle brings about enchanted dreams and fantastical scenes. For tickets, visit www.statetheatrenj.org or call (732) 246-7469. (Photo Credit: Leighton Chen)

Simon Morrison was hoping to pursue a career as an orchestral musician when he fell in love with 20th-century Russian music. From that fascination grew an interest in Russian ballet. Soon, these subjects, and their histories, eclipsed his plans to play percussion or tuba in a symphony orchestra. more

EGYPTIAN EXPLORATIONS: Justin Mathews and Connie Escher team up to investigate the pharaohs of ancient Egypt and many other wonders of the ancient world with their sixth grade social studies students at John Witherspoon Middle School. (Photo by Donald Gilpin)

Tim Charleston, K-8 social studies supervisor for the Princeton Public Schools, described Connie Escher and Justin Mathews, sixth grade ancient world cultures teachers: “As a team they complement each other phenomenally. They both have significant individual strengths. They’re at the top of their game professionally. They take pride and pleasure in providing learning experiences for their students. They approach social studies in a hands-on way, and they care deeply about their students and about history.” more

Princeton Council voted on Monday, December 5 to approve an extension to March 31 of a developer’s agreement requested by architect J. Robert Hillier (a Town Topics shareholder).

Mr. Hillier had asked the governing body at its November 28 meeting to modify an amendment to the original agreement for the Waxwood, a former school for black children in the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood that he converted to 34 rental units over a decade ago. The agreement dictated that eight of the 34 rental units would be sold after a period of five years. Mr. Hillier would like to keep them as rentals. more

There’s a crack in everything — that’s how the light gets in. — Leonard Cohen (1934-2016)

A famous singer songwriter dies, someone you never found time to appreciate, so you go back and start listening and recognize the distant music you heard long ago walking through the fairgrounds of rock, a snatch of song coming from over there, not far, just a whisper away if you’d taken another turn somewhere between Van Morrison and David Bowie. more

Award-winning novelist Jhumpa Lahiri and book designer Amanda Weiss will discuss Ms. Lahiri’s The Clothing of Books (Penguin $7.95) at Labyrinth on Tuesday, December 13 at 6 p.m.

The conversation will consider the art of the book jacket from the perspectives of both reader and writer. The Clothing of Books probes the relationships between text and image, author and designer, and art and commerce. Ms. Lahiri discusses the role of the uniform; explains what book jackets and design have come to mean to her; and how, sometimes, “the covers become a part of me.” more