Town Topics — Princeton's Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946.
Vol. LXIII, No. 18
 
Wednesday, May 6, 2009
Coldwell Banker Princeton Office

Prudential Fox and Roach, Realtors

Gloria Nilson GMAC Real Estate

Henderson Sotheby's International Realty

N.T. Callaway Princeton Office

Stockton Real Estate, LLC

Weichert, Realtors



Advertise in Town Topics

Iris Interiors


Advertise in Town Topics

Weather Forecast


Mailbox

“Professional and Courteous” Police Earn Gratitude for Dousing Car Fire

MICHAEL AUCOTT
Dublin Road
Pennington

University, Borough, Sponsors Thanked For Successful Communiversity Festival

MICHAEL LaRICCIA
Program/PR Manager
Arts Council of Princeton

A Method for Evaluating Tax Fairness: Informed Reason, Not Spiteful Rhetoric

BOB RODGERS
Laurel Road

Walk to Cure Cystic Fibrosis Seeks To Change CF Meaning to “Cure Found”

MARY GERARD
PAUL GERARD
JOHN GERARD
JANAE GERARD
MEGHAN GERARD
MATTHEW GERARD
DAVID GERARD
Talbot Lane
Committee for Great Strides Walk to Cure Cystic Fibrosis


Editor’s Note: The following is a copy of a letter sent to Mark Emann, Princeton Township Police Chief.

“Professional and Courteous” Police Earn Gratitude for Dousing Car Fire

Dear Chief Emann:

I don’t think I’ve ever been so glad to see a police car racing toward me with its lights flashing as on Sunday, April 19. A fire had started in the engine compartment of the old car I’ve been fixing up, and despite my efforts and those of several who stopped to help, the fire was gaining. It seemed like only a matter of time before the car would be engulfed in flames. All of a sudden, there was Princeton Township Police Sergeant Michael Cifelli running from his car with a fire extinguisher. He shut down the fire. Other patrolmen were quickly on the scene, and were followed by firemen and a fire engine, and then by the Fire Marshal. Larini’s wrecker service came and carried the still largely intact vehicle back to my place.

All the responders were professional and courteous. They kept a minor emergency from turning into a major one. I will always be grateful. Thanks to all involved for being there.

MICHAEL AUCOTT
Dublin Road
Pennington

University, Borough, Sponsors Thanked For Successful Communiversity Festival

To the Editor:

On behalf of the Arts Council of Princeton, I want to thank everyone, including our more than 35,000 visitors, who helped to make Communiversity Festival of the Arts 2009 such a spectacular event on a beautiful day.

When the Arts Council and Princeton University students plan Communiversity each year, we envision a town meets gown event with something for everyone: diverse music and dance, engaging children’s activities, and outstanding artistry, food, and participation from community nonprofit organizations. I would like to thank all of the Arts Council staff and volunteers who gave their time and energy to make the Arts Council’s activity areas a success.

We would like to express our heartfelt thanks to Princeton University and the student participants, the University Band, The Princeton Borough Police Department and Fire Department, Princeton First Aid and Rescue Squad, Princeton Regional Health Department, Princeton Borough, our event planner Grayson Bridge Communications Events, Packet Publications, and our generous corporate sponsors, a complete list of whom may be found at www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.

MICHAEL LaRICCIA
Program/PR Manager
Arts Council of Princeton

A Method for Evaluating Tax Fairness: Informed Reason, Not Spiteful Rhetoric

To the Editor:

The presentation of Princeton Citizens for Tax Fairness April 26 at the Suzanne Patterson Center was not surprisingly one-sided, but surprisingly uncivil, lambasting Princeton University as the principal villain in the Borough’s financial morass and culminating in insults and jeering for the University’s Director of Community Affairs. Her request to clarify a practical negotiation process was dismissed in favor of inciting the public to antagonistic confrontation, even to rally in protest before Nassau Hall. Not a wholesome prospect.

So here’s an alternative suggestion, perhaps more useful if there is serious interest in resolution: Do it by the numbers, not the rhetoric. Our property is taxed to support public education and needed government services. Funding is legitimately drawn from a municipality’s citizens, businesses, and institutions, by taxation or otherwise, to assure that support. It is appropriate to consider the scope and size of their respective needs in determining the appropriate (or “fair”) funding.

It should not be difficult to determine the number of students from University housing who are enrolled in the public schools, multiply that number by the district’s average cost per student, and compare the result with the University’s tax and other contributions to the school budget.

Similarly, a tally of municipal services needed and available to the University (and other such institutions) can be made in cost of time, equipment, and allocated overhead, for police, fire, and other departments involved. Again, this may be weighed against the University’s tax and other funding to the Borough and Township, to define whatever imbalance exists against equitable compensation.

The numbers are available. They will provide a measurable, rather than emotional, platform for rational negotiation of the “fair” solution appropriately sought for Princeton’s municipalities.

So let us set aside the spiteful rhetoric and try informed reason. There will be a better response and a more sensible result for our community.

BOB RODGERS
Laurel Road

Walk to Cure Cystic Fibrosis Seeks To Change CF Meaning to “Cure Found”

To the Editor:

Please join us at the West Picnic area of Mercer County Park this Saturday, May 9 at 11 a.m. for the annual Great Strides Walk to Cure Cystic Fibrosis. Last year the Mercer Great Strides Walk contributed $160,000 to the national effort to cure Cystic Fibrosis.

Donations to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are directed to research for new treatments and a cure for this fatal disease. We would like to share some recent progress with you. There are three medicines which focus on the CFTR protein which is the defect which causes the breathing and digestive problems of children afflicted with Cystic Fibrosis. The meds are in phase 3 trials and if successful, and if they are tolerated by children with CF, the course of their lives could be changed dramatically. The clinical trials of other key therapies are in progress. There are many unknown variables, but for the first time there is convincing evidence that the underlying defect in cystic fibrosis can be corrected.

The money that we raised at the Great Strides Walks in the last 14 years has supported this research. Thank you. We need to keep working. Prayers help. Science education is key. Public involvement is priceless.

Please join us on May 9 for music, entertainment, food, prizes, water bottles, T-shirts, and a pleasant walk on the shore of the Mercer County Lake to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. With your help we will change the meaning of the initials CF from Cystic Fibrosis to Cure Found.

For more information, call (609) 683-9577 or e-mail the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at www.cff.org.

MARY GERARD
PAUL GERARD
JOHN GERARD
JANAE GERARD
MEGHAN GERARD
MATTHEW GERARD
DAVID GERARD
Talbot Lane
Committee for Great Strides Walk to Cure Cystic Fibrosis

For information on how to submit Letters to the Editor, click here.

Return to Top | Go to Obituaries


Town Topics® may be purchased on Wednesday mornings at the following locations: Princeton — McCaffrey’s, Cox’s, Kiosk (Palmer Square), Krauszer’s (State Road), Olives, Speedy Mart (State Road), Wawa (University Place); Hopewell — Village Express; Rocky Hill — Wawa (Route 518); Pennington — Pennington Market.
Copyright© Town Topics®, Inc. 2011.