Town Topics — Princeton's Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1946.
Vol. LXIII, No. 48
 
Wednesday, December 2, 2009
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Township’s Tree Protection Law Earns Endorsement of Watershed Association

JIM WALTMAN
Executive Director
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association

Borough, Township Police Demonstrate Another Way to Serve at Thanksgiving

RHONA PORTER
LIBBY RANNEY
Social Workers
Elm Court and Harriet Bryan House

YWCA Thanks Patrons and Artisans for Successful Crafters’ Marketplace

ANGELA DARLING
Chair, YWCA Princeton Crafters’ Marketplace

Mayoral Candidate Thirty Years Ago Questions Town’s Progress on Energy

ROBERT D. McCHESNEY
Bath, Maine

Friends of Princeton Public Library Thank All for Successful Fundraiser

PAM WAKEFIELD
President, Friends of the Princeton Public Library

McCaffrey’s Thanked by Junior School for Help Filling Thanksgiving Baskets

PETER Y. RAPELYE
Headmaster
Princeton Junior School

Environmental Commission Applauded for Autumn Leaf Management Program

GRACE SINDEN
Ridgeview Circle


Township’s Tree Protection Law Earns Endorsement of Watershed Association

To the Editor:

Did you know that the net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to 10 room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture?

In Princeton Township, residents will be cooler and enjoy a wide range of other benefits now that the Township Committee unanimously passed an amended tree protection ordinance, which extends the benefits of retaining woodlands to all development in the township. The ordinance applies to new development applications to the Princeton Township Planning and Zoning Boards, and requires developers who cut down trees to either replace them or pay a penalty. The money raised would be used to plant more trees elsewhere in the Township.

The Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association, central New Jersey’s first environmental group, applauds the Princeton Township Committee for unanimously adopting this new, stronger tree protection ordinance and thanks Mayor Bernard Miller for his leadership on this issue.

Protecting trees is important for a variety of reasons. Trees provide habitat for the diverse range of birds and tree dwelling species present in Princeton. Trees assist in the reduction of heat island effect by absorbing heat from pavement and structures, and improve air quality. Trees also help filter pollutants and reduce erosion near streams, which improves water quality.

We hope the Township continues its proactive environmental stewardship. To learn more about tree protection ordinances and other policies to protect clean water and the environment, visit www.thewatershed.org/wm_supporting_muni.php.

JIM WALTMAN
Executive Director
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association

Borough, Township Police Demonstrate Another Way to Serve at Thanksgiving

To the Editor:

Part of the joy and excitement for the residents of Elm Court and Harriet Bryan House senior apartments on Elm Road is being served their annual Thanksgiving dinner by the uniformed men and women of the Borough and Township police departments.

Each year for the past seven years, close to 15 members of our local police departments and often some of their children as well volunteer their time to become waitresses and waiters for our resident Thanksgiving dinner. Serving up turkey, mashed potatoes, vegetables, cranberry sauce, pumpkin and apple pie to more than 50 seniors, they bring smiles to every face and a wonderful spirit of good will.

We have much to be thankful for in the outstanding service of our Borough and Township police men and women.

RHONA PORTER
LIBBY RANNEY
Social Workers
Elm Court and Harriet Bryan House

YWCA Thanks Patrons and Artisans for Successful Crafters’ Marketplace

To the Editor:

On behalf of the YWCA Princeton, I want to thank everyone who contributed to the success of Crafters’ Marketplace 2009 held last weekend at John Witherspoon Middle School.

Despite a faltering economy, proceeds were higher than last year. Everything we earn from Crafters’ Marketplace — funds from the Patrons’ Gala Cocktail Party in October, application fees from participating crafters, admission fees, and individual donations — goes to our Pearl Bates Scholarship Fund. For 36 years Crafters’ Marketplace has helped make the programs and activities of the YWCA accessible to all women, children, and families who wish to participate but need financial assistance.

We also want to thank our many dedicated, hard-working volunteers; Principal Bill Johnson and the John Witherspoon staff who were so helpful and accommodating; the artisans without whom there would be no Crafters’ Marketplace; and the hundreds of individuals who came through the doors to shop and support this event.

Again, thank you one and all.

ANGELA DARLING
Chair, YWCA Princeton Crafters’ Marketplace

Mayoral Candidate Thirty Years Ago Questions Town’s Progress on Energy

To the Editor:

Thirty years ago this month I ran for mayor of Princeton Borough and lost to Robert Cawley. In cleaning out some files recently I came across a campaign ad run in Town Topics just before the 1979 election. In it I stressed energy issues and set out an energy policy with long- and short-term goals.

The short-term goals included energy audits of all public buildings; grants to finance conservation measures; revised bidding procedures on Borough vehicles to emphasize energy efficiency; use of alternate energy sources at Borough Hall; and solar hot water for Borough Hall. The long-term goals were revision of zoning and parking ordinances affecting energy use, improvement of pedestrian access (for bikers and walkers); and the elimination of sewer infiltration, since burning off the rainwater that gets into the sanitary sewer requires oil.

In light of the community’s professed interests in sustainability and reduced energy use today, it would be good to know what progress the Borough has made towards those goals in the last three decades.

ROBERT D. McCHESNEY
Bath, Maine

Friends of Princeton Public Library Thank All for Successful Fundraiser

To the Editor:

On Friday, November 20, the Friends of the Princeton Public Library held their annual benefit and it was a spectacular success.

We owe that success to an extraordinary benefit committee led by Vivian Allen and Emily Firmenich, an endlessly supportive library staff , and, most of all, the Princeton community that clearly values its public library.

Princeton professor John McPhee started the evening by introducing his old friend and New Yorker colleague, Calvin “Bud” Trillin, to an enthusiastic crowd of about 600 at Nassau Presbyterian Church. After Mr. Trillin entertained and amused his appreciative audience, most of the crowd moved to the Library where they dined in style and bid on an amazing collection of auction items and opportunities. It was a happy and memorable evening for library Friends and fans.

The money the Friends raised at this event and throughout the year goes to keep the library shelves filled and the first class programming coming.

Thanks, Princeton!

PAM WAKEFIELD
President, Friends of the Princeton Public Library

McCaffrey’s Thanked by Junior School for Help Filling Thanksgiving Baskets

Editor’s Note: The following is a copy of a letter to James McCaffrey of McCaffrey’s Supermarket in the Princeton Shopping Center.

Dear Mr. McCaffrey:

On behalf of the faculty, staff, parents, and children of the Princeton Junior School, I would like to express again our deepest gratitude for your store’s generous donation of turkeys to our Thanksgiving Basket Drive last week. Our school collected an assortment of food items to assist needy families in the Trenton area through Mercer Street Friends. Your generosity helped make a wonderful statement about helping others in our community, especially during these challenging economic times. Your support embraced the spirit of the Thanksgiving in the best possible way.

The delivery of the baskets followed the School’s traditional ceremony of songs and words of thanks presented by the children, honoring the spirit of Thanksgiving and acts of kindness throughout the year. Princeton Junior School children also made their own bread to accompany a special turkey soup prepared by PJS “soup dads.”

Your thoughtful contributions to our community service project are greatly appreciated! Thank you for making a difference.

PETER Y. RAPELYE
Headmaster
Princeton Junior School

Environmental Commission Applauded for Autumn Leaf Management Program

To the Editor:

Good for the Princeton Environmental Commission for taking up the matter of autumn leaf management (Town Topics, November 25). Instead of treating leaves as garbage to be put out at the curb for collection at great expense and taxes from increased municipal labor, heavy machinery, greater energy use and air pollution, we can use fallen leaves on site as the resource they can be.

Just as we learned to recycle paper, metal and glass, etc., we can learn to recycle leaves. In wooded areas leaves can be placed among the trees and left to decompose, enhancing the soil. Nothing more need be done. On lots with fewer trees, some of the leaves can be placed among the existing trees and also in a corner of the property to decompose with or without an enclosure. Decomposition reduces the leaf pile to a small fraction of its original bulk.

For 21 years when we lived on a small lot in Princeton, we placed leaves under a large tree in the front of the lot and in a simple chicken wire three-sided enclosure in the back of the lot. It was just as easy with this method, if not easier, than bringing leaves from the back of the lot to the street for collection. For the leaves under the front tree we did nothing for 21 years but allow them to decompose. After all that time there remained a mound of about two feet of decomposed leaves. As to the decomposed leaves in the back of the lot, we used them on flowerbeds and around trees for soil enhancement and protection from dry summer heat and winter cold. Now that we live in a heavily wooded area, 100 percent of the leaves are deposited in the woods and we never put them out for collection.

Leaf recycling on site is something we should strive for as one of the goals under our Sustainable Princeton program. We cannot keep doing the same old thing year after year in light of knowledge of the effects of our actions.

GRACE SINDEN
Ridgeview Circle

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