Area Exhibits 7/10/13 Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has works by painters Alla Podolsky and Charlie Katzenbach through August 4. Visit lambertvillearts.com.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has a Terrace Project by Chris Maher and Instructor/Student Work on view through July. www.artscouncilof
princeton.org.

Bank of Princeton Community Art Gallery, 10 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Fresh eyes on art” featuring young Bucks County artists, through July 13.

Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University has “Passages: Mixed Media Artwork by Ela Shah” through September 11. (609) 497-2441.

Cherry Grove Farm, 3200 Route 206, Lawrenceville, is displaying work by members of The Creative Collective throughout the summer. Visit meetup.com/Creative-Collec
tive-of-Mercer-County.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, through July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is on view through September 22. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has a juried show July 12-August 11.Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Caithness and Sutherland Landscapes,” photos by Kelli Lynn Abdoney, through July 28.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertoia: Structure and Sound” is on view July 20-October 13. Visit www.michenerartmuseum.org.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13. On July 10, “Art After Hours” will celebrate a new exhibit, “Maples in the Mist: Chinese Poems for Children Illustrated by Jean & Mou-sien Tseng” from 5-9 p.m. The Cancion Franklin Band will perform; admission is $5. The exhibit runs through June 22, 2014.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

New Hope Arts Center, 37 West Bridge Street, New Hope, has “Cut and Paste: The Art of Ruth Marcus” in its A Space Gallery July 13-28.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “The Re-Connection Project: Endangered Birds of New Jersey” through July 15. Visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, has “Trash Menagerie,” featuring art made from found objects and recycled materials by the library’s Artist Group through July 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” through September 15. “American Prospects: 19th Century City Views by William James Bennett” is shown through July 14. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Aaron Epstein through August 6. The opening is July 12, 7-9 p.m.

Tinicum Arts Festival, Tinicum Park, Route 32, Erwinna, Pennsylvania, has works by John Schmidtberger, who will paint at the site beginning at 11 a.m. July 13. The festival continues through July 14, 5 p.m. Visit www.TinicumArtsFes
tival.org.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent oil paintings and studies by Thom Montanari July 12-September 13. The opening is July 12, 6-9 p.m. (609) 737-3838.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Full Circles/Painters Circle,” the work of older artists, through July 20.

Area Exhibits Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has works by painters Alla Podolsky and Charlie Katzenbach July 5-August 4. The opening is July 6, 5-9 p.m. Visit lambertvillearts.com.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has a Terrace Project by Chris Maher and Instructor/Student Work on view through July. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Bank of Princeton Community Art Gallery, 10 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Fresh eyes on art” featuring young Bucks County artists, through July 13.

Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University has “Passages: Mixed Media Artwork by Ela Shah” through September 11. (609) 497-2441.

Cherry Grove Farm, 3200 Route 206, Lawrenceville, is displaying work by members of The Creative Collective throughout the summer. Visit meetup.com/Creative-Collective-of-Mercer-County.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, through July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is through September 22. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Look Again” by Rhoda Kassof-Isaac, “Into the Garden” by Martha Weintraub, and “Colors of Iceland” by Wiebke Martens” through July 7. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Caithness and Sutherland Landscapes,” photos by Kelli Lynn Abdoney, July 8-28.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertoia: Structure and Sound” is on view July 20-October 13. Visit www.michenerartmuseum.org.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13. On July 10, “Art After Hours” will celebrate a new exhibit, “Maples in the Mist: Chinese Poems for Children Illustrated by Jean & Mou-sien Tseng” from 5-9 p.m. The Cancion Franklin Band will perform; admission is $5. The exhibit runs July 10-June 22, 2014.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

New Hope Arts Center, 37 West Bridge Street, New Hope, has “Cut and Paste: The Art of Ruth Marcus” in its A Space Gallery July 13-28.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “The Re-Connection Project: Endangered Birds of New Jersey” through July 15. Visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” through September 15. “American Prospects: 19th Century City Views by William James Bennett” is shown through July 14. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Aaron Epstein through August 6. The opening is July 12,7-9p.m.

Tinicum Arts Festival, Tinicum Park, Route 32, Erwinna, Pennsylvania, has works by John Schmidtberger, who will paint at the site beginning at 11 a.m. July 13. The festival continues through July 14, 5 p.m. Visit www.TinicumArtsFes
tival.org.

Two-Nineteen Gallery, 219 East Hanover Street, Trenton, presents “What’s Happenin’” through July 5. Mel Leipzig curated the exhibit of emerging artists. www.sagecoalitionnj.com.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent oil paintings and studies by Thom Montanari July 12-September 13. The opening is July 12, 6-9 p.m. (609) 737-3838.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Full Circles/Painters Circle,” the work of older artists, through July 20.

Area Exhibits 6/26/13 Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Sunshine & Joy,” paintings by Douglas Sardo and Joe Kazimierczyk through June 30. A closing reception is June 30, 3-5 p.m. From July 5-August 4, painters Alla Podolsky and Charlie Katzenbach show their work. The opening is July 6, 5-9 p.m. Visit lambertville
arts.com.

Arts Council of Prince–ton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has a Terrace Project by Chris Maher and Instructor/Student Work on view through July. www.artscouncilof
princeton.org.

Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University has “Passages: Mixed Media Artwork by Ela Shah” through September 11. (609) 497-2441.

Cherry Grove Farm, 3200 Route 206, Lawrenceville, is displaying work by members of The Creative Collective throughout the summer. Visit meetup.com/Creative-Collec
tive-of-Mercer-County.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, through July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is through September 22. The opening reception for the shows is June 22, 7-9 p.m. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Look Again” by Rhoda Kassof-Isaac, “Into the Garden” by Martha Weintraub, and “Colors of Iceland” by Wiebke Martens” through July 7. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Spring Splash,” works by Watercolorists Unlimited, through June 30. From July 8-28, “Caithness and Sutherland Landscapes,” photos by Kelli Lynn Abdoney, is on display.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertola: Structure and Sound” is on view July 20-October 13. Visit www.michenerartmuseum.org.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13. “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” is on view weekends through June 30.

Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, shows Robert Allard’s pen and ink and pencil drawings through June 30. Visit mcl.org.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

New Hope Arts Center, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa., has the Artsbridge 19th Annual Juried Show through June 29 (Fridays-Sundays, 1-5 p.m.). In the “A” Space, “don’t mention the WAR,” recent work by Linda Guenste, is on view through July 3. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “The Re-Connection Project: Endangered Birds of New Jersey” through July 15. Visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery, 20 Library Place, exhibits works by master iconographers and apprentices of the Prosopon School through June 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Picturing Power: Capitalism, Democracy, and American Portraiture” through June 30. From June 29-September 15, “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” is exhibited. “American Prospects: 19th Century City Views by William James Bennett” is shown through July 14. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Away We Go,” a group exhibition by Art+10, through July 2. From July 3-August 5, Vasundhara Bharatiya will be showing her work. The opening is July 14, 3-6 p.m.

Two-Nineteen Gallery, 219 East Hanover Street, Trenton, presents “What’s Happenin’” through July 5. Mel Leipzig curated the exhibit of emerging artists. www.sagecoalitionnj.com.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent watercolors by Linda Bradshaw through June 29.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Full Circles/Painters Circle,” the work of older artists, through July 20.

Area Exhibits 6/19/13 Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Sunshine & Joy,” paintings by Douglas Sardo and Joe Kazimierczyk through June 30. A closing reception is June 30, 3-5 p.m. From July 5-August 4, painters Alla Podolsky and Charlie Katzenbach show their work. The opening is July 6, 5-9 p.m. Visit lambertvillearts.com.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has a Terrace Project by Chris Maher and Instructor/Student Work on view through July. www.artscouncilof
princeton.org.

Cherry Grove Farm, 3200 Route 206, Lawrenceville, is displaying work by members of The Creative Collective throughout the summer. Visit meetup.com/Creative-Collec
tive-of-Mercer-County.

College of New Jersey Art Gallery, Pennington Road, Ewing Township, presents “Art, Innovation and Ideas,” a juried K-12 exhibition through June 23 including work by students from all over the state. Artist Faith Ringgold is among the jurors.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, through July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is through September 22. The opening reception for the shows is June 22, 7-9 p.m. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Look Again” by Rhoda Kassof-Isaac, “Into the Garden” by Martha Weintraub, and “Colors of Iceland” by Wiebke Martens” through July 7. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Spring Splash,” works by Watercolorists Unlimited, through June 30.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.grounds
forsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princeton
history.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertola: Structure and Sound” is on view July 20-October 13. Visit www.michenerartmuseum.org.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick is exhibiting “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13. “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” is on view weekends through June 30.

Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, shows Robert Allard’s pen and ink and pencil drawings through June 30. Visit mcl.org.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

New Hope Arts Center, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa., has the Artsbridge 19th Annual Juried Show through June 29 (Fridays-Sundays, 1-5 p.m.). In the “A” Space, “don’t mention the WAR,” recent work by Linda Guenste, is on view through July 3. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “The Re-Connection Project: Endangered Birds of New Jersey” through July 15. Visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has in it’s second floor gallery a “Drip Art Series” by members of the Arctists Collective.

Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery, 20 Library Place, exhibits works by master iconographers and apprentices of the Prosopon School through June 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Picturing Power: Capitalism, Democracy, and American Portraiture” through June 30. “1913: The Year of Modernism” is on display through June 23. From June 29-September 15, “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” is exhibited. “American Prospects: 19th Century City Views by William James Bennett” is shown through July 14. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Away We Go,” a group exhibition by Art+10, through July 2. From July 3-August 5, Vasundhara Bharatiya will be showing her work. The opening is July 14, 3-6 p.m.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, has works by Jordana Scheer through June 22.

Two-Nineteen Gallery, 219 East Hanover Street, Trenton, presents “What’s Happenin’” through July 5. Mel Leipzig curated the exhibit of emerging artists. www.sagecoalitionnj.com.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent watercolors by Linda Bradshaw through June 29.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has “Full Circles/Painters Circle,” the work of older artists, through July 20. The opening reception is June 23, 4-6 p.m. (609) 716-1931.

Historical Society of Princeton House Tour A Great Success Thanks to 600 Participants Post

To the Editor:

Thank you, Princeton! The Historical Society of Princeton’s House Tour 2013 on November 2 was a great success. We are indebted to the 600 participants who came out on a crisp autumn Saturday to visit five icons of Princeton architecture. It was the perfect day for exploring history, architecture, and design with friends.

The House Tour is our most important fall fundraiser, and we are so grateful to the people who make it possible: our generous homeowners, who open their houses for the tour; David Schure, our House Tour Chair; the hard-working House Tour Committee, that organizes the event each year; and our House Captains and 99 dedicated docents, who heroically oversee operations at each of the houses the day of the event. We are particularly grateful to the enthusiastic agents of Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty for turning out, as always, in great numbers to provide support on the ground.

This year, we were touched to receive especially generous support from businesses in our community. Thanks to all 26 of our business sponsors: Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty and Hamilton Building Supply Company were our lead Bainbridge Sponsors for the event; Acorn Glen: An Assisted Living Residence; Alchemist & Barrister Restaurant; Baxter Construction; Ronica A. Bregenzer, AIA; T. Jeffery Clarke Architect; Glenmede; Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate; Greenleaf Painters; Hamilton Jewelers; Ann Harwood, Weichert Realtors;
Maximillian Hayden, Architect; Ivy Inn; Julius Gross Painting & Home Improvement; Knight Architects; MacLean Agency; McCaffrey’s; Pinneo Construction; Princeton Corkscrew; Princeton Van Service; Tobias Design; Van Note-Harvey Associates; Candy Walsh, Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty; Woodwinds; and Viburnum Designs.

We are also grateful to the Princeton Police and the Lawrence Township Police for helping us manage parking and movement at each of the properties, and to Princeton Public Works for clearing leaf piles in advance of the event. Last, but not least, we would like to extend special thanks to Avril Moore for hosting a tremendous reception at Tusculum at the end of the day. It was a perfect finish to a special day.

Finally, on behalf of the Trustees and staff at the Historical Society of Princeton, thank you to everyone who came out and participated on the Tour. Princeton’s support of this special event each year is truly meaningful. We look forward to 2014!

Erin Dougherty,

Executive Director

Eve Mandel

Director of Programs and Visitor Services

Area Exhibits 7/24/13 Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has works by painters Alla Podolsky and Charlie Katzenbach through August 4. Visit lambertvillearts.com.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has a Terrace Project by Chris Maher and Instructor/Student Work on view through July. www.artscouncilof
princeton.org.

Artworks, Everett Alley, Trenton, presents “nOgWorks,” a group exhibit from the AbOminOg Arts Collective, August 6-September 21. The opening reception is August 10, 6-8 p.m. www.ArtworksTrenton.org.

Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University has “Passages: Mixed Media Artwork by Ela Shah” through September 11. (609) 497-2441.

D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, Olivia Rainbow Gallery, has the Ennis Beley Project/Young Audiences “Arts for Living” Photography Exhibit: “The Cartography of Self,” through August 2. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, through July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is on view through September 22. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has a juried show through August 11. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Caithness and Sutherland Landscapes,” photos by Kelli Lynn Abdoney, through July 28. From August 4-25, paintings by Arthur Anderson are on exhibit. The opening is August 4, 1-3 p.m.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertoia: Structure and Sound” is on view through October 13. Visit www.michenerart
museum.org.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” through September 8. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

New Hope Arts Center, 37 West Bridge Street, New Hope, has “Cut and Paste: The Art of Ruth Marcus” in its A Space Gallery through July 28.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, has “Trash Menagerie,” featuring art made from found objects and recycled materials by the library’s Artist Group through July 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” through September 15. “Faces and Facets: Recent Acquisitions” is on view through August 18. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Silverman Gallery, 4920 York Route (Route 202), Buckingham Green, Buckingham, Pa., shows “Side by Side,” with more than 175 works by the gallery’s four artists, August 3-September 28. Visit www.silvermangal
lery.com.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Aaron Epstein through August 6.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent oil paintings and studies by Thom Montanari through September 13.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has works by faculty members on view through September 6. Artists are Priscilla Snow Algava, Hong Lu, Donna Payton, Aparajita Pooja Sen, Adam Reck, and Zakia Ahmed.

Art and Artifice: Study of Dutch Masters Is Evident in Terri Hood’s Photography Post

BOUNTIFUL HARVEST: Inspired by the still lifes of the Dutch 17th century masters, photographer Terri Hood takes great pains to create a composition that invites the eye, and in this case, the palate. Her “Bountiful Harvest” will be part of an exhibition of her work opening this Friday in the main gallery at Gallery 14 in Hopewell. Work by Charles Miller will be featured in the Jay Goodkind Gallery. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: www.photogallery14.com.

BOUNTIFUL HARVEST: Inspired by the still lifes of the Dutch 17th century masters, photographer Terri Hood takes great pains to create a composition that invites the eye, and in this case, the palate. Her “Bountiful Harvest” will be part of an exhibition of her work opening this Friday in the main gallery at Gallery 14 in Hopewell. Work by Charles Miller will be featured in the Jay Goodkind Gallery. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: www.photogallery14.com.

Gallery 14 in Hopewell begins its fall season, its 13th annual, with an exhibition of work that will transport viewers to another time. Theresa (Terri) Hood’s color photographs conjure up the still lifes of the Dutch masters of the 17th century, painters like Willem Kalf (1619-1693) whose work is much admired by Ms. Hood. Her black and white landscapes are evocative of Ansel Adams (1902-1984).

That Ms. Hood has chosen her influences well will be shown by an exhibition of 26 of her photographs, (13 color, 13 black and white) opening this Friday, September 6, at Gallery 14 with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

“I fell in love with still lifes when studying the Dutch masters,” said Ms. Hood in a phone interview. “They studied light and that is what photography is all about. I’ve been working on still lifes for some five
years now and I craft them painstakingly.”

Ms. Hood’s attention to composition results in gorgeous images of pottery and drapery with artful placement of gourds and grapes, a wine glass, ferns, fruits, and flowers.

But while the Dutch painters infused their compositions with symbolic meaning, Ms. Hood focuses on beauty and light. “Sometimes I am able to use natural light from a window but more often than not I use studio lighting to mimic natural light,” says the artist for whom photography is not only a passion, it’s something of a second career.

Before turning serious attention to the camera some seven years ago, Ms. Hood had her own title insurance agency. “Now I have another life,” said the art photographer, who is in her 50s and works from her home studio in Glen Gardner, Hunterdon County.

The seeds of her present passion were sown when Ms. Hood took a college course and was introduced to the work of the great American photographer Ansel Adams. “Now, I embrace it with unbridled joy,” she said. “When I am working in my studio I am totally absorbed and unaware of the passage of time. There is so much beauty around and that’s what I am hoping to make people realize. Everybody has digital cameras in their phones today and go around taking pictures all the time, but there is a difference between taking a photograph and making a photograph. I make photographs.”

Besides Gallery 14, which she joined less than a year ago, Ms. Hood is a member of the Hunterdon County Photography Club and the Photographic Society of America where she serves as a commentator for a digital study group program on Nature. She co-manages the Exhibition Committee and the Contemporary Arts Group of the New Jersey Photography Forum.

Her work has previously been exhibited in the Hunterdon County Library; Mayo Performing Arts Center; Crane’s Mill Gallery; Overlook Hospital, Somerset County Cultural and Heritage Commission, and the Watchung Arts Center where she received an award of merit for her “Shabby Chic” portrait of a house.

She’s been in the New Jersey Photo Forum Juried Show for the past three years and has participated in the Grounds for Sculpture Focus on Sculpture juried show two years running. In 2012, her black and white image Ocean Zen received Best in Show award there.

According to Ms. Hood, black and white photography is very different from color photography. The latter forces you to look at content. “Anyone who sees a black and white photograph develop in a dark room witnesses something magical and will be transported by it, as I was.”

Her solo exhibition “Life Along the River” is currently being displayed at the Musconetcong Watershed Association Gallery.

The works in her Gallery 14 show are either 16 x 20 or 16 x 24 inches. Prices for the former at $145, and for the latter, $175.

Also featured at Gallery 14, alongside Ms. Hood’s work, will be photographs by Charles Miller of Ringoes. “Waterlilies — Monet’s Flower” in the Jay Goodkind Gallery includes traditional photography as well as images printed on fabric as large wall hangings, photographs on watercolor paper, and macro images. Mr. Miller has exhibited throughout New Jersey and has won several best in show awards.

Both exhibits open on Friday, September 6. There will also be an opportunity to Meet The Artists on Sunday September 8, from 1 to 3 p.m.

The exhibit runs in Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street Hopewell, through October 6. Hours are Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. and by appointment. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: www.photogallery14.com.

 

Area Exhibits 6/12/13 Post

Art All Night, in the Roebling Wire Rope Factory, 675 South Clinton Avenue, Trenton, starts Saturday, June 15 at 3 p.m. and runs through the following day. Visit artworkstrenton.org for more information.

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “Sunshine & Joy,” paintings by Douglas Sardo and Joe Kazimierczyk through June 30. A closing reception is June 30, 3-5 p.m. Visit lambertvillearts.com.

Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, “Unchained, the Bike Art Show” through June 13. The show explores the intersection of art and bike culture. Visit www.art
workstrenton.org.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Neighborhood Portrait: Documenting the Witherspoon-Jackson Community” on permanent exhibit. “Mimesis,” curated by Thaddeus Erdahl with works by regional ceramics artists, runs through June 15. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

College of New Jersey Art Gallery, Pennington Road, Ewing Township, presents “Art, Innovation and Ideas,” a juried K-12 exhibition through June 23 including work by students from all over the state. Artist Faith Ringgold is among the jurors.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, June 15-July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is June 15-September 22. The opening reception for all three shows is June 22, 7-9 p.m. A fine craft demonstration by Joyce Inderbitzin and Geoffrey Noden is July 14, 2 p.m. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Look Again” by Rhoda Kassof-Isaac, “Into the Garden” by Martha Weintraub, and “Colors of Iceland” by Wiebke Martens” through July 7. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Spring Splash,” works by Watercolorists Unlimited, through June 30.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculp
ture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Transformations II: Works in Steel by Karl Stirner” through June 16. “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” is on view through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertola: Structure and Sound” is on view July 20-October 13. Visit www.michenerart
museum.org.

Jane, 7 Spring Street, hosts “The James McPhillips Museum and Gift Shop Show” through June 14.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” through June 23. “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” is exhibited through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13.

Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, shows Robert Allard’s pen and ink and pencil drawings through June 30. A reception is June 15, 1-4 p.m. Visit mcl.org.

Morpeth Contemporary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, presents paintings by Ann O’Connor, titled “reverie,” through June 15.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

New Hope Arts Center, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa., has the Artsbridge 19th Annual Juried Show through June 29 (Fridays-Sundays, 1-5 p.m.). In the “A” Space, “don’t mention the WAR,” recent work by Linda Guenste, is on view through July 3. Visit www.artsbridgeonline.com.

New Jersey State Museum, 205 West State Street, Trenton, has “The Re-Connection Project: Endangered Birds of New Jersey” through July 15. Visit statemuseum.nj.gov.

Prallsville Mill, Sawmill Gallery, 33 Risler Street, Route 29, Stockton, has artworks by Lucy Graves McVicker and Charles McVicker through June 15. A reception is Saturday, June 15, 3-5 p.m.

Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has in it’s second floor gallery a Drip Art Series by members of the Arctists Collective. A reception is June 14, 6-9 p.m. It is sponsored by The Arc Mercer. www.arcmercer.org.

Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery, 20 Library Place, exhibits works by master iconographers and apprentices of the Prosopon School through June 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum “Picturing Power: Capitalism, Democracy, and American Portraiture” is on view through June 30. “1913: The Year of Modernism” is on display through June 23. From June 29-September 15, “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” is exhibited. “American Prospects: 19th Century City Views by William James Bennett” is shown through July 14. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Away We Go,” a group exhibition by Art+10, through July 2.

Straube Center, 1 Straube Center Boulevard, Pennington, shows Jay McClellan’s “Tip, Honey & Lucky-Bold Barks” paintings through June 14. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, has works by Jordana Scheer through June 22.

Two-Nineteen Gallery, 219 East Hanover Street, Trenton, presents “Emerging Artist Exhibition” through July 6. The opening reception is June 14, 6-10 p.m.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent watercolors by Linda Bradshaw through June 29.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, exhibits “WW33: Full Circles,” by artists aged 13-33, through June 15. From June 15-July 20, “Full Circles/Painters Circle” shows the work of older artists. The opening reception is June 23, 4-6 p.m.  (609) 716-1931.

Area Exhibits 7/31/13 Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has works by painters Alla Podolsky and Charlie Katzenbach through August 4. Visit lambertvillearts.com.

Artworks, Everett Alley, Trenton, presents “nOgWorks,” a group exhibit from the AbOminOg Arts Collective, August 6-September 21. The opening reception is August 10, 6-8 p.m. www.ArtworksTrenton.org.

Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall, Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University has “Passages: Mixed Media Artwork by Ela Shah” through September 11. (609) 497-2441.

D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, Olivia Rainbow Gallery, has the Ennis Beley Project/Young Audiences “Arts for Living” Photography Exhibit: The Cartography of Self,” through August 2. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” through September 22. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” on view through August 4.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has a juried show through August 11. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has paintings by Arthur Anderson August 4-25. The opening is August 4, 1-3 p.m.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Pepon Osorio’s “Where the Me Becomes We” and Jonathan Shahn’s “Heads in Wood and Plaster” in the Domestic Arts Building through September 22. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited through September 8. “Harry Bertoia: Structure and Sound” is on view through October 13. Visit www.michenerart
museum.org.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” through September 8. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13.

Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, has cartoons and illustrations by Ralph Schlegel, retired editorial cartoonist, August 1-30. Cartoons, greeting cards, and children’s books are part of the display. Visit www.mcl.org.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, has “Connecting Impressions” by Susan Winter August 3-28. The reception is August 11, 2-4 p.m.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” through September 15. “Faces and Facets: Recent Acquisitions” is on view through August 18. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Silverman Gallery, 4920 York Route (Route 202), Buckingham Green, Buckingham, Pa., shows “Side by Side,” with more than 175 works by the gallery’s four artists, August 3-September 28. Visit www.silvermangal
lery.com.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has works by Aaron Epstein through August 6.

The “A” Space Gallery, 37 West Bridge Street, New Hope, has a photography show by Scott Riether and a glass work display by Alexander Bjorn Papageorge Fridays-Sundays August 3-25. The opening is August 2, 7-10 p.m.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent oil paintings and studies by Thom Montanari through September 13.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, has works by faculty members on view through September 6. Artists are Priscilla Snow Algava, Hong Lu, Donna Payton, Aparajita Pooja Sen, Adam Reck, and Zakia Ahmed.

 

Renowned Painter and Teacher Mel Leipzig Announces Retirement, Discusses Long Career Post

COOKING SCHOOL: Mel Leipzig’s acrylic on canvas painting,“The Cooking Teachers,” features from left: Frank Benowitz and Doug Fee of the Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management program at Mercer County Community College. Mr. Leipzig, who has taught at MCCC since 1968, will presents “Portrait of a College” at Mercer County Community College’s Trenton Campus on Wednesday, April 10 at noon in Kerney Hall, 102 North Broad Street. For more information, visit www.mccc.edu.

COOKING SCHOOL: Mel Leipzig’s acrylic on canvas painting,“The Cooking Teachers,” features from left: Frank Benowitz and Doug Fee of the Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management program at Mercer County Community College. Mr. Leipzig, who has taught at MCCC since 1968, will presents “Portrait of a College” at Mercer County Community College’s Trenton Campus on Wednesday, April 10 at noon in Kerney Hall, 102 North Broad Street. For more information, visit www.mccc.edu.

Art critic Burton Wasserman once described Mel Leipzig as “New Jersey’s greatest living painter.” Ask anyone at Mercer County Community College (MCCC), where he’s taught since 1968, and you’ll find equally enthusiastic accolades.

Being painted by the professor of Fine Arts and Art History is regarded as an enormous privilege. He’s considered a gem among the faculty.

After teaching there for 45 years, Mr. Leipzig has announced his retirement. “I just want to paint,” says the artist, who turns 78 next month.

“Professor Leipzig has been a treasured member of the Mercer faculty,” says College President Patricia C. Donohue. “Not only has he taught countless numbers of artists who have gone on to professional careers in the arts and to teaching the arts, he’s chosen to make College faculty, staff, and students part of the canvas of his life.”

To say that Mr. Leipzig paints portraits of family and friends hardly does justice to his work or its subjects. This is a unique kind of portraiture, one that captures not only individuals but their entire milieu. He records his subjects relaxing at home, or working in their offices.

His paintings are direct and unsentimental. His peers are the realist figure painters Edward Hopper, Ben Shahn, Alex Katz, Larry Rivers, and Philip Pearlstein.

Mr. Leipzig uses acrylic paints, which are brighter and more intense in color than oils, with a palette that he reduced to four colors: dark blue, dark red, yellow, and white in 1990. His paintings, which are done directly from life, have been described as being “filled with vitality and joy of life.”

Asked what keeps his work fresh over a 60-year career, and the painter replies that he has “an epiphany every ten years or so” that usually brings fresh vigor to his work. In 2008, he changed his approach to working directly with paint on canvas. His recent work is some of his best, he says, singling out a five panel painting of Michael Graves. He’s been doing a lot of diptychs and triptychs recently, painting in situ and working fast, he says.

Although his style has often been described as “photorealist,” Mr. Leipzig doesn’t work from photographs. These days he foregoes even using sketches drawn from life that he would once take back to his studio. In fact, these days, Mr. Leipzig says that his studio is more likely to be his subjects’ homes, where he’ll set up for as long as it takes to complete a painting.

“I studied with abstract painters, so I do a lot of things realists typically don’t,” says the artist, noting that he occasionally distorts perspective and uses white paint that most realists shy away from. “I’m a realist in subject matter, I want to do paintings that are scenes of everyday life; the personal environment reveals a lot about an individual.” Focus on context began, he says, in 1991 with paintings of his son and daughter. “My son’s room was covered in graffiti and my daughters in posters.”

“Great figure painting is always integrated into its background,” says Mr. Leipzig, describing his favorites Manet and Degas as “masters of integrating the figure skillfully into context.”

Community College

In recent years, Mr. Leipzig has included his MCCC colleagues as subjects, featuring images of people in myriad roles in more than 100 portraits of college faculty and staff.

Take for instance his portrait of Frank Benowitz and Doug Fee of the Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management program at MCCC. They are shown in the space that is so important to them.

“While best known for his painting, he was also MCCC’s specialist in teaching art history,” comments Ms. Donohue. “We will always remember his passion for his teaching and for bringing out the best in his students; everyone here is proud and deeply grateful that Mel chose Mercer as the destination for his professional life,” she says.

With a scholarship to study art at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, Mr. Leipzig went on to study art at The Cooper Union, at Yale University, and Pratt Institute. He’s had numerous one man shows at museums and institutions and has been featured at the Henoch Gallery in New York City.

His works are part of the permanent collections at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Yale Art Gallery, the National Academy Museum, Cooper Hewitt Museum, New Jersey State Museum, and the White House Collection in Washington, D.C. In 2006, he was elected to the National Academy of Design in New York.

Artist’s Talks

Before he leaves the college, Mr. Leipzig will present two lectures and slide presentations. The first, “Portrait of a College,” takes place at noon, April 10, in the College’s Kerney Hall at 102 North Broad Street in Trenton.

In the second, “A Lifetime Devoted to Painting,” the artist will review his 60-year career from his high school years to the present day, at noon, April 23, in the Communications Building, CM107, on the West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. This will be his last lecture before retirement.

Both lectures are free and open to the public. For more information, call (609) 570-3324 or visit www.mccc.edu/events.

Area Exhibits 6/5/13 Post

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “EAT,” a show by photographer John Treichler, through June 9. (609) 397-4588.

Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, “Unchained, the Bike Art Show” through June 13. The show explores the intersection of art and bike culture. Visit www.art
workstrenton.org.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Neighborhood Portrait: Documenting the Witherspoon-Jackson Community” on permanent exhibit. “Mimesis,” curated by Thaddeus Erdahl with works by regional ceramics artists, runs through June 15. www.artscouncil
ofprinceton.org.

Bernstein Gallery at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, has “Cooking for Change,” photos by Steve Riskind and text by Doris Friedensohn, through June 7.

College of New Jersey Art Gallery, Pennington Road, Ewing Township, presents “Art, Innovation and Ideas,” a juried K-12 exhibition through June 23 including work by students from all over the state. Artist Faith Ringgold is among the jurors.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, June 15-July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is June 15-September 22. The opening reception for all three shows is June 22, 7-9 p.m. A fine craft demonstration by Joyce Inderbitzin and Geoffrey Noden is July 14, 2 p.m. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has works by George W. Taylor in July. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Spring Splash,” works by Watercolorists Unlimited, through June 30.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Transformations II: Works in Steel by Karl Stirner” through June 16.  “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” is on view through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited June 8-September 8. Visit www.
michenerartmuseum.org.

Jane, 7 Spring Street, hosts “The James McPhillips Museum and Gift Shop Show” through June 14.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” through June 23. “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” is exhibited through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13.

Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, shows Robert Allard’s pen and ink and pencil drawings through June 30. A reception is June 15, 1-4 p.m. Visit mcl.org.

Morpeth Contemporary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, presents paintings by Ann O’Connor, titled “reverie,” through June 15.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has in it’s second floor gallery a Drip Art Series by members of the Arctists Collective. A reception is June 14, 6-9 p.m. It is sponsored by The Arc Mercer. www.arcmercer.org.

Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery, 20 Library Place, exhibits works by master iconographers and apprentices of the Prosopon School through June 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe” through June 9. “Picturing Power: Capitalism, Democracy, and American Portraiture” is on view through June 30. “1913: The Year of Modernism” is on display through June 23. From June 29-September 15, “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” is exhibited. “American Prospects: 19th Century City Views by William James Bennett” is shown through July 14. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Away We Go,” a group exhibition by Art+10, through July 2.

Straube Center, 1 Straube Center Boulevard, Pennington, shows Jay McClellan’s “Tip, Honey & Lucky-Bold Barks” paintings through June 14. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, has works
by Jordana Scheer through June 22.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent watercolors by Linda Bradshaw through June 29.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, exhibits “WW33: Full Circles,” by artists aged 13-33, through June 15. From June 15-July 20, “Full Circles/Painters Circle” shows the work of older artists. The opening reception is June 23, 4-6 p.m. (609) 716-1931.

Witherspoon Hall, 400 Witherspoon Street, will exhibit “A Princeton Mix,” a collage mural by Nancy Shill, with a dedication June 6 from 5-6:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton, the mural is made entirely of materials found or collected in Princeton. Also on view will be collages by students who were in Ms. Shill’s workshops.

Area Exhibits 5/29/13 Post

AOY Art Center at the Patterson Farm, 949 Mirror Lake Road, Yardley, Pa., has the Artists of Yardley 2nd Annual Juried Show through June 2. Original paintings, photographs, and sculpture by regional artists is on view. Visit www.artists
ofyardley.org.

Art Times Two Gallery, Princeton Brain and Spine Care, 731 Alexander Road, presents photos by Eileen Hohmuth-Lemonick and Kris Giacobbe, titled “REPORT: Providing Health Care Where Basic Needs are Unmet” through November. View by appointment. Call (609) 203-4622.

Artists’ Gallery, 18 Bridge Street, Lambertville, has “EAT,” a show by photographer John Treichler, through June 9. (609) 397-4588.

Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, “Unchained, the Bike Art Show” through June 13. The show explores the intersection of art and bike culture. Visit www.art
workstrenton.org.

Arts Council of Princeton, Paul Robeson Center, 102 Witherspoon Street, has “Neighborhood Portrait: Documenting the Witherspoon-Jackson Community” on permanent exhibit. “Mimesis,” curated by Thaddeus Erdahl with works by regional ceramics artists, runs through June 15. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

Bernstein Gallery at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, has “Cooking for Change,” photos by Steve Riskind and text by Doris Friedensohn, through June 7.

College of New Jersey Art Gallery, Pennington Road, Ewing Township, presents “Art, Innovation and Ideas,” a juried K-12 exhibition June 2-23 including work by students from all over the state. Artist Faith Ringgold is among the jurors.

D&R Greenway, 1 Preservation Place, has “Dangerous Blossoms,” a mixed-media exhibit, through July 19. Visit www.drgreenway.org.

Douglass Library, Rutgers, 8 Chapel Drive, New Brunswick, has “Trans Technology: Circuits of Culture, Self Belonging” through June 3. The show is part of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series.

Ellarslie, Trenton’s City Museum in Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton, presents the Delaware Valley Fine Crafts Invitational and “Memories of Warsaw,” paintings and drawings by Kyle Hamilton, June 15-July 28. “Trenton Entourage Motors ‘Round the World in 1909” is June 15-September 22. The opening reception for all three shows is June 22, 7-9 p.m. A fine craft demonstration by Joyce Inderbitzin and Geoffrey Noden is July 14, 2 p.m. (609) 989-1191.

Firestone Library at Princeton University, has “Your True Friend and Enemy: Princeton and the Civil War” in the Mudd Manuscript Library through July 31. “A Republic in the Wilderness: Treasures of American History from Jamestown to Appomattox” is on view through August.

Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, has “Where the Land and Water Meet: A Father and Son Show” by Richard and Win Trenner through June 2. Visit photogallery14.com.

Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, Cranbury, has “Spring Splash,” works by Watercolorists Unlimited, June 2-30. A reception is June 2, 1-3 p.m.

Grounds for Sculpture, Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, has Ming Fay’s “Canutopia” in the East Gallery through July. In the Meadow, “THRE3” and “MYTHOS” are on view. Visit www.groundsforsculpture.org.

Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, has photographs from its collection in the Princeton Pride Gallery. “We Love Princeton: Stories from the Street” and “Einstein at Home” are also on view. For more information visit www.princetonhistory.org.

The James A. Michener Art Museum at 138 South Pine Street in Doylestown, Pa., has “Transformations II: Works in Steel by Karl Stirner” through June 16. “Creative Hand, Discerning Heart: Form, Rhythm, Song” is on view through September 29. “Nelson Shanks: A Brush with Reality” is exhibited June 8-September 8. Visit www.michener
artmuseum.org.

Jane, 7 Spring Street, hosts “The James McPhillips Museum and Gift Shop Show” through June 14. Meet the artist June 1, 12-4 p.m.

The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, on the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, has “Lynd Ward Draws Stories: Inspired by Mexico’s History, Mark Twain, and Adventures in the Woods” through June 23. “Henri-Gabriel Ibels” is exhibited through September 8. Works by Russian artist Leonid Sokov are displayed through July 14. “Stars: Contemporary Prints by Derriere L’Etoile Studio” is on view through September 29. “Leningrad’s Perestroika: Crosscurrents in Photography, Video, and Music” is on view through September 13.

Lucas Gallery, Lewis Center for the Arts, 185 Nassau Street, Princeton University, has works by graduating seniors in the Program in Visual Arts, through June 4.

Morpeth Contemporary, 43 West Broad Street, Hopewell, presents paintings by Ann O’Connor, titled “reverie,” through June 15.

Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton Street, shows “Coastal Impression, Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940” through September 29. Visit www.morven.org.

The Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, has new paintings by Shirley Kern, “The Liminal Line,” through May 31. Call (609) 924-0850.

New Hope Arts Center, A Space Gallery, 2 Stockton Avenue, New Hope, Pa. shows “The Not For Sale Art Show and Salon Party” by The Artist Circle, weekends through June 2.

Plainsboro Library Gallery, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, has traditional Japanese watercolors and calligraphy by Taiko Lyding.

Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, has in it’s second floor gallery a Drip Art Series by members of the
Arctists Collective. A reception is June 14, 6-9 p.m. It is sponsored by The Arc Mercer. www.arcmercer.org.

Princeton Theological Seminary’s Erdman Gallery, 20 Library Place, exhibits works by master iconographers and apprentices of the Prosopon School through June 30.

The Princeton University Art Museum has “Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe” through June 9. “Picturing Power: Capitalism, Democracy, and American Portraiture” is on view through June 30. “1913: The Year of Modernism” is on display through June 23. From June 29-September 15, “Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection of Photography” is exhibited. Museum hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Call (609) 258-3788.

Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street, has “Space and Light” abstract paintings and portraits by Jannick Wildberg through June 4. “Away We Go,” a group exhibition by Art+10, is June 4-July 2. “Cosmic Works,” pastels by Joel Rudin, is June 2.

Straube Center, 1 Straube Center Boulevard, Pennington, shows Jay McClellan’s “Tip, Honey & Lucky-Bold Barks” paintings through June 14. Visit www.straubecenter.com.

Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, has works by Jordana Scheer through June 22.

Veridian Gallery, 43 South Main Street, Pennington, has recent watercolors by Linda Bradshaw through June 29.

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor, exhibits “WW33: Full Circles,” by artists aged 13-33, through June 15. From June 15-July 20, “Full Circles/Painters Circle” shows the work of older artists. The opening reception is June 23, 4-6 p.m. (609) 716-1931.

William Makepeace Thackeray at 200: Why Don’t We Know Him Better? Post

William Makepeace ThackerayA big, fierce, weeping, hungry man, not a strong one.

— Thomas Carlyle,
in a letter to Emerson

Carlyle was attempting to describe William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863), whose bicentenary has received little notice while the celebratory drums are already beating for Dickens 2012. The shelves of the Princeton Public Library are teeming with Dickens while Thackeray is represented by two paperback copies of Vanity Fair (1848) with Reese Witherspoon as Becky Sharp on the cover, one battered, yellowed Penguin paperback of The History of Pendennis (1850), and a two-volume Everyman edition of The Virginians (1859); one copy of The Rose and the Ring (1855) is available in the children’s collection. As for biographical or critical works, I had to order Ann Monsarrat’s An Uneasy Victorian: Thackeray the Man (Dodd, Mead 1980) through interlibrary loan.

By now we should have had a BBC dramatization of the triumphs and travails of the author of one of the world’s great novels and the creator of one of literature’s great characters, Becky Sharp. Why don’t we know him better? Why isn’t he regularly taught and quoted? Surely his face deserves to hang in the Barnes and Noble-Starbucks cafe life pantheon next to Dickens and George Eliot, who thought him “on the whole the most powerful of living novelists.”

Thackeray’s first biographer was his colleague Anthony Trollope, who clearly shared George Eliot’s opinion of a writer who, in Trollope’s words, “sees his characters, both men and women, with a man’s eye and with a woman’s” and who “dissects with a knife and also with a needle.” Contemplating Dickens, on the other hand, Trollope found “the sale of his books … so great as almost to induce a belief that Pickwicks and Oliver Twists are consumed in families like legs of mutton.” While Dickens was “a literary hero bound to be worshipped by all literary grades of men, down to the ‘devils’ of the printing-office,” Thackeray, “the older man [by a year], was still doubting, still hesitating, still struggling.”

Thackeray and Brontë

Writing under the cover of her pen name Currer Bell, Charlotte Brontë dedicated the second edition of Jane Eyre (1847) to Thackeray, giving him the lion’s share of a long, lavish preface, “a man whose words are not framed to tickle delicate ears,” who “comes before the great ones of society” speaking “truth” with “a power … prophet-like,” the “satirist of Vanity Fair” hurling “the Greek fire of his sarcasm.” She “sees in him an intellect profounder and more unique than his contemporaries have yet recognised.” After dismissing the commentaries comparing him to Fielding” (“he resembles Fielding as an eagle does a vulture”), she writes: “His wit is bright, his humour attractive, but both bear the same relation to his serious genius, that the mere lambent sheet-lightning, playing under the edge of the summer cloud, does to the electric death-spark hidden in its womb.”

Best to step back from that one. Give it space. No wonder Brontë was let down when she met the eagle in person. Instead of the prophet’s “Greek fire” and “sheet-lightning,” she found “an unwilling idol.” According to a witness in Monsarrat’s biography, “The more intense she became, the more mundane were his responses.” Still recuperating from a near-fatal illness, Thackeray saw “the trembling little frame, the great honest eyes” of “a little austere Joan of Arc marching in upon us and rebuking our easy lives and morals.” Brontë was looking for the man possessed of the audacity to conceive the heroine of Vanity Fair, whose first act is to toss the gift of Johnson’s Dictionary out the window of a coach at the feet of a Dickensian caricature of sentimental goodheartedness. In the words of the same observer of the Brontë-Thackeray conversation, Thackeray, “with characteristic contrarity of nature … insisted on discussing his books very much as a clerk in a bank would discuss the ledgers he had to keep for a salary.” Brontë was looking for a man with a mission while Thackeray, “with many wicked jests refused to recognize the mission.”

Had the big man (he was 6’4) assumed the Promethean dimensions of his “serious genius,” however, Brontë might have faulted him for arrogance, which seems to have been the case on another occasion, described by the same witness, when she treated him to a face-to-a-face litany of his shortcomings, against which he defended himself, as she puts it, “like a great Turk and heathen — that is to say, the excuses were often worse than the crime itself.”

You don’t have to read far in any account of Thackeray’s life before you once again wonder why Andrew Davies or some other BBC mainstay hasn’t written it up for a miniseries. The Brontë episode alone would make for fascinating theater, as would young William’s embattled school days, his adventures in Paris, and the poignance of his marriage to a woman who descended into madness after bearing their third child. (The coincidental resemblance of Thackeray’s doomed marriage to Rochester’s in Jane Eyre led to spurious gossip about a Bronte-Thackeray affair.)

Thackeray’s Doubts

In his preface to Pendennis (1850), the novel that followed Vanity Fair, Thackeray celebrated Brontë’s “vulture,” Henry Fielding: “Since the author of Tom Jones was buried, no writer of fiction among us has been permitted to depict to his utmost power a MAN. We must drape him and give him a certain conventional simper. Society will not tolerate the Natural in our art. Many ladies have remonstrated and subscribers left me because, in the course of the story [Pendennis having appeared first in monthly parts] I described a young man resisting and affected by temptation.” The curious thing about Thackeray’s preface is that it anticipates opposition at the outset, alerting the reader, “I tell you how a man really does act, — as did Fielding with Tom Jones, — but it does not satisfy you. You will not sympathise with this young man of mine, this Pendennis, because he is neither angel nor imp. If it be so, let it be so. I will not paint for you angels or imps, because I do not see them. The young man of the day, whom I do see, and of whom I know the inside and the out thoroughly, him I have painted for you; and here he is, whether you like the picture or not.”

If Dickens was everyman’s idea of the forthcoming, ever-agreeable novelist, Thackeray would seem to have been a more demanding alternative, if not strictly speaking an anti-novelist. Trollope’s biography begins by discussing Thackeray’s indeterminate relation to his work and his audience: “He doubted the appreciation of the world; he doubted his fitness for turning his intellect to valuable account; he doubted his physical capacity, — dreading his own lack of industry; he doubted his luck; he doubted the continual absence of some of those misfortunes on which the works of literary men are shipwrecked. Though he was aware of his own power, he always, to the last, was afraid that his own deficiencies should be too strong against him.”

Like Becky Sharp, Pendennis is an anti-hero, but without Becky’s wicked allure. As Trollope observes, he is “weak, and selfish, and untrustworthy,” and Pendennis, along with Henry Esmond (1852), The Newcomes (1855), The Virginians (1857-59), among others, has been ignored both by contemporary readers and the producers of programs like Masterpiece Theatre. Meanwhile adaptations of Vanity Fair have been staged numerous times in London and New York over the years (we may yet see Bad Becky, the musical), filmed seven times since 1911, most recently in 2004 when Mira Nair directed a heavily Indian flavored version starring Reese Witherspoon as Becky. The 1935 version, titled Becky Sharp and starring Miriam Hopkins, was the first Hollywood film shot in technicolor. The BBC has produced various miniseries, beginning in 1956 (with Joyce Redman as Becky) 1967, 1987, and 1998. In 1975 Stanley Kubrick adapted Thackeray’s The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844), the adventures of another anti-hero, a sort of male Becky Sharp, and one of Kubrick’s most admired films.

Neither the 1998 nor the 2004 versions of Vanity Fair, which I watched this past week, explore the source as satisfactorily as numerous recent adaptations of Dickens, Austen, and Trollope, not to mention the BBC presentations of works by lesser authors like Mrs. Gaskell and Laura Riding. One day perhaps some digital magician will follow Thackeray’s lead by making an animated film based on his witty illustrations, which would at least produce something closer in scale and spirit to the puppet show cited in the Vanity Fair’s closing sentence, “Come, children, let us shut up the box and the puppets, for our play is played out.”

A Game of Authors

Speaking of children, I first encountered William Makepeace Thackeray while playing the card game called Authors. My early fondness for him had little to do with the stern image of his face on the cards. It was his name. Of all the three-part names of authors the rules said had to be pronounced in full when you were asking for cards from your opponent’s hand — Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alfred Lord Tennyson, John Greenleaf Whittier, James Fenimore Cooper, Robert Louis Stevenson, Louisa May Alcott — none felt as nice to say as William Makepeace Thackeray, who was, all the better, the author of what I felt to be the most intriguing and thus coveted card in the deck. Besides having a title I found fascinating in itself without really having any idea why, the Vanity Fair card sported the oddest image. Most of the small title illustrations in the upper left hand corner of the cards made sense — a knight on horseback for Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe, Tiny Tim on Bob Cratchit’s shoulder for A Christmas Carol — but what was the point of the Vanity Fair card’s image of a woman and three air-borne books? Was she dropping them? Recoiling from them? Or had they just fallen upon her out of nowhere?

My parents never explained the “flying books” to my satisfaction, though they must have known the famous opening chapter of Vanity Fair where Becky Sharp unceremoniously disposes of the kindly meant gift of Johnson’s Dictionary. But why three books? You have to give the creators of the game credit. The extra books put a special spin on what was a defining moment for the character, and gave a touch of residual mystery to the stern looking author in the granny glasses — “a stout, healthful broad-shouldered specimen of a man,” according to someone present at one of Thackeray’s wildly successful American readings, “with cropped greyish hair and bluish grey eyes, peering very strongly through a pair of spectacles that have a very satiric focus.”

Art On View in Princeton 9/18/13 Post

MCCC FACULTY SHOW: The current exhibition of work by Mercer County Community College faculty includes Paul Mordetsky’s 30” x 48” oil on panel painting titled, “Transfusion.” Among the other featured artists are Yevgeniy Fiks, Lucas Kelly, and Tina LaPlaca of Princeton. Gallery Hours for this show are Tuesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The Gallery is located on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road and the show runs through October 3. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

MCCC FACULTY SHOW: The current exhibition of work by Mercer County Community College faculty includes Paul Mordetsky’s 30” x 48” oil on panel painting titled, “Transfusion.” Among the other featured artists are Yevgeniy Fiks, Lucas Kelly, and Tina LaPlaca of Princeton. Gallery Hours for this show are Tuesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The Gallery is located on the college’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road and the show runs through October 3. For more information, visit: www.mccc.edu/gallery.

 

POST INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPE: This 24” x 18” watercolor, titled “Flip,” by Kate Graves is one of several sculptures and paintings by the artist currently displayed in the exhibition, “Trenton: A Post Industrial Survey,” in the Gallery at the Chapin School, 4101 Princeton Pike through September 27. The exhibition can be viewed during school hours by appointment. For more information, call (609) 924-7206.

POST INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPE: This 24” x 18” watercolor, titled “Flip,” by Kate Graves is one of several sculptures and paintings by the artist currently displayed in the exhibition, “Trenton: A Post Industrial Survey,” in the Gallery at the Chapin School, 4101 Princeton Pike through September 27. The exhibition can be viewed during school hours by appointment. For more information, call (609) 924-7206.

 

THE ARTIST’S STUDIO: Artwork by the late John Sears will be on display from Thursday, September 19 through Sunday, October 13 at Rider University Art Gallery. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. There will be an opening reception, Thursday, September 19, from 5 to 7 p.m. In conjunction with the exhibit, Gallery Director Harry I. Naar will lead a panel discussion on “The Creative Spirit” with artist and teacher Cynthia Groya, Rider University professor of psychology John Suler and Anne Sears on Thursday, September 26, at 7 p.m. For more on the artist, visit: www.johnsearsartist.com.

THE ARTIST’S STUDIO: Artwork by the late John Sears will be on display from Thursday, September 19 through Sunday, October 13 at Rider University Art Gallery. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. There will be an opening reception, Thursday, September 19, from 5 to 7 p.m. In conjunction with the exhibit, Gallery Director Harry I. Naar will lead a panel discussion on “The Creative Spirit” with artist and teacher Cynthia Groya, Rider University professor of psychology John Suler and Anne Sears on Thursday, September 26, at 7 p.m. For more on the artist, visit: www.johnsearsartist.com.

 

SMOKEY MOUNTAIN FALLS: Work such as this black and white image by photographer Terri Hood is part of an exhibition of her work currently on view in Gallery 14 at 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell. The exhibition also features Ms. Hood’s still lifes as well as a series of photographs by Charles Miller, titled “Waterlilies – Monet’s Flower.” The show runs through October 6. Hours are Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. and by appointment. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: www.photogallery14.com.

SMOKEY MOUNTAIN FALLS: Work such as this black and white image by photographer Terri Hood is part of an exhibition of her work currently on view in Gallery 14 at 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell. The exhibition also features Ms. Hood’s still lifes as well as a series of photographs by Charles Miller, titled “Waterlilies – Monet’s Flower.” The show runs through October 6. Hours are Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. and by appointment. For more information, call (609) 333-8511, or visit: www.photogallery14.com.

 

VINTAGE NJ SHORE: “At Play Barnegat Bay” by Carl Buergerniss (1877-1956), c.1912, oil on canvas from the collection of Roy Pedersen is on view as part of Morven Museum and Garden’s current exhibition, “Coastal Impressions: Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940,” which has just been extended to run through October 27. Through the works of Edward Boulton, Wyatt Eaton, Albert Reinhart, Julius Golz, Charles Freeman, John F. Peto, Thomas Anshutz, Hugh Campbell, and Carrie Sanborn (to name a few), the exhibition illustrates the history of artists who lived, worked and drew inspiration from the New Jersey shores. For more information, call (609) 924-8144; or visit: www.morven.org.

VINTAGE NJ SHORE: “At Play Barnegat Bay” by Carl Buergerniss (1877-1956), c.1912, oil on canvas from the collection of Roy Pedersen is on view as part of Morven Museum and Garden’s current exhibition, “Coastal Impressions: Painters of the Jersey Shore, 1880-1940,” which has just been extended to run through October 27. Through the works of Edward Boulton, Wyatt Eaton, Albert Reinhart, Julius Golz, Charles Freeman, John F. Peto, Thomas Anshutz, Hugh Campbell, and Carrie Sanborn (to name a few), the exhibition illustrates the history of artists who lived, worked and drew inspiration from the New Jersey shores. For more information, call (609) 924-8144; or visit: www.morven.org.

 

 

 

Susan Winter’s “Connecting Impressions” Opens at the Plainsboro Library Saturday Post

WASH DAY ON THE SUB-CONTINENT: Susan Winter’s painting, titled “The Washing” is one of several works inspired by scenes of India on view at the Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren Street, from August 3 to August 28 with a reception on Sunday, August 11, from 2 to 4 p.m., at which time the artist will be on hand to answer questions about her work. “Connecting Impressions,” features oils, oil/collages, and pastels and focuses on landscapes with figures.

WASH DAY ON THE SUB-CONTINENT: Susan Winter’s painting, titled “The Washing” is one of several works inspired by scenes of India on view at the Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren Street, from August 3 to August 28 with a reception on Sunday, August 11, from 2 to 4 p.m., at which time the artist will be on hand to answer questions about her work. “Connecting Impressions,” features oils, oil/collages, and pastels and focuses on landscapes with figures.

Susan I. Winter was born on a large farm in rural Monmouth County where she had few playmates outside of her family. And yet her paintings, even her landscapes, invariably include human figures. “I suppose it is this lonely background that lends itself to the themes of most of my work; I enjoy painting people either interacting with others or in quiet reflection” she says.

Now living in Hightstown, where, since 1983, she’s part of the Art Station Studio, which she describes as “a wonderful studio setting where other artists are available for both critique and support.” A certified teacher, she has taught art at the Peddie School, at Artworks in Trenton, and elsewhere throughout central New Jersey for over 35 years.

Her influences derive from Master Classes with Nelson Shanks and studies with Daniel Greene, Robert Sakson, Rhoda Yanow, Richard Pionk, Christina DeBarry, and Stephen Kennedy. One of her paintings was chosen to be included as part of the White House Collection and her painting “Ole Freehold” is owned by Bruce Springsteen

Inspired also by Mary Cassatt and John Singer Sargent, and, she says, awed by “their genius and value to the art community,” she is a charter member of the New Jersey Pastel Painters Society and a member of numerous galleries and arts councils including the West Windsor Arts Council.

Her recent exhibitions include works on paper at the Philadelphia Sketch Club, and one-woman shows at Bordentown’s Farnsworth Gallery, Trenton’s Gallery on Lafayette, and Princeton’s Triumph Brewery.

Interviewed by phone, the artist shared her excitement at this new exhibition, titled “Connecting Impressions.” “The Plainsboro show is a perfect opportunity for me to express my love of people, and let my viewers see how important my personal connections with humanity are to me,” she says.

The artist’s rural upbringing figures heavily in her art, and although she works predominantly with landscapes, people play a critical role in the theme of each piece. But it wasn’t always so. From 1985 to 1996, she worked as a freelance artist with Greater Media Newspapers. “For 10 years I did nothing but paint portraits of houses; after that I did landscapes because that’s what galleries were interested in, but now I include people in my paintings and that’s what excites me about this show,” she says.

“Connecting Impressions” will feature oils, oil/collages, and pastels, paintings of seemingly ordinary scenes that are awash with light and color. Look for her lively park scene, Girl with the Yellow Balloon and The Washing, her rendering of women washing clothes in the Ganges.

In a statement of her artistic philosophy, Ms. Winter says: “I try to capture the beauty of my life: impossible; to try to capture the beauty in each extraordinary moment is only possible through the artist’s eye and imagination. This is my goal with each new painting.”

Ms. Winter’s exhibit will be at the Plainsboro Library from August 3 to August 28 with a reception on Sunday, August 11, from 2 to 4 p.m., at which time the artist will be on hand to answer questions about her work.

The Plainsboro Library is located at 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro. Hours are 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. For more on the artist and her work, visit: www.paintings
bysusanwinter.com.

For more information, call (609) 275-2897.

 

Three Fine Art Photographers Pushing the Medium at Gallery 14 Post

INTO THE GARDEN: Hopewell’s fine art photography gallery features works by Martha Weintraub, whose “Conservatory,” shown here, is one of several garden images on view. Ms. Weintraub creates hand-colored gel transfers from her photographs to yield whimsical and often surrealistic landscapes. (Image Courtesy of Gallery 14)

INTO THE GARDEN: Hopewell’s fine art photography gallery features works by Martha Weintraub, whose “Conservatory,” shown here, is one of several garden images on view. Ms. Weintraub creates hand-colored gel transfers from her photographs to yield whimsical and often surrealistic landscapes.
(Image Courtesy of Gallery 14)

Photographers Martha Weintraub, Rhoda Kassof-Isaac, and Wiebke Martens feature in a joint exhibition at Hopewell’s fine photography Gallery 14, opening Friday June 7 and running through July 7.

Ms. Weintraub has a series of “Into the Garden” images in the show. “Since the ancient Egyptians, people have been taming the wilderness into spaces reflecting beauty, style, and status,” says Ms. Weintraub, who likens a garden to a work of art “Like painters, garden designers plan perspectives of foreground, middle, and background in their compositions. Designs thus express more than the flowers, trees, shrubs, and water features they may include; history and geography influence design; European and American gardens differ from the gardens of the Far East, which value irregularity and surprise.”

Ms. Weintraub approaches her photography as if it were painting rather than a record of reality. In Photoshop she often improvises, combining and modifying different elements to create a composition. Some of her work is whimsical and surrealistic with imaginary and colorful landscapes, while other work is sensitive consisting of lovely botanical renditions. In either case the viewer is invited to immerse oneself in quiet contemplation.

She has visited many gardens near her home and in travels abroad. For her garden images, she creates hand-colored gel transfers, post computer. She begins by taking photographs, which she then converts to black and white positives and prints on transfer film. Using a gel medium and a roller, she transfers the positives to artist’s water color paper and then hand-colors each image using water color pencils and acrylic paints.

The results are impressions of gardens, not literal translations. Her work is reminiscent of illustrations found in 19th century English literature, etchings, and Chinese and Japanese wood block prints.

Ms. Weintraub’s photographs have been chosen for a number of local and national juried shows. Her image City of Books was awarded Best in Show at Phillips’ Mill Annual Photography Exhibit in 2012. She is the current president of Gallery 14 and her work can be viewed at: www.martha
weintraub.com.

Both painter and photographer, Ms. Kassof-Isaac is a founding member of Gallery 14 and has been inspired by the group’s growth and reputation. “This gallery is a place where professional photographers gather to discuss, share, and explore the new directions that the art of photography is moving toward. Inspiration thrives, grows, and is content in this atmosphere,” she says. The collection of her works on show is titled “Look Again.”

Of the relationship between painting and photography in her work, she says; “Is this like having two languages? The two media speak with each other and offer greater inspiration.”

Ms. Kassof-Isaac is also a teacher and a psychoanalyst. She has lived in Switzerland and Italy for many years. Her photographic work is enhanced by painting on each image.

Ms. Martens has been fascinated by photography ever since receiving her first camera at age 12 and concentrated on travel and landscape when she grew up.

In recent years, she has significantly expanded the scope of her work, exploring the great variety of textures, patterns, and colors in nature.

Last year, on a tour of Iceland, she was captivated by the landscapes, from farm houses in lush, green, pastoral settings to surreal black tuff ring volcanoes. Looking closely, she discovered small flowers covering an orange rock face, algae growing on stones like hair, and beautiful basalt formations. Her images capture the contrasting colors of Iceland. Her collection “Colors of Iceland” is in Gallery 14‘s Goodkind Gallery.

Her work has previously been exhibited at Dalet Gallery in Philadelphia, Art Way Gallery in Plainsboro, and the Bank of Princeton in Lambertville, among others.

For more information and gallery hours, call (609) 333-8511.

Daniela Bittman’s Massive Canvases Astonish Visitors at Rider Art Gallery Post

TAMAR’S PAINTING: Daniela Bittman’s acrylic and colored pencil on canvas painting is a staggering 10 by 12 feet. Inspired by a still life by another artist, it hangs alongside several other mural size pieces in the Rider University Art Gallery, where Ms. Bittman will discuss her work Thursday, October 31, at 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.rider.edu.

TAMAR’S PAINTING: Daniela Bittman’s acrylic and colored pencil on canvas painting is a staggering 10 by 12 feet. Inspired by a still life by another artist, it hangs alongside several other mural size pieces in the Rider University Art Gallery, where Ms. Bittman will discuss her work Thursday, October 31, at 7 p.m. For more information, visit: www.rider.edu. (Photo by Jon Naar)

At an opening reception last Thursday, the art gallery at Rider University was filled with art enthusiasts marveling at the large-scale canvases by Princeton artist Daniela Bittman.

“I’ve been running this gallery for years and this is the first time I’ve observed people stopping to stare through the windows,” said longtime Gallery Director Harry I. Naar. “Daniela’s images are striking, and not just because of their immense size, but because of their subject matter and composition. People are also amazed to find that they are colored pencil over acrylic wash, this is unique to Daniela.”

Ms. Bittman, who lives in Princeton and works from a studio in her home, hasn’t shown her work for almost a decade. For many, her work is something of a revelation. The Rider show features six mural size canvases 10 by 12 feet in dimension, two large canvases of eight by eight feet, and several groupings of pencil on paper works. In addition there is an eight by four feet acrylic on canvas wall hanging that was a special commission to recreate a large scale version of an 18th century Japanese print of The Geisha Itsutomi that Ms. Bittman described as a joy to do since she has been an enormous fan of the Japanese masters since discovering their work in her teens.

Aside from this commission, Ms. Bittman’s work is figurative and fantastic. Her juxtapositions tickle and tease the imagination. Think Gerald Scarfe and the elder Bruegel with a touch of Hieronymus Bosch. Her scenes are peopled with ambiguous figures bordering on the absurd. And there is an enormous amount of fun here, as is evident from titles such as: Dogs and Hardware, Pigs in Clover, and The Side Effects of Coffee. 

One cannot pass lightly over this work. It captures the attention, draws your eyes to marvel at Tonka trucks, cabbages, clarinets and cat’s cradles. Here is beauty and humor, roses and bathing suits, grotesquerie, a man with a crab on his head, copulating dogs, pregnant nudes, plump sleeping babies, faces from the Renaissance.

Ms. Bittman’s pictures, which could be of any time or place, seem teeming with the myriad methods and madnesses of life. Viewers will find themselves recalling art from other periods and puzzling over their own responses.

When asked about influences, the artist cited myriad sources including authors Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, and Belgian-born French novelist and essayist Marguerite Yourcenar. As is clear from her work, she is also drawn to pre-Renaissance and Renaissance masters. “More to the German, Dutch, Flemish and Spanish painters than the Italian,” she said. “But I believe that I am influenced by everything I see, be it art or life, whether I like it or think I don’t. Especially if I don’t.”

In an interview with Mr. Naar, included in a brief catalog that accompanies the show, Ms. Bittman describes her artistic beginnings: “I started to draw not long after I started to walk; and I mean draw; I would fill whole notebooks, or any paper at hand, with obsessive attempts at drawing hands, legs, feet, and faces, in all kinds of positions, foreshortened, etc.; no color. . . . My mother kept some of them, and they were very funny.”

Born to Jewish parents in Bucharest, Romania, in 1952, Ms. Bittman went to an art high school where she was trained not just to looked at things, but to see them. In 1970, she moved with her family to Israel, where she attended the Bezalel Art Academy in Tel-Aviv before going on to study classics at Tel Aviv University. She has been in the United States since 1984.

When she exhibited two large canvases at Ellarslie in Trenton, as part of a group show, Mr. Naar was captivated by her work and determined to find out more.

Ms. Bittman claims no knowledge of where her ideas come from. About one thing she is clear, however: contrary to what many viewers conclude, they do not come from dreams. “I am always amazed, and greatly amused, by what people seem to see in my work: all kinds of hidden symbolism, or stories that show great imagination (on their part), but which I definitely didn’t put in there,” she said.

The artist acknowledges a penchant for the absurd and is conscious of the humor in her paintings as well as the influence of music.

Describing Tamar’s Painting, she explained that the work was inspired by a small still life painted by her son’s girlfriend, Tamar. Ms. Bittman looked at the still life of three bottles with red onion and fennel in the foreground and “saw” the work that she wanted to produce. Tamar’s still life is replicated in Ms. Bittman’s work which takes off from it in the way a jazz musician might riff on a theme.

You might well say that this artist “orchestrates” a painting. Tamar’s Painting, for example, is like a fugue in which its subject is restated in different pitches and in various keys. In Ms. Bittman’s composition, the bottles, onion and fennel surface in the colors and shapes of the three standing figures. Look, there they are again on the tray in the lap of the seated figure.

The major works, the massive 10 by 12 feet canvases, take about a year to complete. Those in the show are not for sale save for one titled, Life Complications, priced at $10,000. Several small sketches are $250, others pencil and paper works are between $230 and $950.

“Her work is the most surreal and unique I’ve ever seen and to think that it is done using color pencils on canvas is beyond belief. Everything she does tests your imagination,” commented Albert Stark of Princeton, who bought two pencil drawings.

The artist will discuss her work at the Rider University Art Gallery, Bart Luedeke Center, 2083 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, Thursday, October 31, at 7 p.m.

“Daniela Bittman: The Colony Within,” will be on view through December 1. Hours are: Tuesdays through Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. For more information, visit: www.rider.edu.

 

Solebury’s Art in the Garden Now Takes Place Over Two-Days Post

ART IN THE GARDEN: This handwoven artwork by Amy Turner also serves as a scarf and is among an abundance of arts and craft items for sale at the 14th Annual Art in the Garden at Paxson Hill Farm, Saturday, August 31 and Sunday, September 1 at 3265 Comfort Road, Solebury Township, across the river in Bucks County. Ms. Turner uses hand-dyed yarns, painted warps, tapestry inlay, and beads into her work. For more information, call (215) 297-1010, or visit: www.paxsonhillfarm.com.

ART IN THE GARDEN: This handwoven artwork by Amy Turner also serves as a scarf and is among an abundance of arts and craft items for sale at the 14th Annual Art in the Garden at Paxson Hill Farm, Saturday, August 31 and Sunday, September 1 at 3265 Comfort Road, Solebury Township, across the river in Bucks County. Ms. Turner uses hand-dyed yarns, painted warps, tapestry inlay, and beads into her work. For more information, call (215) 297-1010, or visit: www.paxsonhillfarm.com.

The 14th Annual Art in the Garden at Paxson Hill Farm will be held, Saturday, August 31 and Sunday, September 1. The event, which runs each day from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and is held rain or shine, will feature an exhibition and sale of work by local artists and fine-crafters.

This is the first time Art in the Garden will take place over two days.

Sponsored by horticulturist Bruce Gangawer, owner/operator of the nursery at Paxson Hill Farm, the event brings together some 58 painters, printmakers, jewelers, photographers, wood turners, fiber artists, ceramicists, and others.

This year’s exhibitors include Sandy Askey-Adams, Mandy Baker, Kathy Barclay, Rob Barrett, Kristen Birdsey, Nurit Bland, Jen Brower, Karen Caldwell, Keppler Castano, Diana Contine, Sheila Watson Coutin, Lara Ginzburg, Bernard Hohlfeld, Deborah Holcomb, Michael Holcomb, Mickie Marshall-Jacoby, Brenda Jones, Sandra Jones, Susan Kern, Evelyn King, Carla Klouda, Donna Kudra, Carole Kyle, Nora Lewis, Leda Manfre, Denise Marshall, Sallie Marshall, Claudia McGill, Kim McGuckin, Janet Miller, Kelly Money, David Money, Mindy Mutterperl, Susan Nadelson, Isabel O’Brien, Rebecca Proctor-Weiss, Ron Prybycien, Michael Ressler, Robert J. Richey, Jr., Glenn Rile, Susan Rosetty, Cindi Sathra, Scott Schlauch, Gale Scotch, Kathe Scullion, Jane Stoller, Deborah Tinsman, Patricia Tolton, Sean Tucker, Amy Turner, Helena van Emmerik-Finn, John Wear, Dawn Weseman, John H. Williams, Katy Winters, Steve Zazenski, and Barbara Zietchick.

Since 2000, Art in the Garden has grown from 17 artists selected for the first event. The garden setting includes numerous sun, shade, Oriental, and water gardens. Visitors are encouraged to wander the gardens, greenhouse, and fish ponds.

The free event takes place at Paxson Hill Farm, 3265 Comfort Road, Solebury Township. For more information, call (215) 297-1010, or visit: www.paxsonhill
farm.com.

 

Record Number of Performers, Artists Expected for 43rd Annual Communiversity Post

Last year’s Communiversity brought record crowds to Nassau and Witherspoon Streets and all points in between. This year, the annual free Town and Gown arts festival, which will take place Sunday, April 27, from 1 to 6 p.m., is showcasing a record number of performers and artists. 

Organized by the Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) with the participation of Princeton University students and the support of the municipality, the festival brings together local and student performers, artists, crafters, chefs, merchants, community groups, and volunteers.

In 1991, Communiversity drew a crowd of 10,000. Last year the number of visitors was four times as many for the Town and Gown celebration that began in 1971 as “The Art People’s Party.” In 1974, the annual celebration was held on the grounds surrounding McCarter Theater and was dedicated in honor of Shakespeare’s birthday. In 1976, when it was held on the Washington Road Bridge, festival attendees arrived by boat and enjoyed picnics by Lake Carnegie. When Princeton students joined in the event in 1985, it became “Communiversity.” In 2006, it changed the name to become “Communiversity Festival of the Arts.”

This year, there will be non-stop live performances on six stages by 40 participating groups of entertainers. There will be over 200 booths on Nassau and Witherspoon Streets, as well as on the green at Palmer Square and on the University campus in front of Nassau Hall.

Paul Muldoon’s Wayside Shrines will perform as will Avi Wisnia, Luke Elliot, and Swift Technique, to name a few. Besides demonstrations by members of the American Repertory Ballet/Princeton Ballet School, visitors will be treated to Bollywood-style dancing from Aaja Nachale and Flamenco dancing from Lisa Botalico and Fiesta Flamenco.

Other musicians from the Central Jersey area include Danielia Cotton, Some Like it Hot Club, Blue Jersey Band, Dave Grossman, Rainbow Fresh, The Blue Meanies, and Stephanie White and the Philth Harmonics.

Street performances from a cappella groups, jugglers, and a drum and bugle corps, will take place throughout downtown and visitors will be able to encounter art at almost every turn with visual artists in action throughout the day at several “street side studios,” in which ACP faculty members demonstrate nine different techniques and media from felting to collage-making and from jewelry crafting to silk painting.

Last year, the Arts Council introduced Paint Out Princeton to great success and this time around, some 40 local painters will be at their easels painting scenes of the day at points around town, including Hinds Plaza, Palmer Square Green, and Tiger Park. Their work, along with work from the Paint Out at Morven Museum and Garden on Sunday, May 4, will be displayed in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts through May 10, with a closing reception from 3 to 5 p.m.

Also new this year, is a community-wide monotype art project in the Hulfish parking lot. Participants will create monotype prints that will be assembled into an enormous piece of artwork.

Besides new events, returning favorites include the popular children’s Stone Soup Circus parading from Nassau Hall to the Palmer Square Stage. The parade begins at 1:15 p.m.

The Palmer Square stage will feature family-friendly entertainment throughout the afternoon. Also on the Square will be sidewalk chalk painting and on the green, “Nana’s-Make-A-Mess” with lots of messy materials for kids to make their own original artwork. A caricature artist will be on hand to observe the young artists in action and create his version of the aspiring artists at work. At the University, kid’s events include sports clinics, a pie-throwing contest, and a bounce house.

In addition to free Sunday parking on Princeton’s side streets, parking will be available in garages on Spring, Chambers and Hulfish Streets and a Communiversity shuttle will run from the Princeton Shopping Center to the corner of Wiggins and Witherspoon from 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.

For more information, call (609) 924-8777, or visit: www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

 

Some 40,000 Visitors Are Expected To Attend Communiversity This Sunday Post

BJARTUR ARRIVES IN TIME: Henry and Robert Landau, owners of the family run clothing store specializing in fine woollens at 102 Nassau Street, unveiled the new store mascot on Monday, April 22, at 11 a.m., right in time for Bjartur to take pride of place at this year’s Communiversity. That’s Henry ushering Bjartur from his traveling box as Robert speaks to the crowd. (Photo by L. Arntzenius)

BJARTUR ARRIVES IN TIME: Henry and Robert Landau, owners of the family run clothing store specializing in fine woollens at 102 Nassau Street, unveiled the new store mascot on Monday, April 22, at 11 a.m., right in time for Bjartur to take pride of place at this year’s Communiversity. That’s Henry ushering Bjartur from his traveling box as Robert speaks to the crowd.
(Photo by L. Arntzenius)

Communiversity, a collaboration between Princeton University and the Arts Council of Princeton, will turn the center of town into an outdoor music festival and farmers market combined this Sunday, April 28, between 1 and 6 p.m.

The 42nd annual Town-Gown event is expected to draw more than 40,000 visitors to Nassau and Witherspoon Streets, the green in Palmer Square, and the University campus. Over 200 booths will showcase original art and contemporary crafts, unique merchandise, food, and community groups. Five stages will host entertainment for all ages.

Performance highlights include central Jersey area artists: Danielia Cotton, Some Like it Hot Club, Luke Elliot, Blue Jersey Band, Dave Grossman, Rainbow Fresh, The Blue Meanies and Stephanie White and the Philth Harmonics, among others.

Dance performances and demonstrations include The ARB/Princeton Ballet School, Bollywood dancing from Aaja Nachale, and Flamenco dancing from Lisa Botalico and Fiesta Flamenco.

For kids, Stone Soup Circus will begin parading at 1:15 p.m. from Nassau Hall to the Palmer Square Stage, where family-friendly entertainment continues through the afternoon. There will be art-themed games, projects, and workshops at The Arts Council where “Nana’s-Make-A-Mess” presents an assortment of materials for hands-on creativity. The University will also host kid-friendly attractions such as sports clinics, a pie-throwing contest, a bounce house, and dunk tank.

New this year is The Arts Council’s “Paint Out Princeton” project showcasing local painters in action. Until 4 p.m., local artists will be working at their easels painting scenes that capture the spirit of the day on canvas. The work will then be displayed at a Wet Work Exhibition and Sale in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Today’s Town and Gown celebration began in 1971 when the Arts Council of Princeton held “The Art People’s Party” with musicians, artists, and crafters. In 1974, the annual party was held on the grounds surrounding McCarter Theater and was dedicated in honor of William Shakespeare’s birthday. In 1976, when it was held on the Washington Road Bridge, festival attendees arrived by boat.

Students from Princeton University joined the party in 1985 and the name “Communiversity” was coined. Over the years -highlights have included a giant banana split fundraiser in 1987 and a “Communiversity Brew” from Triumph Brewing Company in 2001, when the closing concert featured Willie Nelson.

Safety

The tragic bombings in Boston have brought the issue of security to the minds of local officials and there will be an increased police presence this year.

Princeton Administrator Robert W. Bruschi said that in advance of the event there have been meetings with all of the emergency planning groups from fire to first aid as well as public works to discuss protocols and refresh everyone on how to handle different situations ranging from a lost child to imminent danger.

While Princeton Police Captain Nick Sutter, who is effectively covering the duties of Police Chief in the absence of David Dudeck, was reluctant to give specific details in terms of police strategy and numbers of law enforcement officers, he was able to comment on an increase in “officers committed to foot patrol inside the event as well as regular vehicle patrol.” He said: “We will have our officers in highly visible traffic vests for ease of identification for the public.”

The Department of Public Safety at Princeton University will be working closely with local police. Along with the Mercer County Sheriff’s department, they have agreed to supply resources and help with staffing.

“As we do every year, we are taking prudent measures to ensure safety,” said Mr. Sutter. As for advice to the public, he asks for vigilance from all. “People should report any suspicious activity to officers in the area and follow our Twitter and Facebook feeds for the latest information and alerts,” he said.

Landau’s New Mascot

Members of the press and patrons of Landau on Nassau Street turned out to welcome Lindi’s successor to Princeton on Monday. Princeton residents will recall Lindi as the Icelandic ram which stood outside the store as its mascot for some 35 years until it disappeared last July.

The theft was widely reported and the owners had hoped that Lindi, a favorite with Princeton children and visitors, would be returned as had happened once before when two students from The College of New Jersey had held the 150 pound Lindi for ransom. That was 16 years ago and Lindi was safely returned.

Last year’s theft is still unsolved and Lindi has never been seen.

Landau’s owners debated whether to find a replacement. But so many people asked about Lindi, that they felt a new mascot was desirable.

Also from Iceland, Bjartur (pronounced byar-tur) is much lighter and fluffier than his predecessor. His name means pale or fair and he will most likely be kept indoors for safety’s sake. It’s not yet been decided where exactly. Like his predecessor, Bjartur is mounted on a wheeled platform so that he can be moved around easily.

FreeB Shuttle

The town’s FreeB Shuttle will run a special route for Communiversity, allowing people to travel from places where there is ample parking such as the Princeton Shopping Center, the Municipal Complex at Valley Road and Witherspoon Street, Elm Court, and Community Park North, to festival entrance points at the corner of Wiggins and Witherspoon Streets (see map for full details).

There is also the option of parking on local streets (free on Sunday) and in parking garages on Chambers, Hulfish, and Spring Streets. Additional parking can be found in Princeton University Lots 10 and 13, located off Washington Road on William Street.

For more information, visit: www.artscouncilofprinceton.org or call (609) 924-8777.

Obituaries 5/28/14 Post

Obit Erickson 5-28-14Elizabeth Gray Erickson

Elizabeth Gray Erickson of Princeton died unexpectedly on May 22, 2014. She was 46.

A dancer with the School of the Princeton Ballet Society throughout her youth and a graduate of the Princeton public schools, Liz attended Williams College where she majored in Japanese studies and spent her junior year in Kyoto, Japan, graduating in 1989.

During the summers of her college years, she had the opportunity to intern with the Bank of New York and after graduating from Williams worked in New York as an analyst in First Boston’s investment banking group. She then worked for two years at Bloomberg L.P.’s Tokyo office. She returned to the U.S. to pursue her MBA at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Upon her graduation in 1995, she married Jonathan Erickson and moved back to New York to work for American Express.

In 1997, she joined Save the Children as associate director of U.S. Programs and co-founded and managed Youth Noise, a web-based youth advocacy program. Save the Children was the first in a long list of youth and poverty focused commitments to which Liz devoted herself, a list which included leadership roles with Isles, a Trenton-based community development organization, the Princeton Area Community Foundation where she was a leader of the Fund for Women and Girls, Volunteer Connect, Family and Children’s Services of Central New Jersey, the Center for Supportive Schools, and Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum in Ewing. Liz, the recipient of the YMCA’s 2011 Tribute to Women award, had recently joined the board of McCarter Theatre.

As devoted as she was to community and charity, Liz’s greatest commitment was always to her children, Alexandra, William, and Edward Erickson. The daughter of Rachel and the late Charles Gray, Liz is survived by Jon, Alex, Will, and Ned; her mother; brother Douglas Gray, his wife Rebecca Johnson, and their children, Ella and Nathaniel; brother James Gray, his wife Jessica Gray, and their children, Sadie and Billy; and Jon’s parents, Kathy and Ted Erickson.

A memorial service will be held on June 6, 2014, at 3 p.m. at Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Princeton Community Foundation’s Fund for Women and Girls, 15 Princess Road, Lawrenceville, N.J. 08648, www.pacf.org, and Save the Children, 54 Wilton Road, Westport, Conn. 06880, www.savethechildren.org.

Liz’s family is deeply grateful to her extensive circle of friends who have been so supportive and to all who honored her by gathering in Palmer Square on the evening of her passing to give thanks for her life. Her selflessness and unbounded kindness will be missed by her family, friends, and the countless others whose lives she has touched.

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Microsoft Word - Margaret L Daniels Obit.docMargaret Louise Senna Daniels

Margaret (Marge) Louise Senna Daniels, 88, died peacefully on May 24, 2014 at the Acorn Glenn Assisted Living Facility in Princeton. A resident of Belle Mead for nearly 60 years, Marge was born in her grandparents’ home in Bound Brook, N.J. on June 2, 1925. She was the only child of the late Louise Alexandra Viclock who died in 1965 and the late Joseph Edward Senna who was tragically killed in 1927.

Marge and her mother lived with relatives in Texas after her father’s death before returning to N.J. where she graduated from Bound Brook High School in 1944. She continued her education at the Boroughs’ School of Business in New York City and was employed by the Johns Manville Corporation during the war.

Marge married Walter Daniels of Raritan, N.J. on October 26, 1947. They built a house in Belle Mead in 1953 in rural and idyllic Montgomery Township; and as an extended family, raised three children there. Walter and Louise worked, and Marge stayed home to care for her children and the house. An avid gardener and a self-taught artist, she made clothing on an ancient Singer, cooked from scratch, was the navigator and official photographer on long family road trips, and was equally adept at wielding a croquet mallet, a golf club, or a fly swatter. She was a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of Montgomery Volunteer Fire Company #1, the Harlingen Dutch Reformed Church, Strarlight Painters, Pike Brook Country Club, and for over half-a-century, an active participant in the celebrated “Friendly Nighters Girls Club” (Ginny, Martha, Marion, Marie, June, Lisa, Barbara, Naomi, and Zelma), a group of Montgomery women who got together in their 20s and kept at it into their 70s and beyond.

When Walter died unexpectedly in 1973, Marge worked relentlessly to make sure each of her children graduated from college. She was a devoted mother and caring neighbor. She traveled extensively with close friends Pete and Hannes Engler and Carol Dixon. Marge continued working at Princeton Applied Research until her official retirement. Thereafter, she helped her daughter Dawn with her business, The Personal Shopper, for many years. Marge spent the last few years of her life stirring up trouble at Acorn Glenn where she was lovingly known as “Marge in Charge.” Throughout her life, she was known to be unafraid to speak her mind and to express strong opinions. If you knew one thing about her and nothing else, you knew that she would tolerate no “B.S.”

Arrangements are under the direction of the Hillsborough Funeral Home, 796 Route 206, (908) 874-5600. Visitation is Thursday, May 29 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at the Harlingen Reformed Church on Friday, May 30 at 10 a.m. followed by interment at the Rocky Hill Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Marge’s name to Grounds for Sculpture, 14 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, New Jersey 08619. Attention: Rhonda Dimascio — Development Department.

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at Kristin's wedding - 2008Raymond Henry Peters

Raymond Henry Peters, 94, of Griggstown, New Jersey, passed away on May 20, 2014 at the Pavilions at Forrestal Care Center in Princeton.

A lifelong resident of Griggstown, he is survived by his wife of 71 years, Evelyn J. Peters; a daughter Susan Mattern of Schnecksville, Pa.; a son Raymond of Homosassa, Fla.; four granddaughters, Kristin Ploeger of Perkasie, Pa., Michelle Snyder of Indialantic, Fla., Melissa Wood of Edgemoor, S.C., and Virginia Williams of Charleston, S.C.; and five great-grandchildren. Son of the late Frederick August and Julie Bockmann Peters of Griggstown, he was predeceased by his twin sister Evelyn Van Doren and his brother Frederick Peters.

He graduated from the one-room schoolhouse in Griggstown, Princeton High School, and the School of Industrial Arts in Trenton.

Raymond served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater in the Philippines and the occupation of Japan during and after World War II in the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers and retired from the U.S. Army Reserves with the rank of Lt. Colonel.

He enjoyed hunting, saltwater fishing, track, golf, travel, his home, and his family.

Raymond was a lifelong member of the Griggstown Reformed Church where he served for many years as an elder. He was the last surviving charter member of the Griggstown Volunteer Fire Company founded in 1946, a member of the Franklin Park Senior Citizens, the last surviving member of the Griggstown Sportsman’s Club, a member of the Griggstown Historical Society, the Princeton Shrine Club, the Crescent Temple, the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and was a Master Mason at Princeton Lodge #38.

The funeral service was held on Saturday, May 24 at 11 a.m. with a viewing at the Griggstown Reformed Church, 1065 Canal Road in Griggstown. Interment followed in the Griggstown Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Griggstown Reformed Church Memorial Fund, 1065 Canal Road, Princeton, N.J. 08540.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Mather-Hodge Funeral Home.

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Robert Joseph Durant

Robert Joseph Durant was born on July 7, 1938 in Akron, Ohio to Ronald Joseph and Mary Linnane Durant. He passed away peacefully at home on May 21, 2014, following a two-year struggle from the effects of a stroke.

He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother. He is survived by his wife, Mauricette, son Stephen R. Durant, and daughter Jennifer L. Mohr, wife of R. Colin Mohr and granddaughters Lilian Durant Mohr and Marin Mohr. He is also survived by a sister, Mary Dianne Durant and a brother James Michael Durant and his nephews Christopher and Jeremy Durant.

Bob graduated from the Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland, Ohio in 1960 with a degree in electrical engineering. Upon graduation, he entered the US Navy as a Naval aviation cadet, and following flight training, was commissioned a Lieutenant, flying Sikorsky helicopters in various international locations. Upon discharge, he joined Pan American Airways in 1967 as a pilot, rising to the rank of captain. Bob continued flying internationally with Delta Airlines, retiring in 1998.

Bob was a man of many interests. He was a licensed ham radio operator proficient in Morse code. He enjoyed writing and was actively involved in UFO/Remote Viewing studies.

A loving and devoted husband, father, and grandfather, Bob will be sorely missed.

Per his wishes, no religious services will be held but a visitation advent will be conducted at the Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2500 Pennington Road, Pennington, N.J. 08534 on Wednesday, May 28, 2014 between the hours of 5 and 7 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to: Planned Parenthood Association of Mercer County, 437 East State Street, Trenton, N.J. 08608 or Mercer Street Friends, 151 Mercer Street, Trenton, N.J. 08611.

Condolences for the family may be offered at the following email address: MauricetteD1@aol.com.

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obit dennisDennis Minely

After a series of disabilities, Dennis Minely peacefully died on March 30, 2014.

He was born in the well-established Greek community in Bridgeport, Conn., the son of Stargis and Alexandra Minely, both of whom emigrated from the Macedonian area of Greece, subsequently part of Yugoslavia, and now a separate country.

Dennis attended Bassick High School where he was a champion basketball player. He graduated from Dartmouth in 1956. Following his graduation, he was drafted and spent three peaceful years in the Army at a base right near the Mexican border, where he served as the company clerk — not much different from Radar in MASH.

After his stint in the army, he had a long and successful career in business, ending up as director of Strategic Sourcing at Bell Atlantic in the isle of Manhattan. The first thing he did following his retirement in 1999 was to join a group of college students sponsored by College Years in Athens, as a student of ancient Greek history, archaeology, and mythology. He lived in Athens, and traveled to sites all over Greece. On another occasion, he taught English to young Greek students in Gazi, Crete through Global Volunteers.

He and Ivy Starr Minely, a lawyer, were married for more than 50 years. They have lived for 35 years in a house designed by Phillip Collins, the architect, in Hopewell Township, with the old Lindbergh estate on either side of their property.

Dennis was a sociable man, with a lively mind and an excellent sense of humor. He found the world endlessly interesting and engaging. And young women always gravitated to his mustachioed mediterranean good looks, even after he became a bit more “well rounded.”

He was a devoted alumnus of Dartmouth College, and was an active member of the Princeton Dartmouth Club. Over the years, he interviewed countless prospective students and did his best to steer likely candidates to his alma mater, in the hopes that they would love it as much as he did. His love for sports — not just as an observer, but as an active participant — was exhibited by his learning to ride horses for the first time when he was in his 50s. He also continually played a good game of tennis all his life.

But his favorite sport turned out to be poker. A mutual Dartmouth friend in Berlin introduced him to Peter Grosz, who introduced him to what began many decades ago as a group of Princeton graduates, expanding to faculty, and a few others. They continued to meet twice per week for this sport, with a few Princeton outsiders, Dennis Minely included. Dennis delighted in knowing this very interesting and distinguished group of pretty good male poker devotees.

He loved opera, and often attended performances at NTC and all over Europe, particularly in Vienna. He was a staunch supporter of Opera New Jersey in Prince-ton, where he served on their advisory board. But to him, the greatest operatic kick of all was serving for many years on stage and costume continually as a supernumerary for them, on the condition that he never open his mouth. Under these terms, he appeared in fourteen different operas, including as the Executioner in Puccini’s Turandot; as a priest (no less) in Carmen; the Cardinal in Tosca (what a costume!); a Notario in Elixer of Love and the Barber of Seville; a drug dealer and Scarpia’s henchman in Rigoletto; the Ship Captain in The Italian in Algiers, and other silent roles. When he was off-stage during performances, he’d hang around with the children in the cast and particularly with pretty dancers.

Dennis Minely worked as a volunteer for a boys’ and girls’ club in Harlem, where he spent one day a week, and attended many public events with the group. Best of all, in the summer, Dennis and his wife would bring bus loads of kids to his Hopewell home, where great picnics took place along with baseball, volleyball, and lots of swimming.

His interest in Meso-America took him to a large number of important archaeological sites including Maya art and culture in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala. Along with these travels, Dennis amassed a large collection of valuable books and archaeological reports on the subject and collected many striking pre-Columbian artifacts brought into this country before bans on the dispersion of such artworks were enacted.

Most of all, Dennis Minely was devoted to his extended family on his wife’s side, his nephews, nieces, a sister-in-law, two brothers-in-law, and their friends. The nieces and nephews particularly prized him for his good humor, unfailing affection, and interest in their lives. He was known to them as “Mister Congeniality.” His nieces and nephews always knew they could count on him for support, as well as for excellent adventures, silly jokes, and happy gatherings wherever he went.

Robert Desnos, Henri Rousseau, and “A Cat Like Nothing Else on Earth” Post

bk revThere’s a rapping at my study door, a soft persistent tapping, with a hint of claw in the sound. The door is gently banging back and forth in the frame as I sort through ideas for a May 28 column. When the rapping intensifies, it inspires thoughts of a famous Raven at a famous chamber door. Even in the age of Rap the word “rapping” belongs to Poe.

Waiting on the other side is Nora, our glossy 11-year-old tuxedo cat who can’t abide closed doors. I put my thoughts on hold and clear a space for us amid the jumble of books piled on the chaise by the window. Stepping lightly over the rocky paperback-hardback terrain until she has a clear view of the street below, Nora casts a watchful eye on the commotion of a garbage truck making the Thursday pick-up. No birds or squirrels being in sight, she turns her attention to a battered paperback anthology of French poetry I found at the Cranbury Book Worm the other day, gives it a whiskery nuzzling, and then puts one white paw on Baudelaire: His Prose and Poetry, as if to say, “This is mine.” Then she curls up by my side and, as my maternal grandmother would say, commences purring.

With my free hand, I open the Baudelaire, a severely creased Boni & Liveright Modern Library edition from 1919, and start reading aloud from a prose poem about twilight madness and a man who would be sociable and indulgent during the day and “pitiless” in the evening, having once thrown at a waiter’s head “an excellent chicken, in which he imagined he had discovered some insulting hieroglyph.”

While I’m not suggesting that our Nora has a soft spot for Baudelaire, I can tell you that her ears perked up when I read the last part, she who in her wild youth performed feats equal to the throwing of chickens at waiters, if not the throwing of waiters at chickens. Remember that Baudelaire himself was partial to a “strong and gentle” cat, “the pride of the house,” beloved of “ardent lovers and austere scholars” and worthy of comparison to “the mighty sphinxes” with “particles of gold spangling their mystic eyes.”

In fact, it was “The Cat Like Nothing Else On Earth,” a poem by Robert Desnos, that took me to the Cranbury Book Worm and the paperback anthology of French poetry I’m reaching for when the “pride of the house” decides she’s had enough, slips off the chaise, and heads for the door.

The Book Worm

In its heyday, when it occupied the most imposing house on Main Street, the Book Worm had well over 100,000 volumes in stock, not to mention stacks of old Life magazines, LPs, CDs, DVDs, posters, paintings, and upstairs, along with more rooms of books, a substantial assortment of antiques — and fresh vegetables. Here, surely, was the only bookstore in the world that sold cucumbers and tomatoes grown in the mulch made from a compost heap of decaying books. Sadly, the Worm has been downsized to a shadow of its former self and installed in a cramped store front a block away, but as the Stones will tell you, while you may not always get what you want, if you try, sometimes you get what you need. I got Robert Desnos (pronounced Dez-nose) and Henri Rousseau.

Gateway to Rimbaud

Given the condition — spine cocked, page ends yellowed — Wallace Fowlie’s bilingual 1955 Grove Press paperback,  Mid-Century French Poets, should not be priced at $6. The catch is that it’s inscribed “Wishes to Marion and Francis for a blessed Xmas, love Wallace 1955.” Francis is Francis Fergusson, the author of Idea of the Theater (Princeton 1949), who taught at Rutgers, lived in Kingston, died at Princeton Hospital in 1986, and sublet our house in Bloomington one summer; on the subject of inscriptions, the Fergusson kids wrote their names in pencil on the wall of the closet in my room, and so did Leslie Fiedler’s kids when the author of Love and Death in the American Novel sublet the house for a year.

As for Fowlie, he was nothing less than the gateway to Rimbaud for Jim Morrison and Patti Smith. His translation of the Works is on my desk even now. He also wrote a book about Rimbaud and Jim Morrison called The Rebel as Poet, and his friendship with Henry Miller resulted in the publication of their correspondence.

With inscriptions and associations like that, and a nice selection of Desnos inside, how could I not buy this book?

Rousseau’s Dream

My other purchase at the Book Worm was a Museum of Modern Art monograph from 1946 about Rousseau (1844-1910), who was born on May 21 and might have been the subject of last week’s column if he hadn’t been competing with Fats Waller.

The reproductions in the Rousseau book are all in black and white, like Nora, and when she shows up again, nuzzling the leg of my desk, it happens that I’m gazing at a full-page detail of two wild felines prowling the dense forest in Rousseau’s The Dream, painted the year he died. As the title suggests, these creatures are moving wide-eyed and bewildered through the dreaming mind of the naked damsel on the couch. In the poem he attached to the painting, the painter imagines her listening to a snakecharmer’s flute. He’s given her face a stern touch of attitude, thinking perhaps of Léonie, the fiftyish widow with whom he was hopelessly in love at the time. Léonie worked behind the counter in a Paris department store Rousseau faithfully visited only to be unceremoniously rebuffed by her. Day after day, he would return home to paint himself deeper into The Dream. Same old story, he does it all for Léonie, leaves her paintings in his will, and she can’t be bothered to go to his funeral.

The Cat

Robert Desnos wrote “The Cat Like Nothing Else on Earth” for artists and dreamers everywhere, including of course,  Le Douanier, the former toll collector eating his heart out over a department store sales clerk. Desnos’s phenomenal cat goes to a doctor who listens to his heart and tells him it “isn’t doing well/It’s like nothing else on earth.” Then he goes to see “his lady, who examines his brain,” and tells him, “Your brain’s not doing well/It’s like nothing else on earth.” As if that isn’t enough, she adds, “It’s unlike anything in the whole world.” The poem ends with a sigh: “And that’s why the cat like nothing else on earth/Is sad today and doesn’t feel so well.”

Of all the photographs of 20th century painters I’ve ever seen, none come as close to capturing the spirit of “The Cat Like Nothing Else” as the one of Rousseau taken in his studio on December 14, 1908. The aging painter sits facing the camera, his elbow on a table, his chin propped on his hand, looking as if he’s just shuffled home after another slap in the face from Léonie, the muse from hell. Home is one room with a large window. There’s a violin on the table, a broom in the corner, lots of pictures on the wall, and somewhere out of camera range, the artist’s paintings, his easel and the usual accoutrements of his true profession. When someone asks him isn’t it uncomfortable to sleep in a studio, he says, “When I wake up I can smile at my canvases.”

At least he’s got company. On the floor near the broom there’s a bowl of milk.

Desnos Cheats Death

When Robert Desnos died on June 8, 1945, at the concentration camp in Terezin, Czechoslovakia, it was from typhus. Some time before he fell ill, he and a group of other internees were being marched to the gas chamber, so the story goes, when Desnos suddenly began reading the palms of the condemned, predicting a long full life for everyone. His manner was so convincing, so dismissive of all earthly doubt, that the victims began to believe him, and the guards became confused, lost touch with their mission, and ordered the people back into the truck, which took them back to the barracks.

If this anecdote sounds far-fetched, there are indications throughout Wallace Fowlie’s biographical sketch that if anyone could have performed such a feat, it was Desnos, who grew up believing in the existence of the marvellous and the exotic. In the 1920s he hung out with the surrealists, the only one “who could speak surrealistically at will,” according to André Breton; he “read in himself as in an open book,” practiced automatic writing, and seemed to “live within poetry.” During the sleep seances the others engaged in, Desnos proved to be the only genuine medium. As soon as he was asleep, “his power of speech was released and flowed abundantly.” He had discovered a way of translating himself into poetry without the help of books, without the need of writing, “in a state of constant inspiration.”

During the occupation of Paris, Desnos joined the Resistance and helped direct the underground publications of Les editions de Minuit, until he was arrested by the Gestapo and taken to Auschwitz, then Buchenwald, and finally Terezin.

———

There’s that tapping at the study door. It’s after 2 a.m. and the Cat Like Nothing Else On Earth is waiting to be let in.

I have a friend from days on the road to thank for introducing me to Desnos and “The Cat Like Nothing Else On Earth.” This morning he sent me a poem he just finished, “The Shade of Robert Desnos,” which can be read on rogeryates.blogspot.com, at the top of a monthly roster of poetry very much worth scrolling through. 

 

Munch Masterworks From MoMA Now On View at PU Art Museum Post

MUNCH AS PRINTMAKER: Edvard Munch’s woodcut “Two Women on the Shore”is among 26 works by the artist on display in a new exhibition at the Princeton University Art Museum. All of the works are from the Museum of Modern Art in New York. (Image Courtesy of the Princeton University Art Museum)

MUNCH AS PRINTMAKER: Edvard Munch’s woodcut “Two Women on the Shore”is among 26 works by the artist on display in a new exhibition at the Princeton University Art Museum. All of the works are from the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
(Image Courtesy of the Princeton University Art Museum)

Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print: Masterworks from the Museum of Modern Art, New Yorkopened Saturday at the Princeton University Art Museum. The show features 26 of the artist’s most powerful and well known compositions. But don’t look for his famous 1893 painting, The Scream. Instead, look for variations of his best-known painted compositions.

Highlights from the show are his woodcut/lithographs Madonna, Vampyr II, Two People: The Lonely Ones, and lithographs Anxiety and Death in the Sickroom. As their titles suggest, the themes here are typical of Munch, whose work is distilled from memories of his own troubled past and explores anxiety, sex, and death.

Curated by Calvin Brown, the University Art Museum’s associate curator of prints and drawings and organized by MoMA curators Deborah Wye and Starr Figura, the exhibition includes some of his most arresting images from MoMA’s Collection of Prints and Illustrated Books.

The exhibition focuses on the Norwegian artist’s works on paper in a wide range of printmaking methods. The selection demonstrates the artist’s innovation as well as his singular artistic vision. Munch (1863-1944) is well known as a Symbolist and Expressionist painter. He is less well known, at least outside of museum circles, for his prowess as a printmaker and this show reveals why he’s considered among the greatest printmakers of the modern period.

Born in a Norwegian village, Munch was raised by a deeply religious father. “From him I inherited the seeds of madness. The angels of fear, sorrow, and death stood by my side since the day I was born,” Munch wrote.

The artist’s mother died of tuberculosis in 1868, as did his favorite sister Johanne Sophie in 1877. Munch was often ill and kept home from school. He occupied himself by drawing in an atmosphere where even the entertainment had a somber note (vivid ghost stories by Edgar Allan Poe, for example). It is any wonder he had macabre visions and nightmares?

One of his younger sisters was diagnosed with mental illness at an early age and Munch spoke of his two inheritances: consumption and insanity. Many of his early drawings depict miserable interiors and medicine bottles.

According to Mr. Brown, who has been at the Art Museum since 1997, the Munch show is a perfect companion to the current show of Italian drawings curated by his colleague Laura Giles.

Pushed to pick a favorite item from the show, Mr. Brown singles out the woodcut version of The Kiss, of which the exhibition has two versions: an etching and drypoint in which two lovers meld into one iconic figure and a nearly abstract color woodcut, coarsely carved and printed from a weathered pine board.

“Almost all of these prints were made as reproductions of Munch’s paintings. He made them to get his work out but he also used printmaking to experiment and explore themes and ideas that go back to key early memories,” said Mr. Brown. “It’s important to remember that Munch was a contemporary of Freud; you could say that he is trying to make sense of his own life while searching for something that is universal; his creative process involves revisiting important memories over and over again; he meditated on fundamental memories like the deaths of his mother and sister and crystallized his experiences to discover the universal conditions of modern existence.”

Asked whether he might enjoy the artist’s company, Mr. Brown said: “I think he would have been a difficult but engaging fellow. He was very well-connected to poets, writers, and painters so he must have been a good companion but he was was given to depression and he drank a great deal.”

If all anyone knows about Munch’s work is The Scream, then they would be missing out, said Mr. Brown. “The Scream is just one of a handful of images he produced around the theme of anxiety, and anxiety is just one aspect of his work.”

The Scream is the best known of Munch’s intensely psychological works and a version (there are several) was sold at auction for $119.9 million in May 2012, at the time the most expensive artwork ever sold at an open auction; another version was stolen and recovered from the National Gallery in Oslo in 1994; and another version was stolen in 2004 from The Munch Museum in Oslo, but recovered in 2006.

The etchings, lithographs, and woodcuts are arranged according to the techniques that Munch explored, from the first etchings and drypoints that he made in Berlin in 1893, to the Frieze of Life: A Poem about LIfe, Love and Death that was shown at the Berlin Secession of 1902. The Frieze is a collection of works that examine the artist’s major motifs: the stages of life, the femme fatale, the hopelessness of love, anxiety, infidelity, jealousy, sexual humiliation, and separation in life and death.

Also explored are Munch’s collaborations with some of the finest printers in Berlin and Paris. In the 1930s and 1940s, the Nazis labeled Munch’s work as “degenerate art,” putting him in company with the likes of Picasso, Klee, Matisse, and Gauguin.

“The visual intensity of these prints plumbs depths that may be even greater than Munch’s paintings due to the nature and immediacy of his graphic achievement,” said Museum Director James Steward. “His profound connection with audiences over the last century is a testament to his ability to fuse our shared human experiences with his own expressive vision.”

“Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print, Masterworks from the Museum of Modern Art, New York” will be at at the Princeton University Art Museum through June 8. Museum hours are Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. The Museum is closed Mondays and major holidays.

 

Lenin, James Joyce and Dadaism — All in the Style of Oscar Wilde In Tom Stoppard’s Exuberant “Travesties” at McCarter’s Matthews Theatre Post

Tom Stoppard’s Travesties opened in London in 1974, came to the United States and won both Tony and N.Y. Drama Critics Circle Awards for Best Play in 1976 and is currently at McCarter’s Matthews Theatre in a dazzling production directed by Sam Buntrock. It is a wildly extravagant intellectual feast.

“I want to marry the play of ideas to farce,” Mr. Stoppard explained. “Now that may be like eating steak tartare with chocolate sauce, but that’s the way it comes out. Everyone will have to decide for himself whether the seriousness is doomed or redeemed by the frivolity.”

It is Zurich in 1917, during the First World War, with Lenin preparing to return to Russia to lead the Russian revolution, James Joyce is in the process of writing Ulysses, and Dadaist Tristan Tzara is challenging the world of European art. The ideas come thick and fast here, though a constant barrage of puns, limericks, and word play, a smattering of song and dance and recurrent reminders of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest might, as Stoppard suggests, be smothering the seriousness of those ideas in chocolate sauce.

With so many historical, artistic, and literary allusions, this tour de force of hyperactive wit provides extraordinary riches for the mind. In this vein of Wildean farce and George Bernard Shaw’s comedies of manners and ideas, Mr. Stoppard has produced an impressive array of masterpieces over the past five decades, from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (1968) through The Real Thing(1982), Arcadia(1993), Coast of Utopia (2007) and many more. Nowhere, however, do the farce, allusions and intellectual ideas spin more wildly over the top than they do here in the pyrotechnics of Travesties.

Mr. Stoppard’s feat of relentless verbal dexterity, extraordinarily clever plotting to get Lenin, Joyce, and Tzara together through the reminiscences of a minor consular official, Henry Carr, who narrates the play, all in a spoof of The Importance of Being Earnest is surely a composition of genius. The McCarter production is worthy of this genius — also admirable, impressive and delightfully inventive in its staging and in the eight sterling, high-energy, high quality performances of its distinguished cast of eight.

Whether audiences will unreservedly enjoy this play is another question. Such rich fare can be overwhelming. A number of patrons left at intermission last Saturday night, slightly more than halfway through the three-hour show. The fast and furious pace of allusions, ideas, and farce are challenging to say the least. Theater-goers looking for traditional dramatic virtues of plot and depth of characterization will be disappointed. Some diners find both steak tartare and chocolate sauce, not to mention the combination, too much for the palate.

Travesties focuses on the character of Henry Carr (the redoubtable James Urbaniak), old man, sitting in his apartment, still in Zurich in 1974, and remembering, with questionable reliability, back to 1917: “Great days … Zurich during the war. Refugees, spies, exiles, painters, poets, writers, radicals of all kinds. I knew them all.”

The role is fabricated partly from history, partly from Mr. Stoppard’s fertile imagination. A Henry Carr did work as a consular official in Zurich and did in fact play the role of Algernon in a Zurich production of The Importance of Being Earnest produced by The English Players of which Joyce was the business manager at the time. He and Joyce did clash over money matters surrounding the production and their dispute did end up in court.

As Mr. Stoppard wrote in the program notes for the original production, Travesties is a work of fiction which makes use, and misuse, of history. Scenes which are self-evidently documentary mingle with others which are just as evidently fantastical. People who were hardly aware of each other’s existence are made to collide; real people and imaginary people are brought together without ceremony; and events which took place months, and even years, apart are presented as synchronous.”

Mr. Urbaniak embraces this character with panache, both the irascible, forgetful old man (“… you may or may not have noticed that I got my wires crossed a bit here and there, you know how it is when the old think-box gets stuck in a groove and before you know where you are you’ve jumped the points…”) and the urbane young swain.

He transitions seamlessly from the long monologues of an old man’s reminiscences (a la Krapp’s Last Tape) to the vibrant setting (a la The Importance of Being Earnest with an added dose of politics and aesthetics) of Zurich and Carr’s encounters — political, personal and romantic — with Joyce (Fred Arsenault), Tristan Tzara (Christian Coulson), Lenin (Demosthenes Chrysan), Lenin’s wife Nadya (Lusia Strus), Carr’s eccentric butler Bennett (Everett Quinton), his sister Gwendolyn (Susannah Flood) and a young librarian, Cecily (Sara Topham), whom he falls in love with and later marries.

Mr. Coulson’s Tzara, with scissors in hand as he cuts out his words to scramble his poetic creations, is a fascinating, credible figure, vehemently defending his radical aesthetic theories, as he simultaneously pursues his romantic and personal ends.

Mr. Arsenault’s James Joyce, working on Ulysses, described here by Tzara as “derived from reference to Homer and the Dublin telephone book of 1904,” brings this unusual literary figure and his avid limerick-making to vivid, memorable life.

Mr. Chrysan’s Lenin and Ms. Strus’s Nadya are both formidable, authoritative characterizations, seen from a certain distance here — Mr. Carr had little or no actual interaction with the Russian revolutionary. Their dialogue and his speeches are almost entirely taken from historical documents.

Ms. Flood’s Gwendolyn and Ms. Topham’s Cecily both perform admirably in their embracing of the wild (and Wilde) world of this play and in encountering, with flair and poise, the erratic male characters who surround them. Ms. Topham is particularly strong, articulate, and striking throughout, as librarian, Leninist, and romantic interest, then wife, to Carr.

The incomparable Everett Quinton contributes a delightfully bizarre performance as Carr’s edgy, class conscious butler Bennett.

Production values here are of extraordinarily high quality. David Farley’s breathtaking set creates the huge shelves, dark wood paneling, and even a winding staircase between levels of the realistic Zurich library, then transforms so swiftly and effectively to Henry Carr’s small apartment, with clear, specific distinctions between 1917 and 1974 versions.

Mr. Farley’s colorfully fashionable costumes, historically specific and expressive for the period and the particular characters, along with David Weiner’s dramatic, varied, and nuanced lighting, all provide firm grounding and clarification in the creation of the worlds of this play. The renowned David Shire has composed the appropriate, appealing music for the production.

Yes, some knowledge of Europe during World War I, Lenin and the Russian Revolution, Joyce, Tzara, and artistic movements of the early twentieth century is helpful here; but this luminous, dynamic cast, each character aflame with his or her particular passion, and the lucid, imaginative, intelligent direction of Mr. Buntrock (director of an award-winning revival of Sunday in the Park with George in London and New York, 2005-2008, and Take Flight at McCarter two years ago) keep the whirling words and actions moving along on track and in focus. This superb production delivers Mr. Stoppard’s Travesties — jam-packed with word-play, literary allusions, and historical references — with a dazzlingly light touch that assures entertainment even when confusion might defy comprehension.


Mystery, Elegance, and Hidden Realities: An Art Film By Mavis Smith Post

“WALLPAPER”: (20” x 24,” egg tempera on panel.) This is one of the most striking of a series of works in Mavis Smith’s “Hidden Realities.” The hypnotic intensity reflects the artist’s account of how she works: “Your mind is open and you go into a trance and the ideas come in.” The exhibit will be at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown through May 20.

When you wander into an art show called “Hidden Realities” by an artist you don’t know, free of preconceived notions and critical agendas, you may think that you’re merely passing time until you discover that you and time have parted company. If anything, it’s time that’s passing you, not the other way around, since the first painting you see holds you for maybe three or four minutes, and even then, it’s not easy to walk away. The woman in Mavis Smith’s subtly surreal painting, Solace, is looking at you as if you and she have a history. She’s got your number; she’s looking right through you.

It’s the other way around in Night Gown. By all rights a beauty in a silky, darkly lustrous dream of fabric should be seductive, not dazed and vulnerable. Far from putting you in your place, she seems to be saying, “Understand me, tell me who I am, tell me where I am.”

By the time you come to Small Sacrifices, whether you know it yet or not, you’re in Mavis Smith’s movie. While you may feel no particular compulsion to figure out what the “sacrifices” are, you can’t help wondering what it is this wise, wounded, endearing girl has given up. Like the subject in Night Gown, she seems lost, new to the world. Before you start feeling protective, you remind yourself that she’s a work of art like the others, “egg tempera on panel,” and the artist’s love for her is protection enough. She’s safe in there forever, as timeless as the elaborately detailed storybook tapestry passing as wallpaper behind her.

Sensuous Surfaces

In Mavis Smith’s edgy mystery movie disguised as an art exhibit, which will be at the James A. Michener Art Museum through May 20, a great deal of seriously expressive power is communicated through gaze and gesture, flesh tones, fabrics, garments (or their absence), and the sensuous lustre of the surface created by the artist’s meticulous employment of the medium she discusses in the catalogue under “The Fine Art of Tempera Painting”:

“It may seem strange to make pictures by mixing pigments into egg yolks, but people have been doing it for a long, long time …. The process can be tedious — or mesmerizing — depending on how you look at it. Once the pose is sketched in, I start building up layers of paint. Alternating between dry feathery brush strokes and sheer washes of color — back and forth, back and forth. This stage can take days or even weeks, but that’s when the direction and mood of the painting gradually reveal themselves.”

Smith describes being “in a very relaxed, almost hypnotic state” as mood and direction come together. In another statement, she says that the “build up” can require “hundreds of layers,” before it achieves “a luminous, ethereal quality.”

The terms Smith uses in describing herself at work are reflected in the hypnotic mood she creates, although “ethereal” doesn’t really fit the solid, smoothly formed physical presence of the seated woman in Solace, yes, it’s her again, I came back for another look, trying to figure out which movie actress she reminds me of; perhaps an older, wiser, earthier Scarlett Johansson.

It’s no accident that thoughts of movies keep surfacing, what with the Academy Awards looming next Sunday. More to the point, Smith has said that she’s “probably as much influenced by film directors” as by other painters. She likes the way certain older films (think Hitchcock and Kubrick) are shot “with especially tightly cropped frames and from unusual angles, with looming ceilings and odd shadows.” She is equally intrigued by “the idea of the beautiful, pristine surface with the subtle suggestion of a darker side hovering just below” or “around the corner, or in the next frame.” The gallery walls feature quotes from David Lynch’s Wild at Heart and Sam Mendes’s American Beauty, which she considers “a perfect example of smooth on the surface suburban life with a dark undercurrent.”

I began feeling the presence of David Lynch long before I came to the posted quote from Wild at Heart (“This whole world is wild at heart and weird on top,” says Laura Dern’s Lula). Having already picked up flashes of Lynch in the tranced-looking females with outsized jaws and equine faces in flatter, broader, closer-to-caricature works like Specks of Dust, Exile, Somnambulist, and The Key, I knew I was in Twin Peaks country when I saw the blonde girl in rust-colored top and worn-shiny jeans stretched out on a bed in Night Pool. I could almost hear the yearning, angst-saturated music of Angelo Badalamenti, a subtle “the-owls-are-not-what-they-seem” tingle running up the back of my neck at the thought of the surreal off-the-wall ABC series that captivated the nation in the first years of the nineties. Somehow Smith has endowed her females with something like the haunted and haunting aura that could make ominous presences of slowly revolving ceiling fans while network audiences obsessed on “Who killed Laura Palmer?” It all began when a plastic sheet was pulled back to reveal Laura’s face, scary beautiful in death, like a drowned sister to Botticelli’s Venus.

Best Picture Nominee

In an email exchange about films and Oscar night, Mavis Smith made special mention of The Descendants. When she pointed out what appealed to her in the Best Picture nominee — “serene on the surface but subtly disturbing around the edges” — she was obviously describing elements of her own work.

“We come into contact with dozens of people on a daily basis, catch their eyes for a brief moment and move on,” Smith observes in the Artist Statement, “never knowing the intricate accumulation of experience that forms their reality. My work is about that moment — hinting at a narrative, yet remaining intentionally elusive.”

A Mavis Smith moment in The Descendants occurs when George Clooney, in the course of tracking down the real estate agent his comatose wife was having an affair with, finds himself standing on a beach, at the water’s edge, conversing with the man’s wife (played by Judy Greer, who could have stepped right out of one of Mavis Smith’s paintings). Since we know that Clooney has been shaken half out of his wits by a trainwreck of converging crises, we’re intensely aware of the forces building up to a moment that for the friendly, unknowing woman is nothing more than a few casual words about her kids and Clooney’s. For Clooney, the meeting is a stunningly significant event, and he makes the audience feel every one of its, to use Smith’s words, “subtly disturbing” possibilities. We know he must be tempted to blow his cover and make her suffer the knowledge that’s tormenting him (misery loves company and vengeance is sweet). What makes Clooney’s performance Oscar-worthy is the way he’s able to communicate his character’s struggle to contain, contend with, and somehow express a storm of conflicting possibilities (something comparable to Smith’s “intricate accumulation”). Here’s a reasonably rational, centered human being doing his best to cope with (for a start) death, love, infidelity, outrage, guilt, property, and fatherhood.

Mavis Smith’s art, like the art of movie acting, is about expressing the virtually inexpressible, those “hidden realities” cited in the exhibit’s title. One of the show’s most haunting images is staring out at you from Wallpaper, which contains, slyly ignored by the title, the most riveting close-up in the exhibit, a Laura Palmeresque face that holds the mixture of “mystery” and “elegance” Smith has identified as one of her goals. “I was interested in the close cropping of the face,” she writes, “and the proximity of the intense, repetitive wallpaper pattern.” To which she adds, “At one time, women were encouraged to ‘blend into the wallpaper’ but in light of today’s social hierarchy, the wallpaper might take over the room.”

Obviously “wallpaper” is a loaded phrase for a female artist dedicated to presenting female mystery, beauty, strength, and presence. Smith recalls meeting a “very tiny older couple” at the exhibit’s opening reception. “At one point the woman pulled me aside and whispered ‘your paintings give a woman confidence’” — which made the director of “Hidden Realities,” the movie, “feel as good as anything I have ever heard about my work.”

If you can’t get to the museum, be sure to take a tour of Mavis Smith’s work at http://mavissmithart.com/Exhibition%20HR%20page.htm.