July 28, 2015

Cooling Stations

During the current heat wave this week, Princeton’s cooling stations will be open to ensure Princeton residents have a safe place to stay cool during the expected high temperatures. Residents, especially senior citizens, are strongly advised to take advantage of these cooling stations if needed. Cooling stations are air conditioned facilities where Princeton residents can find relief from the heat. Free water is accessible at all stations. more

yoga sourland

Yoga at Sourland Cycles is offered every Wednesday evening at 6:30 p.m. at their Hopewell location, 53 E Broad Street. Michelle and Greta will lead the class in alignment focused vinyasa style yoga (perfect for athletes getting ready for racing season). Weekly information can be found online at HopewellYoga. The cost to attend is $15. Guests should bring their own mats and water bottles.  more

Am GrafittiPrinceton University Art Museum will hold a free outdoor screening of the George Lucas film American Graffiti (1973) on Thursday, August 6 at 8:30 p.m. The film served as the launching pad for many well-known actors including Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, and Harrison Ford. Set in 1962, American Graffiti is based on Lucas’ own teenage years in early 1960s Modesto, California. In case of rain, the film will be shown inside of the Art Museum. American Graffiti is part of the Art Museum’s Summer 2015 film series celebrating the American experience. more

P TriangleWhen you think of college comedy revues, what comes to mind? Probably Harvard’s Hasty Pudding or the Princeton Triangle Show or Penn’s Masque & Wig. But in England, the “gold standard” for over 100 years has been The Cambridge Footlights Revue. Long established as a finishing school for the best of Britain’s comic entertainers, Footlights members have come to dominate British comedy, forging such groups as Monty Python and one half of the original Beyond the Fringe. Its alumni includes Hugh Laurie, Peter Cook, Eric Idle, Stephen Fry, and John Oliver, whom we now claim as our own. They will be joined on stage by two “improv” groups—Oxford’s Imps and Princeton’s own Quipfire, which is hosting this gathering of comedic talent from across the seas on Monday, September 21 at 7: 30 p.m. at McCarter Theatre. more

July 27, 2015

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Peaches are having a splendid season at Terhune Orchards. This year, their annual Just Peachy Festival includes a peachy paradise for local food lovers at the “Summer Harvest Farm-to-Fork Tasting” each day from noon to 4 p.m. Talented area chefs will use the juicy peaches and just harvested vegetables and herbs to prepare creative dishes celebrating summer’s bounty. This special tasting is $12 per person. Terhune Orchards Vineyard and Winery will also offer tastings for an additional charge. Admission to the Just Peachy Festival is $5 for ages 3 and up. Wagon rides, pedal tractors, barnyard of animals, music, play tractors, and children’s games included.

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Princeton Garden Theatre presents a screening of Vincent van Gogh (2015), part of their Exhibition on Screen series on Monday, July 27 at 7 p.m. Made in collaboration with Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum, this film marks a major re-showing of the gallery’s collection on the 125th anniversary of Van Gogh’s death. Experience Van Gogh’s masterpieces on the big screen, in high definition, while world-renowned curators and art historians offer their interpretations and explanations of his work. more

shutterstock_196336097According to an Arts and Transit Project Update from Princeton University, bike parking and bike rental at the station will be unavailable in the bike shelter on the east side of the tracks from Monday, July 27 though Friday, August 10. Alternative temporary bike racks have been installed near the station for use during this time period and signage at the bike shelter has been in place notifying users of the change. Any bikes remaining on the racks in the bike shelter on the east side of the tracks as of midnight on Monday, July 27 will be removed. For more information, contact:  bike@princeton.edu.

July 24, 2015
Attending the ribbon cutting ceremony of the Farmhouse Store located at 34 Hulfish Street were (left to right): Paula Stephens, Farmhouse Customer Service Manager, Mayor Liz Lempert, Stephen Suto, Farmhouse Sales Manager, Co-Owners Kristin & Ron Menapace and John Marshall, President Princeton Merchants Association.

Attending the ribbon cutting ceremony of the Farmhouse Store located at 34 Hulfish Street were (left to right): Paula Stephens, Farmhouse Customer Service Manager, Mayor Liz Lempert, Stephen Suto, Farmhouse Sales Manager, Co-Owners Kristin & Ron Menapace and John Marshall, President Princeton Merchants Association.

On Thursday, July 23, the Farmhouse Store Princeton opened its doors to its new expanded location in Palmer Square on Hulfish Street next to Mediterra restaurant. Noted for its unique selection of handcrafted artisan gifts, pottery, glass, wood, textiles, metal, paper, home decor, and jewelry, the Farmhouse Store had outgrown its home for the last three years at 43 Hulfish Street. Having developed a loyal customer base and following, owners Kristin and Ron Menapace are very excited to expand. more

BN 1A collaboration of the aid organization Outreach Northeast and the Brooklyn-based So Percussion Summer Institute will bring the two organizations together on Sunday, July 26 to assemble 20,000 servings of nutritionally balanced meals for clients of The Crisis Ministry of Mercer County.

More than one and a half tons of the donated macaroni and cheese meals will be packaged Sunday at Princeton University’s Woolworth Hall, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The meals will then go Monday to The Crisis Ministry’s three food pantries for customers who are food-insecure.

So Percussion Summer Institute’s four members are performing in and around Princeton and leading percussion and composition workshops and master classes through August 2. The nonprofit Outreach Program, based in Iowa and with its Northeast branch in Massachusetts, is on track to package and distribute a total of three million meals to hungry people worldwide by the end of 2015.

That organization provides the ingredients for the meals and the materials and expertise for packaging. So Percussion participants raised the funds for the food, and will have 40 participants packaging and boxing on Sunday.  more

BN 3

The Princeton Merchants Association (PMA), in collaboration with local merchants, nonprofits and the Municipality of Princeton, has launched a single use plastic bag reduction campaign for the community.

“Learning our ABC’s” will encourage the reduction, reuse and recycling of single use plastic bags.  The effort will encourage merchants to “Ask First” if customers need a bag, encourage residents to “Bring Your Own Bag” (BYOB) and encourage the use of bins throughout town and homes for our residents and businesses to “Collect and Recycle” plastic bags. more

July 22, 2015

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Last years cause célèbre seems almost lost in this view, with its geometric flash points and the European overtones of that battery of parked bicycles amid the makings of the University’s Arts and Transit work in progress, set for completion in 2017. (Photo by Charles R. Plohn) 

Mercer County Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobson issued an injunction last week which formally stopped all construction activity on the Institute for Advanced Study’s (IAS) faculty housing project until she hears arguments from both sides, culminating in a ruling on September 3. more

shutterstock_283153916The Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Community Development Fund is accepting grant applications from local not-for-profit organizations. Established in 2013 with a gift of $500,000 from the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Foundation, the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Community Development Fund is an endowed fund dedicated to supporting not-for-profit organizations located in the Chamber’s Central New Jersey five-county footprint.

For the second year, the grant pool will be increased through a contribution from the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce Foundation.  The Foundation will provide an additional $5,000 to support the 2015 grant process. more

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Princeton is creating a new Bicycle Master Plan, and the town wants members of the public to participate in the process.

The study will begin in September with a public presentation, likely at a meeting of the Planning Board. This will be followed by a community outreach campaign. In the meantime, residents can get a preliminary look at information about the project at Community Night Out on Tuesday August 4, at the Community Pool. more

Page 1 AA little over 12 years ago, Princeton Public Library’s Youth Services librarian Susan Conlon was approached by a Princeton High School student about hosting a series showing the first efforts of famous film directors. That effort morphed into a festival featuring the works of aspiring filmmakers from the local area, which has since been transformed into an annual event that draws entries from all over the world.

“There were almost 200 original films submitted this year,” said Youth Services Librarian Martha Liu, of the festival taking place Wednesday and Thursday, July 22 and 23, at 7 p.m. in the library’s Community Room. “We have films from Spain, Iran, Ireland, and the Philippines, along with quite a few from New Jersey including one by Princeton High School student Talia Zinder. It has definitely become a big event that many people look forward to.” more

TOYS FOR SMILES: Twin brothers Logan (right) and Sam Leppo are adept woodworkers who combine their skills to create simple wooden toys for children. Earlier this month they donated 50 kid-friendly toys — 25 cars and 25 dogs — to children at HomeFront’s “Christmas in July” event. Taking their ingenuity a step further, the boys have formed their own non profit group to help the less fortunate. The Hun School students plan to partner with woodworking students across the country to create handmade toys for every homeless child in America. By distributing their original designs to students in participating schools, they hope to make and donate 5,000 toys over the next twelve months. For more information, visit: www.loganandsam.org (Photo Courtesy of the Hun School)

TOYS FOR SMILES: Twin brothers Logan (right) and Sam Leppo are adept woodworkers who combine their skills to create simple wooden toys for children. Earlier this month they donated 50 kid-friendly toys — 25 cars and 25 dogs — to children at HomeFront’s “Christmas in July” event. Taking their ingenuity a step further, the boys have formed their own non profit group to help the less fortunate. The Hun School students plan to partner with woodworking students across the country to create handmade toys for every homeless child in America. By distributing their original designs to students in participating schools, they hope to make and donate 5,000 toys over the next twelve months. For more information, visit: www.loganandsam.org (Photo Courtesy of the Hun School)

Hun students Logan and Sam Leppo are twins who hope that their shared passion for woodworking will inspire others.

Over the past year, the brothers designed, cut, sanded, and assembled their own designs for hand-made wooden toys that earlier this month, they distributed to children at HomeFront during the non-profit group’s “Christmas in July” celebration. They gave away 50 kid-friendly toys: 25 cars and 25 dogs.  more

NIGHT TO REMEMBER: Members of the DiGregorio family, from left, Aaron, Nadia, Derek, Steve, and Zack, share a laugh with legendary coaches, from left, John Thompson III, Jason Garrett, and Pete Carril last Wednesday at Conte’s Pizza. Thompson, Garrett, and Carril headlined “A Night with Coaches,” an event held at the venerable Witherspoon Street hang-out to raise money to fight ataxia telangiectasia, know as A-T, for short, a rare genetic neuro-muscular disease which afflicts Derek, 17, a rising senior at Princeton High. Attracting 120 people to Conte’s, more than $150,000 was raised to benefit the A-T Children’s Project.(Photo by John Dowers)

NIGHT TO REMEMBER: Members of the DiGregorio family, from left, Aaron, Nadia, Derek, Steve, and Zack, share a laugh with legendary coaches, from left, John Thompson III, Jason Garrett, and Pete Carril last Wednesday at Conte’s Pizza. Thompson, Garrett, and Carril headlined “A Night with Coaches,” an event held at the venerable Witherspoon Street hang-out to raise money to fight ataxia telangiectasia, know as A-T, for short, a rare genetic neuro-muscular disease which afflicts Derek, 17, a rising senior at Princeton High. Attracting 120 people to Conte’s, more than $150,000 was raised to benefit the A-T Children’s Project. (Photo by John Dowers)

Pete Carril and John Thompson III closed down the bar at Conte’s Pizza many times over the years when they coached together for the Princeton University men’s basketball team, engaging in marathon post-game gatherings at the venerable Witherspoon Street hang-out that would sometimes go into the wee hours of the morning.

Last Wednesday, Carril, the legendary former Princeton men’s hoops head coach, and Thompson, a former Tigers basketball star, assistant coach, and current head coach at Georgetown, along with Jason Garrett, a former Princeton football star and the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys, brought down a packed house at Conte’s as they headlined “A Night with Coaches.” more

 

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The public is invited to view activities at an encampment at Princeton Battlefield State Park July 25 and 26. Between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Re-enactors of 18th century artillerymen of the Rhode Island Train of Artillery and Lamb’s Artillery Company and Mott’s Artillery Company, both of the 2nd Continental Artillery, will be going through their training in the handling of 18th century field cannons.  more

Tracy K Smith

Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts named Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Tracy K. Smith as the new director of the University’s Program in Creative Writing. A professor of Creative Writing on the Princeton faculty since 2005, she succeeds National Book Award finalist and poet Susan Wheeler, who has led the program since 2011. more

shutterstock_130343024Community Options’ President and CEO Robert Stack will be the keynote speaker at the University of Oxford Childhood Education and Issues Program on July 22. Mr. Stack will speak on the subject of “Inclusion for students with disabilities into the workplace.”

He will discuss the successful Princeton School to Employment Program based out of the non-profit organization’s office at 305 Witherspoon Street and the ramifications of implementing a similar program in the United Kingdom. The Princeton program has served as a template for replication in South Carolina. more

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Each summer, serious ballet students across the country take advantage of their time off from academics to shift their training schedules into high gear. Instead of a few classes a week, they take a few classes a day — six days a week. more

Art GardenAnyone strolling through the alleyway between Palmer Square and Witherspoon Street these days will find a tiny garden tucked away in a corner opposite the outdoor dining spot of Teresa’s Caffe.

If you haven’t yet seen it, it’s worth finding — and observing the reaction of town residents who come upon it for the first time. Passers-by are generally enchanted.

Bounded by slim logs of silver birch, the garden is just a few square feet and yet to a child’s imagination it offers a wealth of possibility. Lichen covered rocks and remnants of wood are interspersed with a selection of flowering plants, mosses, and ferns forming a “fairy garden” in a formerly unused spot.

The nurturing hand behind this miniature elfland kingdom is landscape artist Peter Soderman who is known for his playful attitude — he’s been known to describe himself as the “Jackson Pollock of Lawn Care” and the “Court Jester of Synchronicity.” more

book rev“Why is it that everything I have loved on this earth has gone away from me in two day’s time?” wonders Jean Louise Finch a little over halfway through Harper Lee’s long-awaited (to put it mildly) Go Set a Watchman (Harper Collins $27.99).

To Kill a Mockingbird’s Scout has grown up, is living in New York City, and has returned to her Alabama hometown, Maycomb, during what might be called the post-Brown v Board of Education era. Her cry from the heart follows a shattering encounter with Calpurnia, the black woman who raised and loved her and her brother Jem, and is now a remote figure on the other side of the racial divide the color-blind Jean Louise is struggling to comprehend. There the old woman sits, “in a haughty dignity that appeared on state occasions … wearing her company manners,” her face “a million tiny wrinkles, and her eyes dim behind thick lenses … no hint of compassion” in them, even as Jean Louise begs her, “I’m your baby, have you forgotten me? Why are you shutting me out? What are you doing to me?”  more

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