Town Topics — Princeton's Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946.
Vol. LXI, No. 38
 
Wednesday, September 19, 2007
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Using Broadhead Arrows for Deer Cull An “Extremely Cruel” Form of Hunting

MARY T. RAND
North Harrison Street

A Productive Use of Open Space Seen in High School’s New Wetlands Project

LINDA SIPPRELLE
Nassau Street


Using Broadhead Arrows for Deer Cull An “Extremely Cruel” Form of Hunting

To the Editor:

Soon, bowhunting will begin in four of Princeton’s parks.

Bowhunting is, as the scientific evidence overwhelming demonstrates, an extremely cruel form of hunting. For humane advocates and many hunters, bowhunting is set apart from other forms of sport hunting chiefly by its appalling high wounding rate — greater than 50 percent. In other words, it has been documented that for every animal hit by a broadhead arrow and retrieved by a hunter, at least one is hit and not retrieved, usually to die after prolonged agony from septic infection, peritonitis, blood loss, or other complications.

The broadhead arrow is intended to kill primarily by circulatory hemorrhage. It is extremely difficult to shoot an arrow into a vital organ in a large ungulate such as a deer, and thus, a “clean kill” is nearly impossible in bowhunting.

MARY T. RAND
North Harrison Street

A Productive Use of Open Space Seen in High School’s New Wetlands Project

To the Editor:

Princeton residents looking for an enjoyable and educational outing need look no farther than Princeton High School’s wetlands eco-lab (Town Topics, August 8). I recently visited this lush oasis on Walnut Lane. As I walked down the steps to the stream and ponds below I felt invigorated and at the same time tranquil. I was surrounded by native plants, including soft rushes, sedges, rose mallow, pickerel weed and lobelia cardinalis. A bird feeding station invited visits.

The wetlands was the brain-child of PHS students who designed the basin, made possible by a continual flow of water. The eco-lab will be used for the study of plant and animal behaviors.

Stephen Hiltner, the natural resource manager for the Friends of Princeton Open Space, is working with PHS students on this initiative along with PHS science teachers Tim Anderson and Paula Jackowlew. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and PHS’s Parent Teacher Organization also provided support.

The eco-lab wetland is an outstanding and encouraging example of the productive use of open space and a creation well worth visiting.

LINDA SIPPRELLE
Nassau Street

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