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Residents Asked to Double-Check Voting Sites As Princeton Prepares to Vote as One Community

Princeton Borough and Princeton Township will vote as a consolidated municipality in the General Election on Tuesday, November 6. Polls will be open from 6 a.m. until 8 p.m.

Residents who want a mail-in ballot must now apply in person at the Mercer County Clerk’s Office by 3 p.m. on November 5.

Consolidated Princeton now has 22 voting districts. To find your consolidated voting district and polling place, follow the links from www.princetontwp.org/election1.html.

At the local level, Princeton voters will select either Democrat Liz Lempert or Republican Richard Woodbridge for mayor. Candidates for six new Council seats include Republican Geoff Aton, and Democrats Heather Howard, Arden (“Lance”) Liverman, Patrick Simon, Bernard (“Bernie”) Miller, Jenny Crumiller, and Jo Butler.

Vying for three Freeholder seats are Democrats Marie Corfield, Ann M. Cannon, Pasquale “Pat” Colavita, Jr., and Samuel T. Frisby, Sr.; and Republicans David G. Mayer, Richard Urbani, and David Walsh.

Nominees for a single General Assembly seat are Republican Donna M. Simon and Democrat Marie Corfield.

Republican Eric A. Beck is challenging Democratic incumbent Rush Holt in a race to represent the 12th Congressional District, and Republican Joe Kyrillos has challenged incumbent Democratic Senator Robert Menendez.

While the ballot will include the names of nine Presidential aspirants, as well as a “personal choice” box, that race presumably comes down to incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama against Republican Mitt Romney.

Statewide, voters will determine whether or not New Jersey should provide $750 million for certain types of new construction at specified New Jersey colleges and universities, and whether or not to amend the New Jersey State Constitution to redefine justices’ and judges’ salary and pension benefits.

Locally, Princeton voters will have an opportunity to approve an open space tax of 1.7 cents per $100 of assessed property value.

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