October 11, 2017

DEFENSIVE STAND: Hun School boys’ soccer player Dylan Smith, right, marks a foe in a game last season. Senior Smith has helped to shore up the Hun defensive unit this fall. The Raiders, now 2-7, play at Princeton Day School on October 12 before hosting the Hill School (Pa.) on October 14. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

On paper, it looked to be a mismatch when the Hun School boys’ soccer team hosted Pennington in mid-September.

Hun entered the September 19 contest winless while powerful Pennington, which started the season ranked No. 1 nationally, had just one loss. more

FRESH APPROACH: Princeton Day School girls’ soccer player Kelly Beal dribbles the ball in a game earlier this season. Last Wednesday, freshman forward Beal contributed a goal and an assist as PDS defeated the Hill School (Pa.) 4-2. The Panthers, now 9-3, were slated to play at Springside-Chestnut Hill (Pa.) on October 10 before hosting Pennington on October 12 and Portledge School (N.Y.) on October 14. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

The kids are proving to be alright this fall for the Princeton Day School girls’ soccer team.

Featuring a number of freshmen and sophomores in its rotation, PDS has produced a 9-3 start.

“I am happy with where we are; eight of 11 of our starters are underclassmen and we are starting five freshmen,” said PDS head coach Pat Trombetta. more

IN CONTROL: Princeton High girls’ soccer player Colette Marciano controls the ball in a game last season. Last Friday, senior midfielder and Columbia-bound Marciano tallied two goals to help PHS defeat Ewing 5-2 for its fifth straight victory as it improved to 7-3-1. The Little Tigers host Trenton High on October 12 and Hopewell Valley on October 16. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

Colette Marciano is making up for lost time after being sidelined for the first few weeks this fall in her senior season with the Princeton High girls’ soccer team.

“I had an injury with my hamstring and I missed the first four or five games,” said Marciano. “It was killing me; I am glad I am back now and we are on a roll.” more

By Bill Alden

Mary Kate Neff has faced a steep learning curve this fall in her freshman season with the Princeton University field hockey team.

“It is just learning to play the system and play the role the team needs me to play,” said Neff.

“It is a higher speed, it is a lot of aggression and just being able to sustain that level to play smart and make good decisions throughout the whole game. I find myself all over the field but I really do enjoy midfield, getting to play on both sides of the field and helping out where I can.” more

SHARP TOOL: Princeton University men’s soccer player Kevin O’Toole dribbles the ball against Villanova last Wednesday. Freshman midfielder O’Toole contributed a goal and an assist to help Princeton earn a 2-0 win over the Wildcats. The Tigers, who lost 1-0 at Brown last Saturday to fall to 2-6-2 overall and 0-2 Ivy League, host Columbia on October 14. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

By Bill Alden

The bounces had gone against the Princeton University men’s soccer team this fall as it started 1-5-2 with each of the defeats coming by one goal.

Last Wednesday evening against visiting Villanova, Princeton freshman midfielder Kevin O’Toole kicked the Tigers into the win column, assisting on a goal by Benji Issroff in the first minute of the contest and later curling the ball into the top corner of the net with 18 minutes remaining in the second half for his first career tally and the finishing touch on a 2-0 win. more

By Kam Williams

William Moulton Marston (Luke Evans) was a Renaissance man with an impressive array of talents. After earning his BA, PhD, and law degrees, the Harvard graduate taught psychology at Radcliffe. Despite a demanding academic career, he found time to write self-help books and to invent the precursor of the lie detector.

To this day, however, he remains best remembered as the creator of Wonder Woman. Selling the idea to a comic book publisher in 1941 was no mean feat, since until then, Superman, Batman, The Flash, Captain Marvel, The Green Lantern, and all the other superheroes, were male.

The character Marston envisioned was not just a powerful crime-fighter, but also was an attractive Amazon whose eroticism and dominance were deemed to be sexual and sado-masochistic in nature by her detractors. Although Wonder Woman wore a skimpy outfit, as did Superman, and used a rope to subdue and restrain adversaries, the comic books were far from pornographic. Marston had been inspired by the success of the suffrage movement that helped advance the feminist cause. In fact, he once stated that “The only hope for civilization is the greater freedom, development, and equality of women.”

Another source of inspiration were the two women in Marston’s life; his wife, Elizabeth (Rebecca Hall), and their longtime lover, Olive (Bella Heathcote). He would father children with each woman, and they all lived under the same roof, although the scandalous arrangement led to the family being shunned by polite society.

Written and directed by Alexandra Robinson, Professor Marston and the Wonder Women is an intriguing and informative biopic that finally awards a brilliant visionary, who had been marginalized by history, his due. Thanks to our more enlightened LBGTQ-embracing times, William Moulton Marston can finally be fully appreciated.

Excellent (****). Rated R for profanity, graphic sexuality, and lewd images. Running time: 108 minutes. Production Studio: Stage 6 Films/Boxspring Entertainment/Topple Productions. Distributor: Annapurna Pictures.

To the Editor:

This is in reply to Nat Bottigheimer’s letter in the September 27 Mailbox on fire risks of large-scale wood housing.

As a society, we are constructing, once again, huge housing complexes and hotels built of wood. Look around at the new megablock luxury condo/apartment complexes. Almost all are wood framed and built with more combustible lightweight and engineered wood than the heavier wood used pre-World War II.

The result: conflagrations in heavily populated areas that destroy as many as hundreds of wood condo or apartment homes in a single fire. And sprinklers are not preventing the conflagrations, which would not occur if we built large-scale housing out of non-combustible construction as we used to do.

In large-scale wood housing, a single mistake can have catastrophic consequences. Two hundred forty apartment homes were destroyed in a single fire in Edgewater in 2015, and 500 people were permanently displaced. Another conflagration destroyed nearly 100 senior homes in a newly-built upscale retirement community in Georgia and killed one senior. There are frequent massive fires that destroy smaller wood complexes of dozens of condos or apartments.

There are also many fires in under-construction megablock wood complexes. Huge construction fires this year in large-scale wood housing this year in Oakland (multiple conflagrations), Boston (multiple conflagrations), Kansas City, and Raleigh spread to surrounding occupied buildings. The construction fire in Kansas City spread burning embers a square mile and burned two dozen surrounding occupied homes.

For an up-to-date list go to Facebook’s Massive Fires Damage Lives and scroll down.

So far there have not been many deaths in these fires. But death statistics are only one measure of damage. Surviving a major fire and losing one’s home is a traumatic event. Large long-term studies at major medical centers nationwide show that emotional trauma for fire survivors has similar life consequences as physical trauma, including divorce, job loss, anxiety, and depression. Search “Plos One — The Long-Term Impact of Physical and Emotional Trauma: The Station Nightclub Fire”

Megablock wood structure fires are conflagrations in which an entire block or more is burning. Multiple fire companies fight the fires which last many hours, and toxic smoke is released. In Raleigh police warned residents to stay away from the downtown for several days due to unhealthy air. The cost to municipalities in fighting these fires is high, neighborhood communities are destroyed, and the local economy suffers.

Citizens and experts are addressing this issue on the local, state, and national level. National code and fire experts, as well as informed citizens, are working for code reform. Note that paid lobbyists from the building industries wield influence on national building and fire code committees.

There are seven bills before the New Jersey state legislature. Citizens who have been working on this issue since the Edgewater conflagration support New Jersey bills Senate 1632/Assembly 3770 sponsored by Senators Turner and Bateman and Assembly members Muoio, Gusciora, Zwicker, and Chaparro.

It is time to take action at the state and local level for better fire protection in large wood structures.

Alexi Assmus

Maple Street

To the Editor:

As scientists and scientific enthusiasts, we are well aware of recent national trends which disregard science and abuse rational thought. Thus, we feel it’s necessary to support candidates who understand and value science in our society, and will undoubtedly support scientific education. This is why we are backing Jenny Ludmer, a former scientific analyst and writer, for the Board of Education.

One day a year at Littlebrook Elementary, we’ve seen fascinating things happen. Bees, lasers, bubbles, and goats descend upon the school. It’s not uncommon to hear loud chemistry explosions or see marshmallow peeps expand, while words like “central limit theorem” and “bionic eye” come drifting into the halls. For several years, Jenny has demonstrated her passion for scientific education by organizing this inspiring annual event at Littlebrook Elementary, known simply as the Science Expo.

An event that can only happen in a town like Princeton, the Expo draws science enthusiasts from industry as well as academia, parents as well as community members, into the school for one full day of action. Classes rotate through the school, so that each child participates in at least a dozen 20-minute engaging presentations. The goal is simply to wow kids with science, so they can imagine a future for themselves in this intriguing world. And they do.

Jenny is the willing coordinator of this massive project, eager to work with teachers and parents to make it happen. Pouring her time and energy into this project, literally for weeks and months every spring, a perfectly-orchestrated color-coded schedule is generated for this one day in May that rivals many airport timetables. Scientists expect her to pull it off, teachers know she will make it happen, and principals trust her to lead the day. Every year that we’ve participated in the Expo, we’ve walked away with a profound sense of respect for the school’s daily work, but also the knowledge that science is loved and respected here. And we who have seen her in the trenches know that this would not happen if it were not for Jenny’s efforts, organization, and determination.

Jenny’s long-time commitment to running the Science Expo underscores her view that the future of our community will depend on children that don’t just score well on science tests, memorize facts, or do hours of homework, but on developing children’s sense of wonder and scientific thought. We can see this in every initiative she develops and cultivates, from sustainability efforts — not just in the schools but throughout the community — running the Littlebrook Garden Club, and otherwise speaking out for scientific awareness in the general public.

We believe that with her collaborative approach, fierce determination, and sheer grit, Jenny will be a hands-on and effective board member. Furthermore, with her background in scientific research and analysis, she pledges to thoroughly research and review options so that sound, evidence-based decisions can be made. Please consider Jenny Ludmer when you vote on November 7, and in the meantime, check out her website, LudmerForBOE.org.

Gabrielle Cayton-Hodges PhD, 

Amy Rogers, Ohad Mayblum

Dodds Lane

Forrest Meggers PhD

Dorann Avenue

Kosuke Imai

Randall Road

Ari Raivetz

Bertrand Drive

Yael Niv

Franklin Avenue

To the Editor:

We are writing to endorse Jess Deutsch for the Board of Education (BOE). As parents whose children recently graduated from our district, we feel that Jess is a clear choice to help our school district move forward. We have known Jess and her family for nearly 15 years, and can speak with certainty to her commitment to the children of our community and for the well-being of all Princeton children. As the founder of Princeton Balance, a board member of both the 101 Fund and of HiTops, as well as a former member of the Riverside PTO, Jess is perfectly suited to create the critical conversations and bring the changes needed to support all of our children in making the most of their educational experiences.

Jess is well versed in the multiple, complex issues that our district is facing while also having a keen understanding of the district’s strategic plan. She is a listener and problem solver, and she has the judgment and reason that will be necessary to confront the budgetary, space, and communication challenges, and to serve our whole community well. As a long-time public school teacher, I can attest to the importance of having BOE members who have a background in education who understand the needs of our children and district. With an advanced degree in education from Harvard, and years of experience as a professional education advisor, Jess is uniquely qualified to see the issues our district faces from the perspective of a parent, community leader, and, to speak the language of our students and educators. Jess will be at the forefront to ensure that our community will provide to every student in the district a first-rate education, recognizing the urgency of closing the opportunity gap and creative innovative options that will truly prepare our students to thrive. We know she takes seriously the responsibility of making decisions that affect our community for the long-term, and that require the judicious use of our taxpayer dollars.

Our three sons have now graduated from PPS as have Jess and Ted’s children. We are impressed and grateful that Jess is choosing to serve now, with the long view of our entire school system. We state with certainty and confidence that Jess has already had a positive imprint on our district. The school board needs her now. There are many fine candidates running who are looking to serve, and we thank them all for their commitment. Jess Deutsch has our enthusiastic support and is our choice for the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education.

Steve and Nadia DiGregorio

William Livingston Court

To the Editor:

The election for District 16 and all state candidates is on November 7 but the deadline for registration is October 17. With past low voter turnouts in Princeton and elsewhere it is important for people to vote and not take anything for granted, as we learned in last year’s presidential election. Over confidence that your candidate will win, even without your vote, can be a recipe for gross disappointment and worse.

If you are a citizen in Princeton and are not registered, you can go to the Clerk’s Office in Town Hall on Witherspoon Street weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Other towns likely have the same process.) It takes about five minutes to complete and sign the form which can be handed to someone in the Clerk’s Office or mailed to Trenton yourself. You can also obtain an absentee ballot at the same Clerk’s office or call the Mercer County Clerk’s office (609) 989-6465 for these forms.

Since redistricting about seven years ago, Princeton is now a minority within the larger 16th state district, which includes Hunterdon and Somerset Counties. We are fortunate to have some very good incumbent candidates in Republican Senator Kip Bateman and Democrat Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker, as well as new Assembly Democrat candidate Roy Freiman, who has a strong economic business background, much needed now.

Sadly, I cannot say the same of Assembly candidate Donna Simon. In her previous brief tenure in the state Assembly (since replaced by Assemblyman Zwicker) she pretty much went along and voted for Governor Christie’s misguided policies including, for example, the scheme to import toxic fracking waste from other states to New Jersey, the state with the highest number of superfund hazardous waste sites in the nation.
She has also been a strong NRA supporter.

Even at the gubernatorial level there are several splinter party candidates who could throw the election to an unintended candidate if enough people don’t take the time to vote.

Voting should be a citizen’s priority as a right and privilege. It also gives you the right to complain if the results are not to your liking.

Grace Sinden

Ridgeview Circle

To the Editor:

This election, I am proud to support Montgomery’s hometown team — David Cheskis for Township Committee and Mark Caliguire for New Jersey General Assembly. Both are long-time residents of Montgomery, have distinguished records of community service, and understand how to protect our exceptional quality of life.

David has been active in Montgomery for almost 20 years. He was the president of the Pike Run Greens and Master Association boards and holds leadership positions in the local Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. David also has years of valuable experience on our land use boards. First as chair of the Zoning Board and now chair of the Planning Board, David has been protecting Montgomery from unwanted and inappropriate development.

Mark has served Montgomery for 14 years as a Township Committee member, mayor, and now a Somerset County Freeholder. He has been a mentor and friend for years and represents Montgomery’s spirit of community involvement. Mark was instrumental with getting our financial house back in order. We are spending below 2005 levels and have cut debt by over $30 million due to the foundation that Mark created for us. He is also a champion of open space and led the effort to preserve Skillman Park, which was at risk of being developed.

Beyond these impressive records, I am thrilled to support David and Mark because both have ardently fought against Trenton’s affordable/COAH housing mandate, which I believe represents the biggest threat to our quality of life. Special interest groups are pushing Montgomery to build thousands of new homes that we don’t need or want.

As chair of the Planning Board, David has already made a big difference by ensuring developers stick to our strict building standards and fighting for as much open space preservation as possible. While mayor and freeholder, Mark has been on the frontlines working with our state leaders to rewrite affordable housing legislation and has proposed sweeping changes to this reckless mandate.

Sadly, Mark’s election opponent doesn’t share the same position. Assemblyman Andrew Zwicker has been AWOL on the topic for years. I met with Zwicker when he first took office to discuss the biggest issues facing Montgomery. Since then, he has proposed no new ideas, no new legislation, and even refused to discuss the issue with me last summer. I guess he doesn’t care about Montgomery or the other suburban towns in his district that are suffering due to Trenton’s housing mandate.

On November 7, we have a clear choice. Let’s support our hometown team, David Cheskis and Mark Caliguire. Both care deeply about our community and have proven records of making Montgomery a better place to live.

Ed Trzaska

Mayor, Montgomery Township

To the Editor:

As I read about and listen to the positions of the school board candidates, I am concerned about the overly-prescriptive statements of some candidates. Some seem to see the school board as a PTO on steroids, rather than as financial stewards of public assets and a policy making fiduciary body serving our entire community. Julie Ramirez is a refreshing exception, and would be an excellent addition to the Board of Education.

Now more than ever, we need school board members who have relevant financial expertise and professional leadership skills. I worked with Julie for five years in a professional setting where managing expectations, time, and money was key. The initiatives she worked on impacted peoples’ lives on a global scale and they required careful planning and pragmatic execution. Her work required a grasp of the big-picture considerations and attention to the fine details in equal measure, and this is where Julie excels.

Like all good leaders, Julie holds herself accountable. She does the research to understand a problem, takes responsibility for the solution, and owns the results. I trust Julie to represent all Princeton students and taxpayers rather than narrow interests and agendas. She will act in a manner that reflects her understanding that money doesn’t grow on trees. She will ensure the schools achieve broad academic success for all students, while prioritizing the children’s wellbeing.

As the very involved parent of four wonderful kids in the Princeton schools, Julie knows our district well and has a clear vision of where we need to go. I am glad that she is ready to share her many talents with the Princeton community. When you vote on November, 7, please join me in supporting Julie Ramirez for the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education.

Kirk Williamson

Cleveland Lane

Vladimir Voevodsky

Vladimir Voevodsky, a truly extraordinary and original mathematician who made remarkable advances in algebraic geometry, and whose most recent work concerned rewriting the foundations of mathematics to make them suitable for computer proof verification, died at age 51 on September 30 in Princeton, New Jersey. Voevodsky was professor in the School of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), a position he held since 2002.

Voevodsky was able to handle highly abstract ideas to solve concrete mathematical problems. He had a deep understanding of classical homotopy theory, where the objects considered are flexible, meaning continuous deformations are neglected, and was able to transpose its methods in the very rigid world of algebraic geometry. This enabled him to construct new cohomology theories for algebraic varieties, which he used to prove the Milnor and Bloch-Kato conjectures, relating K-theory groups of fields and Galois cohomology.

“When I first saw the basic definitions in motivic cohomology I thought, ‘This is much too naïve to possibly work,’” said Pierre Deligne, professor emeritus in the School of Mathematics. “I was wrong, and Voevodsky, starting from those ‘naïve’ ideas, has given us extremely powerful tools.”

More recently, Voevodsky had worked in type-theoretic formalizations of mathematics and automated proof verification. He was working on new foundations of mathematics based on homotopy-theoretic semantics of Martin-Löf type theories. This led him to introduce a new, very interesting “univalence” axiom.

“Vladimir was a beloved colleague whose contributions to mathematics have challenged and enriched the field in deep and lasting ways,” said Robbert Dijkgraaf, IAS Director and Leon Levy Professor. “He fearlessly attacked the most abstract and difficult problems with an approach that was exceptionally innovative yet decidedly practical. Most recently, he was focused on developing tools for mathematicians working in highly advanced areas, such as higher-dimensional structures, laying out a grand vision for the future of mathematics. He was a pioneer and a catalyst and will be greatly missed by the Institute community.”

Born in Moscow on June 4, 1966, Voevodsky was awarded the Fields Medal in 2002 at age 36, shortly after his appointment as professor in the School of Mathematics. He had spent the prior three years (1998–2001) as a long-term member.

In addition to the Fields Medal, Voevodsky’s many contributions in the field of mathematics have been recognized by numerous honors and awards. He received a Sloan Fellowship from 1996–98, Clay Prize Fellowships in 1999, 2000, 2001, and many National Science Foundation grants for his work. Voevodsky also was named an honorary professor of Wuhan University (2004) and received an honorary doctorate from University of Gothenburg (2016). He was a member of the European Academy of Sciences.

Voevodsky is survived by his former wife, Nadia Shalaby, their two daughters, Natalia Dalia Shalaby and Diana Yasmine Voevodsky, his aunt, Irina Voevodskaya, and extended family in Russia and around the world. A gathering to honor Voevodsky’s life and legacy took place at the Institute on October 8. A funeral service will be held in Moscow on December 27, followed by a mathematical conference in honor of his work on December 28 at the Steklov Mathematical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The Institute will convene an international conference on Voevodsky’s extraordinary and original work September 29–30, 2018.

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Nancy Campbell Weaver

Nancy Campbell Weaver, 80, passed away Wednesday, October 4, 2017.

Born in Petersburg, Va., she was a resident of Princeton for over 50 years. She attended Duke University and earned a BS in pharmacy from the Medical College of Virginia. It was during this time that she met her husband, Bill Weaver, in Charlottesville, Va. They moved to Princeton in 1963, when Bill was invited to the Institute for Advanced Study.

Nancy was an active member of the Princeton community. She was an EMT and volunteered for the Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad for nearly 20 years (’79-’99). As her children matured, she returned to pharmacy, working briefly in Petersburg, Va. then in the Princeton area.

Nancy enjoyed religious studies and attended courses at the Princeton Theological Seminary and frequently participated at weekly Talmud study at The Jewish Center of Princeton. She loved learning, reading of any kind, genealogy, dolls, and antiques.

She was the wife of the late David William Weaver, III, a mathematician. She was also predeceased by her sister Beth Daniel. She is survived by two daughters and one son-in-law: Sallie Campbell Weaver, a lawyer, of Los Angeles, Calif.; Drs. Yaffa and Mark Brown, of Mobile, Ala.; as well as her younger brother, Arthur Gill; 3 grandchildren; and 5 nieces and nephews.

Funeral services and burial were at 11 a.m. on Sunday, October 8 at Washington Cemetery, 104 Deans Rhode Hall Road, Deans, N.J. Memorial donations may be made to the Rabbi’s discretionary fund at The Jewish Center of Princeton. Funeral arrangements were by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Road, Ewing.

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Sonja Olson

Our sweet and gentle daughter, Sonja Carl Goodwin Olson, died early Monday, October 9, with her parents and her caregiver of many years at her bedside. Her death resulted from acute complications of a progressive and degenerative neurologic disease known as “NBIA disorder.”

Born on the Feast of St. Lucia, December 13, 1995, she was a lifelong resident of Griggstown, New Jersey. She was proud to have graduated in June from the Midland School in North Branch. Over the years, Midland created the perfect environment for Sonja to flourish. She especially enjoyed being a Girl Scout, school dances, music therapy, jigsaw puzzles, and all the Laura Ingalls Wilder Little House books. She filled our homes with her arts and crafts projects, jewelry, and mosaics.

Sonja charmed people with her beautiful smile and quirky sense of humor. She loved her sister and brothers, who were able to be with her before her passing. She is survived by her mother Megan Thomas and husband Tom Bodenberg; father Robert Olson and fiancée Irene Strapko; siblings Robert Olson and wife Sara Probasco Olson of Portland, Maine; sister Gwyneth Olson and husband Kendrick Smith of Princeton and Toronto; brother Nevin Olson and wife Allison O’Brien of Somerset; her nieces whom she adored, Lucy and Livy Olson; her grandparents, Lowell and Judy Thomas of Blue Hill, Maine; and grandmother Jacqueline Olson of Meadowbrook, Pa.; and by her beloved caregiver of many years, Gloria Orantes.

Her family is thankful for the compassion and expertise of the St. Peter’s University Hospital pediatric intensive care unit nurses and doctors.

A mass of Christian burial will be held Tuesday, October 17, at 2 p.m. at All Saints’ Church, 16 All Saints’ Road, Princeton. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Saul Funeral Home, Hamilton Square.

Contributions in Sonja’s memory may be made to The Midland Foundation, P.O. Box 5026, North Branch, NJ 08876, and to NBIA Disorders Association, 2082 Monaco Court, El Cajon, CA 92019-4235.

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Jean Millis Gilpin

Jean Millis Gilpin, age 86, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 in Greensboro, Vt. Her husband of 62 years, Robert (Bob) Gilpin, was by her side. A teacher at heart, Jean nurtured, inspired, and advocated for others throughout her life. The stories are too numerous to tell, but include her bringing civics lessons to life by turning her elementary school classroom into the country of Gilpania, successfully fighting for the acceptance of the first Jewish member of her college sorority, and inspiring others to take chances and reach for distant goals.

One of those she inspired was her husband, who still shakes his head in wonder at the woman he credits with transforming him from a kid from Enosburg Falls, Vt., with less than stellar grades, to a world-renowned scholar and Eisenhower professor of International Affairs, emeritus at Princeton University.

Born in Appleton, Wisconsin, to John Schoff and Katherine Millis, Jean moved with her family in 1941 to Burlington, Vt., where her father began his tenure as president of the University of Vermont. After leaving Vermont to spend her freshman year at Lawrence College, she joined the Class of 1953 at UVM, where she pledged the sorority Kappa Alpha Theta, served on the student government association, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Mortar Board (the senior women’s honor society).

Jean earned her first master’s degree in international politics from Western Reserve University (the second was from Trenton State in education). She subsequently worked at the United Nations prior to marrying Bob in 1955. Bob and Jean moved to Princeton in 1962, where they raised their children, Linda, Beth, and Rob. Over the next 30+ years, Jean was active in many community organizations, taught elementary school, and welcomed a stream of her children’s friends and Princeton University students into their home.

Jean Gilpin’s interests and accomplishments were many, and included foreign languages (particularly Japanese), classical music, innovative teaching methodologies, playing the piano, and cold water swimming. She could be found on Sunday afternoons, sandwiched between morning services at Trinity Episcopal church and an afternoon walk at Herrontown Woods or Marquand Park, deep in discussion with Bob about the Sunday Times’ reporting of the week’s news. Jean was a champion debater of the State of Vermont, so Bob wisely resigned himself to losing any and all arguments about current affairs, or any other topic for that matter.

Bob’s sabbaticals in London and Paris were highlights of their family life, along with summer trips to visit grandparents on Cape Cod, Lake Champlain, and Northfield, Vt. After Bob’s retirement, he and Jean moved to their home in Greensboro, Vt, and used it as a home base while traveling the world.

A Girl Scout leader, Jean was the epitome of the lyrics known by Girl Scouts everywhere: “Make new friends but keep the old.” Bonds formed in childhood, during her college years, and while living in Princeton and Greensboro, were nurtured throughout her life and remained vitally important to her.

But in the end, after the world travels, the parenting, the joys, and the struggles, it all comes back to Bob and Jean. Jean was Bob’s partner, editor, and co-author of eight books that have been published in dozens of countries and a multitude of languages, and several of which are considered seminal works. Perhaps the best vignette of their lives together can be found in a profile from the Vermont Quarterly:

“The Gilpins have a close, if occasionally cantankerous relationship, as happens when a couple lives and works together so closely. At one point when he asks if she’s going to talk or let him talk, she laughs merrily and says, “Oh, I’m going to interrupt you, of course. The way I always have.” And they move on, telling their stories, about the long-ago debates Bob would spark among Harvard intellectuals when he introduced the concept of an intersection between politics and economics … about the progressive teaching ideas Jean put into practice … about hearing a beautiful voice singing from the balcony across the street from their apartment in Paris and looking over to see Joan Baez … about how the word around the UVM campus in the ’50s, according to Jean, was that Bob was a radical. Whether this was part of the appeal she doesn’t say ….”

Jean is survived by her husband Robert G. Gilpin, Jr., children Linda Gilpin and Beth Gilpin (both of Waterbury, Vt.) and Robert M. Gilpin of Newton, Mass., and her sister Alice Grover Vest. She will be missed by grandchildren Jamie Benson, Hazen and Riley Powell, Everett, Jeremy, and Toby Gilpin, and Chase and Chelsea Benson (now Laukaitis), all of whom she taught, whether to swim, to read, or the proper usage of the phrase “lie down” vs. “lay down.” Bob, Linda, Beth, and Rob wish to express their deep and heartfelt appreciation to Brenna Gonyo, whose skill, compassion, and dedication have been a blessing over the past four years.

Services will be held in Vermont and Princeton; details to be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers please consider a donation to the University of Vermont or Greensboro Nursing Home in Greensboro, Vt., whose staff provided Jean with comfort and care in her final months. Assisting the family is the Perkins-Parker Funeral Home and Cremation Service in Waterbury, Vt. Condolences can be sent to Beth Gilpin, 480 Black Bear Hollow, Waterbury, VT, or online at www.perkinsparker.com.

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Jane Merchant Hanna

Jane Merchant Hanna, 82, of Old Chatham, New York, died Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at home surrounded by her family. She spent her last years in Princeton, New Jersey to be closer to family.

She was born in Minneapolis, Minn. to the late Ralph Merchant and Louise (Gorham) Merchant, where she lived until attending Smith College, graduating in 1957. Although she remained on the East Coast for the rest of her life, she always attributed her spirit (which was formidable), determination (equally formidable), and down-to-earth attitudes to her Midwestern heritage.

Jane had two careers: teaching and landscape design. She began her teaching career at the Buckingham School in Cambridge, Mass. and as a middle school math teacher at Albany Academy for Girls after the family moved to Albany N.Y. She retired in 1980, to fulfill her lifelong passion for gardens and gifted eye for design, starting Wendover Farm Nursery. She was also involved in Tannery Pond Concerts, an organization committed to bringing world class chamber music to the Berkshires at an affordable price.

She met her husband, John Hanna, Jr. in Cambridge, Mass. Married in 1958, they lived in Cambridge until 1969 when they moved briefly to Albany before moving to their beloved Wendover Farm in Old Chatham, N.Y. Over 47 years together on the farm, they planted beautiful and abundant gardens, filled the barns with animals, and created a welcoming gathering spot for friends, family, and animals. Jane always loved animals, and collected an impressive array over the years, including a fair number of strays that wandered into the yard and never left. Nothing gave Jane more pleasure than to share Wendover with family and friends. Neighbors and guests were always welcome to gather by the pond for a cookout next to the firebowl. Over the years, Jane and John welcomed many of their friends’ children to spend portions of their summers at Wendover, and these visitors became cherished friends in their own rights. In the later years, having her grandchildren gather together and enjoy the farm provided huge joy, and all nine grandchildren consider time on the farm with Granna some of their most cherished memories.

She is survived her husband of 58 years, John Hanna, Jr, three children: Lili Hanna Morss and her husband Steve of Concord, Mass.: Kate Hanna Morgan of Princeton; Josh Merchant Hanna and his wife Kim of Waukesha, Wisc.; and nine grandchildren: Alexandra, Abigail and Caroline Morss: Sarah, Jasper, Lucy and Annie Morgan: and Will and Genevieve Hanna; and a brother Louis Merchant and his wife Joyce of Wayzata, Minn.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton.

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K. Philip Dresdner

K. Philip Dresdner (Phil) died Saturday October 7, 2017. Phil was born April 13, 1927 in Trenton, New Jersey where he attended public schools until attending The Lawrenceville School where he graduated in the class of 1945. Phil served in the U.S. Merchant Marines, USNR, for a year and then received a BA from Yale in 1950. He married Katherine V. Winans (Kay) in June 1950. Phil was recruited while at Yale to join the CIA and assigned to an executive position in Radio Free Europe’s Munich Station in Germany. After leaving Munich Station, Phil continued to work for the CIA in New York at Radio Free Europe and then worked in a number of brokerage firms on Wall Street before opening his own company, Dresdner and Co. in Montclair, N.J. in 1971. While living in Montclair he served as trustee, treasurer, and president of the Montclair Art Museum, as president of the Yale Club of Montclair, and began serving in 1975 as a trustee of the Lawrenceville School.

Phil and Kay moved to Lawrence Township in 1980. His love for and devotion to The Lawrenceville School is reflected in his 20 years of active service on the Board and continued participation as a trustee emeritus. He served as board vice president, as executive committee chairman and treasurer of finance, managing the school’s endowment and saving the school millions of dollars in management fees. He also served as chair of the property committee and received Lawrenceville School’s Distinguished Alumnus Award. Phil had a major impact on the life of the school by actively supporting the Lawrenceville School Board’s move from an all-male school to coeducation which was finally approved in 1985. He supported gender equality in athletics with the creation in 1988 of the Dresdner Cup given annually in recognition of the highest athletic achievement of a girl’s Crescent House to correspond to the Foresman Cup awarded annually to a boy’s Circle House for highest athletic achievement at the school. Phil was also instrumental in hiring the school’s first female headmaster in 2003.

Phil had a lifelong love of music. As a child he studied the violin with Josef Chudnofsky, first chair violinist of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra and played the violin in the Lawrenceville School orchestra and music groups at Yale. He supported the Lawrenceville School music department, donated his Heberlein violin to the school for students to play, and funded the building of Dresdner Hall, a new recital hall in the Clark Music Center.

Phil also served on the Board of the Princeton University Art Museum and was president and treasurer of the Morven Museum Board. In 1990 Phil singlehandedly saved the Morven property from becoming a New Jersey State Police Barracks.

Phil served on many Boards including the Montclair Savings Bank, the Montclair Mountainside Hospital, the Montclair YMCA, First Jersey National Bank and Trust, NJ Seeds, and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

Phil was a member and chairman of District Committee No. 9 of the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD), and a trustee of the Albert Penick Foundation, where he grew an initial investment of $300,000 to more than $5 million over time, making gifts annually over 40 years.

Fishing was another lifelong passion. Phil began fishing as a 4-year-old child on Marshall’s Creek and on the Delaware River in Shawnee, Pennsylvania. He later learned to fly fish and spent 30 years devoting himself to the art of fly casting, travelling to fish in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Alaska, Canada, Iceland, Maine, and the Bahamas. He travelled for many years to Patagonia fishing the Alumine, Malleo, and Corcovado Rivers and also to fish the Traful, Caleufu, Collon Cura, and the Chimehuin Rivers south of Buenos Aires. In July 1995 Phil had a spectacular record day fishing on the Restigouche River in New Brunswick, Canada where he caught and released a 48 pound salmon and then a 60 pound salmon. Catching these two salmon were an “incredible angling feat” as reported in the Bangor Daily News on July 15, 1995.

Phil is survived by his four children, Katherine V. Dresdner of Hopewell, N.J.; Karl P. Dresdner of Newtown, Pa.; Robert P. Dresdner of Vienna, Va.; and William W. Dresdner of Monticello, Va.; and also survived by his four grandchildren, Kate, Teddy, Maura, and Brendan. He is predeceased by his wife Katherine Winans Dresdner; his parents, Karl George Dresdner and Miriam Virginia Neumann; and his sister Hedl D. Roulette.

The burial will be at the Lawrenceville Cemetery on Route 206 near Carter Road, Lawrence, N.J. at 10 a.m. on Saturday, October 14 to which Phil’s friends are welcome, followed by a Memorial Service at 11 a.m. at The Edith Memorial Chapel at The Lawrenceville School. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to SAVE-A Friend to Homeless Animals, 1010 Route 601, Skillman, NJ 08558. Arrangements are through the Mather Hodge Funeral Home, Princeton, N.J.

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Felice Pirone

Felice V. “Felix” Pirone, 87, of Princeton died Monday, October 2, 2017 at home surrounded by his loving family. Born in Pettoranello Di Molise, Italy, he was a lifelong Princeton resident. He was the owner-operator of F. Pirone and Son Paving Inc., member of St. Paul’s Church, the Italian-American Sportsman Club, and Romaeterna. Felix was an avid New York Mets fan, bowler, and card player. He loved his farm and most of all enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren.

Son of the late Umberto and Filomena C. (Nini) Pirone, husband of the late Elizabeth Marie Pirone, he is survived by two daughters Felisa Scannella, Pamela Pirone–Verdi; a son Umberto Pirone; a brother Anthony J. Pirone; a sister and brother-in-law Christine and Teodoro Tamasi; grandchildren Laurence Michael, Larisa and Steven Scannella, Francis Verdi, F. Nicholas, Julia, Salvatore, Joseph, Thomas Pirone; and several nieces and nephews.

The funeral will be held 10 a.m. on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 from the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at St. Paul’s Church 216 Nassau Street, Princeton. Burial will follow in the Princeton Cemetery.

Friends were asked to call on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home 40 Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.

Memorial contributions may be made to: American Lung Association.

Last weekend’s Festival of the Arts at Princeton University featured many events, including an immersive performance featuring original music by Director of Electronic Music Jeff Snyder for the Princeton Laptop Orchestra (PLOrk), TILT Brass, and So Percussion. The performance was in collaboration with theatrical lighting designer Jane Cox, director of PU’s Program in Theater, and Assistant Professor of Architecture Alex Kilian. Festivalgoers share their impressions of the new Lewis Arts complex on page 6, and more photos are on page 16. (Photo by Erica Cardenas)

By Anne Levin

Soon after moving to Princeton eight years ago and becoming a history professor at Princeton University, Martha A. Sandweiss began thinking about a project examining the town’s relationship to slavery. She was aware that other universities were involved in similar endeavors, and thought there might be a relationship worth investigating in Princeton. more

REEL LIFE: After the film, John Stier, one of Nash’s sons, and Dr. Joseph Kohn spoke about their memories of the real John Nash. “You have ten years of fantastic work, and it sort of looks like in the movie that he spent most of his time cutting out newspapers,” said Kohn. “He did really remarkable work.”

By William Uhl

On October 4, Princeton Garden Theatre partnered with the Historical Society of Princeton to hold a screening of A Beautiful Mind, a 2001 film about Nobel Prize winner and Princeton Professor John Nash’s mathematical achievements and struggles with schizophrenia. more

By Donald Gilpin

Edward Felten, professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School (WW), and Alan Krueger, professor of economics and public policy at WW, will serve on a new task force seeking to transform America’s labor market from one based largely on degrees to one based on skills. more

OLD MILL, NEW LOOK: A view of the interior of Isles’ Mill One facility, a historic mill in the final stages of renovation, that will serve as the home of the organization’s Social Profit Center. (Photo courtesy of Isles, Inc.)

By Doug Wallack

On Saturday, October 21, Trenton-based nonprofit Isles will hold its first ever Fall Fest fundraiser in the new Social Profit Center at Mill One in Hamilton. The event will feature food and drink from local restaurants and vendors, along with performances and works from area musicians and artists.  more

Breast cancer survivors, physicians, and others walked the runway October 6 at The Westin Princeton. The annual Lord & Taylor “In the Pink” fashion show benefits the YWCA Princeton’s Breast Cancer Resource Center.

CALLING ALL PHS ALUMNI: Donna Wilkinson, PHS class of 1957, at her 60th anniversary reunion. Wilkinson’s daughter, Mia Sacks, PHS ’83, is co-chair of the alumni steering committee and a leading organizer of the newly formed PHS Alumni Association.

By Donald Gilpin

Looking to engage alumni, build a relationship with them, and at the same time benefit current students, the Princeton Public Schools District (PPS) is launching an alumni association for Princeton High School (PHS) graduates. more

ART AND LIFE: From his childhood behind the Iron Curtain in Bulgaria to a successful career in the restaurant business (starting at a resort on the Black Sea) to a new life in New Jersey as a painter, muralist, and designer, Cvetko Ivanov has come a long way to his porch on Vandeventer Street, where he stands amidst a selection of his original works. 

By Donald Gilpin

Artist Cvetko Ivanov can be found most Saturdays and Sundays surrounded by dozens of his paintings on the front porch of the Vandeventer Street house where he lives with his niece and her husband. From his easy-going, friendly demeanor as he talks to passers-by and other interested customers, it might be hard to guess that his life has taken more than a few dramatic turns.  more

By Anne Levin

Six years after it was first proposed, a 3-megawatt solar array is about to open at the closed municipal landfill on River Road. Officials will gather Thursday morning, October 12 at 11 a.m., for the ribbon cutting.

The project is a partnership between Princeton, Stony Brook Regional Sewage Authority, and New Jersey Resources Clean Energy Ventures. It will supply up to 25 percent of the energy needs of the Stony Brook sewage facility on River Road. The municipality will receive a lease payment of $25,000 a year for the use of the site. more

“AFGHAN GIRL, 2001”: This photograph by Princeton Day School photography teacher Thatcher Cook is featured in the school’s Visual and Design Arts Faculty Exhibition, on view from October 16 through November 9. An opening reception with the artists will be held on on Friday, October 20 from 5 to 7 p.m.

The Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School presents the Visual and Design Arts Faculty Exhibition, on view from October 16 through November 9. There will be an opening reception with the artists on Friday, October 20 from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. more

“BELLE”: The collage paintings of Meredith Remz are on exhibit at Blawenburg Cafe in Skillman through January 5, 2018. Remz says she draws inspiration from contemporary and industrial design, as well as Mother Nature.

Meredith Remz debuts her work at Blawenburg Cafe in Skillman this fall with a solo exhibition of expressive collage paintings. The exhibit will be on display through January 5, 2018. It is is free and open to the public, child-friendly, and all art is for sale. more

By Stuart Mitchner

Movie actors are not always the most quotable beings. The value of their words depends not on substance or style so much as gossip potential, career-advancement, otherwise known as the publicity quotient. Then you have one-of-a-kind people like Robert Mitchum, who was born 100 years ago, August 6, 1917. Unless Mitchum has a ghostwriter named Hemingway slipping him gems, what he says fits perfectly with the big man dwarfing the screen at the Garden two summers ago in Out of the Past. Anyone who has seen Mitchum in that film or in other RKO noirs like Where Danger Lives will recognize him in these words — “Listen. I got three expressions: looking left, looking right, and looking straight ahead.” I hope Hemingway read that line before he died.  more